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Waterfront news
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00072837/00003
 Material Information
Title: Waterfront news
Physical Description: Serial
Language: English
Publisher: Ziegler Pub. Co.
Place of Publication: Ft. Lauderdale Fla
Creation Date: May 1, 1984
Frequency: monthly
regular
 Subjects
Genre: periodical   ( marcgt )
serial   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Broward -- Fort Lauderdale
Coordinates: 26.135833 x -80.141944 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 1, issue 9 (Nov. 15-Dec. 15, 1984); title from cover.
Funding: Funded in part by the University of Florida, the Library Services and Technology Assistance granting program of Florida, the State Library and Archives of Florida, and other institutions and individuals.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 11455814
lccn - sn 84001937
issn - 8756-0038
System ID: UF00072837:00003

Table of Contents
    Cover
        Cover
    Main
        Page 1
    Main: Community News
        Page 2
        Page 3
    Main: The Bulletin Board
        Page 4
    Main: Fishing
        Page 5
    Main: Sailing
        Page 6
    Main continued
        Page 7
    Main: Diving
        Page 8
        Page 9
    Main continued
        Page 10
    Main: Classifieds
        Page 11
Full Text

J Volume 1 Issue 3


May 15/June 15, 1984
Circulation 15,000


What's Inside
Community Colendar
Tide Table
Waterfront Map
Venice of America?
The Dutchman's Log
Underwuater Photography


320 S.W. 2nd St. Fort Lauderdale, Florida 33312 (305) 524-9450


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WATERFRONT NEWS


BROWARD'S REEFS AND

SHORES IMPERILED BY

HUMAN POPULATION

by Moreland Gambl-Swnft

As I write this article a jackhammer is tearing up the
sidewalk outside my window, punching holes in my peace
of mind. Such an environment is appropriate for this story
about Florida's reefs, shores, and future.
A panel of scientists, government officials and others
concerned about Southeast Florida's reefs and shores
gathered at Secret Woods Nature Center on April 28th as
a part of Broward County's observance of "Week of the
Ocean" before an audience of about 100.
Nine speakers, moderated by Dr. George Fitzpatrick,
discussed Broward County's reefs and shores, their
geology, ecology and man's impact upon them. The tone
wasn't upbeat. Grover Champion spoke of vanis6ft.:
beaches: Dr. Gilbert Voss, Professor of Biological Oceanb?-
graphy at University of Miami and the driving force in the
establishment of John Pennekamp Coral Reef State Park
and Key Largo National Marine Sanctuary, discussed coral
reef ecology and the pros and cons of establishing a part
to protect Broward's reefs. Moderator Fitzpatrick de-
scribed the struggle between those who want to fix the
reefs and shores after they break versus those who want
to use preventive management before they breakdown.
Government spokesmen from state and federal agen-
cies discussed coastal and off-shore regulations. Lt.
Cmdr. Michael Crye, an attorney with the U.S. Coast
Guard, touched upon Fort Lauderdale's debate over live-
aboards, stating that federal regulations could possibly
prevent city officials from enforcing sewer hook-ups for
such boats. Whether a floating home is a vessel is
unclear, according to the attorney.
The panel and the moderators joined in a question and
answer session with the audience. A pessimistic Dr. Voss
does not see a bright future for Florida's reefs and shores.
Only with a "really massive cleanup and re-engineering of
the shoreline and inland waterways, could it be turned
back. But I think the influx of people (into this area) is go-
ing to be more than any engineering you could do,"
warned Voss in answering the final question of the ses-
sion.
Finally, Bryan Brooks, coordinator of "Week of the
Ocean" Reef Preserve project off Broward's John U. Lloyd
State Park showed slides of underwater life. Mr. Brooks
asked his audience not to "write off south Florida. There's
;;'2 out there!"


May 15- June 15, 1984

Volume 1 Issue 3


CITY OF FORT LAUDERDALE


MARINE FACILITIES

by Midam 0. Seymour

The City of Fort Lauderdale operates three marinas, one
Anchorage Area, and three boat ramps.
Privately owned boats use the facilities on both sides of
New River between Federal Highway Tunnel and the An-
drews Avenue bridge. Commercial boats use the section
between Andrews Avenue and the Railroad Bridge.
The other two City-owned marinas are Sailboat Bend at
SW 4 Avenue and the Marshall Bridge, just south of the
downtown area, and, on the east side of the City, the ac-
commodations are located on the InterCoastal adjacent to
the Birch-Las Olas Parking Lot.
Directly across the Waterway, on the south side of the
Las Olas Bridge, is the Anchorage Area.
City-owned boat ramps are on the Seminole Canal at
15th Street, Middle River in George English Park, and New
River at 7th Avenue.
All these facilities are under the supervision of three
people who work in the Marine Facilities Office at 14
South New River Drive.
J.C. "Jack" Horner is the Supervisor. Debbie Warner
keeps the office going and Hilton Brown, Jr., handles
Dockmaster responsibilities.
Horner came to Fort Lauderdale a little more than two
years ago, from a job as manager of the largest private
marina on the east coast of the United States. "I've been
around boats all my life," he says.
Hilton Brown, Jr., is a native of Fort Lauderdale. He
graduated from Piper High School and began working for
the City just eight years ago. Brown frankly admits that "I
didn't know anything about boats when I started this job,
but the man who was in charge then ... Mr. Bryant...
taught me what I needed to learn."
Juggling all the details a Dockmaster must keep in mind
is a challenge Brown enjoys. Among other things, it's an
essential part of his job to know the exact dimensions of
each of the 140 city-owned boat slips, how the lowest
tide effects each space, which slips are in use at all times,
and what kind of boat is where.
To help keep track of all those details and many more,
the Marine Facilities office operates its own 22-footer. If
the office receives a report of a dock that's collapsing into
a canal, it's easier to investigate from the waterside than
trying to find the proper location on the landside. The boat
also makes it much simpler to collect rental fees from
customers who use the moorings in the Anchorage Area.
Although technically the Marine Facilities office is re-
sponsible for enforcement of Ordinances governing City
waterways and facilities, it is the Harbor Patrol Division of
the Police Department that handles law enforcement
chores. Like their counterparts on land, the waterborne
officers issue citations for speeding and are on the look-
out for boaters whose erratic behavior might indicate an
unacceptable stage of inebriation. They also investigate
accidents, incidents of boats causing damage to other


boats, and landlubber crimes such as burglary and break-
ins which afflict the boating community.
Broward County has some 30,000 boats registered, but
estimates are that there may be half again as many boats
in the area. There are no statistical breakdowns available
to show what kinds of craft are here, although Brown
says that a 50-footer is 'average'.
Right now the largest boat docked at a City facility is
the 165-foot Ancient Mariner Restaurant, located on New
River just east of the SW 4 Avenue Bridge.
Horner again. "Keeping the waterways clean and open
is a big job and we couldn't do it without the help of other
City departments. We call Public Works when something
big has to be removed. The Engineering Department's
Survey Crew checks depth of water whenever we get a
report of bottom build-up, and they examine seawalls for
signs of deterioration. Community Affairs and Planning
help us when there are problems involving live-aboards in
areas zoned for single family residential. And, of course,
the Fire Department is always on call."
There are also volunteer groups who have an impact on
the waterways. The City's 12-member Marine Advisory
Board screens all proposals having to do with matters that
impact marine activities, including City Ordinances. This
Boar dis also concerned with the future, and Horner, who
serves as liaison between the Board and the City Commis-
sion, says "one of the things I like best about my job is
the opportunity to be in on the planning for our future."
So must men like Hector and Hortt and Stilwell and
Rodes have felt when the came here during the 1920s,
and dreamed of a future city among the mangrove
swamps. They turned their dreams into a solid foundation
for future generations. And among those who forecast
such things, there seems to be general agreement that
the people of today's City of Fort Lauderdale will continue
to take a leadership role in providing the marine facilities
that will create a bigger, brighter, future for the City's
boating industry.


VENICE OF AMERICA?


"Whether you are trying to promote tourism or
hometown pride, it is important to focus on those aspects
of a city that make it distinctly difference from other urban
areas. Our sub-tropical climate and setting are important
features, but they are shared by other south Florida
communities. What makes Fort Lauderdale unique among
American cities are the hundreds of miles of rivers and
canals that criss-cross our town.


"The waterways are not only.our most distinctive and
dominant physical feature, they are also our lifeblood. Our
history is intertwined with the waterways and our
economy is supported by them. They offer serenity and
beauty, recreation, opportunities and, to many who live in
our city, a weekly paycheck."
So begins a city staff report to the Fort Lauderdale City
Commission with regards to proposed city plans for the
waterways that run through Fort Lauderdale. The
commission considered and approved the above, and the
following proposals at their conference meeting May 1,
1984:

1. Adopt "Venice of America" and "Yachting Capital of
the World" slogans. Use these slogans on letterhead and
in promotional materials.
2. Use Venetian barber pole markers as height markers
near bridges in place of current black/white markers.
3. Improve appearance of main bridges by decorating ex-
posed concrete areas with Mediterranean tile. Encourage
civic and neighborhood groups to adopt and improve
smaller bridges.
4. Install gas lights at all of the City's anchorage and
dock facilities.
5. Improve the appearance of City property and facilities
that border the waterways e.g., pump station in south
FEC parking lot, 15 Street launching area, New River
waterways.
6. Make Annie Beck Park more hospitable to boaters by
installing docks, benches, picnic tables.


7. Free up space at the 15 Street boat launching area by
storing confiscated boats elsewhere.
8. Work closely with the DDA to develop Riverwalk plans
that incorporate both commercial and residential activities
along the New River from the Stranahan House to the 7
Avenue Bridge.
9. Add restroom facilities at George English and SE 15
Street boat launching areas.
10. Consider relocating Harbor Patrol to the Birch/Las
Olas docks where they would share office space with the
Dockmaster.
11. Encourage establishment of a Marine Museum by the
private sector, possibly assisting its development by leas-
ing public property at nominal rent.
12. Utilize Police Auxiliary Reserve Officers to provide in-
creaed marine enforcement on weekends and holidays.
Purchase additional patrol boats for the reserve unit with
confiscation funds.
13. Utilize existing data and environmental groups to
determine:
1. the impact of major dredging in the Port on Fort
Lauderdale's reefs
2. what can be done to protect and revitalize our
reefs
14. Encourage the development of more marinas on the
City's waterways.
15. Coordinate an annual waterways clean up program in
Fort Lauderdale with interested civic and commercial
groups (i.e., Marine Industries Association, Yacht Clubs,
Power Squadron).


Irl r re I ,


I










COMMUNITY NEWS


FT. LAUDERDALE'S

SPRING BOAT SHOW

The first annual Fort Lauderdale Spring Boat and Sport
Show will be held Friday, May 25, through Monday, May
28, at Bahia Mar. There will be in-water, land and booth
displays featuring boat and selected sports items and
equipment (diving, camping, fishing, ultra lights, water-
front publications, etc.). Look for Waterfront News' booth
#132 in the main tent.
In keeping with the successful fall Fort Lauderdale
International Boat Show special events and workshops
are scheduled all four days of the show. A fashion show
with yachting clothes from Italy, 12 cooking demonstra-
tions designed around Florida dishes and Florida's catch
and fishing clinics by experienced professionals.


SHOW HOURS:
Friday, May 25
Saturday, May 26
Sunday, May 27
Monday, May 28
ADMISSION:
Adults
Children 6 12
Under 6 Free
Exhibitor Guest Tickets


12 noon 10 p.m.
10 a.m. 10 p.m.
10a.m.- 6p.m.
10a.m. 6p.m.

$4.00
$2.00
$1.00 (Minimum 10)


FORT LAUDERDALE SETS NEXT

LIVE-ABOARD PUBLIC HEARING

MAY 22nd

The Fort Lauderdale City Commission will hold its first
public hearing concerning the proposed live-aboard ordin-
ance 5 p.m., Tuesday, May 22, 1984 at Fort Lauderdale
City Hall, 100 N. Andrews.
At its last meeting in April, the commission members
got their first official look at the proposal drafted by the ci-
ty staff and the city planning and zoning board. After re-
questing primarily the sanitation rules, the city commis-
sion set the May hearing date. The public is urged to at-
tend and express their views concerning these proposed
ordinance revisions. For more information call the Fort
Lauderdale City Clerk's office at 761-2601.

BOATING SKILLS &

SEAMANSHIP CLASS

A 6 lesson, 3 week Boating Skills and Seamanship
Class will start Monday, June 11, 1984, 8 11 P.M. at
Mcvey House, 601 Seabreeze Ave., Ft. Lauderdale.
The course is free. There will be a nominal charge for
textbook and Materials.
This Public rlucation Course will be conducted by the
United States Coast Guard Auxiliary Flotilla 32. It is to pro-
vide basic knowledge to pleasure boaters and thereby
enhance their safety and enjoyment while boating. Family
participation is encouraged.
For information call: Bertha Adler, 463-0034.


VOLUME ONE ISSUE THREE
Copyright by Zliglr Publlhing Co.. Inc. 1984


MAY 15 -JUNE 15


WATERFRONT NEWS

320 S.W. 2nd Stieet
Ft. Lauderdale, FL 33312
Phone: (305) 524-9450


Published by Ziegler Publishing Co., Inc.
Editor: John Ziegler
Illustrators: Teri Cheney
Laurie Cahill
Julie Gepfrich
Photographer: Greg Dellinger
Carriers: Tom Gepfrich Craig Merry
Jason Welles Lee Jensen
Andrew Moyes Swen Neufeldt
Bud Alcott Matt Moore
Scott Moore Fred Castonguay
Darin Gleichman Todd Clarke
Kelly Alcott Dennis Bryant
Jeff Prosje John Metzger
Devon Ziegler Charles Metzger
Patrick Gillis
Printers: Prestige Printing
Sir Speedy Printing Center


ARMY CORPS TO INCREASE

DISCHARGES INTO

SOUTH FLORIDA'S

WATERWAY SYSTEMS

Unseasonably heavy rains have continued to hit Lake
Okeechobee throughout what is traditionally the winter
and spring dry season. As a result, the U.S. Army Corps of
Engineers has had to increase dishcarges from the Lake
into the St. Lucie Estuary.
"We all had been hopeful that April would
bring dry weather so that Lake Okeechobee would begin
dropping naturally," said John Wodraska, Acting Director
of the South Florida Water Management District. "That
has not been the case, however, and the Corps has had to
step up dishcarges to 2,500 cubic feet per second (cfs)."
"This is usually the period of highest evaporation off of'
Lake Okeechobee, so if the rainfall follows normal pat-
terns for this time of year, we probably will not have to
make heavy discharges," Wodraska said. "On the other
hand, if heavy rains continue, major discharges are in-
evitable."
Wodraska noted that discharges at moderate levels
have been made from Lake Okeechobee since February.
This was the first time the Corps has made such
discharges in anticipation of high water conditions, rather
than waiting until Lake Okeechobee rose over its
schedule to make releases. In the past, that procedure
has resulted in very heavy discharges being made, caus-
ing serious environmental damage to the estuary.
This year, in an effort to avoid that type of damage, the
Water Management District requested that the Corps
begin early discharges. They agreed.
"We believe this procedure has been beneficial for
several reasons," Wodraska said. "The Lake has re-
mained relatively steady, in spite of the fact that heavy
rains have poured great amounts of water into it. Normal-
ly, this would have caused a drastic rise in the Lake, with
consequent massive discharges to the estuary. We have
been able to avoid these. In addition, the estuary has had
a chance to adjust gradually to the introduction of fresh
water. Traditionally, discharges have caused a shock-
effect in the estuary. That has also been avoided this
year," he said.
"We have no way of knowing what type of weather we
will be experiencing for the remainder of the spring, but so
far as feel this procedure has worked extremely well," he
said.


545 N.W. 7th


NATIONAL SAFE BOAT WEEK

June 4- 10 is "National Safe Boating Week." Under an
Act of Congress National Safe Boating Week was pro-
claimed.
The purpose and hope is to focus attention on the
importance of Safe Boating.
This year's theme is "Think Before You Drink," be a
Responsible Boater.
The United States Coast Guard Auxiliary is a key spon-
sor of National Safe Boating Week.


SMALL BUSINESS

DEVELOPMENT CONFERENCE

"CAN THE SMALL BUSINESS AFFORD TO
ADVERTISE?" is the subject for a three-hour conference
designed to assist owners and prospective owners of
small businesses. The conference will be held Tuesday,
May 22, from 7 p.m. until 10 p.m. in Room T3 at Nova-
Davie Community School, 3600 S.W. 70th Ave., Davie.
Speakers will be selected from the advertising com-
munity. They will discuss effective use of direct mail,
radio and newspaper advertising and other media. There
is no fee for attendance but reservations are required. Call
the Small Business Development Center in Fort Lauder-
dale 15 467-4238 to make a reservation.
The conference is sponsored by the Florida Atlantic
University Small Business Development Center (SBDC)
and the U.S. Small Business Administration (SBA). It is
one of many conferences, courses and workshops offered
by the SBDC as part of their on-going training program to
aid small businesses. The center also provides free man-
agement counselling and SBA literature for owners and
prospective owners of small businesses who can not re-
tain private consultants.



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Original Layout Envelopes Score
Flyers Programs Perforate
Brochures Price Lists Collate
Business Forms Booklets Staple
Contracts Post Cards Pad
Business Cards Labels Drill
Xerox Rubber Stamps Notary
320 S.W. 2nd Street. Ft. Lauderdale. FL 33312 .
763-8849


Help For Injured Wildlife
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WATERFRONT NEWS


A PLACE FOR ALL REASONS:
BROWARD COUNTY'S NEW
MAIN LIBRARY
Amid the blare of medieval trumpets and dedication
speeches the Broward County Library System opened its
new main library facility at the corner of Andrews and SE
2nd Street in the heart of downtown Fort Lauderdale.
Eight floors of fiction, "talking books," government
documents, special collections and rare books, periodi-
cals, cultural arts and a 300 seat auditorium, the main
library will become a scholastic and cultural hub for the
community. The library hours are 10 a.m. 6 p.m., Mon-
day Friday. For more information about Broward
County's new Main Library call 357-7444, or better yet,
come explore this valuable community resource for your-
self.

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Oa a~oaasWs


3


MARITIME LIBRARY & MUSEUM
The Broward Public Library Foundation, Inc., is in-
terested in establishing a MARITIME LIBRARY & MUSEUM
within the structure of the Broward County Library
organization. Mr. Donald Elliott Pardi, a volunteer for the
Foundation has already made arrangements to donate
approximately 100 volumes of various maritime subjects
and some ship models. Since Fort Lauderdale is the
center of pleasure boating and an ocean seaport, the Task
Force believes that such a library specialty could be de-
veloped as an attraction to yachtsmen, other seafarers,
and young people of the area. Mr. Pardi invites assistance
as either a donor of books, maritime artifacts, money, or
as a source of information leading to donors. By the way,
gifts need not be made during the giver's lifetime. Dona-
tions are deductible.
For more information call Mr. Pardi at 792-5804, or call
the Broward Public Library Foundation at 765-4063.


FORT LAUDERDALE COUNCIL
OF CIVIC ASSOCIATIONS
by Jack Allenby
The last meeting was held April 11th, at the City
Commissioners office and a good attendance was evident.
Myself, and Candy Thomas representing S.B.C.A.
The meeting agenda was varied and interesting as al-
ways. The Port Everglades Commission and its make-up
was discussed, and information about our Port was intro-
duced and also the capacity of the facility was talked
about. Specialization in Container shipment is the future
of shipping. Larger and larger container ships are being
built, and Port Everglades could well be the "drop off"
point for these vessels, providing we have the necessary
equipment and space. Acquisition of land, South of the
Port, towards the Dania Cutoff, is important to the growth
of the P.E.G. Politics should not be so evident in the
management of the Port. A true Port Authority has been
suggested. We have the deepest port on the Eastern
seaboard (after New York) and steps should be taken to
ensure its future. Expansion would certainly bring needed
revenues and employment to our area.
A report was given on Mayor Dressler's "Work Shop"
for Neighborhoods. Over 100 citizens attended the April
7th meeting. The Mayor is firmly behind this project and
believes that Fort Lauderdale's future lies with its
Neighborhood Civic Associations.
The bylaws of the Council again came under discussion,
and it was proposed that a final hearing and acceptance
would be at the next meeting.
Joyce Quinby gave an update on Citizen Crime Alert,
and said that so much interest had been shown at the
Mayor's Workshop, that a Special Meeting has been
called for April 28th.
N.H.S. PROGRAM
The Site Selection Committee made its final determina-
tion of a proposed area for the Programme. The area
selected is Lauderdale Manors/Villas with L.E.P. (Lake
Estates Palmview). This will be presented to the N.H.S. on
May 2nd for their final approval.
Many hours of research were put in by the Site Selec-
tion Committee and the selection was not easily deter-
mined. S.B.C.A. was included in the final group, but alas,
we did not meet all the required criteria. I feel, however,
that once the program begins and is successful, future
programs will be instituted.


Lauderdale Paint
Boat- Koat Marine Spar Varnish-

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PERSONALIZED GIFTS
C Embroidery *Clothing
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,THE BULLETIN BOARD


-9


The S.P.C.A. WILD BIRD CARE CENTER
provides services necessary for the
rehabilitation of sick and injured
wild birds and animals in Broward
County. It is located across from
Snyder Park in Ft. Lauderdale.
Staffed seven days a week mostly
by volunteers, the center treats
hundreds of birds and small wild
animals each month. Call 524-4302.
SEVEN SEAS CRUISING ASSOCIATION
Box 2190, Covington, LA 70434
Phone: (504) 892-3096
WOMEN's YACHT RACING ASSOCIATION- for
more information contact April Moore,
President, at 1-856-8216, or in Bro-
ward call Leanne Williams at 973-7892.


Sailboat Bend Civic Association will
have its monthly meeting May 17th in
the Salvation Army Community Center,
90 S.W. 9th Avenue at 7:30 p.m. For
more information call Chuck Willard
at 462-4629.
July 4, 1984 will be the date that
this year's RIVERBEND REGATTA is
.sailed. For more information call
Bob Ross at 525-0511 for more in-
formation.
CATALINA ASSOCIATION OF BROWARD-
The club held an Easter Cruise to
Miami the weekend of April 20th.
Some members left Thursday evening,
arriving at No Name Harbor in the
early morning hours of Friday due
to existing southeasterly winds.
They met there the Brands and the
Thompsons who had been cruising the
Keys.
The results of the 3rd race, 1st
series are: 1st place, Second Wind;
2nd Place, Doma Cove; and 3rd Place,
Blue Haven.


Coming up: Champagne
and the Memorial Day
For more information


Race on 5/12,
Cruise on 5/26.
call :485-4316.


The Annual Dinner-Meeting of the
Fort Lauderdale Historical Society
will be held Thursday, May 17, 1984
at the Tower Club, 1 Financial
Plaza (Landmark Bank Building). A
social hour will begin at 7 p.m. with
dinner being served at 8 p.m. The
evening's program will include Carl
Weinhardt, former director of Vizcaya
and newly-appointed director of the
the Bonnet House, who will speak
about these two major historic pre-
servation projects. Pre-paid reser-
vations are required (members: $18,
non-members: $20), Ft. Lauderdale
Historical Society, Box 14043, Fort
Lauderdale, FL 33302.
Historic Preservation Week runs May
13th through the 19th. For More in-
formation call the Fort Lauderdale
Historical Society at 463-4431.
Tarpon River Civic Association will
hold its next meeting, Thursday,
May 24th at7:30 p.m. at the Calvary
Prebyterian Church, 706 S.W. 6th St.
Call Jim Naugle for more information
at 463-4706 (days), 525-4095 (nights).
MARINE SCIENCES UNDER SAILS
phone: 983-7015.


POMPANO BEACH...
CHAMBER TO SPONSOR
JUNE 16th GOLF TOURNAMENT
The Greater Pomoano Beach Chamber of Commerce is
sponsoring its Firs. 3olf Tournament to be held Saturday,
June 16, at the Beautiful Palm Aire Country Club. Action
gets underway at 8:30 A.M. with a "shotgun" start in this
"Best Ball" tournament for foursome play.
Entry fees are $50.00 per player and entitle the golfer
to greensfees, cart fees, deluxe bar-be-que lunch, golf
shirt, 3 golf balls, towel, visor, tees, markers and per-
sonalized bag tag.
The low "Best Ba' .oursome wll receive blazers and
foursome pla I e '-ar' Trace Cc',ntry Club. Awards,
prizes, and draw: ill be held for getaway vaca-
tions, golf equipmei, rs and such. Terry Ford of
Pompano Beach is awardir "' '" 4 automo-
bile for a hole-in-one on a d.:: iateo le. Additional
prizes will be awarded for me,; and women's longest
drives, closest to the pin, and any o'; er hole-in-one. ..
A tournament preview party will be ay, June
15, from 6:00 8:00 P.M. ai G rs, 9i9 North
Federal Highway, where Team hole starts and rules for
tournament play will be announced. G. Wl2ikes will pro-
vide complementary hors d'oevure's at the party.
All entries will be handled on a first-received basis with
a maximum of 36 foursomes. Both men and women are
encouraged to play in the Tournament. Entry forms are
available at The Greater Pompano Beach Chamber of Com-
merce, 2200 East Atlantic Blvd., Pompano Beach, FL.
Proceeds from the Tournament will go to the purchase of
a computer system for the Chamber. Call Don Dalton,
941-2940 for additional information.


CABLE


MARINE

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make the difference ........


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PLEASE CALL ONE OF OUR LOCA TONS
FOR FREE ES TIMA TES


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The Yacht Owner:


Drapes
Covers
Bedding, etc.


call
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587-4326
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AIR CONDITIONING REFRIGERATION
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RESIDENTIAL COMMERCIAL MARINE


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Custom Interiors
Enclosures
Flying Bridges
Custom Carpentry
Outfitting
Fiberglas Repairs


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1517 S.E. 16th Street
(305) 462-2822
40-Ton Lift


* Restoration of Fire or Water Damage
* Secure Undercover Storage
* Electrical Services
* Engine Work
* Welding
* Hydraulics
* Refinishing
* Bottom Work


Palm Beach Gardens
PGA Blvd. & Intracoastal
(305)627-0440
60-Ton Lift


Ft. Lauderdale
2491 Highway 84
(305) 587-4000
80-Ton Lift


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FISHING


WRECK FISHING NOWI
by BIN Rhodes
May and June are peak months for large predators in-
habiting the many wreck sites along the Southeast Florida
Coast. Amberjack especially come out of deeper water to
congregate in great numbers this time of year. If you want
a solid hookup and a real rod bending experience take on
one of these large jacks on your choice of tackle.
The fish generally weigh from 30 to 50 pounds but oc-
casionally a 100 pound plus fish is brought to gaff. I prefer
plug or spinning tackle with up to 15 pound test line. In
this way the tackle takes the brunt of punishment instead
of your physical being! Getting a hold of one of these mon-
sters on a large boat rod without the proper belt and
harness equipment could cause aches and pains for days
to come! Lighter tackle takes longer but who's in a hurry
anyway? Just when you seem to be gaining on him
another 10 or 20 yards of line are peeled off your ree.
This may go on for an hour or more until you wonder
who's catching whom! The food value is only fair at best
so many are released. The texture of the meat is firm so it
is excellent for smoking. Some fish smoking houses may
smoke the fillets for no cost but keep half of the fish for
selling.
Live bait is nearly always productive. Chumming in
shallow grassy areas produce small pinfish, grunts and
other panfish. Blue runners, goggle eyes and pilchards are
the greatest. I like to hook the bait up through both lips
with a two to four ounce jig. A trailing (stinger) hook may
be added for a sure hook up. Amberjack swallow the bait
whole and have no teeth so 60-80 pound test monofila-
ment is sufficient for leader material. Pure jigs with or
without plastic worms work almost as well as live bait.
Depending on the speed of drift and depth jigs of 2-4
ounces can be used. Schools are usually halfway or
closer to the bottom. Occasionally a fish will strike your jig
up near the surface and streak back down in the wreck. If
he reaches the wreck the story is over.
On one particular day, I was fishing the "Star Trek"
wreck off Miami with my brother Dick and a friend of his
let's call him Mongo. The wreck lies in 210 feet of
water. We located the wreck easily because of several
other boats working it. I hooked a stout jack on the first
drop down and fought him for nearly two hours on plug
tackle. After about one-half hour of give and take, a
dolphin nearly twenty five pounds swam to the boat.
Mongo boated him instantly by wrapping a wire leader
around his hand several times and offering a washed out
ballyhoo worn from a morning's troll. The dolphin swal-
lowed the bait and Mongo jerked him in the boat green as
a cucumber. I was in total hysteria watching the fish half-
way destroy the boat while I had difficulty holding on to
my rod which was bent double. I would have laughed
harder but it was my boat! Anyway, I proceeded to battle
this AJ for another hour. From the wreck in 210 feet he
swam all the way into 40 feet and back to the wreck
again until I finally subdued the 49 pounder. Mongo
scorned my nearly two hour bout with light tackle while
he helped get the boat in order after the enraged dolphin
rearranged everything from poles to electronics. Mongo
wanted a chance to boat an amberjack his way. His pole
was only four feet long but like a pool cue in diameter.
The reel he used was a 6/0 troller with some kind of cable
on it in place of line. He dropped a 6 ounce jig over the
side and let it go towards the wreck. After several re-
trieving jerks a solid hookup was achieved. From then on
it was a heavy weight wrestling match second to none.
Muscles were bulging and veins were popping out all
over. With the rod supported on the gunwale our boy
Mongo cranked and horsed this fish until it surfaced with
a severe case of the bends. Yes indeed, a 38 pounder in
less than five minutes some kind of record for sure.
With any kind of tackle the amberjack offers a great chal-
lenge to the angler.
Besides Amberjack and Dolphin, Sailfish, Bonito, Cobia,
Kingfish, Black Fin Tuna, Wahoo and others visit the
wreck areas feeding on smaller species. Living within the
shipwrecks or sunken structures we have several
species of grouper and snapper. There's something for
everyone fishing at the artificial reef sites.
For information on line of sight locations and Loran-C
numbers you can write for the Metro-Dade Department of
Environmental Resources Management. A good chart type
depth recorder is a must and a Loran-C desirable.
OFFICE SUPPORT
m m mediate HISPEED XEROX:NG
Sil ;rJu. ; i;li hl;l i :I ; AND COLLATING
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S.W. CORNER-3RO. AVE. & BROWARO *TEMPORARY OFFICE HELP
DOWNTOWN FT. LAUDERDALE
PARKING IN REAR 463-2313


POMPANO BEACH

FISHING RODEO

Over 130 boats and 300 anglers have pre-registered for
the 19th Annual Pompano Beach Fishing rodeo scheduled
for May 18 20. A field of 1,000 is expected to partici-
pate for over 150 awards in a variety of categories.
Top overall angler will take home $10,000 cash from
Lowrance Electronics while the first angler to catch a
white marlin, blue marlin and sailfish over the three-day
event will win the Miller High Life $100,000 Grand Slam.
Entries received by May 1st are eligible for many great
prizes each valued at over $100 a great way to win
back the $110 entry fee for the sportfishing division or
$85 for the driftfishing division. Also, every registered
angler present at the finale of the awards presentation on
May 20 is eligible for a $5,000 first-class trip for two to
San Francisco, compliments of Delta Airlines.
Anglers from 14 states are presently registered with
three Birmingham, AL men trailering a 21' boat and a
brother team from Massachusetts vying from a charter
boat. Last year's top junior angler, Jon Thomas, Jr., age
10, of Tallahassee (FL) is returning with his father to de-
fend his title.
The drift division is filling rapidly. Anglers wishing to
compete from commercial drift boats should make
reservations with local fleets. Top prize is $2,500 for the
first place drift angler.


Activities will kick-off Thursday, May 17, with final
registration on the fourth floor of beautiful Pompano Park
Harness Raceway from 6:00 to 9:00 p.m. However,
anglers wishing to pre-register and be eligible for extra
prizes may do so by mail to the Rodeo headquarters, P.O.
Box 5584, Lighthouse Point, FL 33074.
Interested anglers may pick up Rodeo magazines con-
taining all information on the tournament at local bait and
tackle stores and other marine-related businesses
throughout the state. For further information, please call
(305) 942-4513.

BOAT THERAPY
Because you are proud of your yacht,
seeing her deteriorate can cause
ulcers... and yet boats are supposed
to be therapeutic!

Allow us a moment to offer you a
quotation on REFURBISHING & MANAGING
your investment.....................
We'll make you even more proud of her.
WE MAKE 30ATING [SECIAL
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inrcrpurateL d
YACHT COMMISSIONING DIVISION
1915 Southwest 21st Avenue
305-791-5513 Fort Lauderdale. FL33312


G. T. MARINE, INC.

DOCKSIDE SERVICE
(WE COME TO YOU)


* DEFUEL


* FUEL TANK CLEANING


* FUEL RECONDITIONING


* STORAGE


* FUEL DELIVERY


CAM-2
AV-GAS
REGULAR GAS
DIESEL


$3.50 gal.
$2.00 gal.
$1.16 to $1.25 gal.*
$1.07 to 98 gal.*
'Depending on Quantity


ALL TAXES INCLUDED
PRICES SUBJECT TO CHANGE WITHOUT NOTICE


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DOCKSIDE FUEL TAnM CLE[AJS
. k Lw 491-4795U1 -'
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FOR QUICK SERVICE


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SERVICE


* ENGINE & BILGE STEAM CLEANING & PUMPING


MIAMI/FT. LAUDERDALE/PALM BEACH
JACKSONVILLE thru COCOA BEACH


(305) 491-4795
(904) 756-2869


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WATERFRONT NEWS


SAILING


CARE AND MAINTENANCE

OF SAILS

by Gary Roberts

In order to properly care for your sails you should first
know something about how they are made. The majority
of sails are made from Dacron. This is a polyester which is
a registered trademark of DuPont Company. As a syn-
thetic material, it is very durable and will give you years
of service.
Ther eis no set formula for how long a sail will last. For
someone who uses their boat on a seasonal basis, sails
will probably last longer than for those of us who are for-
tunate to enjoy year round sailing weather. But it is not
only how often a sail is used that will determine its
longevity. How it is used is more important than how
often.
It is crucial to keep your sails covered when not in use
for even short periods. Untraviolet light is harmful to sail
fiber. A sail left to the effects of the sun while uncovered
on the boom or stuffed on the bow pulpit will deteriorate
and eventually tear.
The luff of the sail where the snap hooks or slides are
placed should be protected. Inexpensive plastic inserts
will prevent chafing of the sail along this area. The snap
hooks should be lubricated periodically in order to keep
them working properly. All metal hardware on the sail
should be inspected for corrosion. Not only for its protec-
tion, but also to prevent the sail from accumulating rust
marks which are difficult to remove.
The least expensive item that you will every buy for
your boat, but is mandatory on most sials, are tell tails.
These ingenious small strips of yarn or material are a
great help in keeping a sail trimmed. A well trimmed sail
will not only add to the performance of a boat, but will also
keep the sail from luffing. A constantly flapping sail is not
only unsightly, but is also harmful as it puts undue stress
on the entire sail area. No serious sailor is ever found
without tell tails on almost all his sail inventory.
Before storing your sails, they should be properly folded
or "flaked". A sail which is constantly stuffed in a sail bag
will soon become wrinkled beyond correction. With a little
practice, even a large genoa may be flaked on deck while
under way. The main sail should also be properly folded
along the boom before replacing the sail cover. By doing
this, the sails will retain their proper shape.
Sails should periodically be checked for wear and
should also be cleaned. Most sailmakers will agree that
the Achielles heel of a sail are the seams. The panels
and batten pockets should be inspected frequently and
any deterioration of the thread along the seams should be
noted and replaced. It is recommended to rinse your sails
often, especially the head sail. This will remove salt which
is abrasive to the sail fiber and also dirt which is the
cause of mildew.
A good time to give your sails a thorough going over is
on your yearly haul out. Any extensive repairs and clean-
ing can be done at that time. You'll be without your boat
for a few days and in a frame of mind to take care of all
Don't procrastinate. A neglected sail may give way at
that critical time when you need it the most.


THE SAIL CLEANERS
4711 L N DIXIE HWY.
FT LAUDERDALE, FL 33334

Have You Cleaned
Your Sails Lately?
Unsightly dirt, rust and oil can
damage your sails, affect their
performance and reduce their
longevity.
Here's five good reasons why The Sail
Cleaners should clean your sails:
1. We are the only sail cleaning facility
in South Florida.
2. Our plant has the most modern,
scientific method for treating sails.
3. We pick up and deliver.
4. We are licensed and insured.
5. Our prices are low and quality high.
Give your sails a new life.
Call 491-3327 for a free estimate.

THE SAIL CLEANERS


THE DUTCHMAN'S LOG


by James Sullivan

The Dutchman's Log finds the speed of a vessel by
measuring the time it will pass a chip of wood dead in the
water (thus the true meaning of the term "dead
reckoning").
Two measured marks are made on the ship's rails. A
wooden chip is thrown overboard at the foremark and the
period it takes the chip to reach the stern mark is timed in
seconds. From this the ship's speed is reckoned. Be sure
to drop the cip on the leeside.
The formula for this folios (in this case the distance be-
tween the rail marks is twenty-four feet):

Speed = 24 x .6 Speed = 14.4 Speed = 7.2 knots
2 seconds 2
A stop watch best measures the chip's trip but by coun-
ting one thousand and one, one thousand and two, etc.,
will be close enough.
To make a permanent log cut an old broom handle into
two eighth inch pieces. Drill a small hole into the middle of
each piece and secure the ends of a fishing line to each
broom handle through the drilled holes. The line or string
must measure exactly sixty feet between handles.


To use the log hold the two handles in one hand and
allow the line to flow out behind the moving boat. Drop
one of the handles into the water (caution: do not drop
both handles) and start the stop watch. Stop the watch
the instant a tug is felt, indicating the line has run out.
Divide the seconds run into 36 (60 x .6). This is the boat's
speed through the water.



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WATER SYSTEMS
* Fresh Water Pumps
* Hot Water Heaters
* Watermakers
* Filter Systems
* Wash Downs

CANVAS
* Bimini Tops
* Enclosures
* Fly Bridge Covers
* Windshield Covers
* Equipment Covers

DECK ACCESSORIES
* Windlasses
* Cavits & Chocks
* Tide Ride Steps
* Ladders
* Fish Boxes
* Dunnage Boxes
* Masts & Arches
* Chairs
* Bait Wells
* Outriggers
* Rod Holders





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ENGINE &
MECHANICAL
SYSTEMS
* Stabilizers
* Steering
* Synchronizers
* Oil Change Pumps
* Lube Oil Filters
* Fuel Filters
* Engine Alarms
* Bilge Pumps
* Approved Heads
* Fire Extinguishers
* Air/Electric Horns
* Windshield Wipers


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111 Southwest 6th Street
Fort Lauderdale, Florida 33301
Phone (305) 463-4307


CO., INC.


hly Qualified
s Offering
IService On
sed List
ucts....




iVICE...

APPLIANCES
, Refrigerators
* Freezers
" Ice Makers
- Exhaust Hoods
, Compactors
* Micro Wave Ovens
" Ranges
* Soda Dispensers
" Garbage Disposals
" Washers/Dryers
* Central Vacuum Cleaners
r NuTone Food Centers
, Complete Air Conditioning

ELECTRICAL SYSTEMS
r Stereos
r Intercoms
r Inverters/Converters
rInterior/Exterior Lighting
r T.V. Systems
r Battery Parallel Switches
r 110v/220v Shoreline Systems
rFire/Smoke Alarms
SDocking Lights

USTOM WOODWORK
Anything Custom

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MARINE ELECTRICAL

CUSTOMER RELATIONS


Smokey Handson

When you call a marine electrician to your yacht for
minor or major repairs you probably have certain expecta-
tions about how the job will be done. So does he. If youi
ideas and his are greatly different the results may be les?
than satisfying for both parties. It is very important that
any differences be recognized and resolved early on to
prevent problems from developing later when there may
be no satisfactory solution.
My own experience has led me to believe that most
customers want their yacht repaired in about onehour and
customers want their yacht repairs in about one hour and
want to be assured that "everything is now in perfect
working order." I would want the same for my boat. It
would be truly delightful if a marine electrician could go
aboard your yacht with a magic wand and with one ma-
jestic wave instantly make it electrically perfect. Un-
fortunately, this is not presently feasible.
What does the Marine Electrician want when he arrives
to repair your yacht? First he is probably earning a living
by doing the work. This means that he doesn't want his
time wasted unless he gets paid for it. He doesn't want his
reputation tarnished. Depending on who pays him he may
or may not be concerned about how you pay your bill for
the work. He probably thinks of this job as a unit of work
where he will investigate the problem or problems,
communicate with the customer directly or indirectly,
gather parts, make physical changes in equipment or wir-
ing reaching a point of maximum mess, reassemble
everything, test the repairs, and leave the yacht. He will
probably have some time frame in mind which may or
may not be flexible depending on other commitments.
This time frame might be in hours, days or months. He will
probably be under some pressure to keep the cost down.
He will probably want everything to go "smoothly." This
going "smoothly" is the part which will greatly affect his
quality of life while doing the job. If it is a long job the go-
ing "smoothly" part will affect his family, his friends, and
perhaps even his health. Going "smoothly" IS WHERE ITS
AT both for the customer and for the electrician.
As a customer you are probably going to notice right off
that this electrician doesn't have a magic wand. (You
might even be concerned about what his shoes are doing
to your deck.) So the first thing you want to know is HOW
MUCH is it going to cost and HOW LONG is it going to take.
There may even be some suspicion that he isn't compe-
tent or may pad the bill. So HOW MUCH and HOW LONG?
Answering this question will probably be the most difficult
feat the electrician will perform while aboard your yacht.

Here are some things I consider before answering:
1. Was the original electrical engineering OK on this
yacht?
2. Was the installation done reasonably well?
3. How old is the equipment is it repairable?
4. How well has the yacht been maintained?
5. Can I get reasonable access to the circuits in ques-
tion?
6. HOW COOPERATIVE WILL THIS CUSTOMER BE?
A. Will customer, family and friends be aboard
while work is in progress. (What is the probability
they will leave when I turn off the air conditioning
toilets?)


B. Will the customer add another 25 items to the
after I have quoted HOW MUCH and HOW LONG?
C. Is the customer planning to have new snow
white carpet installed throughout the yacht 5
minutes after I start work?
D. Will I have to tiptoe around 17 coats of wet
varnish?
E. Will the customer's captain supervise the work?
F. Does the customer want to provide all the equip-
ment (which he will purchase from a discount
house in Chicago and expect me to warranty)?
7. Will the yacht be accessible. (Will I have to carry
500 foot rolls of wire up a 20 foot ladder to the deck of
this dry docked yacht?)
8. Is the boat for sale? (Will the broker want the yacht
in ready to show condition on 20 minutes notice?)
9. Will other craftsmen be working on the yacht at the
same time?
A. Who are they and are they reasonably coopera-
tive?
B. Who will be coordinating the work, and does he
or she know their business and enough about mine
not to cross things up?
10. Will the weather be a factor?
11. What is the customer's time schedule and is it rea-
sonable? Is it flexible enough to absorb the unforeseen
problems not related to my work? (If someone else's pro-
blem delays my work will the customer expect me to
lem delays my work will the customer expect me to meet
the original schedule even though it requires me to do my
job in half the estimated time?)
12. What hasn't the customer told me that is relevant?
13. What is the customer assuming about me or my
work that isn't true?
The point I want to make is this: The HOW MUCH and
HOW LONG answer requires considerable communication
between you and the electrician. You are the only crystal
ball he is likely to have. If he is hesitant to look into it, en-
courage him a little; the benefits may be considerable.
May your electrical work go smoothly.


INFLATABLE REPAIR SERVICES
124 S.W. 5th Street
Ft. Lauderdale, FL 33301
(305) 462-6208 ALAN R. HARRIS
ZODIAC Authorized Service Station
Liferafts & Boats







ALL'S MARINE REPAIR
MOBILE DOCKSIDE SERVICE
INBOARDS OUTBOARDS STERN DRIVES

(305)966-9867


BUYER'S GUIDE TO

USED BOATS

by Al Reiser

Record sales have been set this boating season. First
indications were displayed at the New York Boat Show,
late 1983 and again at the Miami Boat Show. This trend
followed at all major boat shows coast to coast.
Sales have been so great that the boating manufac-
turers cannot keep up with sales quotas. Thus deliveries
of new boats to the dealers will be limited and late. Such
as, a boat purchased at the New York Boat Show '83,
delivery date is expected late summer or early fall of this
year.
Since new pleasure boats will be limited and unavail-
able this summer, used boats can be an alternative. Thus
enabling the use of a boat this summer. When buying us
enabling the use of a boat this summer. When buying
used pleasure craft, there are several important things to
look for. Cosmetic as well as mechanical.
The prospective buyer of a used boat may admire the
overall appearance of the vessel; but the problems lay in
the mechanical end of it. There are certain checks which
should be made of the engine, drive and electrical system.
The engine oil should be examined and a compression
test of the cylinders is a wise move. Look for metal filings
on the oil stick or water contamination. Compression
should be up or near to manufacturer specification. This,
and all other tests should be performed after the boat has
been run in the water.
The cooling system is another necessary check. Many
times the thermostat will be removed giving a low or nor-
mal temperature reading on the gauge. When in reality the
engine's cooling system can be overheating, causing
damage, such as exhaust manifolds which are very cost-
ly.
Stern drives or transmissions are another area of in-
spection. Check oil to see if contaminated by water or
metal filings, this goes as well for outboard gear cases.
Make sure shifting is smooth in and out of gear. Check the
propeller tor nicks or bends and any lower unit damage.
In checking the electrical, battery leads should be clean
and free of corrosion. Starter motor and cellonoid should
also be corrosion free. Inspect loose wires in the engine
area as well as the control panel, look for bare or spliced
wires.
When buying a used boat the above items, and more,
should be checked by a qualified marine mechanic. In my
experience, I have commonly found a boater who boasted
he had a terrific buy on a used boat, only to find costly
mechanical repairs were needed after a short period of
operation. If the consumer has a mechanic check the boat
properly this possibly could have saved a great deal of
time and money.
A Marine Surveyor may not be enough because he does
not go into the mechanical detail as mentioned. With time,
effort, preventive maintenance, and a good mechanic,
your choice of a quality used boat can give you many
years of service and pleasure.

Al Reiser Is a marine technician with his own business in
Hollywood, Florida (see Al's Marine ad In this paper).
Relser has been a factory mechanic for many major out-
boards and stern drives, and has held a dealership in
Hawaii. He taught marine engineering at the University of
Hawaii.


BARNACLE AND MOSS
ANTI-FOULING

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2 YEARS TESTED. PROVEN AND GUARANTEED ON ALL SURFACES,
INCLUDING METAL PARTS
EFFECTIVE COVERAGE OVER ANTI-FOULING
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NO MORE EXPENSIVE MESSY PAINTS ONLY $19.50 PER QUART

BARNACLE (COVERAGE FOR AN 18 FT. BOAT.)
IMPROVES GAS MILEAGE & BOAT SPEED.

JIM 'S 1900 ELSA STREET, BLDG. "B" 813-598-1946
NAPLES. FL 33942 BROWARD: 463-4300












WATERFRONT NEWS


I


I I I


DIVING


"ELECTROLYSIS" AND

THE DIVER

by Bi and Ace Clift

A simple but very important diving job on most boats is
minizing metal corrosion caused by what is commonly
called "electrolysis." "Electrolysis" is actually an incor-
rect term for either galvanic corrosion or electrolytic
corrosion, or both. These processes can be extremely de-
structive to props, shafts, and underwater fittings and
fastenings. The diver's job is to maintain special ex-
pendable pieces of metal that deflect this corrosion
damage from vital submerged parts of the boat. These
pieces of metal are called sacrificial anodes or zincs.
Galvanic corrosion is the loss of material from one of
two pieces of dissimilar metal that are immersed in an
electrolyte such as sea water. An electric current is
generated, and the least noble metal, called the anode,
corrodes. (The noble, non-affected metal is the cathode.)
Prevention of galvanic corrosion lies mainly in good boat
building and repairing practices like avoiding the use of
different metals underwater.
Electrolytic corrosion is the loss of material from one or
more pieces of metal immersed in sea water, electrically
connected, and subjected to different electrical potentials.
This difference in potential may be caused by large or
small leaks in AC or DC power.
Sacrificial anodes come in many different sizes and
shapes and, for aluminum boats, may not even be made
of zinc. Varieties are designed for everything from a small
outdrive boat to a freighter. Some zincs are not attached
directly to the metal that they protect but are connected
to it inside the vessel by a bonding system.
The most common zincs for yachts are shaft collars and
pairs of saucer-shaped zincs for struts, rudders, and trim
tabs. Well-made zincs of these types have cast-in con-
tacts that maintain electrical conductivity even as the
zinc corrodes everywhere except at these points of con-
tact. Naturally, the area of contact on the boat must be
free of paint, marine growth, etc.
Shaft collars have a tight precision fit. The machine or
allen screws that hold the two halves together are
tightened, the pieces are tapped with a hammer, and the
screws are tightened again.
Zincs are cheaper than props, rudders, through-hull fit-
tings, etc. Replacement of zincs at an annual haul-out
may or may not be frequent enough to provide protection,
and there is no way to tell except by inspecting them.
Changes in underwater fittings or fastenings, deliberate or
accidental changes in a boat's internal electrical environ-
ment, or electrical changes on the dock or on neighboring
boats can accelerate corrosion. Even plugging a shoreline
into the dock so that polarity is reversed can be dis-
astrous. We have seen some boats go through a set of
zincs every month.
So, put on your SCUBA gear and have a look. I your
zincs are badly corroded or entirely gone, replace them.
Then either call a specialist or a marine electrician or find
the cause yourself. Good books are Warren: METAL
CORROSION IN BOATS and Miller and Maloney: YOUR
BOAT'S ELECTRICAL SYSTEM, 1981/82.


CARPENTRY CLEANING DELIVERIES DIVING
DOCKSIDE YACHT MAINTENANCE
Z i DIVING SPECIALS
Z PI.Ip I& R dll r ( hI ..II... *0111 ( X)
2 I 5. 1) & ";.I: If.., .
P & l, ( h N .. ..ll I ,s'r (-

I -
U0
(( COMPLITI YAC( HT CARH. PAINTING & HI PAIR Z
m HIII&Ali.ii (1 522-6454
VARNISHING WAXING WELDING CARPENTRY


FIRST TIME DOWN

by Corinne Rich

The day finally dawned for us
We'll never forget our first time down
There were five of us on the boat
The instructor, Rogers, Thomas, Lloyd and McGowan

The craft was small for us and all of our gear
She rolled us in three to five foot seas
Butterflies fluttered in our stomachs
And the nausea wouldn't be appeased

A clown act could not have been familiar
Then watching us five on the deck
We slid around like loose cargo
But we were determined to see that wreck

Anchored in thirty feet of water
We continued to struggle, curse, and then shout
"How the hell were we to don wetsuits and scuba gear
Before the days sun went out"

Finally the instructor querried
"Have you done your buddy check"
The four of us green in the face and weak in the knees
Looked at him and answered a relieved "yes"

We did a backwards roll off the gunwales
Then signaled our okay
And patiently waited for our instructor
To join us and show us the way

Regulators in, air out of BC's
Down the anchor line we swam
Pinching our noses and blowing
Hoping our ears wouldn't jam

We hit the sand like sacks of potatoes
And tried to regain buoyancy control
Then we applied our pool skills to salt water
Observed the instructor and did as we were told

Now we could explore the old Brigantine ship
We were as eager as little puppies
Our eyes bulged out of our sockets
We looked like record-breaking guppies

We pointed things out to our buddies
Playing pantomine with our hands
Amazed at the vareity of sea life
And looked for artifacts in the sands

We were children again that day
Trying to take it all in
Blocking out a nine to five world
Vowing to experience diving, over, and over, again



INFLATABLE SERVICES, INC.

VouA Complete Sales and Sevrvice CenteA
omr LiLeAafta and Inglatabfle Boats

Avon, Ach.ues, Giveiut, Bombard and ALL
Majoai Bands Compettitve PUiices
214 SW 21ST TERRACE
FORT LAUDERDALE
792-8523

U.S.C.G. and F.A.A. CertiZied (705-207)
"WE SERVICE WHAT WE SFLL "


U~cczcu~-ues~;Mtte~ediE~F


Complete Yacht Services
Mobile Repair U ilt

522-5789
MAJOR & MINOR REPAIRS ON ALL GAS DIESEL
ENGINES GENLIIAIOIIS CUSIOM INISIAI AIIONS
ELECTRICAL/ AIR CONDITIONINQG/REFRIGERAIION


sales & service

INTERNATIONAL MARINE INSTRUMENTS /COMBI


ADLER BARBOUR
CRUISAIR
MARINE AIR
RARITAN
GLENDENNINO
ONAN
FORD LEHMAN


CATERPILLAR
DETROIT DIESEL
PERKINS
PLEASURECRAFT
UNIVERSAL
WESTERBEKE


DAVE ODHIAM PRESIDENT


17 YE ARS EXPERIENCE /ALL SERVICES GUARANTEED CONSULTATION AND ABSENTEE MANAGEMENT


ff3~331151niUU n~~3 33 3 -11


VOLUNTEER ACTION CENTER 522-6761.
INTERNATIONAL YACHTMEN's ASSOCIATION
525-7444, at 12 SW 6th St., Ft. Laud.
SOUTH FLORIDA SAILING ASSOCIATION
662-2667.


Custom Nautical Flags
A-FLAG AND FLAGPOLE CO.
JEFFREY D. EDLUND
PRESIDENT
305-983-2774
DECORATIONS PENNANTS CUSTOM FLAGS
INTERIOR-EXTERIOR SIGNAGE
PLAQUES DIRECTORIES
3427 GRIFFIN ROAD
FT LAUDERDALE. FLORIDA 33312
Your Complete Flagpole Service




Diving Adventures, Multi-Level Certifications
Travel and Photography
ADVENTURE DIVERS -
523-8354
S. Rich
NAUI 5620
," f1N CMAS M2 US 273 N
"It you really want to know ...
GO NAUII"
CALL FOR NEXT CLASS DATES




MIKE'S MARINE ELECTRIC
Custom Designed Panels

Repair's A/C D.C. Systems
Charger's Alt. Starters
Shore Cord's Gauges

Complete Rewiring

942-6081 24 Hour Service





OFFICE 1500 S.W. 17th St.
(305) 525-4726 Ft. Lauderdale, FL 33312

SUMMERFIELD

BOAT WORKS INC.
Complete Marine Repairs
TOM CORRELL PAULWHITE
Manager Asst. Manager


12








WATERFRONT NEWS


UNDERWATER PHOTOGRAPHY
MADE SIMPLE
by Sim Rich
A few short years ago a revolution began in the
photographic equipment industry. Today automatic focus-
ing, metering, strobes and shutter speeds have become
expected functions on even the simplest of cameras
found commonly on the shelves of your local camera
shop. Thirty-five millimeter format, once a compleW
medium limited to serious students of photography, has
become available to totally in-experienced beginners
because of the aim-and-shoot automatic capability of
most of today's cameras. Kodak's historic Brownie Auto-
matic was the original popular "automatic" that began a
chain of evolution in 110 format.
Today's automatics can bounce sonar off of their sub-
jects to measure distance, rotate discs with tiny motor
drives at amazing speeds for rapid firing, and measure
available light, amount of flash needed and set aperture
and shutter speed in a fleck of a second In short, if you
can aim your camera and push a button, you can shoot
slides, prints, even poster-size blow-ups and select from
the multitude of films produced previously for only profes-
sionals and serious amateurs.
Underwater photography, a field of high specialization,
is quickly following the new path to popularity. In the past,
even the most accomplished land pros knew, to make the
transition into the wet world meant re-learning the basics
and un-learning some bad habits to produce results in an
entirely different medium. However, today's sophisticated
automatics with amphibious capabilities will produce good
quality pictures by even the most novice of waterbugs.
Upgrading these automatics and compact systems to
more expensive and professional equipment becomes a
simple step for the maturing photographer. And, the few
basic rules that apply to the underwater world can easily
be adapted to your basic knowledge gained from exposure
to the automatics.
GETTING STARTED
One of the reasons, if not today's main reason, under-
water photography remains a specialized field is that
before you jump overboard with scuba gear and camera,
you must be a certified diver. Never attempt to use scuba
gear, at any depth, unless you have been properly trained
by a certified diving instructor. One rule divers learn in
their certification course is particularly perinent to photo-
graphers: NEVER HOLD YOUR BREATH. Most land-
experienced photographers hold their breath as they
squeeze the shutter release to prevent camera move-
ment; just as you would if you were squeezing the trigger
of a gun. Underwater this could be very dangerous due to
increased pressure and compressed air breathing. Getting
a certification through a recognized national agency is a
pre-requisite to becoming an underwater photographer.
Once certified, your progression to underwater
photographer is fairly simple. You can rent a camera for
the day or buy your own, depending on how actively you
plan to pursue the hobby. You may just want snapshots of
your trip to the islands for the family album, or you may
decide to take a complete course of instruction in under-
water photography. For an aspiring photographer with


skill and determination, the potential is great. Quality
underwater photos are in demand and the market is more
open than traditional avenues that lead to professional
status. Regardless of the intensity with which you capture
the endless beauty and variety of the world of innerspace,
today's equipment is simple enough for the amateur
shutterbug and sophisticated enough to satisfy the pro.
First in a series of articles on the
subject by Mr. Rich.
VEFl-WIED STEVE SAUNDERS
yWinG .. 373 S.W. 14TH AVENUE
POMPANO BEACH. FL 33060
(305) 522-0293

ALL TYPES UNDERWATER MAINTENANCE & CONSTRUCTION
PROPS SHAITS UNDERWATER HULL REPAIR & CLEANING
DOCKs DECKS PIINGS & SEAWALLS BUILTA REPAIRED
24 Hour SEva
amvmR FOumoR a Tw CAnArr
CURRENTLY EXPANDING DOCKAGE AT
TUGBOAT ANNIES in DANIA

CHINNOCK MARINE INC.
518 W. Las Olas Blvd.
Ft. Laud., FL 33312
We Invite you to Join us in a Tradition of
Quality Craftsmanship and Service. Conveniently Located
on New River at Sailboat Bend and the 7th Avenue Bridge.

WE OFFER THE FOLLOWING
YEAR ROUND SERVICES:


Hauling
Bottom Work
Carpentry
Electrical
Painting/Refinishing
Storage
Marine Air Dealer


Pressure Spraying
Sand Blasting
Mechanical/Repairs
Diesel/Gas
Rigging/Spars
Awlgrip/lmron
Westerbeke Dealer


| Full Line Parts. Supplies and Hardware

Estimates and Quotations
Available on Request
Do It Yourself Welcome
On A Space Available Basis.


763-2250





Marine Lumber Plywood
Milling and Custom Mllwork


2945 State Rd. 84
Ft. Lauderdale, FL 33312


(305)584-8558


MARINE ELECTRONICS SALES* INSTALLATION
SERVICE ENGINEERING
3229 SOUTH ANOREWS AVENUE. FORT LAUDERDALE. FL 3331
305/467-2695



SOUTHWEST LAUNDRY
The Best & Friendliest Yacht ServJic
in Town. PICK UP & DELIVER, all for
only 60 per pound (minimum 10 lb.).
All Folded with Shirts and Pants on
'Hangers. We also do DRP CLEANING at
competitive prices. c,
21 SW 7th St. 761-9768
Ft. Lauderdale 761-, 68 ----
1 1 3 -- -


CONSULTANT
NUTRITIONIST


(30


WELLNESS
CONCEPT


Betty W. Mletzger,
REGISTERED P'ETITIAN


5) 462-3456 FT. LAUDERDALE


P.D.


P.O. BOX 91
FL 33302-0091


4V Frame's

Marine Service
BOAT CLEANING MECHANICS
FINISH CARPENTRY MAINTENANCE
ELECTRICAL DIVING
PLASTIC GLASS INSTALLED


525-6325

,850 SW 12 ST.(Davie Blvd),FT.LAUD.,FL.


m


RFII


ESS


G


WINDS


MAD


1804 EAST SUNRISE BLVD., FT. LAUDERDALE
(Next to GateNwy Theatre)

EVERYTHING FOR THE

WINDSURFER

* LOWEST PRICES IN THE AREA
* BEGINNER AND PROFESSIONAL BOARDS
* COMPLETE BOARDS NEW AND USED
* BOOMS / MASTS / SAILS
* WETSUITS
* BEACH GEAR


Meet Us at the
Lauderdale Spring
Boat Show


DECKS BY DAVIS
CUSTOM UOOD WORK
DeckseBenches*PlanterseLatticeseTrellises
DockseWooden Pilings*FencesoGazebos















DECKS BY DAVIS
TONY DAVIS 2180 S.W. 28th WAY FT. LAUD. 33312
Ucensed and Insured
581-8109
OUTDOOR REMODEUNG


CALL 525 WIND


I, I---.-


~ailu\~Jl~.u\\\\~tlr~t~_u~u~,~tt~.~c ''


-- --- -t -1-


A A - - -


-- 1. -- -- -- --


.1


I












14 WATERFRONT NEWS


"SPLICE THE MAIN BRACE"
a food & drink guide

ANCIENT MARINER, 501 S. New River Dr., E. 525-8100.
Finatino restaurant, fabulous view.
BRYANT HOMES RESTAURANT, 301 SW 3rd Ave.
523-0177. On the New River.
THE CANDY STORE, 1 N. Atlantic Blvd. 761-1888. Beach
cuisine, drinks.
COCONUTS, 429 Seabreeze Blvd. 467-6788. Seafood.
CRABBIE JOHN'S CRAB HOUSE, 2020 South S.R. 7.
584-8680. Baltimore style & garlic crabs.
DOWN UNDER, 3000 E. Oakland Park Blvd. 563-4123.
FIFTEENTH STREET FISHERIES, 1900 S.E. 15th St. (at Ft.
Laud. Marina) 763-2777. Seafood.
FRANK & VINNY'S PIZZA SHACK, 2884 E. Sunrise Blvd.
564-9522.
FISH GRILL, 1434 N. Federal Highway(Dania), 923-10101.
Best Broiled Fish buy in town!
HARRISON'S ON THE WATER, 3000 NE 32nd Ave.
566-9667.
LA RESERVE, 3115 NE 32nd Ave., 563-6644. Come by
car or boat. European entrees.
THE LEFT BANK, 214 SE 6th Ave., 462-5376. French
tableside cooking. Reservations.
LAGNIAPPE CAJUN HOUSE, E. Las Olas near 3rd Ave.
Great crawdads!
LESTER'S DINER, 250 SR 84, 525-5641. 14 oz. coffee.
Open 24 hours.
MR. LAFFS, 1135 N. Federal Hwy., 561-3440. Restau-
rant & Bar (Great Music).
PELICAN'S ON THE WATER, 620 E. Las Olas Blvd. By
boat or car. Behind Riverside Hotel.
POETS, 904 E. Las Olas Blvd., 523-5001. Saloon &
Eatery.
SHOOTERS ON THE WATER, 3033 N.E. 32nd Ave.,
566-2855. Food & Drink.
STANS, 3300 E. Commercial Blvd., 772-3777. By car or
boat.
SUMMERS, 219 S. Atlantic Blvd. 462-8978. Beach Cafe
& Bar. Concerts, too!
YESTERDAY'S, ICW at Oakland Park Blvd., 561-4400.






DELI & CATERING

522-2118
S 601 SE 3RD AVE (on the corner)
Across from Broward Lounty Lourt Hours,.


U.e iy f ll-lUinE. tzc.


Major System Repairs
New Electrical Systems
Custom Panels & Eauipment

252 SW 31 St.
SENTRY Ft. Laud., FL 33315
-- (305) 523-9313



aPcg 7,ade STcratje


Propane & Supplies

2190 State Rd. 84
west of 1-95
Ft. Lauderdale

587-7990





RHODES MARINE ENTERPRISES, INC.
213 N.E. 3TH STREET LIGHTHOUSE POINT. FLORIDA 3304
Need Parts? WE T 'EM!
WE COT 'EM!
FORD LEHMAN CHRYSLER UNIVERSAL
CRUSADER COMMANDER WESTERBEKE
782-1224


WATERFRONT CUISINE

by Alexandra Howard

FRANKIE'S 3333 NE 32nd Avenue, Ft. Lauderdale

Many good things have been written and said about
FRANKIE'S over the years, and to those I add yet another
round of praise. For those of you who visit South Florida in
the winter and may not be familiar with one of the "best"
restaurants anywhere, let me assure you that an evening
out for dinner and dancing at FRANKIE'S is a most
delightful experience.
If you arrive at FRANKIE'S in the proper attire, (jackets
after 6:00 p.m.), you will be treated like a millionaire,
even though you may have only the price of dinner for two
in your wallet, which could be considerable. What I'm say-
ing is that FRANKIE'S is not inexpensive, but you get your
money's worth in good service, excellent food and roman-
tic surroundings. It's a great place to dine anytime, but
especially great for anniversaries and special occasions.
The Italian specialties are supurb and the seafood will
knock you out.
Save your after dinner drink and have it in the lounge
where you can listen to or dance to the fine and fashion-
able Latin hustle or standard favorites. You'll find a
"classy" crowd of big spenders at FRANKIE'S.


caaaaaasarzzzsszszszsssszsssssszzzzssss'


---. WHOLESALE
EXPORT
RETAIL

JOHNSON AUTO SALES INC.

Best Buys in Town
1401 Si Rd 84
DAVE TARZWELL Ft Lauderdale. Fla 33315
462 1401 Mile East ol I 95


/ YtAKb UN Int MAKRKtl t, t-LLIIVL
ON ALL TYPES OF FROM 16' to 85'.
*Heavy & Standard models available
*Effective in winds to 100 m.p.h.
*Eliminates outside piling const'
*All s/s, telescopic spring loaded
*Dock, seawall, marina & piling
installations available
*Eliminates shallow water problems
FOR MORE INFORMATION 491-7570


REFRIGERATION A/C Repairs-
Installations, 12v-115v, Engine
Drive Systems. Cash-M/C-VISA-"Pay
as you go"- Do it yourself Equip-
ment Available. OFFSET YOUR COSTS
THRU BARTER- WE TRADE WORK FOR CARS
GUNS, etc.
CUSTOM REFRIGERATION 527-0540
527-4477.


Telephone:
583-3769




Yacht Refinishing
JoelE. Treichel Yacht Delivery
MARINE REPAIR Mechanical Systems
(Installation & Repair)

I A


LAURIE CAHILL
S(305) 763-2186

SSIINS


& SIGNS


Yacht Lettering
Custom Graphics


Wood Signs
Interior Graphics


Broward's
Exclusive Dealer for

j0(4 By Panasonic

Marsha Pobanz
Piano Instructor
1235 LAS OLAS BOULEVARD
FT LAUDERDALE, FLORIDA 33301
305/523-7991
FOR SERVICE CALL 731-3850



AUTO MARINE

TOP WAITING MONEY

SUPERIOR LUBRICATION
AND FILTERS



/ 100% SYNTHETIC

DIESEL / GAS AND GEARBOXES

CALL RICO MON.-FRI. 9-3 P.M.

463-4898
ANY ? ANSWERED

AMS/OIL MADE IN AMERICA BY AMERICANS
DEALERSHIPS ALSO AVAILABLE


~II-


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- -


INEV."AMOAR
DECORATIVE LAMINATES


I


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fb'










CLASSIFIEDS-

BOAT WANTED
13' BOSTON WHALER- any condition,
call 463-1331.


DOCKAGE
ECONOMICAL MARINA- Live-aboard Dock-
age from $180/mo. Showers, Laundry,
Restaurant. DRY STORAGE for Small
Boats from $30/mo. 584-2500.
BANYAN MARINA APTS- 111 Isle of
Venice. 8' Deepwater up 53'. Pool,
Cable, Phone, Laundry. LIVE-ABOARD
or STORAGE. Phone 524-4430.
ISLE OF VENICE- Sailboat to 41'.
No live-aboards. Annual. Parallel.
Water & 110. 125 Isle of Venice.
Call 463-5621
ISLE OF VENICE- Up to 53', Live-
aboard o.k. Pool, Laundry, Shower
& Phone. Call 525-2223.
FT LAUD- Deepwater dock, no fixed
bridges. Electricity & Water. No
live-aboards. $180/mo/yr.
1472 SE 15 St. Call 462-4234.



FOR RENT

2 BDRM 1 BATH Apt. Call 462-0664.


FOR SALE
DIESEL ENGINES 9.5 HP to 2000 HP;
all applications: Sail*Power*Work-
boats. Competive Prices. 587-8518
ONAN used generators: 3-15 KW
Diesels available. Call for prices
@ REPOWER SYSTEMS 462-3894.
CONTINENTAL CUSTOM YACHTS
1001 S. Federal :Hwy., Pompano Beach,
Florida 33062. Phone: 305-943-5999
Importer of Italian Yachts
ABBATE-MOCHI CRAFT
in stock
ABBATE 33' Offshore twin turbo
Volvo Dsl Duro-Prop.
ABBATE 36' Offshore Twin 450 HP Gas.
ABBATE 42' Executive Twin 400 HP Dsl
MOCHI CRAFT 36' DC Twin 270 HP Turbo
Dsl.
MOCHI CRAFT 42' Tri-Cabin Twin 300
HP Volvo Dsl.
Local Boat Transporting Service up
to 40 feet. Call 305-943-5999.


CABLE
MARINE
INC.


WATERFRONT NEWS


I BOTTOM PAINTING SPECIALSI


'e'll clean and paint your bottom cheaper than you can do it
urself...


Power/Sail


Power/SaH


Power/Sail


nt Under 40 Ft. 41 Ft. 59 Ft. 60 Ft. Plus
ttom Coat $6.50 Per Ft. $7.00 Per Ft. $ 8.50 Per Ft
Vinylux $7.25 Per Ft. $7.75 Per Ft. $ 9.25 Per Ft
Unlpoxy $8.50 Per Ft $9.00 Per Ft. $10.75 Per Ft.
Above ncfuds haul-out and pressure cleaning.
Scrping of heavl fouled bottom exra.


NOW THREE FULL
SERVICE LOCATIONS

FT. LAUDERDALE
2491 HIGHWAY 84
305-587-4000
SO TON FT
PALM BEACH GARDENS
PGA BLVD.& AITRACOASTAL
305-27-0440
60 TON LIFT
FT. LAUDERDALE
1517 8E 16 ST
462-2822
40 TON LIFT


15


FOR SALE cont'
DIESEL ENGJNES (DUCATI) 9.5 HP,
$1875; 24 HP, $2850. Includes in-
struments, harness, oil pump, flex
mounts, coupler, reduction gear &
freight. Call 587-8518.
PALMER P-60 Gasoline Engine 28 HP
Runs perfect, $995. Call REPOWER
SYSTEMS @ 462-3894.
1978 5 HP SUZUKI long shaft o.b.
engine. Not running. $125. Call
791-7813.
INFLATABLE (MOTOMAR)- 81' to 151'
The Quality Inflatable.
Call 522-1486.
8' SUMNER (dinghy) Sail Kit, Very
Good Condition, $500.
Johnson 4HP, Vevy fuel tanks $450
Call 564-7091.
WESTERBEKE- New 3 KW, 6 KW & 8 KW
Diesel Models available. FREE In-
stallation quotes. REPOWER SYSTEMS
462-3894.
30' S2-C: 4 sets of SAILS, Diesels,
many extras. $45,000. Call 564-7091.


HELP WANTED
INDEPENDENT PAPER CARRIERS needed!
Monthly delivery routes from Dania
to Lighthouse Point. Call 524-9450.


MARINE SERVICES
MARINE PLUMBER- Reasonable Rates.
Call 462-6308.
James Sullivan professes a knowledge
of CELESTIAL NAVIGATION, LORAN-C, &
.PREP. for USCG OPERATORS LICENSE.
Will teach same to seafarers for
$12. Call 462-2628.
PROFESSIONAL
TEAK SPECIALIST, Varnish & Yacht
Maintenance. Capt. Frank 525-6221.
Speak SPANISH or FRENCH in only 3
easy weeks, including MARINE Vocab.
INTERPRETING available. 564-6962 or
564-5822
GOOD QUALITY MARINE WOODWORK &
MAINTENANCE, call Lee Jensen @
522-2189.
MARINE ENGINE SURVEYORS- gas &
diesel engines generators. Call
PETER ZARKADAS @ 587-3482.


I I i i


REAL ESTATE
(305) 462-5770 Ofc.
(305) 527-1304 Eves. i MiS

ROBERT P. GARGANO
Lic. Florida Real Estate Broker REALTOR
WATERFRONT SPECIALIST
S1700 E. Las Olas Blvd., Suite 204
S Fort Lauderdale, Fla. 33301-
Specializing in Waterfront Real Estate
SOUTH NEW RIVER ISLES (Citrus Isles)-
Deepwater w/7' at dock, Contemporary
2 Bdrm, Ig. Living Rm & Family Rm,
Central Air, Owner Motivated just
reduced by $10,000!!!
LANDINGS Deepwater 3 Bdrm 2 Bath
extra spacious & private BEST PRICED
deepwater in Landings area.
NEW RIVER Deepwater Vacant Lot
Approximately 190' on the River.
Zoned multi-family Live-aboards
permitted.
RIVER REACH Condo Dock only $10/ft/yr
Golf*Tennis*Pools*Sauna*24hr Security
I. JUST LISTED- Best Priced 2 Bedrm
on island. Great 3rd fl. View over-
looking Pool, Canal & Yachts.
ONLY $73,900!
II. Watch the Yachts go by from the
wrap around balcony of this beauti-
ful 2 Bdrm 2 Bath directly on the
New River.
III. Just Listed- Beautiful 2 Bdrm
2 Bath. 5th fl. view overlooking
GpQf, Tennis and Canal.







MANY OTHER WATERFRONT LISTINGS AVAIL.
"New vuterJf.ont siatingQ needed;
I have oualified buyesu!"
ROBERT P. GARGANO 462-5770 Ofc
ic. Real Estate Broker Realtor 527-1304 Eves
r- 1976- 2076

CENTURY MLS
lme
PROPERTIES, INC.
6908 Cypress Road Plantation, Fla. 33317

Dennis J. DeRolf Broker/President
Office: 584-1400 Eve: 584-3735


WATERFRONT NEWS
ADVERTISING RATES:
Classifieds (35 Characters/Line)
First Line ................ $4.00
Each Additional Line ......$3.00
Per Column Inch.............. $12.50
Business Card.............. $25.00
Minimum Art Set-Up Fee....... $5.00
Insert Fee per Insert ............ 1.5C
(Maximum Size 8" x 11"X
Call concerning Photos & Color

For more information call
524-9450
or stop by our office

ADVERTISING DEADLINE THE FIRST DAY
OF THE MONTH
CIRCULATION 15,000

WATERFRONT NEWS
320 S.W. 2nd Street
Ft. Lauderdale, FL 33312
Phone: (305) 524-9450


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