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Waterfront news
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00072837/00007
 Material Information
Title: Waterfront news
Physical Description: Serial
Language: English
Publisher: Ziegler Pub. Co.
Place of Publication: Ft. Lauderdale Fla
Creation Date: September 1, 1984
Frequency: monthly
regular
 Subjects
Genre: periodical   ( marcgt )
serial   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Broward -- Fort Lauderdale
Coordinates: 26.135833 x -80.141944 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 1, issue 9 (Nov. 15-Dec. 15, 1984); title from cover.
Funding: Funded in part by the University of Florida, the Library Services and Technology Assistance granting program of Florida, the State Library and Archives of Florida, and other institutions and individuals.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 11455814
lccn - sn 84001937
issn - 8756-0038
System ID: UF00072837:00007

Table of Contents
    Cover
        Cover
    Main
        Page 1
    Main: Community News
        Page 2
        Page 3
    Main: Diving
        Page 4
        Page 5
    Main: Waterfront Heritage
        Page 6
        Page 7
    Main: Fishing
        Page 8
        Page 9
    Main: Power Boating
        Page 10
        Page 11
    Main: Sailing
        Page 12
        Page 13
    Main: The Bulletin Board
        Page 14
    Main: Classifieds
        Page 15
    Main: Community Calendar & Tide Tables
        Page 16
Full Text


Volume 1 Issue 7


Community Calendar Tide Table


Broward's Newest Sailinq Club


Fall Boat Show


New River Raft Race


Fishing Tournaments


Impact on Molossess Reef


Rir Sextants

Boating Safety


Shipwreck Symposium


W90 ItII 9nrl St Fort nuderdole. Florida 33312 (305) 524-9450


September 15-October 15, 1984
Circulation 15,000


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WATERFRONT NEWS


NEW RIVER'S
MARATHON SWIM
by
Sue Moesly


Wherever there is a river there are bound to be children
playing in it, around it or on it. But when the river rur
through the town, the whole population takes an interest
Fifty years ago Fort Lauderdale's New River was just suc
a river, It drew the folks down to the city docks
eventide to watch the fishing boats come in and it dre
business men to build their shops near its waterfront
Even the city fathers and their families built their home
along the river's edge. No telling how many of the
children learned to swim in the twisting waterway th;
bent through their town.
The river was especially kind to novice swimmers, for
supplied many sand bars on which to rest awhile and ga
one's breath before tackling another couple of yards or s
The yachtsmen did not think the sand bars so kind, an
berated the many sudden halts they caused when the
vessels ran aground as they tried to make way upstream
There were more children than boats in those days an
fewer altercations arose about who had the right of way.
As they grew older some talented swimmers wei
asked to join the corps of volunteer lifeguards. For fiv
hundred hours of hard training the select swimmers wei
issued life-saving certificates and earned the right to we;
the Red Cross emblem on their bathing suits.
Mr. Cliford A. Root, a Red Cross official, was the
instructor who became the first manager of the municip
casino built in 1928 on S. Atlantic Boulevard. The form(
municipal building erected in 1915 was only a woode
pavilion that had a large dancing floor upstairs. The ne
casino had an Olympic size pool filled with seawater th
was changed every ten hours.


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September 15-October 15


Volume 1


Issue 7


THE FT. LAUDEROALE JAYCEES'
NEW RIVER RAFT RACE

The Fort Lauderdale Jaycees presents the 7th Annual
New River Raft Race on Sunday, September 30th at 9:30
a.m. This year's aquatic adventure benefits The
American Diabetes Association.
The race begins at the 7th Avenue boat ramp and heads .
east on a rambling course down-river to a turn-around
point just west of the Intracoastal Waterway. The rafts
then paddle up-river to the finish at the 7th Avenue
bridge, a distance of over three thrill-packed miles!
Colorful entries in last year's race included a floating
pick-up truck, a raft that resembled ajuicy pink shrimp
and a 12-foot long bar of Ivory soap. Imagine what
might roll down the river this year! 1'-7.0
Tens of thousands of spectators will watch the largest
raft race in the South from the banks of the New River. .. '
Excellent viewing areas include Historical Park, Cooleye 1 7 ii )
Hammock Park, and the riverbanks between Andrews
Avenue and Federal Highway.
KISS-FM will host the Awards Ceremony and post race
party in Smoker's Park (next to the Broward County appearing at the all-day event. There will also be live
Courthouse). Awards include the 'Boat People' award music from "Gator Kicks", rides, games, prizes, fine
for the most people on a raft and the 'River Spirit' food, and lots of family fun for everyone.
award for the most enthusiastic and spirited crew, Entry forms and spectator maps are available at all 7-
among others. A very special celebrity guest will be Eleven stores in Dade and Broward Counties.


!ir guided so much by rules and regulations. They just knew
al how to get along with their neighbors and usually abided
er by their own moral codes.
an The laws did read that turtles were not to be molested
w when they were on the beach, but nothing said they could
at not be touched when they hit the water. A turtle did
provide a feast now and then for a beach picnicker, the
lifeguards included. Turtles are far swifter in the water
than land bound creatures so most survived the urges of
man to reduce them to mere fare for the table. There were
no rules about turtle eggs, though, and some folks said
that cakes made with turtle eggs had a very distinct taste.
Others said they were horrible, that the whites never did
cook and that the yolks turned terribly granulous. You had
to add chicken eggs, they all agreed, if you wanted to use
them in a cake and have it turn out anywhere near fit to
S eat.
Now the event on New River that drew a great deal of
attention, especially for the experienced swimmers and
the lifeguards most of all, was earmarked by the Chamber
of Commerce to become an annual tradition. August
Burghard as manager of the Chamber set up the course
for the 3 1 /2 mile Memorial Day Marathon. It began at the
Andrews Avenue Bridge, turned at the old inlet near the
Coast Guard Station, which is now Bahia Mar, then ended
back at the Andrews Avenue Bridge. I know one
S contestant of both the 1927 and 1928 events who
laughed when she thought back to the races. "Well, I was
a sprinter and not a long distance swimmer," the third
place silver medal winner of the 1927 race told me. "But
that didn't matter so long as I could swim and at 17, 1 was
put in the girl's class. Mrs. Root was in the woman's
class."




~


Before the pool was built the lifeguards took their
training in the ocean, in the roped-off area in front of the
old pavilion. Ropes were strung between pilings that were
driven well down into the sea floor. Even the elders of the
town enjoyed going for a dip in the sea if they could hang
onto ropes for security. There was also a floating platform
and a diving board, but no spring. Anyone who has ever
dived from a spring board and compared it with a
stationary plank knows the difference.
All was not serious life-saving or beach-patrolling in
those days for the lifeguards. People who went to the
beach then were more cautious and looked out for
themselves. After the day was over the lifeguards often
had picnics on the beach. Bonfires added zest to the
spirits of those enjoying the pleasures of plain old-
fashioned good fun. 'Course nowadays a bonfire would not
be allowed, but back then people did not have to be


I encouraged her to continue and she added, 'Well, we
put on men's undershirts. Tank suits, they were, with the
crotch sewed up, of course." I laughed and she explained,
"Well, once you're in the water you can't see anything
anyway and besides they good us all over with axle
grease."
"To slide through the water more easily?" I injected.
"I don't know if it did anything but get us all messy
looking," she shook her head. "At least we drew a crowd
of spectators, but then, what else would people do in Fort
Lauderdale in those days if they didn't have something
going on around the river most of the time?"
I did not answer her question and wished that I could
step back a number of years in time and stroll the banks
of a clean New River as the folks did past fifty years ago.
It must have been wonderful living in the town before it
started to cringe with growing pains. Progress had yet to
taint New River and squeeze the fun out of the river
goings on.















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UWATERFFONT NEWS .UNIT NE S

2 COMMUNITY NEWS


FT. LAUDERDALE INTERNATIONAL
BOAT SHOW.
FORT LAUDERDALE. FLORIDA ..The largest In-water .
boat show in !he United States. The Fort Lauderdale "
International Boat Show. will celebrate its 25th
anniversary from Thursday. November 1 through I,
Monday. November 5 at Bahia Mar Hotel and achlting
Center I
More than 700 in-water and on-land e.hibits will ."-T
featJre nthe last in sailboats, power boats and ,'
brokerage boals million dollar yachts dlngl!es
marine equipment and accessories engines
electronics. fishing and diving equipment' and
fashions
Several-special events including tashion showS. live
entertainment, and diving and fishing clinics are
scheduled at various times throughout the ,
extravaganza -
The Fort Lauderdale International Boat Show is ;n
sponsored by Marine Industries Association of South
Florida and managed and produced by Yachting
Promotions Inc In Fort Lauderdale
The Fort Lauderdale International Boat Show will be
open from noon to 10 p m Thursday. November 1 and
Friday. November 2. 10 a m. to 10 p m Saturday
November 3. 10 a m to 6 p m Sunday November 4. and
noon to 6 p m Monday. November 5.
Bahia Mar is located at 801 Seabreeze Avenue (AIA
and the Intracoastal) in Fort Laudrdale. For more
information, call 764-7642.


BAHIA MAR TAKES FIRST STEP
TOWARD RENOVATION
In a hastily arranged special hearing, Fort
Lauderdale's City Planning and Zoning Board voted
seven to one in favor of recommending to the city
commission Bahia Mar's site plans for filling in 2.8
acres of the north and south basins. These matters
together with a planned $35 million hotel complex on
the Bahia Mar tract were originally to be considered at
the planning and zoning board's next regular meeting,
September 19th. The hotel is still on the agenda for that
date. However, the plans for the yacht basin fill-in and
dock reconfiguration were reviewed by the board and
the public at this special meeting held August 29, 1984.


I.KoS- s.o. -u:s


Volume 1 Issue 7 September 15-October 15. 1984
Copyright by Ziegler Publishing Co.. Inc. 1984


WATERFRONT NEWS

320 S.W. 2nd Street
Ft. Lauderdale, FL 33312
Phone: (305) 524-9450

Published by Ziegler Publishing Co., Inc.
Editor: John Ziegler
Illustrators: Teri Cheney
Laurie Cahill
Julie Gepfrich
Photographer: Greg Dellinger
Carriers: Tom Gepfrich
Jason Welles Lee Je
Andrew Moyes Swen


Bud Alcott
Scott Moore
Darin Gleichman
Kelly Alcott
Jeff Prosje
Devon Ziegler
Patrick Gillis
Tom Fogarty
Dan Fogarty


ensen
Neufeldt


Matt Moore
Fred Castonguay
Todd Clarke
Dennis Bryant
John Metzger
Charles Metzger
Max Miller
Chris Lazure
Doug Channel


Proponents demonstrated the need to renovate Bahia
Mar's yachting facilities and how the increased
parking and larger slips would help meet these needs.
Along with representatives from Drexel Burnham
Lambert (the firm which leases and operates the hotel
and yachting center from the city) those groups and
persons.advocating the fill in and docking changes at
Bahia Mar includes: the City of Fort Lauderdale Staff,
the executive board of the Marine Industry Association
of South Florida, and Mr. Kaye Pearson (president of
the firm which manages the spring and fall boat shows
held at Bahia Mar).
Opponents to the proposed move feel that any
submerged land lost to landfill is lost permanently.
Many local residents worry about the effects of the
highrise hotel on traffic patterns and the visual
esthetics of the neighborhoods around the Bahia Mar.
There is an opinion among many that the hotel complex
is what Drexel, Burnham, Lambert is really concerned
about and that the improvements to the yachting
center are afterthoughts. Both sides cited Fort
Lauderdale's claim as "The Yachting Capital of the
World" in their respective arguments before the
Planning and Zoning board.
Seven of eight planning and zoning board members
apparently felt the proponents arguments in favor of
the fill-in of nearly three acres of Bahia Mar's north
basin and the realinement of dockage held more water
than those of the opposition. If Bahia Mar's
management can get the necessary state and federal
permits for the new dockage, the planning and zoning
board thinks the City Commission should give the
marina the go ahead.
Bahia Mar plans to come back to the board September
19th in reference to their plans for a $35 million hotel
complex just south of the fill-in. Several planning and
zoning board members indicated reservations to this
proposal, while yet voting in favor of the yacht basin
project.
In a related matter, the planning and zoning board
-approves of plans to move its docking facilities from
the North to the South basin at Bahia Mar as part of
the renovations outlined above.


EDITOR'S MAILBAG
Dear Editor:

Just read the article on International Yachtsmen
Association in the July 15 August 15 edition of
Waterfront News, and noticed they are asking for
"donations boats and the like from interested
parties." I felt compelled to inform "interested parties"
about the donation we made approximately three years
ago to the former Sea Scouts!!
We had a 1965 twenty-three foot Owens Cuddy Cabin
boat that had been completely re-built from the bottom up,
and had put a Palmer International Marine engine in the
vessel. The engine needed some minor repairs and at the
time we were in a terrible financial bind and could not
afford to have the work done. My husband worked with a
member of the Sea Scouts organization, and he decided to
donate our boat to them. (We had approximately $10,000
invested in the boat and the donation gave us a $2,000
tax deduction!) We had the boat docked at Ramgoh
Marina and the Sea Scouts left it there. They ran up a
dockage bill of over $700, Ramgoh took them to court, got
a judgment, but did not get their money. So, they towed
the boat out and sunk it!!! This still gives me a sick feeling
in the pit of my stomach!! The entire time the Sea Scouts
had possession of the boat and it sat at Ramgoh Marina,
the boat was neglected and unattended. Since this was
how they chose to handle the contribution that we made
to them, I personally feel that any other "interested
parties" should beware lest their donation wind up on the
bottom of the canal somewhere!!

Sincerely,
Carol S. Glancy

EDITOR'S NOTE: As Skipper of Ship #332 of the Sea
Explorers let me make it clear that this particular Sea
Explorer unit and its sponsor, the International Yachtsmen
Association, were not in any way involved in the incident
described above. Also Ship #332 is not looking for boat
donations; the IYA is.


MAILBAG


I4atcerfroRt
0s News
Ziegler Publishing Co, Inc.
320 S.W. 2nd Street
Ft. Lauderdale. FL 33312


L Help For Injured Wildlife

THE WILD BIRD
CARE CENTER
S.P.C.A. of Broward County, Inc.
P.O. Box 4761, Fort Lauderdale, FL 33338
3200 SW Fourth Avenue (305) 524.4302


Weekdays
9:00 a.m. 4:30 p.m.
Weekends
9:00 a.m. 3:00 p.m.


Tax. Deductible Donations


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THE FREIGHTER WELLWOOD
Impacts on Molasses Reef
By Bryan Brooks
During the early hours of Saturday August 4th the
Cyprus registered freighter Wellwood carrying 6.460
metric tons of animal feed from New Orleans to
.Portugal hit a living coral reef in the federally
protected marine santuary off Key Largo. The ship was
stranded foralmost two weeks as tugboats pulled and
rocked to get the freighter off the reef.
..alvage crews had unloaded about 500 tons of the
cargo of feed grain to lighten the stranded ship. About
90,000 gallons of the ships fuel was also drained into
an oil barge.
The Federal Government had filed a $22 million lawsuit
in Miami against the owner of the vessel.
Florida Bob Graham himself snorkeled around the
freighter during its stay on the reef to see personally
the damage to the reefs fragile coral system. The area
the ship it was apart of the only living Coral Reef in the
United States.
SThe owners of the ship stated that the ship strayed
about 20 miles off course during a thunder storm and
S struck the reef;The reef is a part of the area which is
S.protected by both the State of Florida and the Federal
Government. The area is also known as Pennekamp
Park.
About 250,000 divers a year travel from all parts of the
world to see the reef. The reef area has generated much
in the way of Tourism in the past 15 years.
Much has been made of the impact the ship would have
:on the corals that scientists say had taken hundreds of
years to build and take hundreds more years to come
back. The impact at this time is still not known as to its
permanent damage..

John Halas, a diver who has worked for the State in the
past placing mooring bouys at different sections of the
underwater park, said the section damaged was on the
northernedge of Molasses Reef just north of where
divers are taken by charter operators.
i Halassaidone of his mooring bouys was destroyed by
the ship. Underwater iPspection by Halas and divers
S from the Navy and Coast Guard showed the ship was
S' stillwater tight but had dents all along the length. The
ship was over 400 feet long and 57 feet wide.
Halasi said the 12 and a half days the ship shaded the
part of the reef it was over did some damage that.has
not been totally understood yet. The tug boats also did
some damage to. the reef in its numerous attempts to
S pull the ship free. The type of coral that was damaged
were.some Elkhorn, Brain and Star coral.


Several tour operators are taking people in
bottom boats to see the effects of the damage.
Halas personally escorted the Governor to si
damage done. Governor had already scheduled
his Work Days to help Halas place mooring bouys
Park area.
The accident brought into focus the vulnerability
coral reef structure itself. The ship did a treme
amount of damage but Keys Charter operators
concerned or more concerned about the long
impact of the new Bouganville Condominium, tha
a Marina, will have on the fragil coral system.


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TIME TO REGISTER FOR
PROMENADE
Promenade in the Park, the annual festival sponsored
by Beaux Arts, will be held November9, 10& 11, 1984in
Holiday Park and War Memorial Auditorium in Fort
Lauderdale. Promenade is our answer to the good old
fashioned community fair with live entertainment at all
times, over 100 artists, children's activities and much
more. All proceeds from this fund raising event benefit
the Museum of Art, Inc., Fort Lauderdale. Business,
civic groups, artists, individuals and others who are
interested in exhibiting in this' community festival
should make their reservations now. For information
about reserving exhibit space contact:
Commercial Exhibits, Pat Purtill ......(305) 524-2389
Civic Exhibits, Mae Steinlauf ............. 564-3688
Arts and Crafts, Wendy-Langstroth ........523-7404
Outside Commerical (Plants), Sue Lewis.... 491-4972
For all other information write: Promenade in the Park,
P.O. Box 7172, Fort Lauderdale, Florida 33304.
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4

GETTING CERTIFIED
By Sam Rich

If you're planning to join the underwater
world of innerspace this summer, here are
some tips to help yoy select a proper course of
instruction...
Scuba diving-the sport of the 80's. The lure of the sea,
the adventure and beauty of reef systems, the sensual
thrills of weightlessness and diversity of fascinating
creatures that await the diver have made scuba diving
today's most enticing and sophisticated pursuit. The
fastest growing water-related sport in the country is
rapidly being accepted as also one of the safest. The
technology, which made space exploration possible,
has evolved rapidly. The equipment produced today is
futuristic in design. The related activities offer
tranquility, solace and escape from ever encroaching
maze of complex urban society. It is a frontier, a food
source for the hunter, and an epic adventure for youth.
If you're planning to earn your passport to this
paradise, choose your course of instruction
thoughtfully. It can make a difference in your safety,
enjoyment and confidence. Your major considerations
are:
1. What type of course and certification can you
expect?
2. What will be required of you?
3. Who is the instructor? What is his background and
experience? What credentials does he have? What is
his attitude toward his students, safety, education?
4. What equipment is supplied? What isn't?
5. What will be the total cost of complete certification?
6. How much diving will you do and where?
7. What opportunities exist after you have gotten
certified for further trying? Diving?
If you're satisfied with the answers to these questions
and others you will have, then you've made the right
choice of training. If you're not, don't settle for less-
than you expect. Demand the best, and you will be the
beneficiary.
TYPES OF COURSES AND CERTIFICATIONS
There are five national training agencies that issue
scuba diving certifications:
National Association of Underwater Instructors
(NAUI)
Young Men's Christian Association (YMCA)
National Association of Scuba Diving Schools
(NASDS)
Scuba Schools International (SSI)
Professional Association of Diving Instructors
(PADI)
Each organization maintains its own standards and
training requirements for established .levels of
certification.
The current trend in instruction has been away from the
minimum Basic Level to the more comprehensive
Openwater Certification. Depending on organization,
the individual instructor and the institution's policies,
the criteria for either Basic or Openwater Certification
can vary. However, the major difference between the
two levels is the amount of dives required and the
THE BROOKS FAMILY FULL SERVICE,
BRYAN, MARY, MIKE DIVE SHOP
CHRIS & PAT
I.l






1525 N. FEDERAL HWY. INC
FT. LAUDERDALE, FL 33304 Co 564-8661


CARPENTRY CLEANING DELIVERIES

DOCKSIDE YACHT MAINTENANCE
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WATERFRONT NEWS

depth of water achieved.
Basic certification to most instructors means two or
three dives to 30-40 feet of water; Openwater
Certification requires at least five or six dives with the
final dive(s) to 40 -100 feet. Classroom and pool work
may not be as comprehensive in the Basic Certification
course as it is in the Openwater course. For most
students (80%), formal training will end after their first
course. A few continue and seek specialty
certifications in wreck diving, ice diving, cave diving
and so on. Even fewer continue training to the levels of
advanced or instructor certification. Therefore, you
should make the most out of your initial exposure to
diving.
The certification is valid for life and presently no
requirements are made on certified divers to update or
refresh their knowledge and skills, although most
agencies and instructors offer some type of program to
scrape the rust that quickly forms on inactive divers. A
certification issued 10 years ago is totally invalid
practically in a sport where changes in equipment,
technology and methods are evolving daily.
Where you take your training can also affect thetype of
training you will receive. Courses taught through Dive
Shops will be unlike those taught at colleges or
military installations and may vary from shop to shop.
Training received at government facilities like the
National Oceanographic and Atmospheric
Administration (NOAA) county and city level programs
and from individual independent instructors will also
vary. Thus the same level of certification from the
same type of agency does not necessarily indicate the
type of course offered.
Your best bet is to evaluate the course individual
before enrolling. Look for the amount of actually hours
that will be spent in training. The number of hours of
class and pool work divided by the number of students
is a basic formula for determining how much
instruction you will receive. A class of 20 that will last
20 hours will net you one hour of training. You may find
this formula helpful in assessing the course your are
considering.
Excellent programs exist on all levels as do inferior
courses. A careful screening of the amount of hours
offered, the subjects covered, and the skills taught will
help you to decide which type of course is right for you.
YOUR REQUIREMENTS
"We have to what?" You may find yourself making this
incredulous exclamation half way through the course, r
if you naively assume the role of student. Find out I
before hand exactly what assignments are required,
what tests will be administered and what the water
work entails. Most basic and open water certifications
will cover physics, physiology, marine life, and
environment, equipment function and care first-aid,
diving accident causes and management, rescues, the
dive, tables and safety limits, navigation, basic
oceanography, dive planning and air consumption in
the class room. A final exam, quizzes, written and
reading assignments should also be expected. The time
spent in lectures and participating in formal discussion
should be a minimum of 12 to 18 hours.
Pool exercises should include a swim test, basic
watermanship skills, skin diving skills and practice
time, and thorough training and conditioning with
scuba (self contained underwater breathing
apparatus). Exercises like regulator recovery, mass
flooding and clearing, buddy breathing, proper ascent
training, buoyancy control, removing and donning
gear above and the below the surface, the buddy
system, rescues and normal operation of scuba
condition the student to relax and breath normally
while increasing confidence in his skills. A normal
response for most people is to hold yourbreath when
water is on the face or sudden fear is encountered. Both
may lead to panic underwater and more serious


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problems related to breathing compressed air atdepth.
The pool exercises should uncondition these responses
and develop new abilities to cope with stress and
resultant panic, in addition to building confidence in
equipment handling and skill. Time spent doing pool
exercises sholud not be less than 12 hours.
Open water work should procressively expose the
student to situations of higher learning. Different type
of dives, deeper depths, further exposure to local
conditions and the environment complete the minimum
amount of training the novice should encounter during
his first course.
And all of this training should be enjoyable. The level of
enjoyment may increase as you proceed through the
classroom, pool and open water stages. The final
reward comes with the presentation of your certificate
and card, and you should be proud to have earned it.

To be continued next issue. .

Sam Rich, a Certified. N.O.A.A. Recompression Chamber
Operator and N.A.U.I. Instructor, is a noted underwater
photographer and author published in numerous
periodicals specializing in diving topics. Mr. Rich is owner
and operator of Adventure Divers and is a diving instruc-
tor for the City of Fort Lauderdale, Plantation and Broward
County Schools.


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5


THE GREATER FT. LAUDERDALE
SHIPWRECK SYMPOSIUM
By Bryan Brooks
On August second, third and fourth of this year the
Marine Archaeological Advisory Council of the
Broward County Historical Commission held the first
Ft. Lauderdale, Shipwreck Symposium. The affair was
put on in the Bahia Mar Hotel on the beach and attended
by hundreds of sport divers, archaeologists and
treasure salvors from all over the country.
The list of speakers from the archaeological
community, the treasure salvors and government was
impressive. People in attendance were treated to films,
slides, lectures and debates from the various special
interest groups present. The Symposium was being
followed by Skin Diver Magazine Editor, Paul
Tzimoulos who also lectured on the relationship that
sport divers all over the world have with shipwrecks.
Some of the guests who were present were: Peter
Throckmorton, -an archaeologist; Mel Fisher, a
treasure salvor; Robert Marx, author and treasure
hunter; and also Anne G. Giesecke from the committee
on Marine, and Fisheries under the House of
Representatives.
Part of the'Symposium was to be lectures and round
table debates between the salvors, the sport divers,
government and the archaeologists. Also included
were special trips to the various historical shipwrecks
located off the coast of Pompano Beach and Fort
Lauderdale. The divers who attended the Symposium
were enlighted on the heritage of the historical
shipwrecks that had sunk off this coast. The dive trips
included a stop at the wreck of the Gil Bias just north of


the Hillsboro Inlet. It is believed that William Cooley a
settler on New River had been enrouteto salvage the Gil
Bias when his family and other settlers were
massacred by the Seminoles. The Gil Bias wrecked in
1835 and the massacre occurred in early 1836. This
massacre delayed the settlement of Fort Lauderdale
for over 50 years until the 1880's. The massacre
triggered the Second Seminole Indian War.
Other historical shipwrecks included the Cumberland
Wreck off Lauderdale by the Sea. This ship wrecked in
1931 as it hit clumps of concrete that had been
jettisoned by another ship some time earlier.
The dive boats were supplied by Greg McKay of the
Professional Dive Schools of Florida. Instruction was
coordinated with his instructors and Bryan Brooks of
UnderSeas Sports Inc., of Fort Lauderdale.
Weather played a part in the expeditions on Friday
because of heavy seas. However the divers kept calm
and Saturday brought calm seas and good diving. Most
of the people who attended were amazed with the
amount of ship wrecks off Ft. Lauderdale and the part
they play in helping the fish life. Some divers that we
talked with had no knowledge of anything in Ft.
Lauderdale except for its reputation as a college
hangout at Easter Spring Break.
The round table discussion between archaeologists,
salvors and government created immense interest. The
treasure salvors stated that the wrecks were to be
salvaged under Maritime law and the treasure
recovered should be theirs. The archaeologists were
concerned about both the salvors and the sport divers
permanently destroying valuable records of our rich
past heritage. The sport divers were concerned about
their freedom to explore the wrecks. The government's
representative Anne G. Giesecke brought up House Bill
3194 which would define historical shipwrecks and
place limits on what could or could not be done to those
wrecks.
Skin Diver editor Paul Tzimoulos stated that divers
were seeking the freedom of the sea and did not want
any type of government restriction to hamper their
sport. On speaking with Anne G. Giesecke on one of the
dive boats during the Symposium, she stated that
archaeologists were beginning to see the value of sport
divers helping them in their investigations concerning
historical


historical underwater digs. Giesecke sta. that the
archaeologists were also beginning to see the diver as
something other than a looter of the sea.
All parties were in agreement that sport divers for the
most part had evolved from strictly a hunter to one
more sophisticated and interested in photography,
eccology and archaeology.
The Symposium gave people in attendance films on
Shipwrecks and new techniques of salvage and
recovery of the ships sunk off the seas of the world.
Professor Ray McAllister, Marine Geologist from
Florida Atlantic University and Bill Raymond, Marine
Geologist, gave people valuable insight to the many
historical shipwrecks that are right here in our own
back yard. James Dean and Steven Danforth Singer
from the Broward County Marine Archaeological
Council, the sponsors of the Symposium, have written
a booklet called Shipwrecks of Broward County.
Part of the reason of the Symposium was to show that
this area of the country had historical shipwrecks and
we were interested in properly recovering them
The Marine Archaeological Advisory Council was
formed in 1976 as a part of the Broward County
Historical Commission to assist in the investigating,
cataloging, surveying and protecting Broward County
shipwrecks. To date the Council has located more than
25 historical underwater sites along the 25 mile
shoreline of Broward County.
The Shipwreck Symposium was seen as a success and
among the people who attended many expressed the
hope that this would become an annual affair.



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WATERFRONT NEWS" RI

'WATERFRONT HERITAGE


Figureheads are becoming a thing of the past-on
ships, at least. In fact, they began to move aft, soon
after the disappearance of the dragon-headed Viking
skuta. Historically, it was a "rigged" movement, that is,
with the development of rigging and the continued
increase in canvas, the figurehead was relegated to a
more practical location even if less practical in design.
Early primitive craft were double-ended with high
stems that naturally had to be decorated. These stem-
head carvings probably represent the earliest types of
figureheads. Then, two things began to happen. The
stem-head became less conspicuous and sails became
more complicated. Whatever the causes for the
change-be it progress or practicality-there seem to
be similarities between ancient and "modern"
placement.
L.G. Carr Laughton's Old Ship Figureheads and Sterns
(for stern-posts were also often decorated), chronicles
the movement and design of the ship's "eyes".
The author points outthat "the few Roman figureheads
which have survived from the period of the early
empire are, save for their greater artistic merit,
curiously similar to those which were applied to
English men-of-war inthe Napoleonic era."
Practicality in war-time was a prime factor to the
Phoenicians. While some of their ships bore horse's
heads on their fore stems, their sharp-beakedl war
galleys used their low-slung bronze battering-rams to
splinter the hulls of lighter craft. The painted "eyes" or
oculus helped the ship find its way in fog and darkness
of night.


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Chinese Junks and Malay fishing boats retain the same
oculus, and for much the same reasons. Oriental
mariners simply explain-"without eyes there is no
sight." As with most figureheads, they represent living
creatures or the "spirits" of them. Since few early ships
carry both the oculus and an additional figurehead,
they have been equated as single types of the same
idea.
Figures might represent religious emblems,
nationalities, or ship's names. Dutch and English ships
of the 17th and 18th centuries both used the Lion as a
national symbol; the Egyptians used a variety of
religious emblems that may have also indicated the
name of the.individual ship. In the same line, Spanish
figures of saints became common as a national-
religious motif. The Santa Maria carried such a
distinctive figure.
About the 13th century figureheads almost
disappeared completely, a foreshadowing of things to
come. Forecastles had begun to overlap the stem-
head. And so, with no obvious place to apply the figure,
it was no longer borne on many vessels. Instead, a
small carving was eventually placed on the foremost
rail of the forecastle or on the stem. Neither idea was
very effective except to keep the tradition alive until
the galleon-type was introduced. The beak-head
afforded an even better place for attachment. That
style remained from the days of sailing men-of-war
right up to time of steam.
Few countries can claim a more intricate history and
development of figureheads and devices than can
England. It had some "beastly" beginnings in support of
its royal arms, however. Dragons, lions and horses
became common supporters. By the 17th century, the
Lion was all that was left for the most part. St. George
and the dragon (as patron of England) had been
popular for a time and, of course, was continued for
ships named after the dragon-slayer.
Things seemed to be getting out of hand by the end of
the 18th century so an order was made to abolish
figureheads in the Royal Navy. (Some wags have
commented that when "abolishing figureheads" was
mentioned in the order, perspiration popped out on half
the admiralty). The lion had been established as the
universal figure for men-of-war between 1703 and
1727, but there were always dispensations to use
almost any type. After that year, any figure was
allowed that did not exceed the cost of the lion. The,
1796 order to abolish them as an "unnecessary
extravagance" fell on deaf ears-the order became a

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"dead letter" at once. Another was issued that was
intended to cut down the cost-what have been called
"devices" were to be used on great ships and "busts"
were to go to smaller craft. Busts eventually turned
into half length figures of vast dimensions.
Only steam stopped the rapid growth of figureheads,
even though there was an attempt to provide a
substitute badge or scutcheon on each side of the
steamer's stem. The last figureheads in the Royal Navy
were on sloops of the Odin class which last served in
World War I.
Some individual figureheads have survived the advent
of steam only to be lost through theft, fire or decay.
Many are preserved in maritime museums here and
abroad. That of the H.M.S. Victoryhas been preserved
intact. Some have been restored in duplication of the
originals on reconstructed ships.
Replicas of the ship carvings are now produced in
miniature and in full size. S.T. Preston's at Greenport,
L.I., New York, USA has a large collection which they
have cast in replica, ranging in size from about two to
six feet. Although they no longer sail the seas, many
see them as much part of maritime history as the ships
themselves. But "without eyes, there is no sight."


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September 15-October 15. 1984


WATERFRONT CUISINE
By Alexandra Howard

CASA VECCHIA 209 Birch Rd. 463-7575
Recently, my dinner guests, a group of 12, dined at
CASA VECCHIA located in Ft. Lauderdale's "Spring
Break" area. It was the first visit there for all of us, and
we had only heard rumors of the fine food and service
that awaited us.
Everything we heard turned out to be true, including
the prices! However, I can honestly say it was worth it.
The menu selection was most unusual and we all
decided to try a variety of items. The Crab and Green
Fettucini was outstanding and I definitely recommend
you try it if you are a seafood lover.
They offer a variety of Veal dishes prepared in
traditional and unusual ways. My guests raved over
these dishes.
If you like continental service ard decor, you'll be
delighted by the polished, professional waiters and the
beautiful interior of CASA VECCHIA. Our table faced the
Intracoastal Waterway and the courtyard was
beautifully landscaped and lighted to create a most
romantic atmosphere. Definitely FOUR STARS.


FLORIDA CENTER FOR THE
BOOK ANNOUNCES
CENTENNIAL LECTURE ON
MARK TWAIN
A Centennial lecture on Mark Twain's "Huckleberry
Finn" will be presented as the first program scheduled by
the Florida Center for the Book. A part of the Main Library
in Fort Lauderdale, the Florida Center is a companion to
the Library of Congress Center for the Book. Its purpose:
To promote an appreciation of the role of books in society
and a close relationship between those who create and
those who read them.
"We 'are delighted to have Justin Kaplan, a
distinguished authority on Mark Twain, present this
centennial lecture" said Cecil Beach, director of Broward
County Library. "We look forward to his exposition of why
and how this virtual classic of American literature has
always been in hot water with censors."
Twain's centennial will be celebrated 1984-85, and the
library will be displaying many Mark Twain first editions
which have been donated to our rare book collection, says
Jean Trebbi, program coordinator for the library and for
the Florida Center for the Book. The lecture will take place
in the auditorium of the Main Library on September 11.
John Cole, director of the Center for the Book in the
Library of Congress commented "September 11 coincides
with Banned Books Week, making it a doubly appropriate
observance."
Cole and Carol Nemeyer, Associate Librarian of
Congress, met with planning committee members June 12
to discuss goals and directions for the Florida Center for
the Book. South Florida may be seen as a laboratory for
research on the reading habits of the elderly, since they
seem to run counter to national trends. What makes our
older library users active readers may be instructive to
authors, publishers, and other libraries nationally, Beach
said. Dr. Nemeyer, former president of American Library
Association, urged exploring the trend further.
Florida State Librarian Barratt Wilkins, Dr. Otto
Bettmann were present, as well as representatives from
the public and press. Wilkins endorsed the concept of a
Hemingway Moveable Feast which would feature unique
Florida Hemingway photo exhibits to travel around the
state with programs and films based on Hemingway's
works. The series would begin in October with the Florida
Center coordinating with a Hemingway literary seminar in
Key West planned for January 10-13.
A $5.000 grant from the Ruffner Foundation has been
donated to the Florida Center for the Book to help launch
its activities. Frederick G. Ruffner is president of the
Council for Florida Libraries.
For further information, please call Jean Trebbi, 305-
357-7404.


"SPLICE THE MAIN BRACE"
a food & drink guide

ANCIENT MARINER, 501 S. New River Dr., E. 525-8100.
Floating restaurant, fabulous view.
BRYANT HOMES RESTAURANT,-301 SW 3rd Ave.
523-0177. On the New River.
THE CANDY STORE, 1 N. Atlantic Blvd. 761-1888. Beach
cuisine, drinks.
COCONUTS, 429 Seabreeze Blvd. 467-6788. Seafood.
CRABBIE JOHN'S CRAB HOUSE, 2020 South S.R. 7.
584-8680. Baltimore style & garlic crabs.
DOWN UNDER, 3000 E. Oakland Park Blvd. 563-4123.
FIFTEENTH STREET FISHERIES, 1900 S.E. 15th St. (at Ft.
Laud. Marina) 763-2777. Seafood.
FRANK & VINNY'S PIZZA SHACK, 2884 E. Sunrise Blvd.
564-9522.
FISH GRILL, 1434 N. Federal Highway (Dania), 923-1001.
Best Broiled Fish buy in town!
HARRISON'S ON THE WATER, 3000 NE 32nd Ave.
566-9667.
LA RESERVE, 3115 NE 32nd Ave., 563-6644. Come by
car or boat. European entrees.
THE LEFT BANK, 214 SE 6th Ave., 462-5376. French
tableside cooking. Reservations.
LAGNIAPPE CAJUN HOUSE, E. Las Olas near 3rd Ave.
Great crawdads!
LESTER'S DINER, 250 SR 84, 525-5641. 14 oz. coffee.
Open 24 hours.
MR. LAFFS, 1135 N. Federal Hwy., 561-3440. Restau-
rant & Bar (Great Music).
PELICAN'S ON THE WATER, 620 E, Las Olas Blvd. By
boat or car. Behind Riverside Hotel.
POETS, 904 E. Las Olas Blvd., 523-5001. Saloon &
Eatery.
SHOOTERS ON THE WATER, 3033 N.E. 32nd Ave.,
566-2855. Food & Drink.
STAN'S, 3300 E. Commercial Blvd., 772-3777. By car or
boat.
SUMMERS, 219 S. Atlantic Blvd. 462-8978. Beach Cafe
& Bar. Concerts, too!
YESTERDAY'S, ICW at Oakland Park Blvd., 561-4400.


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'X1 N1
CHUM THE BROWARD REEF
AT NIGHT
By Bill Rhode
If you want to beat the summer heat and be pretty well
assured of a fish dinner, try angling right off the
Broward beaches at night. Pick a nice calm evening
and head out.
A good depth recorder is important to locate a rock pile
or reef ledge.Start looking in 15 or 20 feet of water.
Without the electronics, you may want to arrive before
dark and look for patchy areas on the sand. When a
desired area .is located, it is important to anchor up
current so your offerings drift toward the reef area. Be
aware that the current may change directions during
the night. Securing the anchor to the bottom is one
thing, tying the line to the bow cleat is the other! Many
famous anchors with lines have been lost by not
checking the latter.
You need no sophisticated gear for this type of fishing.
Conventional spinning or plug tackle is sufficient with
line testing around 15 pounds. Crafty reef dwellers
have the ability to pull your terminal tackle into the
rocks or around sea fans. Too light of line test could
result in a lot of fish lost; although, you will find that
lighter line brings more strikes.
Tide seems to have little bearing on fishing; although,
water clarity is important. When fishing near the Port,
check the water especially during the outgoing tide.
The lovely brown hue in the water coming from the
Intracoastal may not help fishing. Up north towards
Hillsborough Inlet, the water is usually clear.
Deciding which phase of the moon to fish, one is open
to much debate among anglers. Some commerical
fishermen, especially in the Keys, fish little during the
full moon. I've had good nights when the moon is
absent. Other times, I've seen Snapper swarm during a
full moon. Who knows?
Take along several boxes of ground fish (chum), a
mesh chum bag, some glass minnows and maybe a few
six-packs just in case. These items are available at
most tackle stores. Some night fishing pros grind their
own chum. A meat grinder mounted securely to the
gunwale is an excellent device for this. On a choppy
night, it's really a sight to see the faces of the wife and
kids as you grind away making your own chum slick!
Stuff and crank, stuff and crank!
In shallow water with little current, the ground fish,
etc., reaches the bottom quickly. For deeper water, it.
takes a little longer. Be patient. For bait, fresh cut
pilchards, sardines, balao, mullet or squia worK great.
Live shrimp get expensive but are hard to beat. A 1-0 or
2-0 hook tied directly to the line is all you need. Wire is
not necessary but heavier monofiliment may be
applied if cutoffs occur. Try letting the hooked bait
float back with the chum line. Again, be patient. Free
line the bait until you get a pick up. Once the fish start
feeding the fun begins. Occasionally throw a handful of
glass minnows in the chum line (not at your wife). With
deeper water and fast current, regular beach sand can
be pressed into handfuls of chum so to make it reach
the bottom quicker. This is when you may need to add a
small sinker to take your bait to the bottom more
rapidly. Use as little terminal tackle as possible, you'll
get more strikes.
On the shallow reefs, Mangrove or Grey Snapper are
the mainstay. These aggressive battlers usually run
one to three pounds, but beware of ten pounders that
might show up. Yellowtail, Grunt, Porgies, Mutton-
Snapper, Grouper and other species may come around
during the night. Deeper water, say 50 to 80 feet will
produce more Yellowtail. Kingfish may show up here
also.


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One night we were sitting at our secret spot off Yankee
Clipper pulling in dinner-sized Mangroves. About the
seventh snapper was coming up off the bottom,
when...Wham! Some monster came up and swallowed
him, breaking the line. Five minutes later, I was
minding my own business cranking in another snapper
when the same thing happened again. Enough was
enough. My fishing partner hooked a live bait on a 6-0
and lowered it to the bottom. It had no chance to reach
the bottom. A solid hookup was achieved indeed. After
a ten minutewrestling match, a beautiful 27 pound Gag
Grouper bellied up at boatside. You're probably asking
yourself, "What's so beautiful about a Grouper?"
Anyway, fishing in this manner produces a surprise
now and then. You never know what will show up when
the fish start feeding. One thing though, you need not
journey far from the dock for this type of adventure.
Also, on your way to and from your reef spot check for
surface action along the Port jetties or under the bridge
lights. Be prepared to cast ajig or plug. Snook, Tarpon,.
Ladyfish and other nocturnal feeders sometimes are
ready to strike your lure.


71c4de StOA&e4


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NG
SOUTH PADRE ISLAND GRAN
PRIX FISHING TOURNAMENT
Charles Raines and the "A" Team from Birmingham, AL
took top honors and the winner's check of $47,040.00 at
the International Billfish League's South Padre Island
Grand Prix August 8-11. The Texas tournament, with a
purse of $117,600.00 was the third leg of the IBL's
seven-tournament world championship series.
South Padre Island is quickly gaining a reputation as
one of the country's best billfishing hotspots. Only two
of the teams entered in the two-day IBL tournament
failed to score points and a phenomenal daily catch
rate (percentage of teams catching fish each day) of 70
% was achieved. "When fishing is this good, it is really
gratifying to see our tag-and-release format working
so well," commented IBL's John Good. "In most big-
money tournaments, all of those fish would have been
killed. Here everyone was released alive. This record is
a great tribute to our teams."
Competition was fierce throughout the tournament.
The "A" Team's victory was in doubt until the very end.
A blue marlin, white marlin and sail were released for a
total of 515 points aboard Raines' 46' Bertram, "Five
Queens, skippered by Robert Jansenius. Billy Osborn's
"Gulfstream", Captained by David Lohse from San
Antonio, also caught a blue, white marlin and sail for
515 points. Tension began to mount around tournament
headquarters as the team headed home from the
-fishing grounds over 50 miles offshore to Southpoint
Marine in Port Isabel.
Radio reports indicated that both The "A" Team and
Gulfstream Fishing Team had scored the same points.
Now the question was, which team had tagged their
last fish first? Under IBL rules, time of catch breaks
ties. Several teams had not reported in. A very real
possibility remained that one of these could knock both
of the contenders out with two blue marlin releases
(each blue scores 400 points). A particular concern was
Stuart Wright and his Oklahoma Billfishing Team. His
blue marlin release from the first day had virtually
assured him of retaining the lead in the world
championship race and everyone knew that his 46'
Hatteras "Sea Warrior", Captained by Alex Rogers,
would be one of the last boats in.
As the reporting deadline approached, most teams had
reached the dock, and only the Oklahoma team could
effect the top standings. When the "Sea Warrior" made
the- turn into the marina The "A" Team began a
celebration that would last far into the night. No
release flags were flying aboard Wright's boat, and
everyone knew that the Gulfstream's last fish had been
caught second. Raines and his team had one their first
IBL title and had moved from 20th to 5th in the overall
standings.
"The IBL has proven, without a doubt, that tag-and-
release tournaments can be just as exciting, if noy
more, than traditional" kill tournaments", said Good. "I
know that all of our teams feel the same thrill that we'
do in allowing these magnificent fish to remain in the.
water to breed and perhaps fight again. We are all'
looking forward to our next tournament in Ocean City,
MD on September 6-8. With the white marlin there in
September, it should be our most productive
tournament yet."


Septe :iI


F FISHING i

TOURNAMENT

November 10, 1984


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WATERFRONT NEWS :. ..;..


10


POWER BOATING


ASK BIG AL


Dear Big Al:
Please advise where I can get the flexible metal pipe
which is the beginning of the diesel exhaust system.
That is, who can construct this ?
Thank you.
Bob

Bob:
M&H Automotive at 3560 W. Broward Blvd. and all
Apolla Auto Stores carry the flexible metal exhaust
pipe you refer to. Metal fixtures can be welded on to the
ends, or just slip a clamp over each end. Be sure to
wrap the pipe with asbestos cloth or strips to avoid
burns.
Al



Dear Mr. Grodsky:
I wonderif you have any ideas on my problem with high
oil pressure. This history is as follows and has been
constant since first start up:
1. VolvoTMO 40-Turbo Diesel inboard 124h.p. operates
at 88-99p.s.i. at anytime over 1500 r.p.m. warm engine,
30# oil.
2. This high pressure confirmed with mechanical
pressure guage.


3. Kurt's Diesel suggested changed pressure relief
valves at oil filter. Dropped pan and changed pressure
regulator valve. No change in pressure.
4. Claus Marine dropped pan and again changed
pressure regulator valve. Used a valve known to
operate as replacement. No change. At this point Power
House Marine, Miami and Volvo said, "Happy boating"
and dropped me. Note: New engine-75 hours.
88.2 my engine average p.s.i.
64.0 p.s.i. max Volvo's Owner's engine manual
24.2 p.s.i. above max
88.2 p.s.i.
71.1 p.s.i. max., Volvo workshop manual
17.1 p.s.i. above max
My concern is as follows:
1.Blowout of oil filter and loss of oil at sea.
2.High pressure causing filter bypass.
3.Future high oil consumption.
I would appreciate your thoughts, Thank you.
J.M.

Dear J.M.:
I read with much interest about your problem of high
pressure. Most people complain about low oil
pressure.
I have had a few high pressure jobs in my time and here
are a few suggestions to check out. If you have an oil
line running to your gauge check for bends .or
restrictions. If you have a wire from a sender to your oil
gauge check for a ground which will give a higher
reading either at the sender or at gauge and lastly a
defective oil gauge will really shake you up at high or
low pressure.
Hope this helps...
Al
IF YOU HAVE A PROBLEM OF ANY KIND WITH YOUR
BOAT, WRITE TO:

"BIG AL"
c/o Waterfront News
320 SW 2nd Street
Ft. Lauderdale, FL 33312
(or call 524-9450)

Big Al will research your problem and answer it to the
best of his abity given the information provided.

(Big Al, a.k.a. Alvin.Grodsky, is a Marine Engine Instructor
for the Coast Guard Auxiliary. He is an aircraft pilot and
former United States Marine Corps Engine Maintenance
Instructor and an Instructor of Engines and Maintenance
for the U.S. Government as a civilian. Al has over fifty
years of marine engineering experience, from steam on.)


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HOW TO LEARN BOATING SAFETY
By Bill Lange
Some places in the world people are born to grow up on
a boat; such as on the canal barges of Europe, or the
millions inhabiting the rivers, lakes and harbors of
Asia. Do they get a boating education? So why should
you worry now that you are a boater and when in need
can call 911 or the U.S. Coast Guard?
There is no law mandating educational training for
most USA boaters. But common sense and self-
protection should bring you to spend a little time in
educating yourself. Self-study at home, preferably
before you burden yourself with a boat (or the wrong
boat), will be much easier and more practical if you
take a public education basic course.
If you are a skipper you should get all who may crew
with you to also take a course. Fairly often a family will
attend together and many very young persons show
stick-to-it results on these topics.
The courses are free in that instruction is given by
properly qualified volunteers of two organizations.
You are asked to pay for the student working papers,
some training items and small administrative costs. It
is also suggested that you buy the text recommended
for the course.
Statistics have proved that boating education reduces
accidents. For this reason insurance companies do
allow insurance discounts to trained operators and for
properly examined boats. You are less liable to sink, to
go aground, or to burn; but lighting does not seem to
spare the trained.
The reason for taking training is that you are better
able to avoid some problems; but especially to handle
others. Afloat this is vital since you are alone in the
action to save your life or you boat. At dock, an
ambulance or fire truck or police should get to you but
probably far slower than normally. At anchor or
underway someone has got to know that you need help
and where you are; then even the U.S. Coast Guard
helicopter arrival on scene will be awhile. The Coast
Guard will send you a commerical tow boat unless life
or property are in real danger.
It takes years of experience to learn how to handle the
many problems that do occur on the water. The theory
and examples provided by experienced skippers will
rub off on you at a meeting with those who participate
in the courses.
May I introduce you to the scope and contents of the
basic public education courses which are given
frequently, but not always much publicized. These are
under the auspices of the UNITED STATES COAST
GUARD AUXILIARY (USCGAUX) or the UNITED STATES
POWER SQUADRONS (USPS). USCGAUX has numerous
Flotillas, and USPS has Squadrons, so you will not
have to go too far. Some are offering "continuous"
courses but most have only four or five sessions a
year.
These two organizations are so fundamental to
pleasure boating that one should certainly learn from
them. Even if you may be able to participate in a
program on boating run by others such as a
Community College, of the Red Cross, or the Sea
Explorers (boys and girls) of the Boy Scouts of
America, or certain small sailing or other clubs...you
must not miss USCGAUX or USPS. Having continuously
taken the courses of both I recommend either. In fact,
though the subject material of each is fundamentally
the same, there is a different optique. Also the
instructors frequently have different experience and,
more especially, their current boating activities differ.
in a way, lots of students having obtained the texts and
a little encouragement could learn seamanship and
safe boating all by their lonesome. But they would
greatly miss the practical aspects-which each
instructor, despite himself or herself, literally emotes.
To many of you I suggest that you take BOTH the
USCGAUX AND the USPS basic courses.
The USCGAUX text and training materials, prepared by
them, are of minimal cost. They are produced and
maintained current with the close guidance,
assistance, and cooperation of the Regular Service, the
Coast Guard. At each echelon of the Coast Guard the
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SeptemberI5ober 15 195.1


USCGAUX has a staff parallel to the Regulars so that
the functions, expertise, techniques and operations are
readily available to all boaters.
The USCGAUX text "Boating Skills and Seamanship"
has two versions. One stresses all boating while the
second "Sailing and Seamanship" covers the same
chapters but each applied to sail boats. But whichever
course you take the USGGAUX Flotillas are composed
of skippers owning power, motorsail and sail boats.
The USCGAUX CHAPTER TITLES are:
1. The Safe Way to Boating Enjoyment
2. Boater's Language and Trailering
3. Boat Handling
4. Legal Requirements
5. Rules of the Road
6. Aids to Navigation
7. Piloting
8. Marine Engines
9. Marlinspike Seamanship
10. Sailing
11. Weather
12. Radiotelephone
13. Locks and Dams
While Flotillas vary, most give the BS&S Course two
nights a week, thus covering the chapters in five
weeks. Some use ten weeks. The final night of these
two-hour sessions includes the examination, which is
about 100 multiple choice questions from among the 25
questions which the student workbook covered for
each chapter. You are handed the certificate of
graduation, which should be retained for it will be
useful over the years. You may earn the right to wear
the uniform. Qualifications for membership in
USCGAUX opens the way to advanced elective courses
in the above and other topics. The Flotilla expects a
member to be active each week doing volunteer
functions. Those obtaining qualification as crew
become operational on their own boat or another
member's facility for patrols and other assistance to
the Coast Guard and the boating public. Then you fly
the ensign and the operational pennants.
The USPS student's folder "Piloting, Seamanship and
Small Boat Handling" and handout materials prepared
by USPS are available at a nominal charge; there is a
small fee for administrative costs. It is suggested that
each student have as a reference the "bible" of
boaters...Charles F. Chapman's tome; same title.
The USPS CHAPTER TITLES are:
1. Know Your Boat
2. Equipment Regulations and Safe Operations
3. Boat Handling

"USPS PUBLIC BOATING COURSE
REVISED"
By Larry Haupt
The United States Power Squadrons have been giving
free public boating courses since 1941. The course has
been improved and refined over the years based on the
experience gained in teaching over two million
students.
There has been a complete revision this year. Two of
the eleven weekly sections are new...Engine
Troubleshooting and Sailing: The course starts with
the basics and in the final section Piloting is
covered...the kind of training needed to get to Bimini
safely.
The course will be given in the New River Middle School
at 3100 Riverland Road, Ft. Lauderdale. Registration is
7:30 p.m. Tuesday, September 18. Classes are held
each Tuesday with the Final Examination December 18.
Many marine insurance companies offer a discountfor
satisfactory completion of the course..
The only charge is for the cost of course material. USPS
instructors receive no pay but serve in the interest of
encouraging safe boating.
The course is meant to be of interest to the entire family
and older children are welcome. For more information
call 524-1242, 587-9168 or come to 3100 Riverland Road
Tuesday, September 18 at 7:30 p.m.


Larry Haupt, N Chairman, Boating Course
Fort Lauderdale Power Squadron


4. Elementary Seamanship
5. Charts and Aids to Navigation
6. Basic Navigation
7. Boat Trailering
8. Weather/Regional Boating
9. Engine Trouble-shooting
10. Sail
11. Piloting
Built within these topics you'll find boat handling under
adverse conditions, common emergencies, compass
use and some Squadrons explain river or canal
aspects.
Most Squadrons give one night a week for twelve
sessions including a final examination which is graded
at national headquarters and sent back to you. Many.
squadrons give special effort to the student learning
how to pilot a cruise on a chart. Some places have two
nights a week, for six weeks.
The Advanced Grades Program of USPS has numerous
excellent elective courses. These are posted to the
members' certificate as completed. One gets a lot;
inexpensive compared to commerical schools. Some
Squadrons even train you for a Coast Guard Captain's
License. The activity of USPS is indeed fellowship and
pleasure boating (other than its public education and
safety campaigns). The Squadrons have far more
members than a Flotilla; frequently 200 to 500 persons
(many not very active), compared to the 45 to 75 (most
of whom engage in two or more of the USCGAUX
operational functions).


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"""






WATRFRONT NEWS IING
SALN


THE SURPLUS AIR SEXTANT
By James E. Sullivan
Seafarers have often been drawn into discussions
concerning the navigational value of air sextants in
marine navigation. Two common notions lace through
these exchanges; one that the surplus air sextant can
be had at a bargain, and two, since the air sextant uses
an artificial horizon (the bubble) sights of a celestial
body can be made at any time, day or night. This article
will examine the construction, accuracy, and the
possible use of the air sextant at sea. Technically air
sextants are octants but are customarily referred to as
sextants and I will do so here.
The idea that the air sextant can be bought on the cheap
is no longer true. For several years following WWII a
surplus air sextant in operating condition could be
purchased for $15 to $25. Today these same
instructments sell $250 to $1,000 or more and as time
goes by they will certainly increase in .value as
collectors seek them as American items. These are
working instruments with a useable bubble. Air
sextants, because of their construction with "less
noble" materials are subject to galvanic corrosion and
when exposed to salt-water moisture could seize up
locking the gear-train and counters solidly in place.
These are costly to repair and are best made into lamp
bases. The most common failure of air sextants is the
loss of the bubble usually due to aging. Bargains in
surplus air sextants can still be found but so can
bargains in used marine sextants if persistence and
diligence are the watchwords.
The second notion that observations can be made at
any time must be closely examined. Bubble sextants do
not 'provide satisfactory results aboard vessels
because of the large acceleration errors made by the
motion of the vessel causing the bubble to dance
erratically. A considerable amount of practice is
needed to develop skill in using a bubble horizon even
on solid land. On land the best an air sextant can do is
about 2 minutes (2 miles) of accuracy while a marine
can be read to two tenths of a minute. With a smooth
sea the accuracy of an air sextant is 5 to 10 minutes,
with a light chop 15 to 30 minutes, and with a heavy sea
the bubble is unmanageable and observations are
impossible. I have experimented with bubble chambers
by replacing the fluid (pentane or zylene) with a
heavier viscosity fluid (castor oil) to dampen the
bubble's motion. I found no difference in control.




15 Years Experience On
The Gold Coast .

canvas

workshop p,
FAST --- DEPEND E
BIMINI TOPS. DODGERS. FULL COVERS.
ENCLOSURES. ETC.
St AVNO BROWARD AND PALM BkACH COUNTIES
2050M TIGERTAIL BLVD. DANIA. FL 33004
STEVE HUBBARD (305) 920-0162


As a youngster I first used a bubble sextant navigating
PAA inc. S-51 flying boats out of Dinner Key Florida.lhe
instrument was a link A-12. I was never able to make
accurate sightings with this sextant because of the
yaw and pitch of the flying boat. A line navigator
named Melvin showed me how to use his marine
sextant to make observations on the sun and moon.
The results were excellent even with a correction for
dip at 45 to 55 minute. Upon turning 19, I was
commissioned a 2nd Lt. and was immediately posted to
the 8th Air Force as a bomber navigator. My newly
issued bubble sextant was a Fairchild A-10 fitted with
an averaging device that did improve sighting
accuracy but it never approached Melvin's marine
sextant.
fluf* __ -


A IO.A -ro,
The air sextant with its need for precision lenses can be
compared to a camera and it was the camera and
optical firms such as Ansco, Fairchild,.Bausch and
Lomb, Kollsman, etc., that made most of the bubble
sextants. The key to the air sextant is its bubble
chamber. The bubble is formed in a transparent
chamber filled with a liquid except for a small air
bubble. The bubble is sized by an adjustment knob that
is turned to increase or decrease the bubbles size, about
the size of a pencil's diameter. The upper wall of the
chamber is a concave lens. The bubble floats against
this concave surface seeking the highest point. When
at its highest point the sextant is level and any
movement of the sextant moves the bubble off center.
/


tb.l 4-- to eh.,bbr vi
body o..r U,. bob',1..


A


I I


WhbbL. Sr.


Opt-LC Path of o hr anl 5'ze b ( g~rtl y .p^Uft.d )
To illustrate the bubble method, of providing an artificial
horizon imagine an empty pocket watch case with its
crystal in place to be completely filled with water
except for a small bubble of air. When the case is held
level the bubble will rise to the center of the curved
crystal. Conversely if the case is not held level the
bubble will be on one side or the other but may be
recentered again by leveling the watch case. Now
transfer this action to the deck of a sailboat and the
problem of using a bubble sextant becomes very
apparent.


A.14 (AN 585Y.11 )S.,t,


To use the bubble feature of the air sextant center the
bubble in the chamber and bring the body up or down
until it is behind or alongside (laterally) the centered
bubble. Record the time and read the altitude from the
counter or the average dial. There is no dip correction
to be applied and the correction for the sun is taken
from the star and planet column. An outstanding
feature found on some air sextants is their ability to
provide a visible (ses) horizon independent of the
bubble to measure altitude. It works exactly like the
marine sextant and the same corrections are applied.
With this feature the best of two worlds can be had;
using the natural horizon during the day and the bubble
horizon during the night.
Note: The world's largest private collection of bubble sextants will be
put on display by the Waterfront News at the Ft. Lauderdale boat
show.

HEADHUNTER

Marine Plumbing Specialists
Confidential Custom Plumbing for Any Purpose

9a. W. "Me el" Mellieger
Headhunter inc.
of Fort Lauderdale
1412 South Andrews Avenue

Manufacturers of Royal Flush Custom Jet Heads
Recreational Bidets (305) 525-HEAD
Gold Decorator Fixtures (305) 527-1935


PROFESSIONAL AUTO GROOMING I
CAR SPA
HAND WASH & WAX
COMPLETE DETAILING
S ,* -.. CARPET SHAMPOOING
ENGINE CLEANING
SPICK-UP & DELIVERY

1700 E. Commercial Blvd.
928-0801 Ft. Lauderdale, FL 33334



SB IP L SINCE 1951
KIEIL
AUTO AIR CONDITIONING
SERVICE and REPAIRS ON ALL MAKES
KEL Rebuilt Compressors
SOLD OUTRIGHT and INSTALLED
*'6 .r .! c "" 2: i
2010 S. Andrews Ave.
JOHN W. PROSJE Ft. Lauderdale, FL 33316
President 305-524-1169/763-8596


MOOR KIN
The ultimate mooring system


AS SHOWN IN

yachting


WRITE FOR MORE DETAI
MOOR KING
2240 N.E. 62ND COURT
FT. LAUDERDALE, FL 333
PHONE (305) 491-757


* HEAVY & STANDARD
MODELS AVAILABLE
* EFFECTIVE IN WINDS *
TO 100 M.P.H.


YACHTINO/July 1984


Gadgets & Gilhickies
by Jack Smith
Mooring arms
Two impressive mooring arms made by Moor King
ILS TO: hold.off J.J. Curran's 11 meter Trojan at his
Ocean Reef Club home on Key Largo-Fla.
108 EFFECTIVE ON ALL TYPES OF
70 BOATS FROM 16 FEET TO 92 FEET
ELIMINATES OUTSIDE DOCK SEAWALL, MARINA &
PILING CONSTRUCTION PILING INSTALLATIONS
ALL STAINLESS STEEL ELIMINATES SHALLOW
TELESCOPIC SPRING LOADED WATER PROBLEMS









September 15-October 15. 1984


BROWARD'S NEWEST SAILING
CLUB LAUNCHED-IN A
SWIMMING POOL
Fort Lauderdale, FI-The Fort Lauderdale Yacht and
Sailing Club, Inc., has been formally launched-in the
sheltered waters of a motel swimming pool.
At a pool party for the Broward County Young
Republicans at the Sherwood Motel Tiki Hut, the first
membership in the new club was awarded when
Christine Holod, vice president of FLYSC, drew the
name of 24 year old Bob Finch of Margate.
Finch, the Finance Director of Congressman Clay
Shaw's re-election campaign, was still slightly damp
when his winning number was called. He received a
plaque proclaiming him Member #1, as well as
receiving a year's free membership in the new club. His
previous sailing experience came at summer camp;
however, he will be participating in the sailing lessons
offered to all new members.
President Lee Garson, who is also president and owner
of Fantasy Charters, has been an active sailor for 25
years. He realized a need for a club such as this because
"too many people who like to sail can't get into it
due to the high cost of boat ownership and
maintenance." This club will make sailing available to
people from all walks of life.
At most sailing clubs the members own their own
boats. With the Fort Lauderdale Yacht and Sailing Club
the members will simply rent them at reduced rates,
and the club has the worries of maintenance, dockage
and insurance.
The FLYSC will offer its members use of yachts at
reduced prices, instruction in small craft handling at a
nominal fee, competitive races, planned flotillas to the
Bahamas and Keys, and an active program of
socializing for people with shared interests. The social
program will include club meetings, sailing lectures,
films, slide shows and barbeques.
One distinctive feature will be the Club's Sailing Buddy
service, designed to match up members who need
sailing partners for planned cruises. Members will be
classified according to age, marital status, number of
children, and preference for day or weekend sailing.
A one-time initiation fee of $695 is charged, $395 for
winter residents who will be here no more than six
months each year. Annual dues are $180, for snowbirds
$100.
To get the club off to a fast start, it is making a special
pre-club opening offer for all members who join before
September 1, 1984. For these "charter members" the
club will waive the first year's annual dues.
The Fort Lauderdale Yacht and Saing Club is
headquartered at the Bahia Mar Marina at 801
Seabreeze Avenue. Telephone number is 761-8845.


MARINE TRIVIA
by Bryan Henry
New Hampshire has the shortest coastline of any state,
18 miles long.
The Amazon River gathers waters along its whole
length from hundreds of feeder streams, some larger than
the Mississippi.
More than half of the coastline of the entire United
States is in Alaska.
If converted to electricity, the energy released by a
single hurricane in one day would power the United States
for three years.
The world's largest lake is the Caspian Sea, the second
largest is Lake Superior.
The Pacific is the oldest ocean; the South Atlantic is the
youngest.
Water is about 700 times more resistant than air.
The Atlantic Bay scallop has as many as 100 eyes.
If a starfish is cut in half, each half will become a new
starfish.
The squid, oyster, clam, scallop, and conch are all
related they are mollusks.
Alligators have brains the size of a dime, but a jaw
pressure ranging to 1,000 pounds.
Anyone can swim or float more easily in salt water than
in fresh water because salt water is heavier, having
greater buoyancy.

(305) 584-6361

^cuglas
u2larine Pplolstcring
ALL KINDS OF VINYL.&
OTHER FABRICS
500 S.W. 21 Terr.
Bay 108A
Patio, Bars & Stools Ft. Lauderdale. FL33312


U I ,IaI


new issues please call :

or send coupon below -
name
Address
I city/state
I phone
AlII inquiries must have phone*


T! LVA0111 R.- "ariur U'loobuva rk I lq
S:'rCtAI l NG IN COMPLETE
RIFS1'OAIITONS DO(CKSIDF O0
S DRYDOCK TEAK DFCKING IOF
RAILS MAhINF FUI41rLJRE *-INTEMfOR.
EA11(411I0GH DESIGN'

RICHARD GIAMBI, 3 ;W)
(305 8 J 533


OFFICE 1500 S.W. 17th St.
(305) 525-4726 Ft. Lauderdale, FL 33312

SUMMERFIELD
BOAT WORKS INC.
Complete Marine Repairs
TOM CORRELL PAUL WHITE
Manager Asst. Manager





Rough & Finish Work Fiberglass Repairs
S Teak & Mahogany Brtrework

A 3 All MARINE
Marine Carpentry .Company
SNo Job Too Large or Too Small -

MIKE McDONNELL 2955 St. Rd 84
ADRIANO NETO Ft. Lauderdale. Fia
(305) 587-8435 Bldg. C-6 33315


JimR Mollica
registered rep.


561-2601


Comstock Investment
3015 N. OCEAN BLVD. SUITE 108 1NC.
FT. LAUDERDALE, FLORIDA 33308 (305) 561-2601
Member: NASD, SIPC. (800) 521-2611


1 4910 N.E. 10th Ter.,
IANERS Ft. Lauderdale, Fla.



Have You Cleaned
Your Sails Lately?
Unsightly dirt, rust and oil can
damage your sails, affect their
performance and reduce their
longevity.
Here's five good reasons why The Sail
Cleaners should clean your sails:
1. We are the only sail cleaning facility
in South Florida.
2. Our plant has the most modern,
scientific method for treating sails.
3. We pick up and deliver.
4. We are licensed and insured.
5. Our prices are low and quality high.
Give your sails a new life.
Call 491-3327 for a free estimate.

THE SAIL CLEANERS


SUE WHELAN
Decoratqr
B.S., Saint Mary s College
Notre Dame, Indiana

Sue has 10 years of experience in the Marine
Field, and has been with D.S. Hull Co., and
Cable Marine, Inc. for 5 years.
Sue's involvement locally in the Marine
Industry includes Serving on the Board of
Chamber of Commerce Marine Task Force
and Board of Governor's Gulfstream Sailing
Club. She has also published articles which
appeared in the South Florida Sailor, New
River Times and The Waterfront News.


Quality Yacht

Interiors...


Quality Marine Interior work requires
experience on and around boats as well as a
knowledge of fabric and color.
Sue Whelan, a 25 year resident of South
Florida, has owned and operated both power
and sail. She is familiar with the effects of sun,
sand and salt. Whether your vessel is a sport
fish, a charter boat, family cruiser or used for
elaborate entertaining each is carefully
considered.
A large Fabric and Carpeting showroom is
open 7 days a week at Cable Marine East. This
convenient location eliminates the expense of
outside contractors. Custom woodworking,
painting, appliance and accessory purchases
and repairs are available on the premises.
Cable Marine, Inc.
1517 Southeast 16th Street
Fort Lauderdale, Florida 33316
(305) 462-2822


Is there an unknown brokerage house

that could help you add substantially

to your growth-performance record?

For free Information on Lower-priced O.T.C. Securities and


m





11ATERFRONT NEWS
14


THE BULLETIN BOARD


SEVEN SEAS CRUISING ASSOCIATION
Box 2190, Covington, LA 70434
Phone: (504) 892-3096
WOMEN's YACHT RACING ASSOCIATION- for
more information contact April Moore,
President, at 1-856-8216, or in Bro-
ward call Leanne Williams at 973-7892.

MANATEE DAY- Come join us at "Mana-
tee Day'celebration of the life of
manatees on Sun., Nov. 4th at Port
Everglades from 10 AM 5 PM. The
day's activities will include live
entertainment, a manatee art show,
exhibits, films, manatee experts
from around the state, food and much
more. A fun day for all! If your or-
ganization would like to become in-
volved, call Broward Audibon Soc.
Manatee Day Director @ 523-4095.


SSSOUTHWEST LAUNDRY
IThe Best &.Friendliest Yacht Service
in Town. PICK UP & DELIVER, all for
Only 60 per pound (minimum 10 lb,).
All Folded with Shirts and Pants on
lHangers. We also do DRY CLEANING at
competitive prices. -1 K
21 SW 7th St. 9 7)
Ft. Lauderdale 761-9768
t. audWzrwaih


r L a hu. ; i ... .' .. ,-.
* -g. r ForAul Yaou Expert Printing
S. .Callus'.-'-.


-- -


P riing Cents r
320 S.W. 2dr.Stqt, t LLuderde, Ft 33312 763-8849


CABLE
MARINE
INC.


CELESTIAL NAVIGATION COURSE- BCC
Tuesday Eves. 7-9:30 PM, Central
Campus. Instructor: James Sullivan.
Call Broward Community Col. 475-6600


Ft. Laud. HISTORICAL SOCIETY
219 SW 2nd Ave, 463-4431


SAILBOAT FISHING TOURNAMENT
Rescheduled to November 10th (Bad
Weather Date: Nov. 17). Reasons for
change: Better fishing, Cooler Weath-
er and better winds. Committee mtg.
on Tuesday at 5:30 p.m. in Pompano
Contact Patrick O'Donnell @
941-4474 or 491-3490.

BOATING, SAFETY & SEAMANSHIP CLASS
USCGAUX Flot. #32, 601 Seabreeze
Mon. & Thu. nights, 8-10 PM, 10SEP-
110CT, FREE (pay for text only).
Call Coast Guard Aux, @ 463-0034.


LOCAL NOTICE TO MARINERS
DRAWBRIDGE CLOSURES DURING HURRICANE
SEASON- During the Hurricane Season
(through 30 november) drawbridges
along the coast can be expected to
close when the U.S. Weather Bureau
posts gale warnings for expected
winds of 34 knots. If, due to extreme
weather conditions, a bridge can
only operate safely in winds of less
force, an earlier closure may be
experienced. Mariners should antici-
pate the closure by listening to
the National Weather Service and
Coast Guard Broadcasts on hurricane
conditions. Because of the uncertain-
ty of hurricane movements, mariners
are urged to seek passage through
drawbridges well in advance of the
arrival of gale force winds.
Private Aid Discontinued. MIAMI AVE.
North Obstruction Light (LLNR 854)
has been discontinued and the struc-
ture has been removed. Charts: 11465,
11467, 11468, 11466, 11451; LLPG: 82
Port Everglades Lighted Whistle Buoy
#1- Off Station, Charts: 11466,11470
BNM: 1880-84, LLNR/LLPg.: 69/807.
Hillsboro River Light 73- Destroyed
TRLB, Chart: 11467, BNM: 0076-84-MIA
LLNR/LLPg.: 4139.50/391.
Special Bridge Regulations: The
West span of the SUNNY ISLES draw-
bridge, mile 1078 will open each
hour on the hour only from 0700 to
1800 local time Monday through Fri-
day to facilitate repairs. The East


BOTTOM PAINTING SPECIALS ;


We'll clean and paint your. bottom cheaper than you can do
yourself...


Power/Sail


Power/Sail


Power/Sail


Paint Under 40 Ft. 41 Ft. 59 Ft. 60 Ft. Plus
Bottom Coat $7.OPer Ft. $7.50 Per Ft. $ 8 00 Per Ft.
* Vlnylux $8.00Per Ft. $8.75 Per Ft. $ 1025 Per Ft.
* Unlpoxy $8.50 PerFt. $9.25 Per Ft. $ 10.75 PerFt.
Aboue includes haul-out and pressure cleaning.
Scraping of heavily fouled bottom extra.


NOW THREE FULL

SERVICE LOCATIONS

FT. LAUDERDALE
2491 HIGHWAY 84
305-587-4000
80 TON LFT
PALM BEACH GARDENS
it PGA BLVD.& INTRACOASTAL
305-627-0440
00 TON LIFT
FT. LAUDERDALE
1517 8E 16 ST
462-2822
40 TON LIFT


HEADHUNTER
Marine Plumbing Specialists
Confidential Custom Plumbing for Any Purpose

Bruce Logan
Headhunter inc.
of Fort Lauderdale
1418 South Andrews Avenue

Manufacturers of Royal Flush Custom Jet Heads
Recreational Bidets (305) 525-HEAD
Gold Decorator Fixtures (305) 527-1935



PETER HARRISON



B & B DOCK & DECK


2320 SOUTHWEST 36th AVE.
FT. LAUDERDALE, FLA. 33312 565-0454



2413 SUGARLOAF LANE FT LAUDERDALE FLORIDA33312
587-4326


b Mobilized Air
AIR CONDITIONING REFRIGERATION
JOHN BASSO
RESIDENTIAL COMMERCIAL


INSTALLATION
SALES & SERVICE

CHARLES LEE
MARINE


FEQIHilnDried BURMA TEAK
Qualty, Service and Price
Make us your best choice



COMPANY

Piece to a 1,000 pieces
6851 S.W. 21Ct.
Davie. FL 33317 472-1155
span remains in the closed position
unable to open. At all other times
the West span will operate normally.
Ref.: BNM 1918-84-CCGD7, Chart: 11467
CG Files: 2229.


Dredging Operations- Delray Beach:
Dredging operations for beach reclam-
ation will commence on or about Aug-
ust 22, 1984 in the vicinity of Del-
ray Beach, Florida and continue un-
til November 1984. The borrow area
in use will be marked with yellow
buoys with flashing yellow lights
and are boaunded by the following
coordinates: 26-27-26N 80-02-52W,
26-27-27N 80-03-01W, 26-26-54N 80-
03-07W, 26-26-53-53N 80-02-58W.
Submerged pipelines will run between
the following approximate coordinates
26-2711N 80-03-08W, 26-27-29N 80-03-
30W.
The dredge ILLINOIS will be operating
on this project and will have a float
ing pipeline behind the dredge of up
to 2000 feet. This pipeline will be
marked with yellow flashing lights
and will have two vertically spaced
red lights where it meets the riser
pipe from the submerged pipeline.
Due to the presence of workboats,
barges, derricks, anchors, cables,
buoys, and pipelines in and around
these areas, all vessels are request-
ed to exercise caution while operat-
ing in the vicinity of the dredge
and to avoid setting anchors in and
around the work areas.
Ref: LNM 33-84; Charts: 11467,11466,
11460.


M-MILMR-- CI1)L Jt II








CLASSIFIED


September 1 5-October 15, 1984


DOCKAGE
ECONOMICAL MARINA- Live-aboard Dock-
age from $180/mo. Showers, Laundry,
Restaurant. DRY STORAGE for Small
Boats from $30/mo. 584-2500.
103 ISLE of VENICE So. Vista Marina
Apts Deepwater, sailboats for live-
aboard or storage. Cable t.v., phone,
laundry & shower. Call 491-2468.

LAUDERDALE ISLES- Deepwater, Any
Size sail or oower. No Live-aboard.
Water & 110 Avail. Call 584-5249.
SEA ISLAND- Off Las Olas Blvd.,
behind private home, quiet & secure.
Water & 110, $180/mo., to 36'. No
Live aboard. Brooks 761-8791.
N. FORK NEW RIVER- Power or Sail,
51' Depth, Water/Elec., up to 50',
No Wake, 523-9351.



FOR SALE

TRADE or SELL, Best Offer, '75, 30'
CATALINA, Atomic 4, 4 Sails,$25,900
Radio & lots of extras. 462-3456
1983 Renken 20' Cuppy Cabin 2.6 litre
120 HP. OMC w/1984 Continental galv.
trailer low hrs., like new VHF radio,
search light $8750. O.B.O. must sell.
966-9867.

GENERATORS, New & Used Gas & Diesel,
With or Without Installation. Call
for Price REPOWER SYSTEMS 462-3894.

MG MIDGET, best offer call 524-9450.

WESTERBEKE- all new sailboat diesel
engines on sale, 10-100 HP. Call for
details REPOWER SYSTEMS 462-3894.
FOR SALE- Close-in, DUPLEX. Ea. Apt.:
2 bdrm Full bath, Living Rm., Large
Eat-in Kitchen & Util. Rm. Call for
appointment 462-0664 (after 7 PM)
763-8849 (9 AM.- 5 PM).
FLOATING HOME, on New River, cptd
liv rm & br, oak flr kitch, tiled
bath, cptd 44x12 rec area w/bar &
patio furn. Furnished, w/covered
boat port & 135 HP, 18' bow rider.
Six mos free dockage. All for
$24,500. Call 764-1078.
WESTERBEKE 4-107 Marine Diesel 40 HP
2:1 gear, $1995. REPOWER SYSTEMS
462-3894.
LORAN C, Micrologic 1000, 110 AC,
Benchtest O.K., $400. 524-2439 or
523-8540.
STAINLESS STEEL FIRE EXTINGUISHER
TANKS- 2.5 gal. capacity, $10 each
584-5143.
1973 Lyman, 24' Complete Fishing
gear, out riggers, all new covers,
radio, depthsounders. Any sensible
offer. Call 525-6221.
Will Sell One
3KW FWL ONAN:
Unit in use
$1400.
S NEW UNIT $2800
Leave phone
number at:
462-7334

GREATER FORT LAUDERDALE BOARDSAIL-
ING ASSOC. meets every 3rd thursday
of the month at the patio bar of the
Riverside Hotel on Las Olas Blvd. at
7:30 pm. For more info call 463-7819.


HELP WANTED
INDEPENDENT PAPER CARRIERS needed!
Monthly delivery routes from Dania
to. Lighthouse Point. Call 524-9450.

MARINE REFRIGERATION ftECH. 764-6192
Man 25 or over with boating back-
ground. Full-time around mainten-
ance work on yachts being readied
for sale. 566-3648 9 to 11 am.



MARINE SERVICES
MARINE PLUMBER- Reasonable Kates.
Call 462-6308.
James Sullivan professes a knowledge
of CELESTIAL NAVIGATION, LORAN-C, &
PREP. for USCG OPERATORS LICENSE.
.Will teach same to seafarers for
$12. Call 462-2628.
PROFESSIONAL
TEAK SPECIALIST, Varnish & Yacht
Maintenance. Capt. Frank 525-6221.
Speak SPANISH or FRENCH in only 3
easy weeks, including MARINE Vocab.
INTERPRETING available. 564-6962 or
564-5822
REFRIGERATION A/C Repairs-
Installations, 12v-115v, Engine
Drive Systems. Cash-M/C-VISA-"Pay
as you go"- Do it yourself Equip-
ment Available.


CUSTOM REFRIGERATION 527-0540
527-4477.
RIVERSIDE BOAT REPAIR & SERVICES /
Mike's MARINE 3001 SR 84, Ft. Laud.
792-3660. WE DO IT ALL Dockside
Service Avail. Services & Repairs -
Gas & Diesel. Welding, Haul-out,
Canvas work, Painting, Carpentry,
SPECIAL BOTTOM PAINTING, Fibreglass
Electrical, IB/OB, Storage. Mon-Sat
NOTICE FREE Will haul away or re-
move your unwanted Boat or Yacht.
Call 782-6228.

Scotty's Marine Refinishing 26 yr.
exp. Marine Work. 10% off all labor
until 9/30/84. Phone Scotty 963-6746
PROFESSIONAL CAPTAIN- Will maintain
or deliver your yacht. Excellent
references. 10 yrs. exp. 523-9351.
PROFESSIONAL TEAK SPECIALIST
Varnish & Yacht Maintanance
Capt. Frank 525-6221


REAL ESTATE

Beaytiful WATERFRONT HOME for sale
off New River- 72' waterfront, 2
docks, water, elec., phone, pool,
fruit trees, immaculate, too much
to describe must see! Call 467-9763
after 7 pm.
4 BDRM 3 Bath, Dock (98' on New River)
NO Bridge to Port, Pool, No Agents
Please, H.L. Gibson, Trustee.
Call 305-781-8300.
S.W. near Marina Bay- 2 BDRM, Deep
water, lowest Price around $89,500
Dennis DeRolf, Realator, CENTURY III
Properties. 584-1400.
FOR SALE Close-in. DUPLEX, Each
Apt.: 2 bdrm, Full bath, Living Rm
Large eat-in kitchen & util. rm.,
Call for appointment: 462-0664 (af-
ter 7 PM)or 763-8849 9-5 (Carole).


(305) 462-5770 Ofc.
(305) 527-1304 Eves.: MLS.

ROBERT P. GARGANO
Lic. Florida Real Estate Broker REALTOR

S1700 E. Las Olas Blvd., Suite 204
.W Fort Lauderdale, Fla. 33301
-.... .....-. "


Specializing in Waterfront Real Estate
Living & Working on the New River
DEEPWATER HOMES & CONDOS

SOUTH NEW RIVER ISLES (Citrus)- Deep
water, 3 bdrm 2 bath, Central A/C -
Great Condition! 76' Lot w/ New 50'
Dock.
LANDINGS Price JUST REDUCED, Deepwater
3 bdrm 2 bath, Extra Spacious & Pri-
vate, BEST PRICED, Deepwater in the
Landings area.
NEW RIVER Deepwater Vacant Lot, Approx
0.4 Acre & 190' on river. Zoned R3A
(25 units/acre) Multi-family. Live-a-
boards permitted. Reasonable $135,000
RIVER REACH Dockage only $10/ft/yr
Golf*Tennis*Pools*Sauna*24hr Security
I. GREAT PRICE & OWNER FINANCING!!!
2 bdrm 2 bath corner Only $74,900.
II. 2 bdrm lI bath Great 3rd Floor
view overlooks Pool, Canal & Yachts
Only $73,900. Owner wants offers!
l I. Beautiful 2 bdrm 2 bath. 5th Fl
view overlooks Golf, Tennis & Canal


MANY OTHER WATERFRONT LISTINGS AVAIL.
"New wvateat ont LLitings needed;
I have qualified buyea !"
ROBERT P. GARGANO 462-5770 Ofc.
Lic. Real Estate Broker- Realtor. 527-1304 Eves.
I/ 1976- 2076

T. CENTURY s

min
PROPERTIES, INC.
6908 Cypress Road Plantation, Fla. 33317

Dennis J. DeRolf Broker/President
'JTTi,. DO'f-lI4U tve: I


WATERFRONT NEWS

ADVERTISING RATES:
Classifieds (35 Characters/Line)
First Line ................ $4.00
Each Additional Line ...... $3.00
Per Column Inch.............. $15.00
Business Card ................ $30.00
Minimum Art Set-Up Fee ....... $5.00
Insert Fee per 1000 ........... $15.00
(Maximum Size 8" x 11")
Call concerning Photos & Color

For more information call
524-9450
or stop by our office

ADVERTISING DEADLINE THE FIRST DAY
OF THE MONTH
CIRCULATION 15,000

WATERFRONT NEWS
320 S.W. 2nd Street
Ft. Lauderdale, FL 33312
Phone: (305) 524-9450


Office: 584-1400 EveB: 58(4-3735







SUNDAY


MONDAY


CGViU'7TY CLENDAR & TIDE TABLES


TUESDAY


WEDNESDAY


THURSDAY


FRIDAY


SATURDAY


16

September




TIDE +2.2'
T;ME 0726*1335*1956
TIDE +0.4' +0.9'

23







+2.8' +2.9'
0159*0752*1425*2022
+0.2' 0.0


17






+2.0' +2.1'
0134*0813*1426*2048
+0.5' +0.9


+3.0' +3.0'
0249*0845*1516*2100
0.0 -0.1'


LAST QUARTER MOON 18

USPS BOATING COURSE
7:30 pm @ New River
Mid. School. Wkly.
Ocean Sound Band @
Musicians' Exchange

+2.0' +2. 1
0226*0911*1530*2152
+0.5' +1.0


Moon in Perigee 25
NEW MOON
Moon on Equator

"CARIBBEAN/PANAMA
CANAL"(trovelog)
with Norm Zlatin
7:30 pm @ Margate
Library

+3.2' +3.1'
0338*0936*1606*2157
0.2' -0.2


Moon Farthest Northi
of Equator







+2.3' +2.2'
0332*1018*1636*2302
+0.5' +0.9


26
ATLANTEAN DRIFTWOOD
BAND (Jazz) at
Musician's Exchange
Survival in the 80's
Tactics for Small
Business, noon-6pm
Pompano Chamber of
Commerce
+3.2' +3.0'
0426*1026*1655*2243
-0. -n 1


20







+2.1' +2.3' TIDE
0444*1127*1742 TME
+0 4' TIDE


27







+3.2' +2.9'
0514*1116*1743*2331
-n 'A n n


21
KILIMANJARO (Jazz)
@ Musician Exch.
thru-22nd




+2.3' +2.5'
0007*05554*1234*1840
+n 71 -n i'


28
Ocean Sound Band @
Musician Exchange
thru 29th




TIDE +3.1'
TIME 0603*1208*1834
T ine _> so i n n


SEPTEMBER EQUINOX 22
Kid's Dog Show a
Plantation Caomnity
Center 10 an




+2.5' +2.7'
0106*0654*1330*1932
a.n c .in i


29
Jr. Hardcourt State
Tennis Championship
Geo. English Park.
Call 761-2609




+2,8' +2.9'
0021*0654*1303*1928
_n ,. n t",


30 October


4EW RIVER RAFT RACE
2 Marshall Bridge
7t. Lauderdale.
:all 791-0202 (J-C's)



+2.6' +2.7'
0112*0748"1401*2027


First Quarter Moon
Moon Farthest South
of Equator




+2.4' +2.5'
0210*0848*1503*2133


Moon in apogee


+2,4' +2.5'
0215*0805*1431*2023
+0.6' +0.6'


+2.5' +2.5'
0249*0845*1508*2058
+0.5' +0.5'


2







+2.2' +2.3'
0313*0953*1612"2243


Moon on Equator
FULL MOON


+2.6' +2.6'
0323*0918*1543*2130
+0.4' +0.5'


3







+2.1' +2.3'
0427"1103*1722*2349


10







+2.7' +2.6
0356*0953*1618*2200
+0. +0.5'


Triathlon Series at
C.B. Smith Pcrk,
Patbrook Pines
Call 474-7921


+2.1' +2.3'
0535*1208*1817


11







+2.7 +2.5'
0428*1028*1651*2233
+0. +0.A


+2.2' +2.41
0047*0634*1303*1907


12
LEO KOTKE (folk-rock'
@ Musician's Exch.





+2.7' +2.4'
0500*1104*1727*2305
+0 I' + 7'


+2.3' +2.4'
0135*0723*1349*1947
+0 7'


TIDE
TIME
TIDE









TIDE
TIME
TIDE









TIDE
TIME
Tinc


-l in""


+2.6' +2.4'
0534*1139*1803*2338


14 15 EASTERN DAYLIGHT SAVINGS TIME TIME ADJUSTMENTS FOR TIDE TABLE
BASELINE: ANDREWS BRG. @ MEAN LOW High Water Low Watei
Hillsboro Inlet----------- -31 minutes -50 min.
Saf zt Bahia Mar----------------- -20 min. -18 min.
Port Everglades Inlet----- -45 min. -62 min.
N e__WS Playboy (Dania Cut-Off)--- +45 min. +28 min.
TIDE +2.5' +2.3' ,2.4i TIDE Summerfield (S.F. New R.)- +40 min. +40 mi
TiME 0611*1219*1841 0016*0651'1306*1927 TIME
TIDE +0.4' +0.9 +0.5' +1.0' TTIDE


I_ L_ I I ,_I I I- I


"' '" '


11 nF n 1, n n 1- *0 L,"