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Waterfront news
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00072837/00004
 Material Information
Title: Waterfront news
Physical Description: Serial
Language: English
Publisher: Ziegler Pub. Co.
Place of Publication: Ft. Lauderdale Fla
Creation Date: June 1, 1984
Frequency: monthly
regular
 Subjects
Genre: periodical   ( marcgt )
serial   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Broward -- Fort Lauderdale
Coordinates: 26.135833 x -80.141944 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 1, issue 9 (Nov. 15-Dec. 15, 1984); title from cover.
Funding: Funded in part by the University of Florida, the Library Services and Technology Assistance granting program of Florida, the State Library and Archives of Florida, and other institutions and individuals.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 11455814
lccn - sn 84001937
issn - 8756-0038
System ID: UF00072837:00004

Table of Contents
    Cover
        Cover
    Main
        Page 1
    Main: Community News
        Page 2
        Page 3
    Main: Sailing
        Page 4
        Page 5
    Main: Power Boating
        Page 6
        Page 7
    Main: Waterfront Heritage
        Page 8
    Main continued
        Page 9
    Main: Fishing
        Page 10
        Page 11
    Main: Diving
        Page 12
        Page 13
    Main continued
        Page 14
    Main: Classifieds
        Page 15
    Main: Community Calendar & Tide Tables
        Page 16
Full Text


Volume 1 Issue 4


June 15-July 15, 1984 \
Circulation 15,000



erf011


NCWS


What's Inside
Community Calendar
Tide Table
Live-aboards
Sea Turtles
Beach Symposium
Celestial Navigation
Food From Your Galley


20O S.W. 2nd St Fort Louderdiole F 'l,(J( 53312 (305) 524-9450


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WATERFRONT NEWS


June 15-July 15, 1984


Volume 1 Issue 4


BEACH SYMPOSIUM


MAY 11- 14

Over 100 people, all interested in the Fort Lauderdale Beach area, met
for 2 days to discuss the future of the beach. This following statement
and recommendations reflect the general consensus of the group.
However, it should not be assumed that every individual participant
agrees with every recommendation.

FINAL STATEMENT
The beach area of Fort Lauderdale is not meeting the residential,
economic, social, or recreational needs of the community. A series of
problems were cited as keeping the beach from being a good place to
live, work, socialize and recreate. These problems center on an image
crime, the presence of "undesirables" or transients, parking and traf-
fic, and litter. The area lacks a positive identity due to a lack of aesthetic
quality, conflicts between residential, tourist and business interests, and
a failure of the various interests to come together as a community.
There needs to be more outlets for active recreational activities. The
resources of the area are greatly underutilized with the result that there
is limited appeal to both tourists and residents. An inadequately bal-
anced social structure which fails to appeal to all elements of society
has resulted in an abandonment of the area by the community and
declining tourism. These factors, in turn, have led to increasing blight in
the area. The absence of any direction by either the public or the private
sector has led to the area drifting downward at an ever increasing rate.
Attractions which make use of and complement the association with the
water, both the intracoastat and the ocean, will make the area a better
place to work and play.
Fort Lauderdale needs to diversify its tourist economy by promoting
tourism at times other than 'Spring Break." Spring Break is adequately
promoted at this time. Therefore, the public and private sector should
target their promotional efforts at other groups during the remainder of
the year. In order to attract family and business visitors, several fun-
damental changes must be made in the beach area. First, establish an
identity which capitalizes on the natural environment in conjunction with
enhanced social and cultural opportunities. Second, the area must be
cleaned up and attention given to signage and landscaping. Third, a well
located conference facility is needed to support business tourism. This
facility should be supported by high quality hotels, shops and
restaurants which key on the "Venice of America" theme, making use
of the year-round climate.
Fort Lauderdale Beach has an image of being an area of high crime
rates. This is more perception than reality. However, perceptions are
what people react to, and this perception must be addressed. The pro-
blem of the crime image will be eliminated if the community and family
tourists return to the beach and displace the undesirable element and
this should be the ultimate goal of the area.
There is not sufficient economic stimulus for investment in redevelop-
ment programs. Additionally, the state of decline of certain areas re-
quires that large scale projects be undertaken. Fragmented ownership of
small parcels impedes the necessary land assembly. Therefore, some
public land assembly program is needed in order to promote private
redevelopment. Innovative zoning techniques, including site plan review,
should be utilized to encourage redevelopment, articulated style, land-
scaping and a greater mix of commercial and tourist uses. The groups
were evenly split on whether there should be a greater mix of residential


S. : .





uses in the beach area. There was a minority position that there should
be no additional residential development and all existing residential
areas in the tourist core area be made nonconforming uses and phased
out over time. There was some sentiment for tax abatement and tax in-
crement financing programs as a means to encourage desirable
redevelopment.
The existing transportation and parking system in the tourist core area
are functionally inadequate, and the system itself is incapable of effi-
cient performance due to poor design. The first priority of the transporta-
tion system in the tourist core area should be the enhancement of the
visitor experience rather than the efficient movement and storage of
automobiles. Alternative transit systems such as water taxis, bike
paths, a promenade and trams or trolley cars are better alternatives to
be utilized. In the long term, parking along the east side of A-1-A in the
tourist core should be eliminated. In the short term, parking along A-1 -A
should be restricted There was sentiment for sunset, 8:00 p.m. and
10:00 p.m., as the time when this parking would be prohibited. There
was a majority in support of one-way pairing of A-1-A with Birch and
Seabreeze. The minority position was against one-way pairing.
The aesthetic quality of the beach area is not what it should be. The
area lacks adequate landscaping, buildings are outdated and poorly
maintained, and there is visual pollution in the form of garish signs and
l,:ter. The building codes wera felt to be adequate, but enforcement of
the code weak due to a lack of city staff and public commitment. A
stronger commitment from local businesses and civic groups, to bring
poorly maintained buildings to the attention of city staff, is needed. The
litter problem is of such magnitude that increased efforts are clearly
necessary. It is unrealistic to assume that the private sector alone will
solve this problem. The essence of all this is pride of ownership. The


SEA TURTLES:

A SAGA OF THE SEA

The ponderous female sea turtle cautiously lumbers out
of the ocean and onto the moonlit beach. For the past
several years she has been safe in the ocean's depths,
her enormous size a deterrent to all predators save the
shark.
Now, on land, she is completely vulnerable to her only
real enemy man. If not captured by poachers while
struggling to cross the beach, the sea turtle will dig a hole
in the sand with her hind flippers and lay more than a hun-
dred eggs. While laying, the turtle sighs and weeps salty
tears which rinse the sand from her eyes and rid the body
of excess salts. Afterwards she will cover her eggs with
sand in an attempt to protect them.
But as she drags herself back toward the ocean, her
giant shell leaves a telltale path in the sand. If she is
lucky, she will plunge back into the sea before poachers
(who prize her oil, leather, shell, meat and cartilage)
discover and slaughter her.
And when the morning sun rises, her tractor-like tracks
widely advertise the location of her eggs that are in
danger from poachers who comb the beach in search of
the vulnerable (and valuable) nests.
If not discovered during the next five to six weeks by
poachers or by natural predators such as raccoons or-
feral hogs, each embryo grows from a mass of cells into
fully developed little sea turtles who use their temporary
"egg teeth" to scratch a hole in the thick shell. Once half
out of their shells, the tiny turtles rest for several days,
conserving their energies for the great escape.


area property owners and the city should join together to encourage this
pride.
The beach area and its businesses should be upgraded to attract local
residents on a year-round basis. If the residents are satisfied with the
facilities, tourism will naturally follow. Activities and events should be
planned and promoted to attract both residents and tourists throughout
the year.


SPECIFIC RECOMMENDATIONS
The following recommendations received majority support. However,
it must be recognized that nothing can happen as long as the water and
sewer moratorium continues. Therefore, it follows that the steps to
remove the moratorium must be immediately undertaken.
The highest priority for recommended immediate action concerned
restricting parking along the east side of A-1-A, moving toward the total
elimination of parking on A-1 -A as soon as parking areas near the beach
become available. There was strong sentiment for the immediate re-
moval of parking on A-1-A without regard to replacing lost parking
spaces. The cost to implement the parking restriction, which involves
the replacement of signs, is to be borne by Broward County. The second
priority was granted to the movement of traffic on A-1-A, which, along
with Birch Road and Seabreeze, should be made one-way. The state
Department of Transportation shall bear the cost of modifying these
state roads. To make the beach area a destination rather than a
thoroughfare, a landscaped promenade, including bikeways and several
small, easily maintained public restrooms was assigned the third priori-
ty. Costs should be equitably distributed between property owners and
the city by seeking an Urban Waterfront Redevelopment Grant. The TDC
should be encouraged to devote a portion of locally generated funds
toward permanent tourist oriented facilities such as those proposed
above.
The fourth priority concerned improving the overall image of the
beach, including the elimination of blighted areas and litter. To ac-
complish this objective, a beach redevelopment program and the de-
signation of a redevelopment area under the authority of the City of Fort
Lauderdale should be established.
The first element of the redevelopment activity should be the
construction of a conference center and attendant parking facilities. The
conference center would be complementary with convention facilities
developed by other entities outside the beach area. The conference
center parking would be dual purpose, for both the facility as well as
replacement for beachside A-1-A parking spaces eliminated pursuant to
recommendation number one. The city's responsibilities will at least in-
volve the assembling of the site and some bonding mechanism to pay
the costs of assembling the site. A method of partially financing this pro-
gram would be the sale of the city's Alhambra parking lot, which would
3e replaced by the parking available at the conference facility. Revenue
derived from the sale would facilitate the construction of the conference
center parking. Innovative funding for the construction and operation of
the facility should be investigated. Private Sector investment should not
be ignored, and the inclusion of retail space for lease to private business
would make the proejct more economically feasible. Within the
redevelopment area, the city should make better use of R4C zoning, with
special emphasis around the conference facility.
The fifth priority concerned the assignment of beach areas to
segregate active and passive uses. There should be no cost in
implementing this recommendation.
The sixth priority was the city's acquisition of management rights of
Birch State Park from the state for active recreational use. This cost
shall be borne by the city.
The final priority to address the beach area's image of crime concern-
ed the use of beach rangers to patrol the beach and prevent nuisances
and minor infractions of ordinances. The cost will be borne by the city.


Several nights later the two ounce hatchlings frantically
batter their way to the surface until the sandy roof caves
in, and together they steer a desperate course directly for
the ocean they have never before seen.
It is estimated that only one in ten thousand eggs sur-
vive to become adult turtles, and, in fact, many of the new-
born turtles are picked off by natural predators such as
ghost crabs before they ever reach the water. And once
they are swept into the sea, sharks, bluefish, mackerel,
and other species will make a meal out of the unsusper'
ing little turtles.
No one knows where the surviving young turtles go dur-
ing the first year of their life. Scientists call this the "lost
year." In fact, there is much about sea turtles that still re-
mains a mystery to us. No one knows how long they live,
although estimates range up to fifty years. It is believed
that turtles develop a homing instinct to return to the
place of their birth as some fish do to spawn. But we do
not know how they do it.
And we may never know. For six of the seven species
of sea turtles are being driven to the very brink of extinc-
tion. It is our last chance to save these unique, prehistoric
creatures of the sea from the ignorance and greed of the
newer species man.
Courtesy of the Weak of the Ocean and the US Turtle Rece Fund







2-

EDITOR'S MAILBRG


Dear Editor:
The City Commissioners of the City of
Fort Lauderdale recently announced
that they are in agreement with the
plan of the current management (les-
sors) of Bahia Mar to fill in approx-
imately 26 slips in the north basin
in order to build a 400 room hotel
and parking garage. In order to com-
pensate for the loss of slips, add-
itional slips would be constructed
following Army Corps of Engineers
approval of the proposed plan. The
total number of slips to be lost,
given permission to build new, is
"about 6 to 10".

Given Bahia Mar's feelings toward sup-
porting our visiting yachtsmen, in-
cluding closing down the Postal Sub-
Station due to operating costs, does
everyone really believe that the new
slips will be constructed? Does every-
one believe the Corps of Engineers is
going to allow the new construction?
I do know that you can make a lot more
money as a hotelier from 400 rooms
than from 26 slips. The City of Fort
Lauderdale will also gain more reve-
nues due to their lease agreement with
Bahia Mar.


SMALL BUSINESS

CONFERENCES

KEEPINGG IT LEGAL, LEGAL ASPECTS OF RUNNING A
SMALL BUSINESS" is the title of a newly offered business
conference to be held for the first time on Thursday, June
14, at the Pompano Beach Recreation Center, 1801
Northeast 6 St., Pompano Beach, from 8:30 p.m. until
10:30 p.m. The conference is presented by the Florida
Atlantic University Small Business Development Center
and the U.S., Small Business Administration. The con-
fereace is open to the public and there is no fee.
At the conference a group of local attorneys will provide
information on the legal aspects of running a small
business including city, county, state and federal licens-
ing and permitting requirements, valid tax records and
protection against lawsuits. An additional topic of current
national concern, stress management, also will be
discussed by an attorney who specializes in this subject.
The conference is designed to be of special interest to
newly formed small businesses or those contemplating
entrepreneurship.
The FAU Small Business Development Center, with of-
fices in Fort Lauderdale and Boca Raton, provides an on-
going training program and. free management counseling
for new and prospective small businesses which can not
retain private consultants.
Call the Greater Pompano Beach Chamber of Commerce
at 941-2940 or the FAU Small Business Development

Volume 1 Issue 4 June 15 July 15, 1984
Copyright by Ziegler Publishing Co.. Inc. 1984


WATERFRONT NEWS

320 S.W. 2nd Street
Ft. Lauderdale, FL 33312
Phone: (305) 524-9450


Published
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WATERFRONT NEWS COMMU Y

m---- COMMUNITY NuEWS


Who loses? Every MARINE related busi-
ness in the "Venice of America", that's
who. Who else loses? Every business
that is patronized by tens of thousands
of people employed in the marine indus-
try, due to the loss of 26 of the big-
gies, the over 50 footers, the ones
who spend the bucks.. You see, it does
not really cost a lot to clean a hotel
room. Try weighing that against the
revenue generated from the sale, dock-
age, maintenance, refitting, crewing,
and operating a 58 foot Hatteras or
an 85 foot Broward. (Oh yes, some of
those Browards are actually made
right here in Fort Lauderdale.

We live in a county where, on the aver-
age, every ninth resident owns a boat.
(130,000 registered boats in Broward
County). There is no other place in the
world where you can find this concen-
tration, and that figure does not in-
clude transients.

Please, let City Hall know where you
stand.

Dennis W. Nusser
Ft. Lauderdale


Center at 467-4238 to make a reservation.

"THE COMPUTER: AN AFFORDABLE ADDION TO
EVERY BUSINESS" is the title of a conference to be
presented Tuesday, June 26, at Coral Springs Branch of
the Broward County Library, 10077 Northwest 29th
Street, Coral Springs, from 7 p.m. until 9 p.m.
The conference will be presented by the Florida Atlantic
University Small Business Development Center (SBDC)
and the U.S. Small Business Administration (SBA). The
conference is free but reservations are required. Call the
SBDC at 467-4238 to make a reservation.
Computer experts will speak on subjects in their area of
expertise and then present a hands-on workshop period.
The course is part of the Small Business Development
Center's on-going training program for new and prospec-
tive owners of small businesses. The center also provides
free business counselling for those who can not retain
private consultants.

A six-hour workshop for small business owners and
those considering founding or buying a small business will
beheld Wednesday and Thursday evenings, June 27 and
28, at the Broward County Library West Regional Branch,
8601 West Broward Blvd., in Plantation. Entitled "HOW
TO START AND OPERATE A BUSINESS FOR PROFIT," the
workshop will be held in the library's meeting room from 6
p.m. until 9 p.m. both nights. It will be conducted by the
Florida Atlantic University Small Business Development
Center (SBDC) and the United States Small Business Ad-
ministration.
SSpeakers will discuss the basics of organizing for a pro-
fitable business venture. Subjects on the agenda include
financing, marketing, record keeping, insurance, taxes
and legal matters as well as how to select a new
business. This is a pre-business workshop designed to
assist those who are contemplating starting a new
business or have recently started a business in South
Florida. The workshop is free but reservations are re-
quired. Call the West Regional Library at 474-5880 or the
SBDC at 467-4238 to make a reservation.



FT. LAUDERDALE

COAST GUARD AUXILIARY

SETS UP WEATHER STATION

A weather station has been set up at C.G.AUX. station
McVey House. Readings on wind speed, wind direction,
barometric pressure and relative humidity and dew point
are taken.
Cloud formation, speed and type are recorded and
entered in a log.
All equipment was made and assembled by the weather
observers of Flotilla 32 headed by instructor Walter
Krock. Members donated equipment and funds to buy
arnemoniters, wind vanes, and gauges which were in-
stalled by Alvin Gronsky.


F


r


FT. LAUDERDALE'S

NEW LIVE-ABOARD RULES
ORDINANCE NO. C-84-

An ordinance repealing Sections 11-20(f) and 47-63 of the Code of Or-
dinances of the City of Fort Lauderdale to delete requirements pertaining
to habitation aboard watercraft, floating homes, and vessels (generally
known as the "live-aboard" ordinances); further, re-enacting Code Sec-
tion 47-63 of the Code of Ordinances, to be entitled "Habitation on
Floating Homes or Vessels", to: provide definitions; identify areas within
which habitation aboard such homes or vessels is permitted and pro-
hbited; specify annual permit requirements and conditions when habita-
tion Is Intended within certain residential and commercial districts;
create a dwelling unit density Imitation appicable to such habitation;
provide for inspection and proof that devices used for wastewater
disposal from vessels meet U.S. Coast Guard requirements; require
floating homes to connect to a shore facility collection system when
such service Is available; and, specify a penalty of $500.00 for any
violation.

WHEREAS, pursuant to Section.,11-20(f) of the City Code of Or-
dinances, certain requirements exist governing the areas in which per-
sons are permitted and prohibited to live on or aboard watercraft
moored, docked or anchored in the City, subject to certain restrictions,
locations and periods of time; and
WHEREAS, pursuant to Section 47-63 of the City Code of Ordinances,
other requirements exist governing permanent habitation on floating
homes and vessels, which contain similar prohibitions and regulations,
including restrictions based upon density; and
WHEREAS, it is the desire of the City Commission of the City of Fort
Lauderdale, Florida to reconcile the provisions appearing in both or-
dinances, where possible, by repealing them and providing for a single
comprehensive ordinance which would govern such habitation; and
WHEREAS, after a number of public hearings held before the Fort
Lauderdale Planning and Zoning Board, it has been recommended to the
City Commission, and the City Commission agrees, that a single compre-
hensive ordinance is both necessary and desirable to control and
regulate such habitation in a manner that will afford adequate protection
to the health, safety, environment and welfare of City inhabitants, who
live both on land and over water; and
WHEREAS, such an ordinance is necessary to prevent overcrowding
of both waterways and lands within the City, to reduce and control pro-
blems attendant with such habitation and which problems the City is cur-
rently experiencing, including: claims by citizens of pollution of water-
ways from improper homes and vessels; wastewater and "grey water"
from floating homes and vessels; concerns of the City Fire Department
with fire safety; concerns of the Police and Building & Zoning Depart-
ments with the parking of additional vehicles; the providing of adequate
police protection for such additional inhabitants; concerns of the Utilities
Department with the disposal of additional garbage and trash; concerns
of the City Planning Division with the additional density burden imposed
upon lands by Waterway inhabitants, which necessarily result from the
influx of additional people; and, an overall concern of the City Commis-
sion with the improvement of the aesthetic appearance of the City, on
both lands and waterways; and
WHEREAS, it is the desire of the City Commission to address such
municipal problems by attempting to reconcile the interests of all City
inhabitants, both on land and aboard watercraft, in a manner that will
reduce and minimize the impacts of such problems, but will allow both
land and marine residents the opportunity to pursue the lifestyle they
choose to live; and
WHEREAS, it is the desire of the City Commission to permit such
habitation, subject to reasonable conditions as to the locations and the
use of such locations for such purpose, which conditions are designed to
safeguard against such overcrowding and the problems attendant upon
it;
NOW, THEREFORE, BE IT ORDAINED BY THE CITY COMMISSION OF
THE CITY OF FORT LAUDERDALE, FLORIDA:

SECTION 1. That Sections 11-20(f) and 47-63 of the Code of
Ordinances of the City of Fort Lauderdale, Florida are
hereby repealed.

SECTION 2. That in the stead of the repealed sections identified above,
a new Section 47-63 of the City Code of Ordinances is
hereby re-enacted and created to read as follows:

SECTION 47-63. HABITATION ON FLOATING HOMES OR VESSELS

(1) Definitions:
(a) A "floating home" is any waterborne structure designed for use
primarily as a home or dwelling.
(b) A "vessel" is any waterborne craft (other than a seaplane) used
or designed and capable of being used as a means of transpor-
tation on water.
(c) "Habitation" aboard a floating home or vessel means overnight
occupation of it by one or more persons, while the home or
vessel is moored, docked or anchored in any of the public water-
ways lying within the city.

(2) Habitation aboard a vessel is permitted in:
(a) any municipal dock area;
(b) a licensed commercial marina lying within an S-1, SP-1, B-1,
B-1-A, B-2 and M-1 District;
(c) a licensed yacht club;
(d) waterways adjacent to property zoned B-1, B-1-A and B-2, after
a permit has been secured as provided below; and
(e) waterways adjacent to property zoned for multiple residential
use, except for R-2 Districts, after a permit has been secured as
provided below.
(3) Habitation aboard a floating home (which has been certified for oc-
cupancy pursuant to Chapter 48 of the City Code of Ordinances) is per-
mitted in:
(a) any municipal dock area;
(b) a licensed commercial marina lying within an S-l, SP-1, B-1,
B-i-A, B-2 and M-1 District;
(c) a licensed yacht club; and
(d) waterways adjacent to property zoned B-l, B-1-A and B-2, after
a permit has been secured as provided below.







WATERFRONT NEWS


(4) An annual permit for habitation aboard a floating home or vessel
must be obtained by the property owner or his agent from the city at the
office of the City Supervisor of Marine Facilities before the first day of
habitation begins. The supervisor shall Issue the permit The application
fee for an annual permit is $50.00, exclusive of any other applicable
building permit fees. Once a permit has been secured, two copies of it
will be issued, both of which must be prominently displayed on the
floating home or vessel so that they are readily visible from both the ad-
jacent real property and from the waterway. A permit shall not be issued
until the applicant for It has established, after review of the application
by the city Building and Zoning Department, any confirmatin is received
frm the Departent lo the Supervisor, that:
(a) Zoning district density limitations applicable to the adjacent real
property will not be exceeded in residential areas (for the
purpose of administration of this subparagraph, each vessel
shal be considered and treated as the equivalent of a dwelling
unit?. A dwelling unit density not to exceed 40 units per acre
may be permitted, where property Is adjacent to a waterway
with a minimum width of 100 feet and the waterway does not
terminate in a "dead end". The foregoing density limitations
shall apply only to habitation aboard a vessel when it exceeds
the zoning district density limitation;
(b) Required parking is available on the adjacent real property (one
parking space per vessel or floating home);
(c) The requirements of all applicable laws and regulations, such as
those governing public health, public safety, sanitation and the
environment are met provided, however, that the applicant
must furnish proof to the Deprtment that the vessel is equipped
with one or more operable and certified marine sanitation
devices orholding tanks, as approved by the U.S. Coast Guard,
which shall be verled by a Department inspection and a floating
home must be equipped to deliver all sewage to a shore facility
collection system, as specified in Paragraph (7), below:
(d) Navigation in the waterway will not be Impeded or obstructed by
the floating home or vessel; and
(e) As to floating homes only: after a certificate of occupancy has
issued and obtained, as required pursuant to the provisions of
Article XI, Chapter 48, of the City Code of Ordinances.
(f) The permit shall be signed by the Supervisor and by the
applicant By his or her signature, the applicant for a vessel
permit shall agree that no waste water and grey water shall be
disposed of except by use of the approved device or tank. By
his or her signature, an applicant for a floating home permit
shall agree to abide by the provisions of subparagraph (7),
below.

(5) Habitation aboard a floating home or vessel in any other public
waterway within the city, except as provided in this law, is prohibited.
(6) Habitation, and the permitting of habitation, aboard a vessel in a
residential area without a valid permit is unlawful. Habitation and the
permitting of habitation aboard a floating home in a waterway adjacent
to property zoned B-1, B-1-A and B-2 without a permit is unlawful. It is
the responsibility of the owner of property adjacent to any portion of a
public wwaterway used for habitation to secure the permit required and
to ensure compliance with the provisions of this section. Any person
found responsible for a violation of .any provision of this section after
notice and hearing shall be subject to a fine not to exceed $500.00 for
any single violation. Additionally, upon the establishment of such viola-
tion, the permit shall be revoked. Any disposal of wastewater, grey
water, or both other than as permitted by this section, and In accord with
al applicable U.S. Coast Guard regulations, upon finding of such violation
after notice and hearing, shall be grounds for revocation of the permit.
(7) Every owner of property adjacent to any portion of a public water-
way used for habitation aboard a floating home, when such habitation is
permitted by this section, must cause it to be connected with the
municipal sanitary sewer system within ninety (90) days of the date that
such service is available. Until such service is available, the floating
home must be equipped with one or more operable and certified marine
sanitation devices or a holding tank, as approved by the U.S. Coast
Guard, and the applicant must furnish proof to the Department that the
home is so equipped, which shall be verified by a Department inspection.
SECTION 3. That if any clause, section or other part of this Ordinance
shall be held invalid or unconstitutional by any court of competent
jurisdiction, the remainder of this Ordinance shall not be affected
thereby, but shall remain in full force and effect.
SECTION 4. That all ordinances or parts of ordinances in conflict here-
with, be and the same are hereby repealed.
SECTION 5. That this Oridnance shall be in full force and effect ten days
from the date of final passage.

AVArrOArP'AP'A~AYAP'AAVA1 r


FLORIDA OFFSHORE MULTIHULL ASSOC.
invites all multihull enthusiasts to
attend its next meeting at Harbor
Lights Restaurant, 318 N. Federal
Hwy., Dania on June 20, 7:30 pm.
Guest speaker will be Cynthia Hancock
of "Week of the Ocean." F.O.M.A.
sponsors regattas, cruises, and other
activities of interest to multihull
enthusiasts. For more info contact
Ed Wiser at 975-8595.

GREATER FORT LAUDERDALE BOARDSAIL-
ING ASSOC. meets every 3rd thursday
of the month at the patio bar of the
Riverside Hotel on Las Olas Blvd. at
7:30 pm. For more info call 463-7819.

USCGAUX "Boating Skills and Seaman-
ship" course starts Monday, June 11
register by 7:30 pm. Classes will be
monday and thursday at 8 p.m. ending
June 28. Call 463-0034.

SEVEN SEAS CRUISING ASSOCIATION
Box 2190, Covington, LA 70434
Phone: (504) 892-3096
WOMEN's YACHT RACING ASSOCIATION- for
more information contact April Moore,
President, at 1-856-8216, or in Bro-
ward call Leanne Williams at 973-7892.


VOLUNTEER ACTION CENTER 522-6761.
INTERNATIONAL YACHTMEN's ASSOCIATION
525-7444, at 12 SW 6th St., Ft. Laud.
SOUTH FLORIDA SAILING ASSOCIATION
662-2667.
Broward's marine-related clubs and
organizations are invited to list
their organization's services and
projects in the 1984-85 edition of
the DIRECTORY of BROWARD CLUBS and
ORGANIZATIONS, according to Cynthia
Hancotk and Bill Ermeling, Week of
the Ocean coordinators and co-pub-
lishers. All organizations must clear
their information and the $10.00
listing fee with their board of dir-
ectors prior to the Friday, June 29
deadline.
To request a listing form,
call Cynthia Hancock at 462-5573
or Bill Ermeling at 463-2313.
The directory is being used as a
fund raising project by Week of the
Ocean and other groups may purchase
quantities for this purpose also.
Complimentary distribution of both
the 1983 and 1984-85 books in-
cludes media city desks and public
service directors; area city halls
and chambers; and county libraries
throughout Broward.


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4






WATERFRONT NEWS
.... SAILING


WOMEN'S OCEAN RACING INVITATIONAL 1984


Sponsored by Gulfstream Sailing Club
Fort Lauderdale, Florida
May 20, 1984
RESULTS


GSCPH Class


Yacht/Skipper


1 Four Graces/
Shirley Callum
2 Rose Mariel
Ester Perez
3 Cheeks/
Lorraine Engel
4 Movin'/
Lynn Pena
5 Brandy IV/
Barbara McCully
PHRF CLASS
1 Dazzler/
Shirley O'Malley
2 Penny Antel
Betsy Owen
3 Heat Wavel
Carol Millman
4 Sherry Ann II/
Julia Turk
Course #4 12.2 miles WindlDirection:


I ~


Corrected
Time
1:54:01
1:54:14
1:54:51
2:36:55
2:54:37


3:08:56
3:09:13
3:17:20
3:28:34
SSE 20 Knots


Gulfstream Sailing Club has sponsored Women's races
annually since 1970. This has grown to encompass the
invitational to attract other women sailors in South
Florida. The philosophy of GSC remains the same, to
enhance the participation, safety, excellence and enjoy-
ment of sailing.
Rules for the GSC Women's Ocean Racing Invitational
were conducted under the current International Yacht
Racing Union (IYRU) racing rules as adopted by the United
States Yacht Racing Union (USYRU) and supplemented as
follows: One man may (but, does not necessarily have to)
be aboard to act only in case of imminent danger, never to
assist verbally, nonverbally, or physically while racing.


Trophies were awarded in each class, as established by
the race committee. In addition, the Mack Shaw Perpetual
Trophy with keeper was awarded to Dazzler the First
Place yacht in the P.H.R.F. Class. The Virginia Marks
Perpetual Trophy with keeper was awarded to Four Grace
the First Place yacht in the G.S.C.P.H. Class. Spinnaker
and blooper sails were used for the first time in Gulfstream
Sailing Club women's racing.
Many sailors from the Women's Yacht Racing Associa-
tion, Biscayne Bay, joined the GSC Invitational.


"
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GALLEY NOTES
by Betty Metzger, R.D.
Did you ever go travelling for that long awaited vacation
to Shangrila or points unknown only to have your vacation
spoiled by hyperalimentation? What is that?
An estimated one-third to one-half of all people traveling
outside their home countries develop the diarrhe, vomiting,
headache and fever known as taveler's diarrhea. Other
colorful terms for this condition include Montezuma's
revenge, Delhi belly, and Tokyo trot. Traveler's diarrhea is
more common in the warmer climates but can happen
anywhere. Mexicans traveling to the U.S. call it San Fran-
ciscitis. Whatever it's called, it can certainly ruin a vaca-
tion.
Although traveler's diarrhea can come from the same
organisms that cause food poisoning and "stomach virus"
at home, it is most likely to be caused by strains of the
common intestinal bacteria E. coli unfamiliar to the suf-
ferer. That is why the people living within a country may
be unbothered by diarrhea whereas the traveler is likely to
develop it within ten days of arrival.
Contaminated water and food handlers who are
careless about personal hygiene are the most common
sources of intestinal infections. The best cure is, of
course, prevention. Eating only cooked (preferably peeled)
foods, and drinking only boiled water (coffee and tea are
OK), and factory-bottled sodas, mineral waters, and wines
are helpful. Mixed drinks and drinks with ice cubes are
possible sources of contamination and should be avoided.
As with any attack of diarrhea, it's important to replace
water and minerals, especially if the attack is prolonged
or involves a child or elderly person. Fruit juice fortified
with a half teaspoon or so of honey or corn syrup and a
pinch of salt is one easily-made recipe for fluid and
mineral replacement. The wise traveler will discuss the
proper medication before the trip with his physician. The
symptoms of hyperalimentation of this type usually sub-
side within a few days. If they do not, a physician should
be consulted, or local health department or teaching
hospital with a tropical disease clinic.
OOPS!
In last month's Galley Notes there was a typographical
error. The retort packaged food needs NO refrigeration and-
has two to five years shelf life. You may order these from
us in individual servings or half steam table trays (15
servings).

CONSULTANT WELLNESS
NUTRITIONIST CONCEPT

Betty W M. et ger, R.D.
REGISTERED DIETITIAN

P.O. BOX 91
(305) 462-3456 FT. LAUDERDALE, FL 33302-0091



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WATERFRONT NEWS


SIMPLE CELESTIAL

NAVIGATION AGAIN

by James Suflivan

Let us sail across the North Atlantic Ocean navigating
by celestial means. To do so we will need only a compass
(it need not be accurate) and a watch, set to Greenwich
Mean Time.
Nothing else is needed, no charts, tables, almanacs,
sextants, or any other navigational gear. We will make
the journey without the knowledge of, or the calculations
of, drift and set, deviation, variation, courses, or chart
work.
We will depart from Ft. Lauderdale, Florida or any other
Atlantic port, on the 1 st of October of any year, sailing the
shortest route (great circle) to a mid-European port. For
this exercise we will use Bordeaux, France.
Before we depart borrow a Nautical Almanac from the
vessel in the nest slip, the year of the almanac is not im-
portant. This book is needed to find a star that will pass
over Bordeaux on the night of Oct. 1 st and the exact time
it will do so. While aboard copy Bordeaux's latitude (N60*
- the entrance light to the Gironde) and Longitude (W
01') from one of the charts always found on tied-
up vessels. We will not need a chart for our trip.
Turn to Oct. 1 in the Nautical Almanac (page
192) and finger-run-down the list of stars til we
find a star that has the same latitude (declinations)
as Bordeaux. We find a couple, we select Capella
(dec. N 46*) since Ii will be nite-visible during our trip.
Note, to find nite-visible stars enter the planet diagram
(page 9) with the date and the SHA (sidereal hour angle)
of a star. Local time of the star's meridian passage will be
given for any location. ,,oA,, +INV *
TRI /LE .' Tf`(iE AE M) 'ffLLA
N-un.cL MILE5 N UM b3
OE* &. L.




To find the exact GMT Capella will be over Bordeaux we
subtract the SHA of Capella (281 *) from the longitude of
NATIONAL PARK, N.J. A retired professor who sailed
around the world without navigational aids ended his jour-
ney Sunday when he stepped off his 36-foot cutter to the
cheers of family and friends; Marvin Creamer, 68, set.off
from here in December 1982, determined to prove to
scholars that he could use the stars to navigate his
voyage, wave patterns to help him steer and bubbles
passing the boat to determineits speed. He called the
voyage, on which he used fewer navigational aids than
10th-century Vikings, "a dream come true."

LOCAL NOTICE TO MARINERS
PUBLIC NOTICE: .-Oakland Park Blvd'. Draw-
bridge Operation Regulations.
SUMMARY: At the request of Fla. Dept.
of Transportation, the Coast Guard
is considering a change to the regu-
lations governing the Oakland Park
Blvd. drawbridge, mile 1060.5 in Fort
Lauderdale by permitting the number
of openings to be limited during cer-
tain periods This proposal is being
made because periods of peak vehicular
traffic have changed. This action
should still provide for the reason-
able needs of navigation.
DATE: Comments must be received on or
before July 2, 1984.
PROPOSED REGULATIONS:
(a)From 15November 15 May, from
7 a.m. to 6 p.m., Monday Friday,
the draw need open only on the hour,
20 minutes past the hour, and 40 min-
utes past the hour to pass all accum-
u;ated vessels. From 10 a.m. to 6 p.m.
on Saturday, Sundays and- legal holi-
days, the draw need open only on the
hour, 1 hour, 5 hour and 3/4 hour to
pass all accumulated vessels. At all
other times the draw shall open on
s ignal.
(b)The draw shall open at any time
for the passage of public vessels of
the United States, tugs with tows,
regularly scheduled cruise vessels
and vessels in distress. The opening
signal for these vessels shall be 5
blasts of a whistle, horn or by other
sound-producing devices or by shouting.


Bordeaux. We must add 360' to the longitude to allow
this to be done. This will give us the FHA (Greenwich Hour
Angle) of Aries a point on the celestial equator that
stars are hooked onto.
Bordeaux's longitude W 00a'00'


Bordeaux's longitude
to subtract SHA add


W 001' 00'
360* 00'


360' 00'
SHA of Capella 281 00'

GHA of Aries 80' 00'
Use Aries column in the Nautical Almanac to Convert GHA
to GMT for time of passage.
On Oct. 1 st Capella will be over Bordeaux at GMT 04 42
33 or EDT 00 42 33. Return the Nautical Almanac, it
won't be needed again.
At this exact time obtain a compass bearing on Capella.
This will serve as your compass heading for the first day
out, at Ft. Lauderdale it will be approximately 50'. At the
same time measure the height of your guide star Capella
with your fist. Your outright fist held at eye level
measures 10' (bigger fists have longer arms). Pile fist
upon fists until Capella is reached, from Ft. Lauderdale
Capella will be 21/2 fists above eye level, or 25*. To find
the great circle distance to Bordeaux or zenith distance
subtract 25' from 90' and multiply by 60' giving the dis-
tance as 3900 nautical miles.
On Oct. 1st we depart for Bordeaux. That evening 4
minutes (3 min. 56 sec.) earlier than the previous evening
we again observe Capella. We swing the vessel until
Capella is on the forestay and read the compass this
will be our new compass heading until the next evening.
Caution do not follow Capella for it will appear to travel
westward from Bordeaux 15" each hour.
Again fist measure Capella to obtain the new distance
to Bordeaux, the difference between this and the previous
measurement is the mileage made good that day.
By observing Capella 4 minutes earlier each night we
will in effect stop the spinning of the earth and place
Capella over Bordeaux for years.


5
Other dates and times that Capella will be over
Bordeaux include:
Nov. 1 GMT 02 40 41 EST 21 40 41
Dec.1 GMT 00 42 48 EST 19 42 48
Jan.1 GMT 22 36 54 EST 17 36 54
On this date (Jan. 1), Capella, although over Bordeaux,
will no longer be nite-visible. We must switch to the star
Deneb and depart March 1st when Deneb will be nite-
visible. The compass heading and distance remains about
the same.
Deneb will be over Bordeaux:
Mar. 1st GMT100719 EST 050719
Apr. 1st GMT 08 05 24 EST 03 05 24
Bon voyage.

THE SAIL CLEANERS
4711 L N. DIXIE HWY.
FT. LAUDERDALE, FL 33334

Have You Cleaned
Your Sails Lately?
Unsightly dirt, rust and oil can
damage your sails, affect their
performance and reduce their
longevity.
Here's five good reasons why The Sail
Cleaners should clean your sails:
1. We are the only sail cleaning facility
in South Florida.
2. Our plant has the most modern,
scientific method for treating sails.
3. We pick up and deliver.
4. We are licensed and insured.
5. Our prices are low and quality high.
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* Windlasses
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* Fish Boxes
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* Stabilizers
* Steering-
* Synchronizers
* Oil Change Pumps
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* Refrigerators
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k Garbage Disposals
k Washers/Dryers
k Central Vacuum Cleaners
r NuTone Food Centers
- Complete Air Conditioning

ELECTRICALL SYSTEMS
k Stereos
k Intercoms
SInverters/Converters
k Interior/Exterior Lighting
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r 110v/220v Shoreline Systems
r Fire/Smoke Alarms
r Docking Lights

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^6 WATERFRONT NEWS


POWER BOATING


SAFETY ON THE WATER

by
Bil Lange

VDS ... VDS? What is that and who cares?
Well, I do and you should, too, for Visual Distress
Signals especially for Florida boaters have frequent-
ly meant the difference between being brought home and
never being seen again. And how come this applies so fre-
qunelty to you boaters? Stand with me at any public laun-
ching ramp for any Saturday morning as we offer
Courtesy Marine Examinations to the scurrying skippers.
Very frequently the boater has no visual distress
signals. Yet some of those same skippers are "Bimini or
Bust" persons. Or at least they are tempted to go "a little
further offshore" in pursuit of a weed-line. Some, every
dang Saturday, are having trouble getting the engine to
kick over or to catch! Their probability of a serious no-
start off shore is high. Yet with the big fish on the horizon,
or with mermaids ditto, one gathers that without VDS,
often without a VHF radio, most vague on where the Gulf
Stream is today or its speed, and with several cases of
beer cans sitting near their compass (if there is one), they
are candidates for much "solitude in the triangle de Ber-
mude."
May I ask that even Hobie Cat riders pay heed to this
subject?
Many cases where visual distress signals were needed
do not break into the press or TV; but make sure that you
make shore and are not a candidate for either category.
VDS do not have to be flares. These and other legal
alternatives will be discussed in a few minutes. What did
they or didn't they do recently?
In January six Miami persons, unheard from during a
one-day fishing trip, were given up as lost. But on the
seventh day were found 200 miles to the North when
their flare was spotted by a Navy destroyer 40 miles off-
shore.
n---- February a young couple spent 18 hours on an over-
turned Hoby Cat. Search boats were close but you can't
see the low profile of an overturned boat at night; and the
couple had no VDS. They were lucky to be found at
daylight. Sharks and hypothermia were at hand. When
you rent or sail a Hoby Cat. make sure to have life pre-
servers and VDS.
In March a 35 foot cigarette was heard on Channel 16,
dead in the water, but without VDS. The Coast Guard had
difficulty finding the boat. Many times a radio becomes too
weak to serve in radio direction finding.
In April a 24 foot boat party of five went fishing, without
VDS, lost power, were not heard or seen by passing
vessels. Two days later they had drifted from Port
Everglades to 50 miles off Port Canaveral. A Coast Guard
patrol plane spotted them.
IN April another Hoby Cat. Drifted upside down all after-
noon, even with other boats not far away, until just at
dusk a distant shore observer figured they could not be
playing games and vectored a Coast Guard boat to the
-, spot.
In May a 20 foot pleasure boat from Miami, adrift off
Bimini; the three aboard spent a very long day and longer
night until their weak VHF call started a search and a
Coast Guard helicopter saw their VDS flare. If you could
have been there when the three persons came ashore, I
guarantee you that every boat you ever pilot would have a
double VDS supply.
So what is the requirement? To receive the USCG Aux-
iliary decal after a Courtesy Marine Examination every
boat, no matter where or when afloat, must meet the op-
tions.


Marine Lumber Plyuwo
Milling and Custom M!llwork


2945 State Rd. 84
Ft. Lauderdale, FL 33312


(305) 584-


You must have both a day and night type of VDS.
Most small boaters meet this by having a package of
hand-held red flares. You must have three flares. These
are very visible at night and fairly visible at day. Provided
the observer is not blinded by glare of the sun.
Any of the options must be US Coast Guard approved
type, and all pyrotechnic options are stamped with a date
and must be still valid. When the expiration date is
reached some pyrotechnics may still function; so keep
them as a reserve. The old hand-held flares with an all red
cover burn with a hot slag drip so would best be taken
ashore for use on the highway. The successor hand-held
flares burn very cleanly but should still be held downwind
and over the side.
The other pyrotechnic option is to have rocket flares. I
strongly urge you to get both that is, have the rockets
and also the hand-held. As the major manufacturer points
out: the rockets are "alerters" to be seen by a distant
observer, while the hand-held are "locators" to mark your
actual location once the rescuer starts searching for "a
needle in a hay stack" (that's your boat or you).
All pyrotechnics come in several sizes: primarily 12
gauge or the larger 25 milimeter. Naturally a larger size
gives you the bigger flash. There is even a 37 mm type
said to allow sighting at 40 miles. The rocket flares may
be meteors which shoot up as a streak of less than 6
seconds; or the rockets may be parachute flares which
drift down while burning and thus may be visible far better
(hopefully at 1000 feet and for 25 seconds).
With respect to pyrotechnics, the proper firing is not
simple. I saw a planned demonstration in which the expert
got the rocket backwards. You can too. So open the VDS
package and read carefully what is written. Don't wait un-
til the time of emergency. Have a family or crew study
session. Because of misfires, or aiming at the wrong
angle, your mandatory three items are scarcely adequate.
Practice firing a focket in a safe place once a year so you
can see how difficult it is to get a properly visible trajec-
tory. But do not fire red buy the "White Practice
Meteors."
The other options, if you do not want flares, are:
orange hand-held smoke stick (daytime only)
orange floating smoke (5 to 15 minute size, daytime)
an orange 3 foot by 3 foot flag (with black square and
black ball on the flag) (daytime)
a special.-electric distress, hand floatable lantern,
which is nighttime only and which makes only SOS signal.
It is high intensity.
note that strobe lights do not meet any legal option.


Otherworldwide-known visual distress signals are to fly
the United States flag upside down; to fly the signal letter
flags "N" and "C"; to somehow without danger make a
large volume of smoke; to have a small mirror with a
peephole, and aim the mirror reflecting light toward the
rescuer; to move your arms equally at your side from
shoulder level to the vertical.
Store your VDS in a dry manner, "readily accessible",
away from children. Save your VDS until you hope
somebody is watching with proper visibility. Whoever
sees the first meteor? Many a time I have thought there
was a flick toward the horizon, but it could be a glint from
the goggles or the spyglass so the observer waits to
seen, soon, a second signal. So buy ten less cases of
beer, or cancel one day of boating, and use the money to
buy some more "alerter" VDS.
That Gulf Stream is waiting to give you a free ride past
Newfoundland and you'll never make it to England.





od





8558


ASK BIG AL
Question:
Dear Al,
Why is it, when I buy something in a marine store:
water pump, fuel line, fan belt, etc., I pay three or four
times the price I pay for the same item for my auto. WHY?
Joe
Answer:
Dear Joe,
I know we all feel we are being taken, but it is not as
bad as it seems. Water pumps for boats are usually brass
or bronze with rustproof Impellers. They are expensive.
Fuel Pumps are dual-diaphragms with glass cups to show
leaks, etc., or sealed electric. They cost more; and a
cheap fan belt stretches and breaks or goes to pieces for-
ty miles out to sea. Most marine gear is better is
stainless or brass. Look for the marine discount catalogs
or BOAT U.S. catalog they are reasonably priced and
guaranteed. You can buy your oil or oil filter at the auto
store.
IF YOU HAVE A PROBLEM OF ANY KIND WITH YOUR
BOAT, WRITE TO:

"BIG AL"
c/o Waterfront News
320 SW 2nd Street
Ft. Lauderdale, FL 33312
(or call 524-9450)

Big Al will research your problem and answer it to the
best of his ability given the information provided.

(Big Al, a.k.a. Alvin Grodsky, is a Marine Engine Instructor
for the Coast Guard Auxiliary. He is an aircraft pilot and
former United States Marine Corps Engine Maintenance
Instructor and an Instructor of Engines and Maintenance
for the U.S. Government as a civilian. Al has over fifty
years of marine engineering experience, from steam on.)

WECATERPARTIES
FOR ALL OCCASIONS 522-2118

JUCOA lR ( O-R T I1L

HOUSE OF THE
OVERSTUFFED
SANDWICH
a block 601 S.E. 3rd AVENUE
south of FT. LAUDERDALE, FL
New River (Across from Broward Cty. Courthouse)



T(m CMEIIEV






I L L U S T R A T O R
524-7129


ALL'S MARINE REPAIR
MOBILE DOCKSIDE SERVICE
INBOARDS OUTBOARDS STERN DRIVES

305 966-9867


~t~uuu~u\~- --;'''- ~t~t~~~~lu)\~\~~ttft~Qp7








WATERFRONT NEWS


MARINE ELECTRICAL

A MOST IMPORTANT WIRE

by Smokey Handson

What is the most important wire on your yacht? When I
am called to trouble-shoot an electrical problem where
smoke has been observed or there,are burned wires, I
check this wire first. In my experience about half of the
electrical fires I have repaired have in some way involved
this wire not being properly in place or not being properly
connected at the time of the fire. As important as this
wire is, it generally does very little work. If it was re-
moved from a yacht with an otherwise healthy electrical
system everything would still work and you would probably
never miss it. BUT WHEN THINGS GO WRONG IT BETTER
BE THERE!
Now you may be thinking of the AC safety grounds
which were not even installed in early yachts. Think
again. The wire in question is one specific wire which has
a terminal on each end and each terminal must be at-
tached to a specific place. Anyone who works around the
inside of a yacht might have reason to see or even dis-
connet this wire. It isn't buried in the electrical panel or
hidden in the wire runs. This wire is right out there where
you or someone working on your yacht can foul it up in a
moment of inattention.
A while back I had a service call involving a yacht
where the wire in question was not in place at all. The
yacht owner called and related the following events. First
he had tripped a circuit breaker for the shore power outlet
supplying power to his twin engine diesel yacht. Not
realizing the loss of AC power to the on board battery
charger, he continued to use DC power while docked until
the battery supplying power was completely discharged.
On this yacht there was a port engine battery and separ-
ate starboard engine battery which also supplied power to
the house portion of the yacht. Realizing the starboard
battery was totally discharged, he discussed the problem
with a neighbor who volunteered to remove the battery
from the engine room and recharge it with a portable
charger on the dock. (I do not know why they did not use
the on board charger to recharge the battery without re-
movin git.)
After recharging the battery and returning it to the
engine room they attempted to start the main engines.
The port engine started normally but the starboard engine
cranked sluggishly and would not start. Immediately an
alarming amount of smoke billowed up from the engine
engine compartment to find two green bonding wires
smoldering. One wire ran from the port fuel tank to the por
engine block. The other wire ran from the starboard fuel
tank to the starboard engine block. These #10 wires
(which can safely carry 30 amps) had become red hot
completely burning off the insulation. The frightened
owner finished his story with a request for service. He did
not understand what was happening and wanted help.
Examination of the battery cables revealed that the
ground cable for the starboard engine starter had not been
reconnected to the battery. It was lying out of sight be-
tween the battery boxes. On the ground side of this bat-
tory were two other properly connected battery cables,
one ground interconnect to the port engine battery
ground, and a ground cable for the ship's DC house distri-
bution panel. Obviously THREE battery cables had been
disconnected but only TWO had been reconnected leaving
the starboard engine starter not grounded.
Do you believe the starboard engine starter was really
not grounded? WHY DID THE STARBOARD ENGINE CRANK
SLUGGISHLY OR AT ALL? Somehow cranking current got
from the ground side of the starboard engine battery to
the starboard engine block. The burned wires should give
you a clue. From the ground side of the starboard engine
battery, current was flowing through the interconnect to
the ground side of the port engine battery and through the
port engine starter ground cable to the port engine block.
Current was flowing from the port engine block through
the -10 bonding wire to the port ALUMINUM FUEL TANK
AND THROUGH THE RIGID COPPER FUEL LINES TO THE
FUEL MANIFOLD AND ON TO THE STARBOARD


f31z L S-ky
New Electrical Systems
Custom Panels & Eauipm.ent
Major System Repairs


SENTRY



252 SW 31 St.
Ft. Laud., FL 33315
(305) 523-9313


ALUMINUM TANK and via the #10 bonding wire to the
starboard engine block. Had there been conductive fuel
lines from the engines to the fuel manifold the starboard
engine might have started normally and the yacht owner
might not have realized he was using his fuel lines as bat-
tery cables.
Pulling hundreds of amps through fuel lines is hazar-
dous business and definitely not recommended. There are t
also other paths for the starting current to flow through
which are equally hazardous think about it sometimes.
That brings us back to that most important wire. It is a
wire equal in size to the starter cables which connects
directly from the starboard engine starter motor ground to
the port engine starter motor ground. If there is a
generator engine, its starter motor ground should also be
directly connected to one of the main engine starter motor
grounds.
The regulations state it like this:
183.415 GROUNDING EFFECTIVEDATE:FEB. 1,1978
"IF A BOAT HAS MORE THAN ONE GASOLINE ENGINE, p
GROUNDED CRANKING MOTOR CIRCUITS MUST BE CON-
NECTED TO EACH OTHER BY A COMMON CONDUCTOR
CIRCUIT THAT CAN CARRY THE STARTING CURRENT OF
EACH OF THE GROUNDED CRANKING MOTOR CIRCUITS."'
"The purpose of this requirement is to prevent acci-
dental passage of battery supply current through fuel sys-
tems and smaller electrical conductors that may be com-
mon to the engines. If one of the grounded cranking motor
circuits accidentally opens due to corrosion, vibration,
etc. the accidental passage of current could melt fuel
I:- I- .. -,-+-e g~nh n flnea n~nticrmid m- .


s enil or burn u


p cotnucIU rs.t oui tu Lo U -ese a nzarl cUUUU ca j



G. T. MARINE, INC.

DOCKSIDE SERVICE
(WE COME TO YOU)


FUEL TANK CLEANING
EFUEL STORAGE
FUEL RECONDITIONING

FUEL DELIVERY
OGAMT-2 $3.50 gal.
A\/-r2AC.u yw.~\ -


REGULAR GAS
DIESEL


lead to fire and explosion accidents."'


1 Taken from ELECTRICAL SYSTEM COMPLIANCE GUIDE-
LINE Prepared by the U.S. Coast Guard.


$2-.Vu yai.
$1.16 to $1.25 gal.*
$1.037 to 967 gal.*
'Depending on Quantity


ALL TAXES INCLUDED
PRICES SUBJECT TO CHANGE WITHOUT NOTICE


* RADIO DISPATCHED TRUCKS
FOR QUICK SERVICE


* ENGINE & BILGE STEAM CLEANING & PUMPING


MIAMI/FT. LAUDERDALE/PALM BEACH
JACKSONVILLE thru COCOA BEACH


(305) 491-4795
(904) 756-286.9


I ii


* D


"""






8 WATERFRONT NEWS


HOW TO BUILD A TIN BOAT

by Sue Mosely

Tom Sawyer and Huckleberry Finn may have had great
adventures poling their homemade raft along the Mis-
sissippi, but Mark Twain's characters could not have had
any more fun than the boys in Fort Lauderdale fifty years
ago when they set out in their tin boats to explore the
nooks and cranies of New River.
Basically there were three types of tin boats: the square
transom model, the double-ender and the elite model that
had outriggers and sails. All were built from galvanized
sheet metal, thus giving the name of tin boats to the
custom craft. Even in those days custom meant "home-
made of original design". All were displacement-type
vessels and the propulsion was always done by hand,
unless, of course, the boats were the sailing version.
Boats with planing hulls would come at a later stage in the
boy's life when he could first earn the money to buy the
outboard and secondly the gasoline to run it.
Novice shipwrights usually began their first tinboats by
building the open square transom models. They were
more stable with flat bottoms towards the stern and could
carry a heavier load, sometimes even two boys who pad-
dled with their bare hands or with hand-held shingles of
wood. These boats had higher freeboards which made
them drier, but they were also slower as the square tran-
soms dragged-through the water. Speed and efficiency
were increased if they were made longer and wider, thus
giving them more buoyancy and in turn a higher lift to
their transoms.
If a boy contemplated cruising extensively, such as go-
ing out to the beach and Burnham's Point for a camping
expedition or exploring the western reaches of New River,
he would choose the double-ender model. Narrow of beam
these v-bottomed craft had the best prismatic coefficient
of all models and could slide through the water with the
greatest of ease. Although they lacked stability and were
wetter because of their low freeboards, the double-enders
required the least amount of energy to paddle them
through the water.
Some of the more elaborate models of both styles were
decked over and the helmsman crawled into small open-
ings similar to those on kayaks. Feed sacks bought from
the chicken farm at a nickle apiece were used for the
decking material that was drawn over lightweight wooden
frames. Decks added weigfit,;though, and decreased the
tin boat's stability. The cloth was weather-proofed with
left-over paint scavenged from someone's tool shed.
When the cans were empty and resealed they were tied
to the notoriously sinkable tin boats as flotation. I suppose
the boys had as much sense of security in the air-filled
cans as they would have had with holding an umbrella
when they jumped off a roof top. Maybe the empty paint
cans never really prevented a sinking, but as bobbing
buoys they made it easier for the boys to find their boats
in the muddy depths of the river.
The sailing models were the ultimate in tin boats and
their owners were esteemed as the highest ranking tin
boat designers and builders. Usually the sailboats were


WATERFRONT HERITAGE


built as ketch-rigs with outriggers on each side to insure
stability. With a nice breeze they were very fast. One
might also call them convertibles, for their outriggers,
which were miniature-decked over tin boats, were
detachable and could be removed to change the boat back
to the basic, hand-paddled, double-ender. Added improve-
ments such as splash rails, rudders and steering systems
turned the formerly simple rigs into feats of accomplish-
ments for the more enterprising and imaginative young
shipwrights.

MATERIALS NEEDED TO BUILD A TIN BOAT

1. Galvanized sheet metal: Usually a resurrected piece of
corrugated roofing, but some sheet metal is flat. One
sheet makes one boat.
2. Wood: A piece for the small seat in the middle of the
boat. Strips of 1"x2" to be used as spreaders for the
beam, and for the stern and bow posts. Batten strips of
3/8"x1" to wrap around each side of the gunwhale.
Square transom models needed wood for the sterns and
decked-over models needed strips of wood for framing. All
models needed wood for paddles, and redwood shingles
were preferred.
3. Roofing type of tar: The tar is heated in a tin pail over
an outside wood fire.
4. Nails

OTHER CONSIDERATIONS

1. Patches for old nail holes in previously owned pieces
of sheet metal were usually repaired with scraps of rags
mixed in tar and shoved in the holes. One boy who came
from a more affluent family than the rest went right down
to the lumber yard and bought a brand new sheet of gal-
vanized tin. The other boys with boats of patched-up tin
always admired the shiny boat with its clean-cut bow that
gave it a sharp entry. They also admired the boy whose
integrity never allowed him to exploit the fact that he had
more than the rest. In those days boys were measured by
their own accomplishments, not by thoir fathor'c bank .-
counts or material possessions.


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CENTER:
HI-SPEED XEROX:NG
, .lima i ii[l.I ;l ,i : AND COLLATING
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PARKING IN REAR 463-2313


2. Tar was used fifty years ago like some novice ship-
wrights use epoxy glue today. Poor fitting joints were
sealed and hidden by the tar. One boy's father, who was a
plumber, came to the aid of his son's boatbuilding by clos-
ing the ends of his tinboat by soldering the joint. That was
one tin boat the did not leak.
3. Floats were more often made from empty paint cans
rather than empty glass bottles. Oh, there were glass
Clorox bottles available that came in gallon sizes, but few
parents had enough extra pennies to splurge on bleach for
their laundry and the boys took what pickings they could
find in the trash cans. That's usually where they salvaged
pieces of rope and twine, too.
4. Sails for the sailing models were made from scraps of
cloth as well, but mostly from those feed sacks bought for
a nickle apiece from the chicken farmer who lived down
by the river near the Seventh Avenue bridge.

IN CONCLUSION

The above information is to be used at your own risk.
The main risk is that you just might enjoy a taste of
nostalgia. ..

LAURIE CAHILL
S(305) 763-2186




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- -

















FOOD FROM YOUR GALLEY

By Nedda Anders

Setting sail as contributing food editor of the Waterfront
News, it seems to me that a statement of intent is in
order. Here it is. I'll be serving up dishes from every part
of the globe and every kind of cuisine. Nouvelle but not
off-the-wall. Old-fashioned but not old-hat. Classic, but not
so much so that you'll need a crew of chefs to assist with
the cooking procedures.
We'll stick with recipes that are suitable for boat people
and galley cooks. Nutritious, often quick and easy, and al-
ways, well, stylish, because good food can be stylish too.
The question most health-conscious diners are asking
these days is not "Where's the beef?" but "Where's the
chicken?" This light version of an old-fashioned French
favorite is more than just a very good chicken dish. It is a
complete main course in one pot or, more accurately, in
one skillet. And you can easily prepare it at home and
carry it on board to be reheated and served in minutes.

Menu Suggestions

Julia Child comments that, in France, parsley potatoes
are always served with coq au vin but (though Julia's
word is usually good enough for me), I can't imagine why,
because the hard surface of the potato ball resists the
lovely sauce. I prefer to bed this chicken on softly tender
cooked broad egg noodles, which yield to the gentle
penetration of the wine-flavored liquid. The firmness of
the onion balls and the ovals of golden carrots bring the
necessary contrast in color as well as shape to the other
ingredients. Be sure to mop up with crusty wedges cut
from French bread, to be thrust into the sauce as a climax
to a splendid dish.
For salad, serve a tossed greens, or thick slices of
beefy tomato dressed with vinaigrette and torn basil
leaves. For dessert, especially for Le July 4 weekend, go
red-white-and-blueberry with mounds of strawberries,
blueberries, and sweetened commercial sgur.cream or yo-
gurt to spoon over them. Now bring out the good bought
cookies and mugs of hot coffee... and sit back and enjoy
the crystal blue waters.
COQ AU VIN
(Chicken in Wine with Whole Baby Carrots,
Mushrooms and Small Onions)

2 frying chickens, each cut into 8 pieces, see note
2 tablespoons oil
2 diced onion
2 cloves mashed garlic
11/2 cups Burgundy, Beaujolais, or wine left from last
night's dinner)
2 cups chicken stock or water with 2 envelopes
chicken broth seasoning
2 teaspoons tomato paste
1 tablespoon flour
1/2 teaspoon dried tarragon or 1 tablespoon chopped
fresh tarragon leaves
1/2 teaspoon salt, optional
1/2 pound frozen or canned drained cooked small onions
112 pound frozen or canned drained whole baby carrots
1/2 pound sliced mushrooms
6 small sprigs parsley
Freshly ground pepper
1 pound broad noodles, cooked
6 small sprigs parsley


OCEAN SOUND BAND

CREATES WAVE OF SUCCESS
by Marsha Rose

Ocean Sound Band? Does the band really have anything
to do with the sound of the ocean? No. But they have a lot
to do with an innovative synthesized rock-jazz-fusion
sound that is reaching a wider segment of the music lis-
tening public, thanks to precursors like John McLaughlan,
Pat Metheny and Spyra Gyra.
Twenty-nine-year-old Randy Bernson, formerly of Blood,
Sweat and Tears, is the lead guitarist, composer-arranger
and guiding creative spirit of the group. He is very soft
spoken, with a low key South-Floridian style as he talks
about where a band goes with famed local exposure and a
first album. The album is entitled, Music For Plants, Peo-
ple and Washing Machines and was three years in the
making. It features some all-time jazz greats including:
Herbie Hancock, Bob James, Peter Erskine, Michael Ur-
baniak, Robert Thomas, Jr., and Jaco Pastorius, the latter
two formerly of the group Weather Report. Dealing with
scheduling recording sessions and coming up with the
bucks to pay these guys were two factors responsible for
the stretched out time frame. But Randy is a patient man.
And who wouldn't be with the possibility of such coveted
musicians lending their creative juices to your very own
original works?
The album features such titles as Sundance, on which
there is the sound of seagulls in the background, taped
live by bassist, Chiodo, on a gig in St. Petersburg last
year. Sir Yellow Bird is Bernson's self-styled reggae tri-
bute to the well known island standard. Cone Head Bop is


Wash and dry chickens. Heat oil in skillet and brown
chicken over medium high heat (350 degrees in electric
skillet) until golden on both sides. Add the diced onion and
garlic, spooning them under the chicken. Cover and let
simmer for 15 minutes. Pour in wine and 1 cup stock.
Combine remaining stock, tomato paste, flour, tarragon
and optional salt. Pour over chicken. Cover and let sim-
mer for 30 minutes. Add onions, carrots and mushrooms
and cook for 15 minutes or until chicken is tender. Serve
immediately or set aside and let cool until ready to carry
skillet and its contents aboard. Shortly after serving,
bring to simmer temperature and heat thoroughly for 5
minutes. If necessary, add more wine. Or uncover skillet
and let some of the liquid boil away. Serve on a bed of
noodles, garnish with parsley, and sprinkle with' pepper.
Makes 6 servings.
Note: i-or taster cooking (no skins and bones to dispose
of either) you may substitute 21/2 to 3 pounds of skinless
chicken cutlets. Brown cutlets on both sides, then trans-
fer pieces to warm platter. Add onion and garlic with
remaining stock, tomato paste, seasoning and flour. Con-
tinue as directed, until sauce is reduced to 11/2 cups.
Return the cutlets to the skillet and turn them in the sim-
mering sauce. Serve and garnish as above.

Nedda Anders would love to hear from you with com-
ments, suggestions, advice and even questions about
food From Your Galley.


a lilting Bob Jamesish type tune. Rounding out the album
are Old Hats, Windsong, Steppin' Out and The Flow.
Recently I heard the group live at the Musician's Ex-
change and they played a blues-funk tune called Yankee
Clipper, which they announced had only been performed
twice before. It featured a synthesized guitar solo by Bern-,
son sounding exactly like a steel drum. Nice touch.
Bernson hates being labeled under any one classifica-
tion because he can and does play all types of music.
Originally classically trained, he is his own eclectic stylist.
He spends time playing in two other bands and is
constantly writing new material. Commercially speaking,
Bernson realizes that his music is not as accessible as
someone like Michael Jackson but he is willing to take the
risk and "is happy to be able to pay my bills doing what I
love best, writing and performing."
So what does the future hold for the Ocean Sound
Band? They recently opened for Ramsey Lewis at the
West Palm Beach Jazz Fest where the crowd was ex-
tremely warm and enthusiastic. Promoters from both L.A.
and N.Y. are showing interest in booking the group for
openings of more established acts and a possible tour is in
the offing.
The album, presently on Bernson's own label, Abra, will
soon be picked up by Zebra Records, an independent label
with a wider distribution.
The Ocean Sound Band performs regularly Tuesday
nights and some weekends at the Musician's Exchange,
729 West Sunrise Blvd. For more information call:
764-1905.


DECKS BY DAVIS
CUSTOM WOOD WORK
Decks*Benches*Planters*LatticesoTrellises
DockseWooden Pilings*Fences*Gazebos


DECKS BY DAVIS
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LL IN THE INFORMATION BELOW ANO MAIL TO
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I






io0


.- s
..,
JUNE IS DOLPHIN TIME

First of all let's not confuse this tasty gamefish with the
ever popular Flipper. The porpoises and varieties of
dolphins are mammals related to the whale. Our "fish"
dolphin is a colorful battler and an excellent table fare as
well. Early in the summer large schools appear along the
Florida Coast roaming the Gulfstream in search of prey.
Dolphin have a voracious appetite and will eat practically
anything and everything. Usually you'll find them around
weed patches or other floating debris. Sargassum weed,
especially, is a home for myriads of aquatic life forms.
Larval forms of crustaceans, jelly fish, and shellfish in-
habit these "microcosms". Feeding on these tiny delights
are small fish such as juvenile jacks, ocean tally, even


WATERFRONT NEWS


fingerling dolphin and many others. Of course these small
fish attract larger predators such as dolphin. Also those
patches of weed and other debris offer shade from the hot
summer sun. Floating wood, plastic, even trees are
havens for fish.
Pursuing these gamesters often requires more hunting
than fishing. Instead of trolling blindly out on the blue, I
like to run off shore keeping a sharp eye for anything float-
ing on the surface. Often times after a few days of calm
seas, "rips" occur collecting weed and other debris. If you
locate one of these areas, look for the tiny fish already
discussed. Usually small baitfish in great numbers in-
dicate that you will probably find dolphin around. If the
weed line is void of small critters, I won't spend too much
time trolling it, moving to "greener pastures". A large iso-
lated patch can be productive also. Watch for diving or
hovering birds. Sea birds may dive on baitfish from above
while dolphin are feeding below. I find that if the brids are
moving fast, tunas or bonitos may be present. But this
may not always be true.
Trolling rigged balao or small mullet is a great way to
locate the fish. Vary your baits by using different colored
plastic skirts. Also a plain jig, plastic squid or various arti-
ficials may be added to diversify the menu. I like to fish
four lines from a small boat; two in the outriggers, and
two flat lines. If too many lines ar eout and a large school
strikes, tangled lines and pandemonium may result in lost
fish. More often than not when a fish is brought to the
boat others will follow. This is when you store the trolling
rods quickly and get out the light tackle. To keep the
school around the boat, leave one hooked fish in the
water. The others come around and often will strike any
offering. When they hesitate to bite, cut up some bait fish
and throw the pieces overboard. Put a piece on a plain
hook or jig and drop it over the side. A landing net is han-
dy to boat the small fish and of course a good gaff hook is
necessary if the fish is too large for the net. Dolphin give
you spectacular jumps, runs and head shakes and are
great fun on light spinning or plug tackle. Drop the fish in
the box, close the lid and let him wear himself out.
Unhook him later. In the meantime, use an extra rod to
hook another. In the summer heat it's a good idea to have
plenty of ice available as these fish spoil quickly. Keep
enough for dinner and release the rest to fight again
another day. Occasionally a large male "Bull Dolphin" may
swim with the school. One may weigh up to 50 pounds or


BILLFISHING'S LARGEST ticipants vowed to be on hand for the second Gran Prix
A Event of the series. "Here we really didn't have any local
PA YOF Bahamian boats entered because there weren't any in this
area," said Jake Jordan, captain of the Mean manene
WALKER'S CAY, Bahamas With $196,000 awarded, Fishing Team from Summerland Key, FL. "In other stops
the highest guaranteed purse in the history of fishing, the on the circuit there are going to be a lot of local boats
International Billfish League launched its Gran Prix Series entering. These tournaments are going to grow in stature
at Walkers Cay, Bahamas, April 4 6. The three-day through word of mouth. My entire crew agreed that this
event provided more than its share of excitement and pro- was the best first-time tournament we ever saw."
ved once and for all that a big-money tournament can The IBL's commitment to conservation goes beyond
operate successfully within a release format. simply releasing fish. IBL officials are establishing a Con-
IBL officials could not have been more pleased with the servation Advisory Committee and will provide the com-
results of this first tournament in the seven-event series. mittee with funds to improve billfishing through lobbying
"We've really turned billfishing into a big money sport," and research. "Now that the League is established, we
said IBL Vice President John Good at the awards banouet. are going to make significant contributions to the
"Just last week they had a tennis tournament in Boca conservation effort," said IBL President Wade Horn. "We
Raton (FL), and I believe the winning check Jimmy Con- want to be sure that our children will be able to enjoy the
nors received was around $50,000. We're about to pre- same thrill of fighting these magnificent fish that we have
sent a check for over $78,000 for first place. I don't think come to love."
you will ever see a smaller one in any of our Remaining 1984 IBL Gran Prix Series events will be
tournaments." With a 100-boat format, first-place money held in Morehead City, NC., June 21 23, South Padre
will reach $224,000 in future events. Island, TX., August 8 11, Ocean City, MD., September 6
The next stop on the tour takes angling teams to 8, Orange Beach, AL., October 4 6, Key West, FL., Oc-
Morehead City, NC on June 21 23. Most of Walker's par- tober 23 25, and Palm Beach, FL., late January 1985.


'FISHING


larger. Look out on light tackle! This 54 pounder was
taken off Tavernier a couple of years ago on 12 pound
spinning tackle! It took two hours to subdue the monster.
Now is the time to go after them. Early summer we'll find
the fish in greater numbers and closer to the reef. Later in
August and September, the fish are usually farther out.
On two occasions while catching school dolphin, or
grass hoppers as they call them, a large Blue Marlin sur-
faced and scattered the school. It's a good idea to have a
heavy trolling rod rigged with a live bait hook if one of
these monsters comes around. Offer him a live bait, and
you may be in for the battle of your life.

Tight Lines,
Bill Rhodes




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,






WATERFRONT NEWS
- II- '1 ~r- F -~


POMPANO BEACH


FISHING RODEO

1984 RESULTS

Sportfishing division
(Based on 1 point per pound of eigile fish)
1. John Roth, My Way, 412 points; 2. Jerry Johnson,
PBMC, 377.5 points; 3. Lou Skulnik, Redhead, 335
points; 4. Joe Toms, Live Wire, 328 points; 5. Jack
Braden, Hit & Run, 290 points; 6. Barbara Ferguson, Zara
Spook, 281 points; 7. Pete Zinoarella, Go Getter II, 226
points; 9. Larry Stanvitch, That's My Hon, 222.5 points;
10 Roger Kuzara, Pass Line, 216 points.
Driftflshing division
1. John Paul Flaherty, Fish City Pride, 50.5 points; 2.
Burt Moss, Helen S., 39.5 points; 3. Christmas Rawie,
Helen S VI, 37 points; 4. Pete Frascella, Fish City Pride,
29 points; 5. Kurt Maley, Helen S, 25.5 points; 6. Edgar
Paul, Fish City Pride, 22.5 points; 7. Minh Cung Huynh,
Fish City Pride, 19.5 points; 8. Mario Karp, Fish City Pride,
19.5 points; 9. L.D. O'Dell, Helen S, 17.5 points; 10. Bob
Richards, Helen S, 17 points.
Top female anglers drift
1. Sandra Hughes, Helen S VI, 14.5 points; 2. Edee
Nevers, Fish City Pride, 10.5 points.
Top junior angler drift
1. Paul Foisy, Helen S VI, 7 points.
Driftboat standings
1. helen S, 232 points; 2. Fish City Pride, 227.5
points; 3. Helen S VI, 169 points.
Top large-boat angler (26 feet & over)
1. John Roth, 412 points, My Way; Jerry Johnson,
PBMC, 377.5 points.
Top small-boat angler (under 26 feet)
1. Joe Toms, Live Wire, 328 points; 2. Jack Braden,
Hit & Run, 290 points.
High-point boat
1. Pompano Beach Marine Center, 486 points; 2. My
Way, 412 points; 3. Zara Spook, 409.5 points.
Top female angler sport
1. Barbara Ferguson, Zara Spook, 281 points; 2. Debra
Wilcox, 225.5 points; 3. Carolyn Jennings, Undertaker,
154 points.
Top junior angler sport
1. Jack Korthals, Lady Margaret, 75 points; 2. Danielle
Cooper, Reprieve, 62.5 points; 3. Tina Woodard, Ram
Rod, 44 points; 4. Corey Johnson Sanchez, Edna R., 44
points.
High-point family
1. Ferguson, Zara Spook, 409.5 points; 2. Waldo,
Lucky Strike, 135.5 points.
Heaviest fish
Blue marlin: 287 pounds, Lou Skulnik, Redhead; 2261/2
pounds, John Roth, My Way; 202 pounds, Larry
Stanavitch, That's My Hon.
White marlin: 62 pounds, James Troutman, Cuervo; 44
pounds, Ed Shadoin, Reel Music.
Sailfish: 80 pounds, Pete Zingarella, Go Getter II; 75
pounds, Barbara Ferguson, Zara Spook; 72 pounds, Joe
Toms, Live Wire.
Kingfish: 401/2 pounds, Patrick Moylan, Honey; 32/2
pounds, Jerry Johnson, PBMC; 32 pounds, Thomas Fitz-
patrick, Miss Fitz.
Dolphin: 531/2 pounds (Rodeo record), Jerry Johnson,
PBMC; 44 pounds, Ginny Wheeler, Quetzal; 43 pounds,
George Poveromo, Marc VI.
Wahoo: 621/2 pounds (Rodeo record), Danielle Cooper,
Reprieve; 551/2 pounds, Larry Wingate, Rascal; 54
pounds, John Waldo, Lucky Strike.

For more information about the International Billfish
League and its Gran Prix Series contact the IBL at 4201
N. Federal Highway, Suite B, Pompano Beach, FL 33064
(phone 800/338-3815 or in Florida 305/942-4517).


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The 19th Annual Pompano Beach Fishing Rodeo held
May 18 20 provided 819 anglers on 387 boats with the
most outstanding fishing ever recorded in Rodeo history.
Over 220 registered anglers came from outside Broward
County to compete while 68 traveled from 20 states.
Women, juniors and family combinations accounted for
nearly 200 of those registered to fish.
Final registration was taken on Thursday, May 17, at
spacious Pompano Park Harness Raceway with over
3,000 people attending the kick-off party. More than 60
beautiful custom-made trophies as well as thousands of
dollars in outstanding merchandise prizes were on display
and dozens of door prizes awarded. Everyone enjoyed the
free hor d'eourves while listening to a steel band and
Rodeo information plus socializing with anglers and
guests.
Friday morning 220 small boats and 167 large boats
headed out Hilisboro Inlet for the 8:00 Bimini start. Within
20 minutes the marine radio was humming with anglers
reporting ctaches to Doc Mauger, the Rodeo's radio opera-
tor. Weigh-ins from Louis Skulnik aboard the "Read Head"
leading the Rodeo with a 287 Ib. blue marlin. However, Ed
Shadoin, 1982 Rodeo winner, had captured two-thirds of
the MILLER HIGH LIFE $100,000 GRAND SLAM with a
white marlin and sailfish. All Ed needed was a blue marlin
to take home the $100,000 cash and $7,100 in
merchandise prizes. John Roth of Winter Springs, FL held
down second place with his 226.5 Ib. blue caught aboard
"My Way" with Capt. Paul Stewart. A king mackerel,
tagged by the National Marine Fisheries in 1977 off Cape
Canaveral, was caught by Kenny Higgens of Boca Raton.
The fish, which was estimated to weight 7 Ib. when
tagged, topped the scales at 26 lb.
Seas remained choppy, but the anglers weren't con-
cerned because the fish were biting. Saturday was again
outstanding with another white and two blues weighed in
as well as sails, dolphin, wahoo and king mackerel (15 lb.
minimum weight on non billfish). John Roth set a Rodeo
record when he weighed in his second blue marlin of the
tourney this one weighing 162 lb. Roth took over the
lead with Jerry Johnson second aboard the "Pompano
Beach Marine Center Mako 28." Jerry accumulated
337.5 points with a king, several dolphins and sails over
the two days as well as breaking the heaviest dolphin
record with a 53.5 pounder. Friday's leader, Louis
Skulnik, added two dolphins to hold down third with 335
points. Twelve-year-old Danielle Cooper of Ft. Lauderdale
weighed in an impressive 62.5 Ib. wahoo another
record breaker by 7.5 Ibs. Danielle was fishing with her
dad, Gordon, aboard their 21' "Reprieve." Jack Braden on
"Hit & Run" held fourth place as well as winning the Logo
Scramble a special award for the first angler catching a
sail, wahoo and dolphin. Pete Zingarella, 15-years-old,
weighed in an 80 Ib. sail (missing previous record by one
pound) to add to his two sails and king from the previous
day. Joe Toms on the "Live Wire" also scored high with
sails and dolphins both days.


11


Sunday's fishing slowed down, and anxious friends and
relatives watched the weigh-ins at the four weigh stations
to see if the lead would change. Bill "Kayak Willie" Tytler,
fishing in his second Rodeo aboard his 17' kayak, brought
in an ineligible 10.5 lb. king mackerel. Tytler described
his 5 hours with the kind in the kayak as livingg in a bait
box." Besides the kayak, a 15' Zodiac and a Hobie Cat
were also entered in the Rodeo.
That evening 1,600 people gathered at Pompano Park
for a bountiful buffet dinner and awards presentation.
John Roth's two blue marlins held firm. Roth walked away
with the $10,000 first place check. The PBMC Mako 28
team of Jerry Johnson and Ken Burkert combined their ef-
forts to take home top boat honors as well as $12,000
cash for the Corral Round-up, an optional boat entry in
which 48 boats participated. Barbara Ferguson was top
woman angler for the third time with a total of 281 points.
She also accumulated the most points from her placement
and participation in the Miami and Fort Lauderdale Billfish
tournaments and the Rodeo to take home the coveted
"Triple Crown" award. Combined with her husband, Don,
the Fergusons took top family, $6,000 in the Corral
Round-up and top small boat aboard their 23' "Zara
Spook." Ten-year-old Jack Korthals of Pompano Beach
registered 75 points for top junior angler from the charter
boat, "Lady Margaret." Jack Braden of Pompano Beach
won $1,000 for his 35 Ib. dolphin caught on Shakespeare
Line. The sportsmanship trophy was presented to the
"Sea Ray" crew for their honesty in reporting a sail
caught before fishing hours on Sunday. John Paul Flaterty
on the "Fish City Pride" won $2,500 cash plus a Bahama
trip as top drift angler (aboard a commercial drift boat).
Over $75,000 in cash and $60,000 in merchandise and
trophies were presented to Rodeo anglers. However, the
$100,000 MILLER HIGH LIFE GRAND SLAM went
unclaimed.
Rodeo officials announced that donations would again
be made to the International Game Fish Association, the
Pompano Beach Public Library's Marine Science Section
Pompano Beach Library's Marine Science Section and the
University of Miami's Rosenthiel School of Marine and At-
mospheric (for continued research on ciguatera). More
than $20,000 has been presented to these and other
charities in past years. Over $6,000 will go to the "Rodeo
Reef" fund from the proceeds of the Corral Round-Up, per-
sonal donations and raffling of $1,500 in custom-built
rods donated by Fish 'n Stuff of Pompano Beach. The
"Rodeo Reef," located off Pompano fe9A'h. has Alriady
become very produtive with 34 Chevron gasoline tanks
and the 435' freighter, "Lowrance" (former "Mazon")
located on the site. The Rodeo committee is currently
searching for suitable materials, particularly of concrete
or steel, to add to the reef.
For additional information on the Rodeo or the "Rodeo
Reef," please contact Wade Horn, Rodeo Chairman, at
(305) 942-4513 or write P.O. Box 5584, Lighthouse
Point, FL 33074.


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12


UNDERWATER PHOTOGRAPHY

MADE SIMPLE
by Sam Rich


WATERFRONT NEWS


UGHTING AND VISIBILITY


A major concern to divers worldwide, but especially to
photographers of the deep, is underwater visibility.
(visibility is the latteral distance that a diver can be clearly
seen) Taking effective pictures underwater depends in
part on understanding light and the four major factors that
affect visibility.

ABSORPTION: selective filtering of light that increases
with depth to the prismatic effect of water. The deeper
you go, the less light penetrates. Colors are selectively
absorbed by frequency. The slower side of the spectrum
is first; the faster side penetrates to about 100 feet
where everything becomes gray. The color red, which has
the longest wavelength in the spectrum, does not exist
deeper than approximately 30 feet. Orange is the next to
go, then yellow and eventually green. This phenomenon
exhibits itself rather dramatically If you were diving and
accidentally brushed against the reef causing a little cut,
your blood would be green!
To compensate for absorption you will need your own
source of light. Newer automatics come with built-in
flashes; 35 mm cameras require an independent strobe
light.
ILLUMINATION: amount of light available. Visibility is
directly affected by sunlight. On cloudy days less light
penetrates and visibility is reduced. Surface reflection
also affects light intensity. During early mornings and late
afternoons, more light will be reflected off the surface of
the water producing less than ideal conditions. Your Dest
results will be had on bright sunny days when you have
planned your photo sessions for midday. Ambient light is
needed in addition to artificial light to expose anything
other than macro photography.
DIFFUSION: bouncing and sCattering of light rays under-
water due to the molecular structure of water. Look at the
beam emitted from a swimming pool's underwater lamp.
Instead of traveling in a straight path, the light will ue dif-
fllSPd.intn wavI nfttprnc Vni rln pn nmnonQetn nrrtinllv.
-.TremI sieO-byedding-stronger- strobes "anSa
(secondary strobes, usually of lesser intensity than the
main strobe, that are synchronized to fire when the main
strobe is lit) and staying close to your subject. Automatics
will meter the amount of light reflected back to the lens
from the subject. If lighting is poor, the strobe will stay on
longer. If it is good, the strobe will fire for a shorter dura-
tion. More sophisticated techniques require spot metering
for fill-in flash and back lighting for special effects. '
Total compensation is impossible, but be creative try
using the effects of light scattering and 'back scatter to
enhance your photos. The patterns created by diffusion
can make a sandy bottom come alive!
TURBIDITY: amount of suspended particles in the
water. Silt from the bottom gets stirred up easily in water
movement. Murky conditions mean restricted.visibility. To
avoid turbid conditions, keep your fins from touching or
fanning the bottom. May a great scene has been ruined by
lack of good buoyancy control.


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Overriding all other factors is weather. Heavy seas, high
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Two other phenomena of major consequence to under-
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mediums of different densities. As light rays leave the
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according to their respective frequencies. That is, the
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(blue, indigo and ultra-violet) gets ahead of the slower
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Proximity of subject is worthy of mention in any discus-
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secret of successful underwater photography is getting
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-are used. They allow you to get close and they gather in
more light. Telephoto lenses are virtually useless under-
water. Macro or close-up photography requires further
specialization and is beyond the scope of the beginner.
Dispersion and absorption of light necessitates a com-
plete new set of guide numbers for proper exposure
underwater. Strobe intensity, duration and distance from
subject are all greatly affected by diffusion and refraction,
but getting close will offset most of these problems in-
herent in the dense medium of water.
Your transition to the world of underwater picture-
taking will be easier if you remember this rule: Slow down
the shutter speed from what you are used to on the sur-
face and open up the aperture. Most underwater photos
are taken at about 1/60 second. The beginner inevitably
relies on what he knows is true topside, but the effects of
water on light require a new perspective on control and
creativity.
Overall, there is much less available light underwater.
allowing down me shutter speed and opening up the aper-
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FT. LAUDERDALE'S

GERMAN SUBMARINE

U-BOAT

FACT OR FICTION

by Bryan Brooks

As a young boy growing up in Ft. Lauderdale in the late
1940's, I heard over and over about the German Sub-
marine that sunk off our coast. The stories were tucked
away in a young boy's mind. When i started diving in the
mid 1950's, the stores surfaced again. The thought of
discovering a sleek U Boat somewhere out there was
mind food for a young lad already deeply in love with the
Sea.
It's no secret that during the War, German U Boats
prowled up and down the Gold Coast. Old timers
remember seeing freighters or tankers on fire lighting up
the sky and knowing that somewhere a German U Boat
had done its job.
I began slowly to collect and document as best as
possible the truth or fiction of these stories. My original
diving instructor had told me that he and another lad had
seen the U Boat somewhere off Hillsboro Inlet. They were
being paid by a boat captain to find something on the bot-
tom. The boat captain was trolling the lads deep behind
his boat. They both saw it for an instant. Air was getting
short and they surfaced, not telling the boat captain about
it. They later went back three times and couldn't locate it.
I asked him where it was, and he stated "East of



OCEAN / WOMAN

A DIVER'S FANTASY

by Bryan Brooks

Her soft waves caress you with feelings of pleasure.
Her power lets yo uknow you have met your match.
Her Charms beckon you to explore the depths of Her.
She is always there. in my mind. my heart, my soul.

A moment deep in Her is to know happiness, to know love
Leaving Her is sadness. a part of you will always be in
Her.
She beckons. you follow. Her sensual spirit tells you.
"I have you and you know you can never leave Me."

She is Mother. She is strength, always there day after
day.
Her seas raging or Her quiet waters teasing you to
follow Her. She seduces you and you willingly go.
She is Mistress. Her spirit has you. Your soul will burn
with the communion of Her salt waters.

You know inside of you that no matter what woman you
may know
She is your Mistress. She flows deep into you.
you leave Her searching for worldly pleasure, but you
know that no woman will ever truly control you for
She will rage. Her power is awesome and total.

She has you. your worldly troubles, pains and torments
are melted as you run crying to Her shores.
Your tears fall like torrents into Her. Her waves wash your
soul. You mind's hurts and pains fade.
Her waves one after another, never ending. bring calm
and peace.

You know you are Hers. She is your Lady. She is Love.
She is Mistress. She is eternal. She beckons, you follow.
she calls and willingly you are Hers.
Deep into Her waters you swim. deeper ever deeper.
You know love. you know heaven. You become one with
Her.
She is all that is Beauty She is the Sea.


PETER HARRISON




B & B DOCK & DECK


2320 SOUTHWEST 36th AVE.
FT LAUDERDALE, FLA. 33312 583-8017


Hillsboro, somewhere." Depth? Are you kidding? This was
back in the days of the two hose regulators The only
estimate was deeply The year that they found the sub?
Sometime in the late 1950's.
The documentation went on. Old stories were checked
from Sea Captains who had taken people out to fish over
what they stated was a German submarine. One old cap-
tain was met at dawn at the Hillsboro Inlet. He stated that
a friend had seen the sub trying to sneak into the inlet one
night. He had called the Navy. The morning came and the
sea captain stated that he had seen Navy planes bomb
what they were told was a German sub. He stated it was
in 500 feet of water due east of the Hillsboro Light House.
The name of the person who saw the U Boat? Passed
away, the oily witness. Later research from the County
stated that the water was too shallow in Hillsboro Inlet at
that time for a German U Boat to get in.
Another Sea Captain, Harold Wayne, stated that his
wife gave birth to their son on December 17, 1942 and
that the halls of Broward General Hospital were crowded
with German sailors from the U Boat. I frantically
searched through old Newspaper Micro film. Nothing.
Possibly because the press was under wartime censor-
ship. Local leaders may have been afraid the news might
start a panic. This same captain stated that the sub was
off Dania in over three hundred feet of water. He related
that a navy frogman went out and dove on the sub,
recovering some documents from it. Efforts to locate the
navy diver were for naught. He lived somewhere in Ala-
bama, maybe. Captain Wayne stated that before he
retired he had taken many people to fish off this sub.
Endless leads were followed but the trail was always
cold. I belong to the Ft. Lauderdale Historical Society.
They recently had a World War II Exhibit. There was a
guest speaker, Dr. Roy Wirshing. He had been stationed at
the Naval Air Base in Ft. Lauderdale during the war and
was present when the five planes disappeared in
December 1945. After the presentation I asked him about
any information he might have concerning the German
sub. He surprised me when he stated that he had been a
teacher at Deerfield Beach High School and that around
1974 one of his students came to school with a rusty Ger-
man Luger pistol. He stated that he and his friends had
found the sub off Boca Inlet in 103 feet of water. They
entered the sub and recovered old artifacts including the
Luger. Where was this student? I'm still looking.
So the story goes. Is the sub off Dania, Hillsboro or Boca
Raton Inlet? Who knows? It is fact or fiction? A young
boy's fascination becomes an oio uiver's lntasy. Is it
there or not? In making a living as a Dive Instructor at the
YMCA, crawling around in Mother Ocean's belly off Ft.
Lauderdale, the thought still occurs, will I see It? Looking
off into the depths of the sea on dive after dive I wonder,
is it out there .. somewhere?


THE BROOKS FAMILY
BRYAN. MARY, MIKE
CHRIS & PAT


FULL SERVICt
DIVE SHOP








INC.
305- 564-8661


MIKE'S MARINE ELECTRIC
Custom Designed Panels

Repair's A/C D.C. Systems
Charger's Alt. Starters
Shore Cord's Gauges

Complete Rewiring

942-6081 24 Hour Service


Engine Mechanical Electrical Pumps -
Toilets Generators Installation & Repairs
Engine Surveys, Absentee Owner Supervision
Crusader, Perkins, Borg Warner
Vetus Marine Diesels
TED HETTLER YACHT SER VICE
Serving Ft. Lauderdale Yacht Owners Since 1960

301 Bayberry Drive Telephone
Plantation. Florida 33317 587-7282


13


MARINE TRIVIA

by Bryan Henry


The Dead Sea, which is actually a lake, contains more
minerals than any other body of water on earth.
The Gulf of Mexico is the world's largest gulf, covering
an area of 800,000 square miles.
Two percent of the shoreline of the United States is set
aside by the government for public recreation.
The first submarine used successfully to sink an enemy
ship was the H.L. Hunley, launched by the Confederacy
during the Civil War.
A baby oyster is called a set.
A baby eel is called an elver.
Those areas of the oceans called the "high seas" are
the open waters beyond the limits of national territorial
jurisdiction.
Seventy percent of the earth is covered by water, the
same proportion our bodies contain.
Sweden has more than 100,000 lakes.
Every year, man takes about 100-million tons of fish
from the oceans.
"Hurricane" originates from the Spanish word "hura-
can," meaning well spirits. A typhoon is a hurricane in the
North Pacific; a cyclone is a hurricane' in the Indian Ocean;
a willy-nilly is a hurricane in Australia.
Several species of shrimp, after one or two seasons as
sexually active males, change sex and function as
females.
The Bahamas consist of 700 islands and more than
2,000 cays (a coral reef or sandbank off the mainland):
The electric eel can deliver a 600-volt shock.
On average, there are 3.5 pounds of salt to every 100
pounds of sea water.
The manatee, or sea cow, closely related to the
elephant, gave rise to the old mariner's tale of mermaids.
*


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373 N. University Drive FREE ESTIMAT
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(305) 979-5701 f


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EQUIPMENT SUPPLIES

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1979 N.W. 55th AVENUE
MARGATE, FLORIDA 33063



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6908 Cypress Road Office: 792-1074
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Typesetting Letterheads Fold
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Flyers Programs Pertorate
Brochures Price Lists Collate
Business Forms Booklets Staple
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Xerox Rubber Stamps Notary
% 320 S.W. 2nd Street. Ft. Lauderdale. FL 33312.,
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- -








WATERFRONT NEWS


"WHAT'S IN A NAME!"

My name is Stella. No, I wasn't really named for a star,
but rather for my grandmother who was, I gradually dis-
covered, the brightest in my mother's firmament. I have
always liked the appellation and, as a young girl, secretly
added Maris to Stella Star of the Sea because of my
love for earth's great bodies of water.
Throughout my life, no matter where I happened to be, I
would seek out a watercourse to spend memorable, satis-
fying hours swimming its deeps or exploring its borders.
As a middle aged woman with graying hair, a lone and
recent empty-nester, I chose as my habitat an apartment
overlooking the sea of Florida's island of Sanibel.
Whenever I had a spare hour or two I would wander to a
relatively unsequestered part of the beach to gather shells
and to scavenge for any other interesting flotsam that
might have been washed ashore. As for the latter, one
day I found a fragment of milky white glass, then on
another day, an amber colored piece, small shards of
sea glass probably broken from bottles tossed over-
board a long time before I came upon them. These speci-
mens had gradually been transformed in the turbulent
waves. The sharp, rough edges were now smooth so that
it was a pleasure to rub the bright margins with my fingers
and to hold the weathered pieces as filters to the sun.
As for the shells, I had soon collected perfect samples
of those most abundantly found on the beach various
snail shells such as the round glossy one named for the
moon, the golden salt-sprayed channelled whelk, bulging
in its center and spiralling to its pointed apex. Once, only
once, did I come upon a not quite perfect shell I later
learned was a double sunrise. Its translucent white halves
were exactly matched in size, shape and exquisite pat-
tern, three rose colored rays fanning out from the golden
hinge binding the halves together.
As I added speciments to my collection I arranged them
as centerpiece on my dining table, creating ever new pat-
terns to delight the eye, when treasures were added, I
noticed how much my guests liked to examine and handle
the individual shells, replacing them carefully where they
belonged in the design. This selection of "gifts from the
sea" always proved an ice-breaker at a gathering of old
and new friends.
Once, while collecting new speciments, on a rare
dismal drizzly day following a cold, stormy one, I found I
-^ ^^.asss^^^ .s, m.li ~.m-- U.on_. -9 oisanaoy-< -.
shore, bent over an object which, I surmised, had been re-
trieved from the water.
As I approached, it became apparent that the object
was some sort of tooled post, probably a chair or table leg.
It was still covered with debris but was rapidly being
cleaned up. As I passed by, the man who was doing the
scrubbing, looked up and smiled. He was handsome -
how could I help noticing? with the bluest of blue eyes,
strongly masculine features and a head of heavy dark hair
streaked with gray, a color that seemed inappropriate for
one with such a youthful face.
As he looked up he noticed the collection in my hands,
"Another beachcomber," he remarked with a grin.
I showed him my find of the day.
"And what is it you are collecting?" I asked.
"Here it is," and he exhibited the post from which he
had scraped enough clinging fragments to reveal the fine
grained and shapely wood. "I think this is a beautiful
place," he.added. "And if my wife consents, I'm going to
display it in our living room."
"I hope she approves."
"And so do I!" he exclaimed.
There came a pause. He filled it in by remarking, "I
didn't really come here in search of an artifact like this."
And he gave the post another rub. "I was looking for
something quite strange and different."
My curiosity was aroused.
"You see," he continued, "I read something once when
I was a small boy, something I never forgot. It was an old
Indian legend telling about a young man who would come
from a great distance to visit the shore of a certain body
of water. He did this in the hope of finding a star that had
fallen during the night." Then he hesitated, perhaps in


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583-3769


SYacht Refinishing
Joel ETreichel Yacht Delivery
INE REPAIR Mechanical Systems
(Installation & Repair)
Lss egsssjsassssssELssass


sudden shyness, while his eyes seemed to become bluer
than blue. "And I come here for that reason, too. But I've
never found the star."
"But you have," I exclaimed. "You found one today."
And I told him my name.
There was a new light in his eyes but he seemed at a
loss for words. Instead, he reached into his pocket and
pulled out a piece of sea glass of a kind and color I had
never seen before. It was flat like the others, its edges
smoothly rounded, but it had in its deep azure center a
strange marking, probably produced by abrasion. What I
glimpsed was a veritable star sapphire of the sea.
The man handed me the token in silence and I accepted
it without words. Then we Darted and that was all, or so I
thought.
*
A number of years passed, It may have been half a
dozen, and my hair had turned from grey to white. My ex-
quisite acquisition remained in a place of honor in my
centerpiece of shells. However, I rarely though conscious-
ly of the delightful incident that had elicited the gift. The
stranger and I were, as the poet Longfellow described us,
"Ships that pass in the night, and speak to each other in
passing." The memory was a happy one, but was slowly
fading.
It happened one day that I was walking with a close
friend on the foot trail in the Ding Darling National Wildlife
Refuge. The sanctuary, one of the gems of Sanibel Island,
is situated in a dense mangrove swamp amid rich
estuarian waters. The tangled shade form the mangroves
provides refuge for numerous migratory birds, who come
to Sanibel for the winter, as do "snowbirds" of the human
species.


My friend was equipped with a pair of binoculars, so
that we constantly stopped to get close-ups of birds
feeding in the swamp birds such as pure white egrets,
or herons of various hues. Most captivating of all were the
birds on the wing; the most beautiful the roseate spoon-
bills, the pinko f their wings flashing against the'blue of
the sky.
It was getting late, so we put the binoculars away and
started walking briskly toward our waiting car. Presently
we saw a well built man approaching from the opposite
direct on. His face, incongruously framed in pure white,
had a ruddy, boyish glow. Walking rapidly, he gave the
impression of an extremely robust human being. As he
passed us, something made me turn. He turned at the
same instant.
"I remember you," he said, his eyes as deeply blue and
smiling as I recollected them.
"And I remember you," I responded, with a stab of un-
expected pleasure.
He raised his arm and pointed to the sky. I held out a
cupped hand. We nodded in recognition, turned from each
other and continued on our separate ways.
"Who was that fellow?" my companion asked.
"Someone who, a long time ago, picked up a fallen star
on the shore of the Gulf."
"What?" he questioned in puzzlement.
To compound the mystery, for it was strictly my affair
and not his, I replied, "All I can say is that it concerns an
ancient Indian legend." But to myself I added, "And it also
concerns the fact that my parents named me Stella."

Martha E. Munzer


silver. Ships and money seem to have developed
collaterally. Not only did the Greek and Roman ship
designs develop from Phoenician craft (dating back some
30 centuries Greek drachmae and Roman states were
struck in the image of Phoenician money. The two banks
of oars on the ancient Phoenician galleys with their sharp
ramming beaks eventually evolved into biremes and tri-
remes.


Ki 7 or.


SHIP MONEY


by Bob Hammack-

Three centuries ago "ship money" caused a serious
sensation in England. King Charles I levied the ancient tax
without the consent of the newly powerful parliament a
definite breach of protocol that was at least partly re-
sponsible for scuttling the ship of state. Charles literally
lost his head over the matter.
Originally, British cities and towns were required to sup-
ply ships, sailors and arms for the country's defense as
well as its economic growth. As the years passed, money
replaced mariners; cash replaced chandlery.
But the ship money of the 17th century is minor com-
pared to the taxing effort of cataloging coins, tokens and
banknotes from early Phoenician gold to modern
Colombian currency that depict triremes, galleys, gal-
leons, clippers and canoes.
Thousands of maybe a million coins and curren-
cies bear a surprising number of diverse vignettes. His-
torically, they begin with such pieces as ancient as Greek
and Roman ship-types, sail through Spanish galleons and
Dutch clippers, and cruise to the United States' ironclad-
gunboat Monitor and on to the Canadian schooner
Bluenose.
Dimes, dollars and denarii all reflect the change from
ship to canoe. Canadian dollars since 1935 have pictured
the "canoeman", and 10-cent pieces since 1937 have
featured the fishing schooner Bluenose, captained by
Angus Walters.
Back when money had a name you could bank on -
that is, notes issued by such institutions as the Bank of
Upper Canada, York (Toronto) ships and boats drew
water on a paper sea. An 1831 Canadian one-dollar note
pictures an unidentified ship, and all the Maritime Pro-
vince banks issued ship money of similar design. The
Bank of Nova Scotia at Halifax still redeems early issues,
but few turn up in their hands; not when collectors pay
upwards of 10 times the face amount for such things as a
1903 $20 bill. Bank of Prince Edward Island notes are no
longer redeemable the bank failed in 1881 but no
matter. Their redeeming feature is their value to collec-
tors. Of course, all value depends on the condition of the
seldom seen paper currency.
A battle ship graces the 1913 $10 bill of the Royal
Bank of Canada in Montreal. While few modern countries
use warships on their coins or currency, the earliest
money often featured men-of-war at least the prows of
Phoenician war galleys were part of the ancient gold and


However fanciful the stories of early coinage and the
ships that literally sailed them around the "middle of the
earth" the Mediterranean few could rival Sir Philip
Gibbs' plantation tokens of 1788 and 1792. These rare
copper penny pieces bear a sea-going, horsedrawn sleigh,
and Neptune (or Poseidon) holds the distinctive trident
symbol of Barbadoes. Just below the god of the sea is
what appears to be a paddle-wheel. If it in fact is, it pre-
dates the real things by several years. Besides, although
river captains claimed paddle-wheels could "run on a
heavy dew," they are inefficient on deep rough water.
Hardly a fitting craft for a god, especially a sea god.
Historical ships such as the Kalmar Nyckel (Key of
Kalmar, a Swedish city), which carried Swedish settlers
to North America in 1638, appear on both American and
Swedish coins. It was the only time the same ship ap-
peared on two national currencies commemorating the
same event, the settlement of the state of Delaware.
Of course and sometimes, off course the same
ship has appeared on the money of several nations. Most
notable is Columbus' flagship Santa Maria which has
managed to find its way into numismatic navigation more
than any other identified ship. Nearly every Latin
American country including Haiti, Cuba, Venezuela and
Equador has used the design at one time or another.
The U.S. Columbian Exposition half dollar of 1893 was the
first.
The register of numismatic watercraft continues to
grow. There is little doubt that every type of lake, river or
sea-going craft will have (or already has) made its way in-
to the coins and currency of the world.

(Bob Hammack, a former newspaper edi-
tor, is a widely published writer,and
is currently a professional in the
Scouting and Sea Exploring programs in
St. Louis, Missouri.)


14









CLASSIFIED

BOATS WANTED
Business has been great and our list-
ings have been selling which means
that we are once again in need of good
clean Power and Sail Brokerage Yachts
(32' plus). Due to our heavy national
advertising campaign we can effective-
ly promote your boat using high qual-
ity advertising. Please give us a
call and one of our friendly brokers
will be haDpy to discuss the details
with you. e9/0,v i ; ay Yacht Sales
and Charters. 2160 SE 17 St. Ft. Laud
305-7647590.
13' BOSTON WHALER- any condition,
call 463-1331.

DOCKAGE
ECONOMICAL MARINA- Live-aboard Dock-
age from $180/mo. Showers, Laundry,
Restaurant. DRY STORAGE for Small
Boats from $30/mo. 584-2500.
BANYAN MARINA APTS- 111 Isle of
Venice. 8' Deepwater up to 53'.
Pool, Cable, Phone, Laundry.
LIVE-ABOARD or STORAGE. Apartments
Weekly/Monthly also available.
Call 524-4430
ISLE OF VENICE- Sailboat to 41'.
No live-aboards. Annual. Parallel.
Water & 110. 125 Isle of Venice.
Call 463-5621
ISLE OF VENICE- Up to 53', Live-
aboard o.k. Pool, Laundry, Shower
& Phone. Call 525-2223.
FT LAUD- Deepwater dock, no fixed
bridges. Electricity & Water. No
live-aboards. $180/mo/yr.
1472 SE :5 St. Call 462-4234.


WATERFRONT NEWS


FOR SALE cont'
DIESEL ENGINES (DUCATI) 9.5 HP,
$1875; 24 HP, $2850. Includes in-
struments, harness, oil pump, flex
mounts, coupler, reduction gear &
freight. Call 587-8518.

PALMER- P-60 Gas Engine, 2:1 gear,
28 HP, runs perfect, $995, REPOWER
SYSTERMS' 462-3894.

INFLATABLE (MOTOMAR)- 8' to 151'
The Quality Inflatable.
Call 522-1486.
DIESEL ENGINES 9.5 HP to 2000 HP;
all applications: Sail*Power*Wcrk-
boats. Competive Prices. 587-8518


HELP WANTED
INDEPENDENT PAPER CARRIERS needed!
Monthly delivery routes from Dania
to Lighthouse Point. Call 524-9450.

MARINE SERVICES
MARINE PLUMBER- Reasonable Rates.
Call 462-6308.
James Sullivan professes a knowledge
of CELESTIAL NAVIGATION, LORAN-C, &
PREP. for USCG OPERATORS LICENSE.
Will teach same to seafarers for
$12.-Call 462-2628.
PROFESSIONAL
TEAK SPECIALIST, Varnish & Yacht
Maintenance. Capt. Frank 525-6221.
Speak SPANISH or FRENCH in only 3
easy weeks, including MARINE Vocab.
INTERPRETING available. 564-6962 or
564-5822


15


REAL ESTATE


(305) 462-5770 Ofc.
(305) 527-1304 Eves. Mi

ROBERT P. GARGANO
Lic. Florida Real Estate Broker REALTOR
./ ........ ....

Sf1700 E. Las OlasBlvd., Suite 204
.......' Fort Lauderdale, Fla. 33301


Specializing in Waterfront Real Estate
Living & Working on the New River
DEEPWATER HOMES S CONDOS
SOUTH NEW RIVER ISLES (Citrus Isles)-
Deepwater, JUST LISTED, 3 bdrm 2bath
Central A/C Great Condition! 76'
Lot with New 50' Dock.
LANDINGS Deepwater 3 bdrm 2 bath
Extra Spacious & Private BEST PRICED
Deepwater in the Landings area.
NEW RIVER Deepwater Vacant Lot
Approximately 190' on the rivet.
Zoned Multi-family, Live-aboards
permitted.
RIVER REACH Dockage only $10/ft/yr
Golf*Tennis*Pools*Sauna*24hr Security
!. Best Priced 2 bdrm on island!
Great 3rd fl. view overlooks Pool,
Canal & Yachts. ONLY $73,900.
II. Watch Yachts go by from the wrap
around balcony of this beautiful
2 bdrm 2 bath directly on New River
II. Beautiful 2 bdrm 2 bath. 5th Fl
view overlooks Golf, Tennis & Canal


FOR SALE

WESTERBEKE 4-107 Marine Diesel 40 HP
2:1 ge _$995. REPOWER SYSTEMS
462- 9

BOSTON WHALER 11'4" elec start 20 HP
Merc,trailer & davit $2500 781-8037.

GENERATORS, New & Used Gas & Diesel,
With or Without Installation. Call
for Price REPOWER SYSTEMS 462-3894.

MG MIDGET, best offer call 524-9450.

WESTERBEKE- all new sailboat diesel
engines on sale, 10-100 HP. Call for
details REPOWER SYSTEMS 462-3894.


GOOD QUALITY MARINE WOODWORK,
REFINISHING & MAINTENANCE, call
Lee Jensen @ 522-2189.
MI CnAc.L b rIM I L .-. -*
plete dockside service. Call 474-2730.

WOODENBOAT REPAIR, Planking, Framing
Custom Woodwork. Al- 524-4687.
REFRIGERATION A/C Repairs-
Installations, 12v-115v, Engine
Drive Systems. Cash-M/C-VISA-"Pay
as you go"- Do it yourself Equip-
ment Available. OFFSET YOUR COSTS
THRU BARTER- WE TRADE WORK FOR CARS
GUNS, etc.
CUSTOM REFRIGERATION 527-0540
527-4477.


__________L ~ n T V -~-~.---.- ~ -


CABLE
MARINE
INC.


BOTTOM PAINTING SPECIALS


We'll clean and paint your bottom cheaper than you can do it
yourself ...
Power/Sail Power/Sail Power/Sail
Paint Under 40 Ft. 41 Ft. 59 Ft. 60 Ft. Plus
Bottom Coat $6.50 Per Ft. $7.00 Per Ft. $ 8.50 Per Ft.
a Vinylux $7.25 Per Ft. $7.75 Per Ft. $ 9.25 Per Ft.
* UnIpoxy $8.50 Per Ft. $9.00 Per Ft. $10.75 Per Ft.
Above includes haul-out and pressure cleaning.
Scraping 9f heavily fouled bottom extra.


NOW THREE FULL

SERVICE LOCATIONS

FT. LAUDERDALE
2491 HIGHWAY 84
305-587-4000
80 TON LIFT
PALM BEACH GARDENS
PGA BLVD. & INTRACOASTAL
305-627-0440
60 TON LIFT
FT. LAUDERDALE
1517 SE 16 ST
462-2822
40 TON LIFT


~.



MANY OTHER WATERFRONT LISTINGS AVAIL.
"Neww vwte'fr9 ont L -tiPg.' needed;
ROBERT P. GARGANO 462-5770 Ofc.
Lic. Real Estate Broker Realtor 527-1304 Eves.


WATERFRONT NEWS
ADVERTISING RATES:
Classifieds (35 Characters/Line)
First Line ................ $4.00
Each Additional Line ......$3.00
Per Column Inch.............. $12.50
Business Card................ $25.00
Minimum Art Set-Up Fee ....... $5.00
Insert Fee per Insert ............. 1.50
(Maximum Size 8" x 11")
Call concerning Photos & Color

For more information call
524-9450
or stop by our office

ADVERTISING DEADLINE THE FIRST DAY
OF THE MONTH
CIRCULATION 15,000

WATERFRONT NEWS
320 S.W. 2nd Street
Ft. Lauderdale, FL 33312
Phone: (305) 524-9450


- I -


_~--p- _~i~BLC-~-slll


I


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An Id








COMMUNITY CALENDAR & T)P1Efi BLE
A N/ r, A T Al


SATL1FRE)/L'/


LUPN UA Y IVIuIu.4k Y I r,.J.- L L VV\ ILE JC' \ -
Ila.l Mata at
Andrews Ave. June 105 16
TIME ADJUSTMENTS FOR TIDE TABLE Bridge over
High Water Low Water New River. Ocean Race-West End
Hillsboro In let----------- -31 minutes -50 min. Feet + or Thru June 17
Bahia Mar----------------- -20 min. -18 min. mean low.
Port Everglades Inlet----- -45 min. -62 min. Eastern Day- 2'1.
Playboy (Dania Cut-Off)--- +45 min. +28 min. light Saving C50 *1718'228 0553*11311801
Summerfield (S.F. New R.)- +40 min. +40 min. Time. c0. -"3.0 -0.3'

1 Moon in apogee 1 Moon on Equator
LAST QUARTER
FATHER's DAY FT. LAUD CITY Fla. Offshore Multi- Gr. Ft. L. Board SaillFlorida Gold Coast Plantation (Key) Yacht
COMMISSION MTG Hull Assoc. meeting, Assoc. 7:30 pm. Patio Age Group Swimming Harbor Dolphin Tourna-
8:00 & 10:00 a.m. Harbor Lights-Rest. Bar, Riverside Hotel Championships. ment. June 23 & 24.
CITY HALL Dania. 7:10 pm. Ft. L., Call 463-78191Swimming Hall of Call 1-852-2381.
Fame thru June 24 hinh

+.0' 1.7 *1i6' .1.6'
+011' +1.7 + 1.' +17' + 1.5. l;..' *1.5' +1.6' +1.5s 0452'1133'1740*2359
001 06381218-0 5"0725*1 t1934 IOI "08131359202'4 0226-0904-1456213.6 0316"iT954155012i2 0405-1045e1647*2305 0.o01 -o. 3
w 0, 0 0.' +1 0.2. +0.' 0.' 2' +0.23 0.1' .00 .,

S24 25 26 27 28 NEW MOON 29 3
Moon farthest
Women's Yacht Racing Ocean Sound Band Atlantean Drift- Buehler Planetarium: D atih~feof directorr Gulfstream Sailing
Assoc., BBYRA One Musicians Exchange wood Band "Cosmic Visitors" a of Broward's marine Club, Twilight Race
Design (Trophies at Ft. Laud. Musicians Exchange new star program. related Clubs & Orga
CGSC). Call 973-7892 BCC Central Campus Call Cynthia Hancock
MIASF Board Mtg. 3501 SW Davie Rd. 462-5573 or Bill Emer high
high Executive Off. Ft.Laud. 7:30 pm. ling 463-2313-. +2.0' +2.3'
5'1 6219 183 +1' +1.7' o:.o' +1 8' +21' +1 +2..2 + +23' 0441*1020*1655*2305
-.,1 01850 0628'1305*1918 0137*0712"1349*2003 0223"07581434*2046 0308"0845"1520"2133 035440930'1606"2217 -0 -o0.
iou *n. -0.2' :0.7' 0 -n 5' 0.0' -0.6' o.o -0.6' Low

JulyMoon in perigee2 3 4 FIRST QUARTER 5 6 7
Moon on Equator
FT. LAUD. CITY INDEPENDENCE DAY FT. LAUD CITY MARINE Miami's Summer Boat
COMMISSION Mtg. ADVISORY MTG.7:30p.m. & Sport Fishing Show
8 & 10 am City Hall Thru July 11.
City Hall
.igh +1, +2.0'
+2.9110' 2.2' + 2.0 2.1' +2.0' +'2.0 042.0 .719 +2.0' 0 08171923
05291110* 522 691205.1835 0042"0713"1303*1937 0i35*0808"1400 2032 0131*0907 15082013 0329 1008"161552240 -o.08 +o.1
-0.2' -0.5' -0 2' -0.4 .2' 0.3' 0.3' 0.0' Cow
tow

8' 9 10 11 Moon farthest 12 13 14
south of Equator FULL MOON
Ocean Sound Ban.3 Discovery Center host
Musicians Exchange "MicroScopes/Micro-
't. Laud. escapes: Finding Art
Science." Thru Aug. 5
231 SW 2 Ave., Ft. L +1.9' +2.1'
+ 1.9' +2.0' 1+,3 "' .. 2. 2 *.0 -0.4'
05"21908'1822 + -9' 70'913 L- 7:;O7 o 02'"0809"*o'4 GE 0U310850 15312142 04 9'060431 516224L
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