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UFPKY NEH LSTA SLAF



Waterfront news
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00072837/00002
 Material Information
Title: Waterfront news
Physical Description: Serial
Language: English
Publisher: Ziegler Pub. Co.
Place of Publication: Ft. Lauderdale Fla
Creation Date: April 1, 1984
Frequency: monthly
regular
 Subjects
Genre: periodical   ( marcgt )
serial   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Broward -- Fort Lauderdale
Coordinates: 26.135833 x -80.141944 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 1, issue 9 (Nov. 15-Dec. 15, 1984); title from cover.
Funding: Funded in part by the University of Florida, the Library Services and Technology Assistance granting program of Florida, the State Library and Archives of Florida, and other institutions and individuals.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 11455814
lccn - sn 84001937
issn - 8756-0038
System ID: UF00072837:00002

Table of Contents
    Cover
        Cover
    Main
        Page 1
    Main: Community News
        Page 2
    Main: The Bulletin Board
        Page 3
    Main: Fishing
        Page 4
    Main: Diving
        Page 5
    Main: Power Boating
        Page 6
    Main continued
        Page 7
        Page 8
        Page 9
    Main: Power Boating continued
        Page 10
    Main continued
        Page 11
    Main: Sailing
        Page 12
        Page 13
        Page 14
    Main: Classifieds
        Page 15
    Main: Community Calendar & Tide Tables
        Page 16
Full Text



Volume 1 Issue 2


Circulation 12,000




erfrrolt


Ncws

UJhat's Inside
Community Calendar
Tide Table
Waterfront Map
t *Pompano's Neu Reef
SLUWeek of the Ocean
r Windsurfing
"- -'W- lomen's Yacht Racing
Marine Electrical
Tin Boots & Free Spirits
Czech Sea Scouts


-'


320 S.W. 2nd St. Fort Lauderdale, Florida 33312 (305) 524-9450


April/May 1984


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WATERFRONT NEWS


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"WATERSHIP DOWN"

by Moreland Gamble-Swift

POMPANO BEACH, FLORIDA (around 10:00 a.m.)
The WATERFRONT NEWS has sent photographer Greg
Dellinger and me to cover the sinking of the 435 foot
freighter, the S.S. LOWRANCE (formerly the MAZON) off
Pompano Beach in about 210 feet of Atlantic Ocean
water, one and one-half miles offshore. We're aboard the
HELEN S., a 65 foot drift fishing boat helmed and owned
by Captain Tom Hal. All us press type people who could
not pull the strings for rides on the Goodyear Blimp or a
helicopter are on this, the "press boat."
One of Captain Hall's mates, Joe Hampton, shows us
...-.... .. "" me waiting to depart. Joe
gives us a bnet overview o mine fishing packages this boat
the larger HELEN S. VI has to offer.
(10:30 a.m.) Helen S. is underway, proceeding north on
the Introcoastal Waterway towards Hillsboro Inlet. Captain
Chuck Clark, who assists Captain Hall, is on the port bow
with me. We are discussing how waters off Pompano
Beach all the way down to the Keys are becoming "fished
out". This new artificial reef (the soon to be sunk freighter)
should improve the fishing environment around Pompano
within days, drawing the likes of grouper, snapper, amber-
jack, blue runners, dolphin, and saifish. Still, the effects
of dredging, overfishing, urbanization, and the destruction
of the mangroves along the now seawalled inland and
intracoastal waterways wig continue to be felt by the fish
and those humans depending upon them. Chuck points
out rare pockets of mangrove among the docks and wals,
explaining how the mangrove act as natural filtration
systems, passing by as we ply to the north.
(10:45 a.m.) We have made Hilsboro Inlet; the
lighthouse is off our port beam ard then to our stern as
Captain Hul swings HELEN S. around to a roughly
southern course. Definitely a festive atmosphere is de-
veloping as we share the Inlet and now our course with
boats of al types and sizes. The press mingles comparing
-notes, preparing cameras and other equipment, some
jockeying for better vantage points In anticipation. Greg
has made it to HELEN S.'s upperdeck with scores of his
camera-toting colleagues.
(11:00 a.m.) I am swapping business cards with my
cohorts on the bow when the outline of the LOWRANCE Is
sighted dead ahead. Immediately there is a mood change
and I find myself in an "Ishmael" mindset (excuse me, Mr.
Melville). As LOWRANCE and HELEN S. draw closer one
can make out the former with a following, a flotilla of near-
ly a thousand vessels coming from the south. Is this a
funeral or'a festival, public execution or a family outing, a
death or a birth?
(11:10 a.m.) The HELEN S. Intercepts the LOWRANCE
and draws the attention of Broward Sheriffs Deputies in a
launch escorting the freighter in tow behind the tugboat
FORT LAUDERDALE. Captain Hall clocks HELEN S. around
the stern of LOWRANCE and then abeam her, off the
freighter's starboard.
A veteran print reporter comments on the parallels be-
tween this scene and one off Newport, Rhode Island (last
fall's America's Cup), as the tug and LOWRANCE find their
marks between red buoys due east of the Pompano Beach
watertower. An almost ghoulish school of boats encircles
LOWRANCE and the tug as Coast Guard, Florida Marine
Patrol, and the Broward County Sheriffs craft practice
crowd control. "Move your boats back 1000 yards."
Reluctant boaters back off to the refrain heard over and
over gain, "Move your boats back another 200 yards. The
navy won't set the explosive until you move back 200
yards"
(12:15 p.m.) Waiting. The sun is bright and burning
away the morning's chill. Seagulls mingle in the sky with
the blimp, whirly-birds, and what appears to be the hint of
a smog haze over the aureole of idling boats. "Where's
the Reef?" a play on that over-used commercial and
political question, and the theme of a commemorative
t-shirt made for this media event takes on new signifi-
cance as things fall behind schedule and deadlines
loomed on the horizons of many journalistic minds. But
who ever heard of boats sinking on time or news events
respecting copy deadlines?
(12:30 p.m.) The crew of HELEN S. serves us spiked
punch to lube our patience. The skipper of the
LOWRANCE, Captain Vittorio A. Forgiadni, completes his
last watch on his charge and can be observed surveying
her from the aft deck, as the Navy frogmen from the SEAL
team cap the 200 pounds of plastic explosives. A Moun-
tain Dew can tossed from one of the onlookers' boats
takes on water and sinks in a prelude to what is to follow.
HN one notices.


OLD FREIGHTER FORMS

LARGEST ARTIFICIAL REEF

ON EAST COAST

POMPANO BEACH, FL When there is no war in-
volved, it takes more than loose lips to sink a ship.
That is especially true, when the sinking is to be inten-
tional, and involves several thousands of dollars, many
governmental agencies, hundreds of volunteer laborers,
civic and service clubs galore, a leading electronics firm,
a fishing rodeo, and even the U.S. Navy.
It took place March 31 when the S.S. Lowrance was
towed to sea off the coast of Pompano Beach and sunk to
form the largest artificial fishing reef ever established on
the East Coast.
Formerly the Mazon, the 435-foot steel-huled freighter
which was docked at nearby Port Everglades for the last
three years, was renamed for the principal sponsor of the
project Lowrance Electronics, Inc., of Tulsa, OK. The
reef it creates will be called the "Lowrence Reef,",
located one-and-one-haif miles off the coast at Pompano
Beach.
The project, hailed as a major conservation effort by
environmental, fishing and marine groups, was initiated
more than a year ago by the Pompano Beach Fishing
Rodeo. The group hosts one of the nation's largest
saltwater fishing tournaments each year, and has spon-
sored a number of marine research and artificial reef pro-
jects. The projects are designed to enhance and re-estab-
lish fishing for many saltwater species.
Wade Horn, chairman of the rodeo, said the final hurdle
in establishing the reef came recently when the Broward
County Commission voted to authorize expenditure of
$20,000 to be used for construction of the reef, allowing
volunteer workers to free the ship of oil and debris.
Cleaning and repainting of the ship was completed
through the efforts of many volunteer workers, a Boy
Scout troop, and local firms which donated cranes,
trucks, and cleaning equipment for the arduous task.
At the same time, Horn announced that representatives
of the U.S. Navy Seals demolition team, from Norfolk, VA.,
visited the city and the ship to determine steps and pro-
cedures necessary to sink the vessel.


: .


The LOWRANCE rotates round its anchor line with a
current pushing her around. The tug noses her around to
the other extreme so that the current will push her back
into the desired bow-to-the-north, stern-to-the-south posi-
tion.
(1:01 p.m.) A red flare is seen burning from the aft deck
of the LOWRANCE. The SEALs and Captain Forglarini
have safely been evacuated onto a Coast Guard launch
which is rapidly withdrawing from the proximity of the
freighter.
(1:11 p.m.) A red smoke bomb is Ignited from the Coast
Guard launch. Spectators pause from downing their
punch. Cameraman tense in a firing squad stance.
(1:13 p.m.) Black smoke, followed a second or two
later by something like three rapid-fire explosions is seen
and are heard from the LOWRANCE. The explosions seem
not to be that loud. A few moments of doubt arise: Mis-
fires? Miscalculations?
(1:15 p.m.) The LOWRANCE is slowly listing forward,
the stern and rudder increasingly exposed. Murmurs of
sadness, followed by reflections of "better this than
scrap."


Horn said the Hvide Shipping Company of Port
Everglades volunteered two large tugs to tow the ship into
pace, where Navy divers sunk it by placing charges on
the hull below the waterline. Welders torched huge holes
above waterline prior to its being towed to the site, so that
it would sink straight down and create "the best reef pos-
sible."
The ship is 55 feet wide, with a superstructure exten-
ding 65 feet high.
Steve Somerville, an engineer and artificial reef
coordinator for Broward County's Quality Control Board,
termed the project "a once in a lifetime opportunity."
"Many fisheries, marine, environmental and conserva-
tion groups have joined forces to make the project a reali-
ty," he said. "it's not often that they are united in a single
effort, but this one has had the cooperation and support of
all."
Somerville was in charge of the clean-up campaign on
the ship, which he said wat "an awesome undertaking."
More than 30,000 gallons of water and oi were
pumped from the freighter's five holds, he said, with 3000
gallons of oil recovered and sold.
"More than 10 truckloads of trash and debris were
hauled from the ship last week," he stated, "with addi-
tional cleanup to be accomplished before it can be in-
spected and approved for sinking by the U.S. Coast Guard.
"Al the cleanup has been by volunteer people, firms
and groups," Somerville said. "They have been tremen-
dous, working seven days a week."
L,.wraice one of the world's largest electronic firms
and a leading maker of compA60i li m i( N8w:
ed the final $20,000 necessary to fund the $45,000 pirO
ject.
it is one of four major conservation efforts being made
this year by the company, according to Darrel J. Low-
rance, president of the Tulsa firm.
"Through these efforts, we wil contribute more than
$100,000 in 1984 to fisheries conservation," he said. "It
is our way of contributing to the resources both salt-
water and freshwater fisheries which have been instru-
mental in making our company one of America's true suc-
cess stories."
The company is also a major sponsor of the annual
Pompano Beach Fishing Rodeo.


(1:17 p.m.) The bow is submerged now and the seas
are entering the large holes cut into the freighter's top-
sides. Her descent rate is rapidly increasing now. The
stern is completely exposed and the LOWRANCE Is begin-
ning to take on that classic TITANIC pose.
(1:19 p.m.) The bow of the 435 foot huH apparently
finds the ocean bottom 210 feet below as the LOWRANCE
is in a head stand, pausing momentarily In its rapid sflde.
She now eases her stern more slowly towards the bot-
tom. The lighthouse in the foreground.
(2:20 p.m.) The stern is now just submerging to a
herald of whale-like spoutings of spray and air gushing
from the huH to the surface and above. The seas around
the sinking hull have become a light blue with air bubbles
like a spring. The fleet sound their horns.
(Later) Back on shore, at a Bar-Be-Que thrown by the
Lowrance Company and other parties with interests In the
new reef, Captain Hall of the HELEN S. talks of all this as
"just the beginning." Steve Summerville, an engineer
with the Broward County Environmental Quality Control
Board and the man who was the prime catalyst behind
this artificial reef project, talks of sinking derelict oil plat-
forms. If only co-existing problems like a rusting hulk at
Port Everglades and a need for a reef at Pompano Beach
could be married more often to produce such constructive
solutions as in this instance.
Finally, the old freighter and now reefs former Captain
Forgiarini tries to comfort a grandson and talks of taking a
vacation. Then he turns his thoughts one and one-hal
miles to the east saying, "She was beautiful... She wen
down just like a lady... Like we wanted ... She's goinr
to be serving the sea for a long time!"












COMMUNITY NEWS


EDITOR'S MAILBAG
Dear Boaters... MANATEES NEED YOUR HELP

lorida's OFFICIAL marine mammal Is endangered it
could become extinct Manatees are fascinating gentle
creatures who must surface to breathe. They are very
large, slow-moving vegetarians, feeding just below the
surface on submerged plants.
Living around the Florida coast manatees come into In-
land waterways In winter since they cannot survive cold
ocean temperatures... Here they meet the deadly propel-
lrn of speeding boats the number one cause of death.
A law was passed July 1978 making it mandatory for
boaters to reduce speed in critical habitats Nov. 15
through March 31. However, in Ft Lauderdale area
WATCH OUT FOR MANATEES ALL YEAR AROUND. We
have a herd of about 100 who stay here the year around.
Manatees are also protected by the Federal Marine Mam-
mal Protection Act of 1972 and by the Endangered Spe-
cies Act of 1973.
Attention Fishermen ... Monofilament Ine often gets
wrapped around manatees' front flippers and fish hooks
are found embedded In their ips. PLEASE do not discard
tangled Nne Into Florida waters... Thank youllll
There Is a state manatee Information center. Please cal
the Florida Marine Patrol and report any harassment, In-
jury or death of a manatee you may observe. TOLL FREE
1-800-342-1821.

Thank you ... Sincerely,
Jacquelne Beeson
Fort Lauderdale

DEAR EDITOR,
My position on proposed increased costs to lease state
owned submerged lands -
The revised rates Indicate a likely Increase of 300%.
That means If one facility pays $2500 annual lease cost
to the state, the cost would rise to $10,000 per year.
This is exorbitant!
I strongly recommend an increase somewhere between
50% and 100%; NOT 300%.

Richard F. Zed
The Venetian Condo., Inc.
1


VOLUME ONE ISSUE TWO
Copyright by Ziegler Publishing Co.. Inc. 1984


APRIL/MAY 1984


WATERFRONT NEWS

320 S.W. 2nd Street
Ft. Lauderdale, FL 33312
Phone: (305) 524-9450


Published by Ziegler Publishing Co., Inc.
Editor: John Ziegler
Illustrators: Teri Cheney
Laurie Cahill
Julie Gepfrich
Photographer: Greg Dellinger
Carriers: Tom Gepfrich Craig Merry
Jason -Welles Lee Jensen
Andrew Moyes Swen Neufeld
Bud Alcott Matt Moore
Scott Moore Fred Castonguay
Darin Gleichman Todd Clarke
Kelly Alcott
Jeff Prosje
Devon Ziegler
Patrick Gillis
Printers: Prestige Printing
Sir Speedy Printing Center


FLORIDA LIGHTHOUSES

(FORT LAUDERDALE, FL March 23) "Florda
Lighthouses" will be the subject of the next History Pro-
gram at the Fort Lauderdale Historical Society Museum,
219 S.W. 2nd Avenue, at 8:00 p.m., Wednesday, April
11. Guest speaker Hibbard Casselberry will present a side
program and discuss his extensive research into Florida's
maritime heritage and its unique lghthouses. His pre-
sentation features accounts of numerous beacons along
Florda's long coastline, Including Broward's own Hllsboro
Light, one of the most powerful on the Atlantic coast.
Admission is free to Histrical Society members, $1.00
for non-members. Seating is limited, so please reserve a
space by caing the Historical Society at 463-4431.


COUNCIL OF FORT

LAUDERDALE CIVIC

ASSOCIATION

by Jack Allenby

The monthly business meeting of the Council of Fort
Lauderdale Civic Association, an umbrella group for all
civic associations in Fort Lauderdale, was held on
Wednesday, March 14th.
A report was given by School Ioard Member Mr.
Samuels on the recent meeting, regarding the closing of
some schools in the area. This Issue is a complicated one
and causes great concern to parents and students alike.
The Council pointed out that it had taken a stand as long
as three years ago opposing the closing of any schools
within the City of Fort Lauderdale.
A proposal to allow space on the beach for sailing clubs
to tie down boats was defeated when put to the vote.
However, this Idea is under review by the Parks & Rec.
Div. The counsel fel, however, that the beach belongs to
Its citizens as a whole.
A slate of officers was presented for election and the
floor was opened for any further nominations. There being
none, the counsel elected those persons recommended by
the Nominating Committee.
A review of the Council's by-laws took place and some
changes were recommended and will be discussed and
voted upon at the next meeting.
A CRIME ALERT report was given by Joyce Qulnby and
Sail Boat Bend was thanked and complimented for having
its Block Captains in place..
NEIGHBORHOOD HOUSING SERVICES PROGRAM
The Site Selection Committee did a Tour of some of the
Ft. Lauderdale neighborhoods last Friday (March 23rd).
Sail Boat Bend and also Riverside Park were included.
Thanks to Candy Thomas and Nancy Edeistien for giving
of their time and doing a great P.R. Job for their areas.
(Sail Boat Bend and Riverside).


TARPON RIVER NEIGHBORHOOD

ORGANIZES

CIVIC ASSOCIATION

by Sue Whelan

Residents of a Southwest section of Fort Lauderdale
met Thursday, March 22, to form a civic association in
their area. Fifty neighbors attended the meeting, or-
ganized and chaired by Jim Naugle, home owner, who is
active in city civic affairs. The Tarpon River Civic As-
sociation proposed boundaries are Davie Blvd. on the
South, the F.C.C. Railroad tracks on the East, and the New
River on the North and West
Mayor pro tern Virginia Young addressed the group,
stressing the importance of active civic associations and
praising them for their interest, pride and future of their
neighborhood. State Representative Ann MacKenzie
encouraged members to get involved. She and Staff
Member Maryann Idon urged neighbors to contact local
officials who need voter input.
Joyce Quinby, President of the Nurml Isles Civic
Association, represented the Crime Alert program. Other
topics Involved neighborhood schools, beautification and
property values.
The next meeting wil be held April 24, 7:30 P.M. at the
Calvary Presbyterian Chruch, 706 Southwest 6th Street.
For more information cal Jim Naugle, 463-4706 days,
525-4095 nights.


FORT LAUDERDALE CITY

COMMISSION MAY DISCUSS

LIVE-ABOARD ORDINANCE

APRIL 17th

Proposed Live-aboard Ordinance revisions will Ikely be
submitted to the Fort Lauderdale City Commission for con-
ference discussion at the commission's meeting at 8 a.m.
Tuesday, April 17, 1984. This is according to an internal
city memo from Assistant City Attorney Tom Ansbro.
The Fort Lauderdale City staff has spent the past winter
"fine tuning" the draft ordinance revisions recommended
by the city's Planning and Zoning Board last fai. Changes
had to be made to proposed sanitation regulations that
would have required ilve-aboard vessels or floating homes
to be connected with the city's sanitary sewer system.
U.S. Coast Guard attorneys have advised Fort Lauderdale
that such regulations are pre-empted by Title 33 of the
U.S. Code, Section 1322. This means that sewer hook-
ups cannot be required and "certified marine sanitation
devices are permitted in connection with habitation
aboard any vessel located in a navigable waterway."
Waterways located in Fort Lauderdale (unless landlocked,
such as a lake) would be considered "navigable" water-
ways for federal purposes. There is some doubt as to
whether a "floating home" is, or must be, considered a
"vessel" under federal law.
The Fort Lauderdale City Commission meets in con-
ference at the City Hall, 100 N. Andrews Avenue, at 8
a.m., Tuesday, April 17th. The agenda for the conference
meeting should be available to the public late in the after-
noon on the Friday proceeding the meeting date (in this
case: Aprill3th) at the City Clerk's office.



FT. LAUDERDALE WATERWAY

DREDGING PROGRESS

According to the City of Fort Lauderdale Engineers,
dredging of seven canals has been compelted or is
currently being done. Waterways already dredged include:
Rio Verde (between NE 17 St. and NE 18 St.), Rio de Sota
(Aquavlsta Blvd. and NE 3 St.), Rio Aragon (Pelican Dr.
and Castilla Island), Rio Castilla (Castilla Island and Del
Mar PI.), and Rio Placid (Solar Isle and Riveira Isle). Rio Del
Mar (between Del Mar PI. and E. Las Olas Blvd.) and Rio
Coral (Solar isle and Flamingo Dr.) are canals currently be-
ing dredged by the city.
Dredging has been funded and will get underway soon
on six canals connecting with the south fork of New River
between SW 18 Avenue and SW 23 Terrace, and Sospiro
Canal between SE 17th Avenue and Mola Avenue. These
fourteen waterways make up the city's Water Dredging
Priority 2.
A group of ten canals (including five on the north fork of
the New River between SW 2nd Street and SW 5th Place)
compose Priority H-A. The City of Fort Lauderdale has
accepted bids on this dredging project and the city
commission will consider them in April. Three canals on
the south fork of New River (one between 5th Ct. and SW
5th PI., Kingfish Canal and Crevall Canal), Karen Canal (be-
tween Gordon Road and Hendricks Isle), and Rio Giraldo
Canal off the Introcoastal Waterway between NE 2nd
Street and NE 3rd Street.




COAST GUARD AUXILIARY

OFFERS BOATING SKILLS

& SEAMANSHIP CLASS

A 13 lesson, 5 week Boating Skils and Seamanship
Class wi start Monday, April 23, 1984, 8 10 p.m. at
McVey House, 601 Seabreeze Avenue, Ft Lauderdale.
The course is free. There wil be a smal charge for text-
book and materials.
This Pubic Education Course will be conducted by the
United States Coast Guard Auxiliary Flotila 32. It is to pro-
vide basic knowledge to pleasure boaters and thereby en-
hance their safety and enjoyment while boating. Family
participation is encourage.
For Information cal: Bertha Adler, 524-2294; or
463-0034.


I










THE BULLETIN BOARD


FLORIDA OFFSHORE MULTIHULL ASSOCIATION
is sponsoring an open class (no handi-
capped) multihull REGATTA, April 21st
and 22nd. Saturday the fleet will race
from Dinner key to Ragged Key, rafting
at Ragged Key for the night. Noon, Sun-
day the final leg will bring them back
to Dinner Key.Call 975-8595 for info.
CATALINA SAILING CLUB- The 2nd race of
the 1st series was held 3/25/84 and the
winners were: 1st Place, Second Wind,
skippered by Harold Buckles; 2nd Place,
Tranquility, Thomas Brand; and 3rd,
Blue Haven, Gary Roberts. Our congrat-
ulations to the crews for an outstand-
ing performance.
Don't Forget!!! The Easter Egg and
Matzo Hunt at T.Y. Park on 4/14...and
the annual Easter Cruise on 4/21 to
No Name Harbor on Key Biscayne. Call
Tom Brand at 973-9341 for details.
GALLIGAN's LAKESIDE MARINA, 7848 South
Dixie Hwy. in Hypoluxo was sold for
$3.6 million to WMJB Marine Inc.
Ray Corona and Alene Exton were seri-
ously hurt when the boat "Ray of Sun-
shine" burst into flames about 11 p.m.,
March 25th at a Watson Island boat
dock.


FLOTTILLA 32 USCGAUX will have an
evening of discussion as to what boat-
ers should do with their boats when
there is a Hurricane Watch, 7:30 p.m.
Wednesday, May 2nd at the USCGAUX Base,
Mc Vey House, 601 Seabreeze (next to
Swimming Hall of Fame). For more call
463-0034.

For information about the HOLLYWOOD
AMATEUR RADIO CLUB call 652-8869.

Dania's MARINE FLEA MARKET, May 4-6,
at the Dania Jai Fronton. Over 250
booths. The country's largest nautic-
al swap shop. Look for WATERFRONT
NEWS' booth.


II-, I,


HISTORIC PRESERVATION WEEK runs May
13 19. FLORIDA LIGHTHOUSES will be
the subject of Hibbard Casselberry's
presentation, 8 p.m., Wednesday, April
11th at the Ft. Lauderdale Historical
Society Museum, 219 SW 2nd Avenue.
Call 463-4431 for more about either of
these events
WOMEN's YACHT RACING ASSOCIATION- for
more information contact April Moore,
President, at 1-856-8216, or in Bro-
ward call Leanne Williams at 973-7892.
illa


ARRIVE ALIVE
by Corinne Rich

When taking loved ones out for boating
Respect them respect yourself
Have your boat routinely checked for safety
A member of the Coast Guard Auxiliary can help

Remember Florida waterways can have congestion
So adhere to the rules of the road
Learn what navigational aids stand for
And on the boat don't overload

Give respect to the Florida Marine Patrol
They police the waterways for you
Ticketing the negligent skipper
Protecting the seas precious resources too

Give respect to the Coast Guard
Who risk their lives for you
Going out in all kinds of weather
To perform search and rescue
Most of all give respect to the sea
She always gets her way
Her moods are affected by weather
Sometimes they change each day

She'll take that ignorant sailor
And toss him around a bit
Teaching him a lesson
And one that will never quit

The sea is there for enjoyment and education
She is there for our survival
She wants each and everyone to be
A friend not a rival

Common sense should tell us
ARRIVE ALIVE apples to the waterways as well
Don't let your weekend boating trip
Turn into a journey of hell
S Keep safe boating the wonderful, often exhilarating
Experience it can be
There are so many things one can do on a boat
As many as A to Z
BOATS & YACHTS HAND WAXED
PROFESSIONAL AUTO GROOMING
C 4CAR SPA
HAND WASH & WAX
COMPLETE DETAILING
A j." CARPET SHAMPOOING
ENGINE CLEANING
*PICK-UP & DELIVERY

1700 E. Commercial Blvd
928-001 Ft. Lauderdale, FL 33334


CABLE


MARINE

INC
Our qualified people
make the difference ........


PLEASE CALL ONE OF OUR LOCA TIONS
FOR FREE ESTIMA TES


Offering The Following
Professional Service -To
The Yacht Owner:


3
3ROWARD COUNTY TO CELEBRATE FIFTH
ANNUAL WEEK OF THE OCEAN APRIL/
MAY- Broward County and the Greater
Ft. Lauderdale area will focus their
attention on the ocean once again
this year when the 5th Annual Week of
the Ocean takes place, April 26-May 6,
a date which includes National Week
of the Ocean.
Local events include the Ft. Lauderdale
Billfishing Tournament; a school i
marine fair seafood and project compe-
tition; a reefs and shores seminar;
scuba one-on-ones; a gondola parade;
several seafood samplings; snorkling
at John U. Lloyd State Park; and Mar-
itime Day at the Broward County Main
Library.(See the Community Calendar
for specific dates or call 462-5573
for details.)


Three convenient locations to erve you.


~


Stabilizer Services
Custom Interiors
Enclosures
Flying Bridges
Custom Carpentry
Outfitting
Fiberglas Repairs


" Restoration of Fir~e or Water Damage
" Secure Undercover Storage
" Electrical Services
" Engine Work
" Welding
" Hydraulics
"~ Refinishing
e Bottom Work


Ft. Lauderdale
1517 S. E. I 6th Street
(30S) 462-2822
40-Ton Lift


Palm Beach Gardens
PGA Blvd. & Intracoastal
(305)(627-0440
60-Ton Lift


Ft. Lauderdale
2491 Highway 84
(305) 587-4000
80-Ton Lift










FISHING


POMPANO BEACH

FISHING RODEO:

May 18 20

Sport and drift fishing enthusiasts are marking their
calendars for May 18 20, 1984 the dates for the 19th
Annual $250,000 Pompano Beach Fishing Rodeo.
The Rodeo Is a three-day fishing tournament In the
waters of the Atlantic Ocean off Pompano Beach. Anglers
travel from many parts of the country to vie for more than
200 different awards (cash, trophies, merchandise). Cost
to enter the sportfishing division (from private or charter
boats) Is $110 per angler. Drlftfishing enthusiasts com-
pete in their own division from commercial drift boats. En-
try fee is $85 plus price of daily fishing trips. With each
entry an angler receives a Rodeo t-shirt, cap, awards ban-
quet ticket and numerous sample items in his or her
angler kit.
Activities begin on Thursday evening, May 17, with
final registration of anglers at spacious Pompano Park
Harness Raceway. Anglers receive their angler kits,
discuss the rules, inspect the numerous trophies and
awards on display and enjoy the free hors d'oeuvres while
planning their strategy to catch a blue marlin, a white
marlin and a sailfish. The first angler to do so will win the
MILLER HIGH LIFE $100,000 GRAND SLAM
Friday through Sunday all boats ranging from 15' and
up head out Hillsboro Inlet for the 8:00 a.m. "Bimini
start." Each afternoon anglers bring In their catches of
eligible fish (blue marlin, white marin, sailfish, dolphin,
wahoo and king mackerel) to one of four weighing sta-
tions. A point per pound is awarded, and al non-blfilsh
carry a 15 Ib. minimum weight.
Sunday evening everyone gathers at Pompano Park
again for a bountiful buffet and presentation of awards.
Top high-point anger takes home $10,000 from LOW-
RANCE ELECTRONICS. Cash totaling $24,400 is then
divided between; the next seven large boat anglers (boats'
26' and over) and seven small boat anglers (boats under
26). An angler has over 160 ways to regain his entry fee.
Beautiful trophies, cash prizes and merchandise are
awarded to top females, juniors, families as wel as
heaviest three fish caught of the six eligible species.
Anglers not catching any eligible fish shouldn't be upset.
They are eligible by way of their entry to win DELTA AIR
LINES' $5,000 first-class trip for two to San Francisco at
the end of the banquet (must be present to win).
Anglers traveling to Pompano Beach will find excellent
off-season rates and accommodations at oceanside
hotels. Dockage for boats is also available at marinas con-
venient to Hillsboro Inlet. Anglers trallering boats can
leave their boats and trailers each night at Alsdorf Park
Boat Launch. The park is located three blocks from the
Palm-Aire Lucaya Beach Hotel the Rodeo's host hotel.
The Lucaya, located on the beach, is convenient to
restaurants and shopping for non-angler coming for the
Rodeo.


MR. & MRS. FISH

AT THE SWIMMING

HALL OF FAME

by Swen Neufeidt (age ten)

MR. & MRS. FISH was an educational play. It was main-
ly for children nine or under. It was based on undersea life
and focused on whales. Mr. & Mrs. Fish were also telling
about how a plant and animals can hold rocks or coral in a
storm. It was one hour and forty-five minutes long. On a
grading bar if one to five stars, I would rate it ***


PROPER LICENSING IMPORTANT

TO CHARTER OPERATORS

BY Paul McElroy

Ever have the urge to charter your boat and be called
"Captain"? There seems to be a mystique about the
charter captain that is hard to explain,
Chartering is serious business because of the potential
liability existing in case of an accident or injury. Also, the
charter boat operator is expected to know how to handle
his boat under emergency conditions. In addition, if the
charter is lor fishing the captain is expected to produce
fish.
Many boaters don't realize that according to Coast
Guard definitions, simply offering to bring food or re-
freshments along for the captain on an outing can mean
making the boat a "vessel for hire." This includes paying
for the gas as a friendly gesture for your friend or neighbor
as a token of thanks or simply helping out with the expen-
ses for a day. Along with the definition of a "vessel for
hire" goes along the liability in case of injury. Also, the
owner/operator is subject to a fine or penalty if he gets
caught operating without the proper license. But more im-
portant is the fact that he may not have adequate insur-
ance protection or clearly know the "Rules of the Road"
or the basics of safety and operation.
Chartering can be a lucrative business for both the
enterprising fisherman or boater who wants to make his
boat pay off. However, if not properly licensed and
covered by insurance, personal injury or property damage
can outweigh the profit.
If you are planning on chartering a boat to go out cruis-
ing or fishing be certain that your boat captain is properly
licensed and insured before you leave the dock. Cap-
tains that belong to a local charter boat associa-
tion will be qualified, but watch out for the one
that is chartering out of his backyard.
The steps to becoming a licensed charter operator are
not very difficult. An application must be made to the
Coast Guard Office in your area which includes the results
of a physical examination, documentation of vessel opera-
tion on the waters that you wish to be licensed for and an
application which includes basic background information
for yourself. Your eyes must be no worse than 20/100 in
both eyes correctable to at least 20/20 in one eye and
20/40 in the other. Also, you must be able to pass a color
sense test. If you have passed the physical satisfactorily
and have documented adequate service time on the
water, the Coast Guard will notify you that your applica-
tion has been accepted. Then you must schedule a date to
travel to your Coast Guard Office to take the examination.
The examination is very comprehensive and requires a
thorough knowledge of: Rules of the Road, Navigation
(winds, weather, buoys, etc.), General (seamanship, boat
handling, etc.) and Safety (lifesaving, firefighting and first
aid). You must pass the first section of the exam with a
90% minimum score and a minimum of 70% for
the other sections. If you fail the Rules of the





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Road then you are done and msut be scheduled for
re-testing at a later date.
Learning all of the material is no easy task and many
applicants come back for re-testing several times before
they get through, if at all. There are some forms of home
concentrated study and memorization. Also, some com-
panies offer a short course in various cities across the
country usually taking one week of night classes. The
pass rate is very high (usually in the 90% range) which
makes it almost a sure bet.
If you thought all there was to becoming a charter boat
operator was to own a big boat and be able to catch fish,
then you should have more appreciation for those who
have a license. If you are one of those who has been
chartering your boat on the side without a license be cer-
tain you're willing to risk'all you possess in case of an ac-
cident involving property damage or personal injury.
Can chartering be lucrative? You bet it can for both the
fisherman and the large boat owner who wants to take
people out cruising for a day! However, if you plan on
chartering or just want a license so that you can be called
"Captain," take a look at the types of instruction available
to you. Also, don't forget to have the proper insurance
coverage.


_ -~-- ~











DIVING


UNDERWATER MAINTENANCE

by Bill & Alice Clift

Most people seldom think about the most important part
of their boats the underwater part. When it is well-
maintained, it keeps you afloat, allows you to proceed
easily through the water, transmits power efficiently with
one or more propellers and shafts, permits seamanlike
boat handling in close quarters, gives adequate amounts
of cooling water for main engines, generators and air
conditioners, and is protected against corrosion. The
whole thing is then topped off with a clean boot top or
waterline stripe.
The foundation for good underwater boat care is the
more-or-less annual haul out, but in South Florida this is
usually not enough. Our water is warm and rich in nutri-
ents. We dock our boats in water that is warm and rich in
nutrients. Therefore, algae, grass, barnacles, and even
oysters and corals grow rapidly whenever and wherever
anti-fouling paint is not adequate. So do toredos or marine
boring worms that can do great damage to underwater
wood. Do not scrape a wooden hull unless you plan to
haul and paint soon.
The most troublesome areas for fouling are the
waterline, the bottom of the keel, and any metal parts
other than sacrificial zinc anodes. Fouling may be minimal
and merely unsightly, or it may be so severe that a boat
cannot be safey maneuvered. At least one auxiliary
sailboat was swept by the current into Ft. Lauderdale's
17th Street Bridge because its prop was too fouled with
barnacles to deliver power. If carefully idling your boat in
gear while still made fast to the dock does not produce a
prop wash, think about going for a swim or hiring a diver.
Less easy to spot are barnacles and oysters inside
through-hull fittings. If engines or air conditioners gradual-
ly operate hotter and hotter over a period of weeks or
months, suspect barnacles as well as a water pump or im-
pellor. (If the increase in temperature is sudden, a plastic
bag may be obstructing the cooling water intake.)
Fast-growing goose barnacles can grow quickly inside
scoop or other strainers mounted on the outside of the
hull. Scoop strainers often have slots that are large
enough to take a scraper blade that may be used to break
up barnacles and oysters, but the engines should not be
running and should be fitting with sea strainers so that
pieces of shell will not damage pump impellers or clog
cooling systems. Some strainers have very small holes
and must be removed for cleaning. When working in deep
or dirty water, wiring a small float to the, strainer before
removing it is good insurance.
Warm water accelerates the growth of marine plants
and animals and also accelerates metal corrosion from
what is commonly called "electrolysis." Thus, frequent
underwater maintenance is more important in the sum-
mer. But it is also much more pleasant. So either go for a
swim yourself, or get someone else to. But don't neglect
the most important part of your boat.

Next month: "Electrolysis"


Bill and Alice Clift own and operate Dockside Yacht Main-
tenance. Bill has been in the boat business for 20 years in
Florida, the Bahamas, and the Caribbean, working the last
four years in Ft. Lauderdale. Alice recently became a cer-
tifled diver and now works alongside him full time.


REEFS OFF PARK CAN

BECOME MAJOR ATTRACTION

By Bryan Brooks

WEEK OF THE OCEAN members are seeking community
support in their efforts to preserve coral reefs off John U.
Lloyd State Park south of Port Everglades.
The area proposed for government protection includes
three reef ledges that run parallel to the park from 100
yards to one mile offshore.
Week of the Ocean is a non-profit organization whose
aim is to educate people about the sea. It is our sincere
wish to impress upon the people of South Florida how
important it is to preserve this small area off our coast for
countless generations to come.
A part of the third, or outermost reef, is called Hammer-
head. Baracuda Reef is located on the second coral ledge.
Both sections contain a large amount of fish and soft cor-
als. Often, the waters off both ledges is clear and beauti-
ful.
Another reason Week of the Ocean wants this area
preserved ,is because it is a turtle nesting habitat. On the
west side of John U. Lloyd are mangroves which are a
vital saltwater nesting area.
Those of us who have lived in Fort Lauderdale for a long
time can remember when most of Fort Lauderdale was
surrounded by mangroves. Today, the mangroves are
gone, and much of the coral life on the ledges of Fort
Lauderdale is gone, too.
We implore business and civic leaders to assist in the
effort to turn this small area of what is already a state
park into an aquatic preserve. We wish to end spear fish-
ing, coral collecting and needless damage done to the cor-


"PLANET WATER"

SLIDE/FILM SHOW

EXPLORES BEAUTY OF

UNDERWATER WORLD


World-famous underwater photographer, Rich Frehsee,
will present a fascinating slide show entitled "Planet
Water" during Week of the Ocean, Saturday 28, from 8
-10:00 P.M. at the Pine Crest institute for Civic for Civic
Involvement, 1501 N.E. 62nd Street, Fort Lauderdale,
according to Mary Brooks, Underseas Sports club, coor-
dinator.
This entertaining and memorable program is priced at
$4.00 for adults and $2.00 children or students with i.d.
The two-hour slidelfilm presentation is Frehsee's per-
sonal celebration of the richness, excitement and mystery
of the vast underwater world of the ocean.
Co-sponsored by Underseas Sports club, Pine Crest
School and Week of the Ocean, the program will benefit a
Pine Crest science student and the Fifth Annual Week of
the Ocean Festival.
Tickets will be available at the door, at Underseas
Sports shop, 1525 N. Federal Highway, from Week of the
Ocean members and from participating dive shops.
For ticket information, contact Mary Brooks, 564-8661
or Cynthia Hancock, 462-5573,Week of the Ocean presi-
dent and festival coordinator.




HARMON's

SPECIALTY

GIFTS


MARINA INN & YACHT HARBOR
2150 S.E. 17th STREET
FORT LAUDERDALE, FLORIDA 33316
We specialize in
COIN CUTOUTS
BRASS CLOCKS
and
SPECIALTY GIFT ITEMS
525-3484 ex.168


al by boat anchors. We also ask that this area not be used
as a borrow or spoil area for beach dredging.
Often the dredging has a side effect of covering the cor-
als with silt. You den't have to be a marine biologist to
understand when corals and other organisms are covered
up and can't filter feed taeWiprobably won't survive.
Since Disney opened the "artificial world" in Orlando,
tourism here has had problems. However, South Florida
still has something that is real and not artificial. We have
real fish, real corals and a real ocean that no one can
reproduce artificially.
Skin Diver Magazine's marketing survey shows that
500,000 divers a year travel to the Florida keys. Many go
to John Pennekamp Coral Reef Park off Key Largo to dive,
spend money and pump up the local economy.
Since we have better motels, restaurants, theaters, and
roads, maybe some of these tourists would spend their
time and money here if we had our own undersea pre-
serve.
At one point in the area's history, marine life off South
Florida seemed boundless. We now know that life in the
sea is not boundless.
Week of the Ocean hopes to bring to the mentionn of the
public an understanding of how important it is to preserve
the sea life that still exists off our coast.
We make no claim of being oceanographers, marine
biologists or geologists, but we have drawn extensively
on the knowledge of these experts in making our propos-
als, which, by and large, the experts support. Basically,
we are humble citizens of this beautiful community by the
Atlantic Ocean who have a deep love and respect for the
original mother of us all, the sea.

Bryan Brooks, chairman of the reef committee of
Week of the Ocean, is a third-generation Floridian who
owns a dive shop in Fort Lauderdale.
Reprnted from the Sun Sentinel


REEFS AND SHORES

CONFERENCE

The beaches are moving, and the taxpayers' money
flows freely to renourish them. in response to this, and
other coastal issues, Broward County Audubon Society
will sponsor a conference on "Reefs and Shores," Satur-
day, April 28th, 9:00 a.m. 5:00 p.m., at Secret Woods
Nature Center. The conference will cover the dynamics of
shoreline processes, natural and man-made stresses to
the coasts, and the ecology of coral reef communities. A
panel of speakers, including Dr. Raymond McAllilier, Dr.
Gilbert Voss, Dr. Howard Odum, and Dlnesh Sharnra, will
discuss environmental problems of our coastal
ecosystem, and present structural ~a non-structural ap-
proaches to them. The conference will be free of charge,
however, there will be a $5.00 charge for lunch. For fur-
ther information, or to make your reservation, call Audu-
bon at 792-7119, or Jeanne and Bob Wershoven at
764-4652.
CARPENTRY CLEANING DELIVERIES DIVING
DOCKSIDE YACHT MAINTENANCE
Z DIVING SPECIALS z
Z Prop & Rudder Cleaning: '30.00
Bottom Cleaning: '1.50 & up/foot
Monthly Rates: on request
SProp& Zinc Changing '45.00/hour m
m Hull Inspection
Search & Recovery '30.00 min.
(24 HOUR EMERGENCY SERVICE)
Dock Piling Restoralion i
co COMPLETE YACHT CARE. PAINTING & REPAIR -
BILL& ALICE CLIFT 522-6454
VARNISHING WAXING WELDING CARPENTRY









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,FE MRE*







FrePakngif


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POWER BOATING


MOTOR BOAT MECHANIC

FUEL SYSTEM

by Al Reiser

Welcome Aboard:
In Florida we have many a problem due to humidity,
condensation, heat and the sun. If you notice, in the early
morning your car has a layer of moisture. This moisture
also develops inside your fuel tank on both your car and
boat. The moisture stays inside the tank and may cause
serious problems. Such as: carburetors retain the mois-
ture in the bowl of the carburetor due to the fact that
gasoline is fighter than water. Over a period of time this
moisture collects and some will enter Into the engine
causing problems with internal engine parts, pistons,
rings and valves. In outboard engines, it affects the bear-
ings.
A way of eliminating moisture developing in the fuel
system is to keep your fuel tanks full at all times. I know,
this sounds impractible, but the more air in the fuel tank
the more chance of moisture. A second way to avoid
moisture problems is to use a fuel conditioner which ab-
sorbs moisture. There are many fuel additives on the
market. I recommend staying with a Marine fuel additive.
Some automotive fuel conditioners will dissipate the fuel
oil mix for outboard motors.
oil mix for outboard motors. I use 2 + 4 Fuel Conditioner
made by OMC. I've been using it for several years with ex-
cellent results. This fuel conditioner can be used on both
Inboards and outboards. Speaking of outboards, when you
mix your outboard oil to fuel and let it sit for over 6
weeks, a gum and varnish will appar in your entire fuel
system. This 2 + 4 fuel conditioner will prevent that, as a
matter of fact, it will keep the oil mix fresh for 12 months.
The most important thing is to add the proper amount, the
directions are on the can. You will find this conditioner
will go a long way. Also, do not spill any on the fiberglass,
It will stain.
The next part of your fuel system are the hoses. Life
expectancy of fuel hoses is short. Examine your fill hose,
(Inboards), any vent hoses and the fuel hose to the
engine. You should have a hose from your tank to the fuel
pump. Check for cracking, twist or bend the fuel hose and
look for any surface punctures. Check if It is brittle or
hard. Outboard fuel hoses are exposed to the sun, there-
fore, they dry and crack prematurely. Fuel is like dyna-
mite, especially on a vessel. Take proper care and replace
any hoses you might be in doubt of. Better to be safe than
sorry and have a serious accident. Also, check your fuel
line from the fuel pump to the carburetor. Check for leaks
at the fittings or for any loose fittings. Check the carbure-
tor for any leaks as well. I have found many an
automotive carburetor on a marine engine. This Is not on-
ly wrong, but also dangerous. It will not perform, especial-
ly on waves or before planning the boat. The most
dangerous thing when using an automotive carburetor Is
when flooded it will spill excess fuel externally on to the
engine, which in a boat can very easily explode. A marine
carburetor when flooded will not do this, excess fuel will
be internal. Most marine carburetors will recycle excess
fuel back into the fuel pump by way of a hose. This is safe
and efficient. Stay with marine products on a marine
engine for safety.
I hope these articles will be of help to you to assure you
a safe boating season.





(C


ALL'S MARINE REPAIR
MOBILE DOCKSIDE SERVICE
INBOARDS OUTBOARDS STERN DRIVES

305) 966-9867


OFFICE 1500 S.W. 17th St.
(305) 525-4726 Ft. Lauderdale, FL 33312

SUMMERFIELD
BOAT WORKS INC.
Complete Marine Repairs
TOM CORRELL PAUL WHITE
Manager Asst. Manager
i.


MARINE ELECTRICAL

SOURCES OF

INFORMATION

by Smokey Handson

Whether yo work on your yacht's electrical system or
hire others to do so, it is sometimes important to know
about current standards and practices. The information is
available but you may have to put forth a bit of effort
before you have it in your hands.
The U.S. Coast Guard has developed a paper bound
manual of about 110 pages entitled ELECTRICAL SYSTEM
COMPLIANCE GUIDELINES. This book is addressed to the
"average boatbuilder" with the intent of helping the boat-
builder understand and comply with federal regulations.
This manual was prepared by the American Boat and
Yacht Council for the Coast Guard. It is dated January
1978 but it is still the current edition. For a technical book
it is amazingly readable and has excellent sketches to il-
lustrate almost every idea. This document is available to
the general public through the National Technical Informa-
tion Service, Springfield, Virginia 22161; phone (703)
487-4600. The document number is AD/A-049 638.
Although it may not tell you as much as you want to now
it is an excellent starting point in gathering information.
The American Boat and Yacht Council publishes STAN-
DARDS AND RECOMMENDED PRACTICES FOR SMALL
CRAFT which contains an excellent section on the elec-
trical systems of yachts. The complete binder contains
the work of the following technical committees: the Hull
Division, the Machinery Division, the Electrical Division,
the Equipment Division, and the Engineering Standards
Division. The preface of the book states that the book "is
the product of a consensus of representatives of govern-
ment, industry and public sectors. It is intended solely as
a guide to aid the manufacturer, the consumer and the
general public in the design, construction, equipage, and
maintenance of small crafts." Although the electrical sec-
tion is only a small part of ihis book it contains sections
on the bonding of DC systems, cathodic protection of
boats, wiring identification, lightning protection, AC
electrical systems, DC electrical systems, and storage
batteries. This information is presented rather formally
and deals with more complex systems than the Com-
pliance Guideline mentioned earlier. Technical terms are


ASK BIG AL


Question:
Dear Al,
My boat runs and starts fine but after about an hour or
so it slows up then speeds up. This happens often enough
to get me worried what's wrong? Jack
Answer:
Dear Jack,
This is usually caused by clogged filters. Clean those
that can be cleaned and throw away the disposable type,
check for water in fuel tanks and carburetor. Blow fuel
lines and check for kinks in lines or air leaks.
Question:
Dear Al,
My boat has a bilge pump that goes on very often,
where do I start? Where is the water coming from?
Bruce
Answer:Bruce
Dear Bruce,
Let us start with the easy one. You never said if this
was a fiberglass or wood boat. If it is a fiberglass hull,
check al through hul fittings, check all stuffing boxes,
shafts, rudders, etc. Repack all packing glands and all
head and cooing inlet valves and sea cocks. These are
musts on all boats, wood or fiberglass.
I It Is a wood boat, Bruce, I would haul the boat and
check for worms and rot In planks in hull. Also, one bilge
pump is never enough; get a back-up pump in case one
falls



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CAR SPA
HAND WASH & WAX
COMPLETE DETAILING
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ENGINE CLEANING
SPICK-UP & DELIVERY

1700 E. Commercial Blvd.
928-0801 Ft. Lauderdale, FL 33334


clearly defined and there are numerous tables and draw-
ings. The information applies quite broadly to both large
and small yachts. This manual is available from the
American Yacht and Boat Council, Inc., Post Office Box
806, Amityville, New York 11701 or phone (516)
598-0550.
The storage battery is one of the real essentials of a
yacht's electrical system. It is also probably the most
overestimated, least understood and abused pieces of
equipment aboard a boat. Yet, when treated with respect
and understanding, it will give amazing service. A very
informative manual is available which is used by the peo-
ple who distribute, sell, and service batteries. Although
the manual contains a great deal of technical information,
it is quite readable. This manual describes many proce-
dures which you probably should never attempt to do, but
understanding why the procedures are done may greatly
improve your understanding of the storage battery. The
pages on determining the cause of battery failures are
pure gold. You can easily translate this information into a
list of things you should never do to a battery. The STOR-
AGE BATTERY TECHNICAL SERVICE MANUAL is publish-
ed by the Battery Council International, Headquarters:
111 East Wacker Drive, Chicago, IIl. 60601, phone (312)
644-6610. You might even find one at a battery shop if
you asked for it.
The National Fire Protection Association Pamphlet #
302 represents the cumulative result of 48 years of at-
tenti on to fire safety of power boats. Approximately 16
pages of the 66 page pamphlet are devoted to the yacht's
electrical system. NFPA # 302 is available from the Na-
tional Fire Protection Association, Inc., Batterymarch
Park, Quincy, Mass. 02269.
There are also other books which might be of interest in
solving specific problems. The ones listed below are
generally very dry reading and the ideas presented are not
easy for the yacht owner to assimilate into useful informa-
tion even if he is willing to work at it. First is the IEEE Std
45 which is titled IEEE RECOMMENDED PRACTICE FOR
ELECTRIC INSTALLATIONS ON SHIPBOARD. It is published
by the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers,
Inc. Then there is CG-323 RULES AND REGULATIONS FOR
SMALL PASSENGER VESSELS (UNDER 100 GROSS
TONS) and CG 259 ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING REGULA-
TIONS. Both are U.S. Coast Guard manuals.
If you have found a particularly helpful source of
information drop me a note at the newspaper office so
other readers may share it.


IF YOU HAVE A PROBLEM OF ANY KIND WITH YOUR
BOAT, WRITE TO:

"BIG AL"
c/o Waterfront News
320 SW 2nd Street
Ft. Lauderdale, FL 33312
(or call 524-9450)

Big Al will research your problem and answer it to the
best of his ability given the information provided.

(Big Al, a.k.a. Alvin Grodsky, is a Marine Engine Instructor
for the Coast Guard Auxiliary. He is an aircraft pilot and
former United States Marine Corps Engine Maintenance
Instructor and an Instructor of Engines and Maintenance
for the U.S. Government as a civilian. Al has over fifty
years of marine engineering experience, from steam on.)


PURE WA TER
by Reverse Osmosis

Guaranteed safe Drinking Water
by R/0, removes pollutants like
asbestos, pesticides, industrial
wastes, bacteria, viruses,
sodium, magnesium, etc.
No electricity or chemicals,
works on water pressure alone.
Ideal for use in home or on
board any boat with pressure
water system. For demonstration
or more information call:

525-2645
hattivlqt- 3 Ici11C3 UIVtLK StAILb
phone: 983-7015.
INILRNAIIONAL YACHTMEN's ASSOCIATION
525-7444, at 12 SW 6th St., Ft. Laud.


SOUTH FLORIDA SAILING ASSOCIATION
662-2667.


I _


I











WATERFRONT NEUS


GALLEY NOTES

by Jim and Betty Metzger, R.D.

Let's go sailing
What sailor can hear those words without leaping into
action? But wait a minute. Time invested in planning, is
time well spent. Where are we going? Who will be going
and for how long?
I especially like to be prepared when asked, "What's for
dinner? We're starving"
Years ago when it came to providing food for their
crews, the early seafarers often fared none too well. They
faced the same problems that best all travelers who must
carry their food supplies with them:
providing food adequate to keep everyone healthy
preserving the food
finding a place to store it
Noah on his ark probably ate chicken stored live until
time for the meal. Early sailors who knew little about
nutrition and who had only primitive food preservation
techniques were unable to keep their crews alive and
healthy. Ships sometimes lost much of their crews to
scurvy, a disease caused by a deficiency of Vitamin C.
The English navy men were called limeys because they
carried limes on board to prevent it.
Our modern explorers, such as the astronauts, such as
on the Skylab Mission (1973-74), had a small freezer and
were able to enjoy such dishes as lobster newberg, filet
mignon, and ice cream. What is even more amazing,
astronauts aboard the space shuttle have no freezer. Still
they have 74 food items and 20 beverages to choose
from, according to FDA Consumer.
Fortunately, today there is so much research in the food
industry giving us both better packaging and food
preservation. All we have to do is follow it with an open
mind and put the new technology into our daily living.
In planning my menu I want to include food that is:
appetizing and pleasurable to eat
nutritionally adequate based on the U.S. Recommen-
ded Dietary Allowance
preserved against spoilage
lightweight and compact
Food scientists at NASA's Johnson Space Center in
Houston and at the Army Research and Development
Labs in Natick, Mass., have spent two decades develop-
ing a set of foods that fulfill their requirements.
Let's take a look at the food carried on the space shut-
tie. The food is classified into 5 categories based on the
method of food preservation. All of these methods are
related to the fact that bacteria in food grows best in
moist environment and warm temperatures. We are all
familiar with these first four.
Rehydratables: foods that are dehydrated by freeze
drying, air drying, spray drying, or other methods. Astro-
nauts rehydrate some, such as sliced bananas, with the
saliva in their mouths. Others, such as shrimp cocktail,
scrambled eggs, and all beverages are rehydrated with
water.
*. Intermediate moisture: foods that are partially dehy-
drated such as dried apricots, raisins, apples or peaches.
Irradiated: foods that have their normal moisture but
are exposed to ionizing radiation which destroys bacteria,
such as corned beef, bread.
"Natural" form: foods that are naturally law in
moisture, such as nuts, cookies, and crunch bars.
Thermostabilized: foods that are sealed in cans or
aluminum laminated pouches and cooked at temperatures
that destroy bacteria.
For the first time since World War II, the Armed Forces
basic combat ration is being replaced. The new meal is
built around the retort pouch. The Meal-Ready-to-Eat is
abbreviated MREs and featured on the combat menu as
convenience foods par excellence.
Meat entree items are classified by the method by
which they are placed in the pouch.
pumpable such as chicken a'la king and beef stew

WATER PURIFICATION PRODUCTS
2333 N. State Road 7
c Margate, Florida 33063
979-5066
STATE and COUNTY CERTIFIED
OVER 20 YEARS EXPERIENCE
SALES-INSTALLATION-SERVICE
,LL TYPES FILTERS, CARTRIDGES,
QUIPMENT..... DISCOUNT PRICES
Open 9-5 Mon-Sat/Call anytime


placeable such as meatballs in barbecue sauce
and ham slices
extrudable such as chicken loaf
Florida was a test market for this last group. Now we
can obtain them only by ordering direct from the manu-
facturer. They come in individual servings and half steam
table trays.
A typical menu for one day
Breakfast apples, beef patty, scrambled eggs, Total,
cocoa, and orange drink.
Lunch chicken patty, chili, bread, bananas, almond
crunch bar, and apple drink


LOCAL NOTICE TO MARINERS
SAFETY ZONE REGULATIONS: on the INTRA
COASTAL WATERWAY (ICW), between PORT
EVERGLADES, FL Turning Basin and the
DANIA CUT OFF CANAL.
The Coast Guard is establishing a
safety zone fro the drilling, blast-
ing and dredging operations conducted
between Coast Guard Station Ft. Laud-
erdale and 700 feet south of the Dry
Marine Canal on the ICW at Port Ever-
glades. The zone is needed to protect
swimmers, pleasure boaters, commer-
cial traffic and construction person-
nel from safety hazards associated
with the drilling, blasting and dredg-
ing operations. Entry into this zone
is prohibited unless authorized by
the Captain of the Port.
EFFECTIVE DATES: This regulation be-
comes effective on 3 April, 1984. It
terminates on 29 May, 1984 unless
completion of the drilling, blasting
and dredging operation occurs first.
FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT:
Ensign P.J. Cormier, c/o Commanding
Officer, U.S. Coast Guard Marine
Safety Office, Miami, FL 33130,
Phone: (305) 350-5691.
PORT EVERGLADES Light 9; Destroyed
/TRLB; Charts: 11470, 11466.


15 Years Experience On
hthe The Gold Coast

canvas *n1

workshop; |
FAST -- DEPENDAE
BIMINI TOPS. DODGERS. FULL COVERS.
ENCLOSURES. ETC.
SERVING BROWARO AND PALMU EACH COUNTIrE
2050M TIGERTAIL BLVD. DANIA. FL 33004
STEVE HUBBARD (305) 920-0162





MARINER'S
MAIL CENTER

MAIL/PARCEL FORWARDING AS YOU GO
RELIABLE MESSAGE CTR FOR BOATERS
TELEPHONE ANSWERING SERVICES
MARINE SAFETY SUPPLIES
OUT-OF-TOWN NEWSPAPERS
CIGARETS, MAGAZINES & SUNDRIES
950 NE 20 Ave.,Ft.Laud.,FL 33304
527-1871




C TTHE NAUTICAL BUILDING
10 S.W. 6th STREET
FT. LAUDERDALE, FL 33301
co
YACHT DELIVERIES
Fully Equippld. Professional
I.- Offshore Delivery Teams

CI NAVIGATION & SAFETY (305) 764191
EQUIPMENT (305) 764-8191
L EJohn A. Sanders
S Seamanship and integrity Kim L. Sanders


7
Dinner tomato juice or soup, salisbury steak, rice
pilaf, green beans with onion rings, fruit cocktail, butter-
scotch puaaing and iced tea.
The nicest part about this menu is that our inventory is
usually stored on board from one voyage to another. It re-
quires an refrigeration and the shelf life is 2 to 5 years.
Bon Voyage and Bon Appetitl
Jim and Betty Metzger, R.D., are food nutrition con-
sultants In Fort Lauderdale. The Metzgers are active
members of the Catallna Sailing Club (CAB) and Betty Is a
charter member of the Broward County Dietetic Associa-
tion.


FLORIDA-ICW-BISCAYNE BAY: Sailboat
Race.
Monty Trainer's Bayshore Marina will
sponsor the monty Trainer's 9th An-
nual Bayshore Regatta from 1000 to
1800 local time on 19 May 1984. The
race will start at Dinner Key Channel
Daybeacon 2 (LLNR 858) in approxim-
ate position 25-42.8N 80-12.7W then
proceed south to Featherbed Bank East
Channel Daybeacon 3 (LLNR 874.20)
in approximate position 25-32.4N
80-12.5W. Approximately 40 sailboats
ranging from 22 to 65 feet in length
are expected to participate. Non-
participating vessels are requested
to exercise caution in the area.
Charts: 11465, 11467.
FLORIDA-SEACOAST: Aid Light Rhythm
To Be Changed.
Fowey Rocks Light (LLNR 74) flash
characteristic is proposed to be
changed to Fl W 10s, red sector
from 0000 to 0210 and from 1810 to
1870, nominal range 16 miles.
Charts: 11466, 11465, 11467, 11451,
11460, 11013; LLPG: 9.
Comments should be received by
2 July 1984: U.S COAST GUARD (oan)
CMDR. 7th C.G. Dist.
51 SW 1st Avenue
Miami, FL 33130


S fjod does not subtract from man's
SIthe ours spent saflbng
SQuality 50/50 Silkscreen T-Shirts
Royal Blue and Raspberry. S,M,L
& $1.50 shpg. to Shipmates Ventur
S20 Ave. Ft. Lauderdale, FL 3330
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allotted time

;. Cream, Grey
& XL. $7.95 + tax
es, Inc., 942 N.E.
14.


WE ARE THERE...
WHEN YOU NEED US!



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* Immediate Delivery












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OO S.W. 15th Street, Fort Lauderdale, FL 33315
(305] 522-6767


- I I I I I I ~ I I


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WATERFRONT NEWS'
WATERWAY/ROAD PILOT
ADVERTISERS GUIDE


Numbers= AD pge
DIVING


BOATS WANTED
MARINE ENGINE


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SAILS


REAL ESTATE
MARINE STORES
MARINE SERVICES


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MARINE FUEL
INFLATABLES
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MARINE CONSTRUCTION


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10


A REALISTIC GUIDE ON BUYING

REFRIGERATION AND AIR

CONDITIONING EQUIPMENT

by Bruce Whealey

Well, I am back. I think it is rather premature to say by
"popular demand," but whatever the case, here I am. If
you remember, last month I threatened to write my own
guide for boat owners to buy refrigeration or air condi-
tioning equipment without being "taken." The process is
very simple if you keep your objectives in line and in
sight.
First, you must figure out just what you want to ac-
complish. Then, what do you have to work with. For ex-
ample, what voltages will you have and will you have the
same voltage at all times? You may find out the "hard"
way that the 230 vac at Pier 66 becomes 100 vac at the
Drug Smuggler Inn in the Bahamas. And the most impor-
tant thing to remember is HOW MUCH DO YOU WANT TO
SPEND?? then, HOW MUCH WILL YOU SPEND?? There is
a world of difference between those two sentences. Let's
separate the two types of equipment. First, refrigeration is
very stable. Your box, the insulation, the capacity, etc.
never changes. It is very easy to size up the needed
equipment. But remember P-R-I-C-E if you are told that you
must have a 3/4 ton 115 vac unit and 4 holding plates (at
$350.00 each) and the total job price comes out at
$3700.00!! Well, that is great, IF you can spend that kind
of money. But if you can't, remember that a 1/4 ton unit
with 2 plates will also give you needed refrigeration at
maybe $1000 cheaper. The big difference is in running
time. At dock side it makes no difference (unless you
must pay the FPL bill) but at anchor, you may have to run
your generator 11/2 2 hours longer than you would with a
larger sized unit. Like I told you last month, the bottom
line is money ... plain and simple. No matter how perfect
the unit is for your boat, if you can't afford it, you can't
have it ... but that doesn't mean you must resort to buy-
ing ice again!! Now for air conditioning. This is a bit
harder. I always play it safe and over size a unit for a
boat. You really can't guess where this owner or the next
owner will take the boat. The heat loads are quite differ-
ent between the Rhode II. Sound and Cozumel. If you are
told a 10,000 btu unit will be "ok", be wize and get a
12,000 btu unit. It may come in handy when your mother-
in-law informs you that you will be taking her and her two
dogs sailing for two weeks this July, remember how much
that woman sweats when she gets hot!
For those of you that read my last article and after
reading this one, you may get the idea that I don't like
BRAND NAME COMPANIES!! And you are so right. You
see, I feel that money spent on refrigeration or air condi-
tioning equipment should go into that equipment. I just
don't feel right about paying for a BIG BUILDING, ALL OF
THOSE SECRETARIES, ALL OF THE SALARIES FOR THE
ASSEMBLY LINE FLUNKIES, AND ALL OF THAT VERY
EXPENSIVE ADVERTISEMENTS YOU SEE. Those "large
overhead" companies use the same parts as do we
independent companies. We all simply assemble parts
bought from individual manufacturers. We all have the
same warranty, passed along from the parts manufac-
turer. "Over head" is the big difference, that and quality
control. Once a big company sets up an assembly line,
they can then hire $3.50 hr. "warm bodies" to put the
parts together. Look at it the same way you would for
wood working on your boat. You can do one of three
things. The best way is to hire a REAL ships carpenter
who works for himself (quality control), pay him what he
asks ($18 to $25 per hr.) and you will, in most cases, get
a great job that will last for years and bring many compli-
ments. Or you may chosoe to go to a yard and pay bet-
ween $30 and $40 an hr. for an "educated" bottom
scraper to do the wood work. Just remember that no mat-
ter what the yard people try to tell you, a REAL ships
carpenter won't work for $9 to $11 an hr., and that is
,what yards pay their "carpenters:" The rest is for the
yard's OVER HEAD. But if you feel really lucky, go to a
constructionsite and geFta nail banger to do the job on


Engine Mechanical Electrical Pumps -
Toilets Generators Installation & Repair
Engine Surveys, Absentee Owner Supervision
Crusader. Perkins; Borg Warner
Vetus Marine Dieselst
TED HETTLER YACHT SER VICE
Serving Ft. Lauderdale Yacht Owners Since 1960

S301 Bayberry Drive Telephone
Plantation. Florida 33317 587-7282


POWER BOATING


Saturdaysll If you look at as do I, you won't mind paying a
fair price to get the job done. But you want your money to
go into the job don't you, that means "parts and labor." I
don't care how much OVER HEAD the local 7-11 store
has, I won't pay $121.00 for a 6 pack of coke, would
you?? So why pay some LARGE COMPANY $4700. for
what should cost $2400.
I am often asked for a recommendation of "who else to
call" for an estimate. Since I know most of the people in
the marine end of the air conditioning and refrigeration
trade, and since I hear all of the latest stories from the
local supply houses on who screwed up (again) and who
has the most returns and warranty work, I will give you
my personal opinion on the top three people in this local
area. They are in alphabetical order, of course: Rich
Beers, Charles Lee, and myself (you didn't think I would
leave myself out, did you?). All three build their own
equipment and all three do their own work. All three lose
money on return trips and warranty work, so all three do it
-icht the first time, or else! Any of the three will be happy
come to your boat for an estimate or repair work, or to
ielp you design a do-it-yourself system. Well, that about
sums it up. Forget about heat loads, unit sizes, and other
such drivel. Get a basic idea on what you want and then
call a COMPETENT refla-c man and pay him for an honest
opinion, and to design a system to fit your needs and
BUDGET. But no matter what you want to do, spend your
money wisely, on the equipment, not on a skiing vacation
to Vail for some company president.

Bruce Wheatley, of. Custom Refrigeration (see
Classified, this paper) has been building custom units to
meet the individual needs of individual boats for five years
in the Ft. Lauderdale area. Although many people in his
trade don't like his candidnesss," nobody disputes the ac-
curacy of his statements. Remember, CAVET EMPTORII


FASCO UNLIMITED of
HIALEAH

FAMOus STEELFLEX FOR AIRBOATS
TrAK BOAT DECKS, ETC.

HOME OF THE FAMOUS EPOXO 88
The Original Table Top Resin
EPOXIES POLYESTERS
COATINGS RESINS
GLUES FIBERGLASS CLOTH
RESINS FIBERGLASS MAT

MANUFACTURERS OF SPECIALIZED COMPOUNDS AND
COATINGS EPOXIES POLYESTERS URETHANE


GERALD J. WOJCIK
PRESIDENT


7435 W. 19 Ct.
Hlaleah, FL 33314
CALL: 305-821-9441


JOE'S AUTO/MARINE SUPPLY BEN'S AUTO/MARINE SUPPLY
201 S.W. 5th Street 132 So. Seagrave Street
Ft. Lauderdale, FL 33312 Daytona Beach, FL 32014
CALL: 527-9200 CALL: 252-3817


Chuck McKinley D/B/A SNOVEk, INC.
FASCO DISTRIBUTORS 1230 No. Dixie Hwy.
645 Avenida de Mayo Lake Worth, FL 33460
Sarasota, FL 33581 CALL: 586-6091
CALL: 349-7529
SEE ONE OF THE ABOVE DISTRIBUTORS IN YOUR AREA &
Look for our NEW Store in STUART





a E5- E -E<--q
I (^ ^^/^^^^ Zy*7^


I


Local and International
Deliveries
Sail or Power
U.S.C.G. Licensed


BOAT MAINTENANCE
WASHING WAXING
COMPOUNDING TEAK CLEANING
VARNISHING
WEEKLY, BI-WEEKLY & MONTHLY
MAINTENANCE PLANS AVAILABLE
Serving Dade & Broward Counties
CHEAP PRICES e SUPERB WORK

BEEPER-305/353-2020
Wait for Beep Dial Your Number Hit # Button
SUITE 450 Walt for Busy Signal.
1323 S.E. 17th STREET Hang Up
FT. LAUD.. FL 33316 EVES: 305/854-9533


MACHINE SHOP
LAUDERDALE TOOL and DIE CO., INC.
209 Southwest 17th Street / Fort Lauderdale, Florida 33315 / Phone 524-1539
SINCE 1962


METALIZING


WELDING

MARINE MACHINING

CUSTOM MACHINING


If it is made of metal, we can
repair it or reproduce Itill


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SW 17th St.


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Fast, Courteous service
We cater to the marine trade.


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------- ----



















LAS OLAS ART FESTIVAL &

FORT LAUDERDALE STREET

DANCE PROVIDE THE

WATERFRONT A WEEKEND

TO REMEMBER

by Moreland Gamble-Swift

SOn the waterfront at the Stranahan House (March 25,
1984) What a weekend! Allow me to assemble my
notes and my thoughts before the breeze blows them into
the New River.
Yesterday the music, food, and masses that were the
Fort Lauderdale Street Dance, and today (and yesterday)
the sculptors, painters, potters and patrons of the arts
that were the Las Olas Art Festival encompassed the
waterfront.
Yesterday one could sample ethnic foods and continu-
ous live music. Jazz, egg rolls, and beer gave way to a
fireworks display mirrored upon the New River. Happy
birthday, Fort Lauderdale.
Today my senses were massaged by the Tibetan-like
sounds of handcrafted bells, the colors and shapes of
many artists' imaginations, and tickled by "Tacky Flam-
ingo art." It was not just the gold necklace crowd there,
but also boat people with visors and tee-shirts, Sunday
after-church folks and the young bikini-clad.
The only things plastic this weekend on the waterfront
were the cards being wrung through the machines as the
artists sold their works.
Thank you, Mrs. Stranahan, for letting this scrivener
rest and write on your porch by the waterfront, lest we
forget. It's so easy to lose sight of our community and our
heritage in the glare of all the hype. But weekends like
this one get you back in touch with real things. Now the
wind and river can have my notes, like the colorful kites
at the festival.




15TH ANNUAL LAS OLAS ART

FESTIVAL'S "BEST OF THE

SHOW" AWARD WINNERS


Kenlyn Stewarts "Intrusion Series #2," Batik with Inlay;
Knoxville, TN.

Bill Keatings, "Wind Song," handmade bronze sculpture;
Lillian, AL.

Bill Turner's "Fish Face," handpainted photograph; Atlan-
ta, GA.

Wayne Session's "Big Red," watercolor painting; Coral
Gables, FL.


SEA SCOUTS HELPED or

START A NEW NATION

by Bob Hammack V

In the waning weeks of 1918, Czechoslovakia was
slowly becoming a nation. Austrian rule had collapsed at
the end of World War I and a national committee was or-
ganizing the new government.
It was risky business and no mean feat, but that did not
deter some 96 Czech Sea Scouts (Ceskych Skautu) from
volunteering to deliver sensitive messages between
members of the organizing committee.
Josef Rossler Orovsky, Deputy Chief Scout, offered to
form the messenger service and enlisted the aid of the
older Sea Scouts to carry the mail. He produced about
80,000 special stamps to help identify the Czech Scout
Post.
Time was short for use of the service from November
7 to November 25, 1918 as was the period of validity
for the specially designed postage stamps, the first of the
fledgling nation. Some were used as early as November 2,
according to a specimen that has been discovered.
The service was re-instated for one day, December 21,
for the arrival of the nation's first president, Thomas
Masaryk. Masaryk was a national hero and was closely
followed by those who protected him from harm. The only
official contact and chronicles of his journey back to
Prague were carried by the Sea Scouts. They served to
carry news, letters, telegrams, reports and official state-
ments between Prague Castle, Parliament, the Town Hall,
the railway station, the post office, the telegraph station,
members of Parliament and other members of the organiz-
ing committee.
Jan Masaryk, the president's son, sent this telegram to
his mother: "Dad is in good health, approaching the
border." It was delivered by a Sea Scout.
Masaryk's journey is covered by telegrams housed in
the government archives and in private collections. All of
them bear the Scout stamps or seals as proof of their offi-
cial nature.
Perhaps the most outstanding specimen message came
from Rossler-Orovsky to an unknown recipient. Special-
ists suspect that it went to Dr. Domin, a member of Parlia-
ment connected to the Czech Scout group or Junak.
Dated December 23, 1918, it details the arrival:
"We were guarding the Wilson Railway Station from the
morning, then we had sentries at the Old Town Hall and
from 4-6 in the Parliament Building and then we shall be
during the whole night at the Royal Castle.
"Besides that my Scouts are standing guard along the
whole route from the Wilson Railway Station from where
President Masaryk is going to drive to the Castle.
"I have a few minutes here in the Parliament Building
while the Parliament is in session to write you these few
lines and I am enclosing a few Scout stamps with today's
overprint 'Arrival of president Masaryk' which will be very
rate and are used today just for official correspondence.
"With best wishes."
Rossler-Orovsky was right about the rarity of the over-
prints. They have become valuable enough to attract
counterfeits who applied the fake inscriptions over the
real stamps.
The matter of the stamps is not so important as the ser-
vices they represent by the Sea Scouts, but they are a
large part of the history of the new country.
Apparently caught up in anniversary nostalgia, the gov-
ernment of Czechoslovakia in 1968-69 actually allowed
the Scout movement to come out of the underground and


participate in international activities. In 1969, however,
fearing a new liberalization of ideas, they quickly sup-
pressed the movement.
Another oddity surrounding the popularity of Sea
Scouting in Czechoslovakia is the fact that there is no
open sea in the country. Czechoslovakia is land-locked.
Sea Scouts practices their skills on the lakes and rivers of
the country, and prepared themselves for regattas and
covering.


C4DNtL


DELI & CATERING

522-2118
601 SE 3RD AVE (on the corner)
Across from Brojward Lounty LOurt House.





IRS ZOC
INFLATABLE REPAIR SERVICES
124 S.W. 5th Street
Ft. Lauderdale, FL 33301
(305) 462-6208 ALAN R. HARRIS
ZODIAC Authorized Service Station
Liferafts & Boats


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SENTRY Ft. Laud., FL 33315
(305) 523-9312


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Licensed and Insured

581-8109
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I I I ,-II -"


"""


















'. Rating necessary to win.


HAVE YOU CLEANED

YOUR SAILS LATELY?

by Gary Roberts

Ask most sailors the above question and the response
will be, "Are they supposed to be cleaned?"
Probably the most neglected, but one of the most impor-
tant items on your sailboat are its sails. Sailors relgiously
clean the bottom of their boats knowing this is a primary
factor in its performance. The same rationale should be
applied to the sales.
A sail laden with salt, covered with mildew and an
assortment of stains wiN not perform as the sailmaker
designed it. There are remedies that can be used to
remove the various Items that have found their way to
your sail.
Salt is the most common and the most damaging, but
also the easiest to remove. Salt will cake on sails making
them stiffer, heavier and deteriorating the sal fiber due to
abrasion. In most cases a rinsing with fresh water will
keep salt from accumulating. For sails which have not
been cleaned for some time, you may have to soak the
entire sal in fresh water which will dissolve the salt.
Mildew will soon be found on a sail which is not kept
clean. Although mildew will not form on the synthetics
from which sails are made, it will form a dirt. Again, the
prevention is frequent rinsing of the sal. If mildew does
form, it can be removed by using a mild non-alkaline soap
and a non-chlorine bleach. They should be applied to the
sail with a soft nylon bristle brush. The sail should then be
rinsed several times to remove the cleaning agent from
the cloth completely. Lemon juice or a 50/50 solution of
vinegar and water may be applied to any remaining
mildew. Alkaine detergents can cause damage to the sail
fiber and chlorine bleach may yellow the sail so these
should beavoided.
Stains may be removed by solvents, although profes-
sional assistance is advised. Petroleum products such as
oil, grease and tar may sometimes be dissolved by


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(305) 761-9109
1110 S.W. 1st St.
Ft. Laud., FL 33312




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Mack-Shaw Sailmakers, Inc.
100 S.W. 15th Street. Fort Lauderrle, FL 33314
(305] 522-6767


RACE #6 RESULTS

March 10, 1984


Yacht
MENAGE
FLYMG CIRCUS
MAN 0 WAR
MONTRUE
VENUS
SCIROCCO


Yacht


MY DANCE
SUNNY TOO
VENDETTA
TIME WARP


Yacht
SASHA
SASHAY
TENSION
CLOUD NINE
PUMPKIN PATCH

Yacht
MENAGE
FLYING CIRCUS
MY DANCE
MAN 0 WAR
MONTRUE
VENUS
SUNNY TOO
VENDETTA
SCIROCCO
TIME WARP


Rating
165
162
165
168
165
168

Rating
201
186
186
204

Rating
186
174
186
216
166

Rating
165
162
201
165
168
165
186
186
168
204


b. Average speed.


c. Speed increase necessary to win.


A CLASS
Rnish Elapsed Correct. Corr. time
15:26:04 03:16:04 00:44:38 02:31:26
15:25:36 03:15:36 00:43:49 02:31:47
15:35:35 03:25:35 00:44:38 02:40:57
15:36:39 03:26:39 00:45:27 02:41:12
15:37:37 03:27:37 00:44:38 02:42:59
15:49:22 03:39:22 00:45:27 02:53:55
B CLASS
Fnlsh Elapsed Correct. Corr. time
15:41:24 03:31:24 00:54:22 02:37:02
15:46:01 03:36:01 00:50:19 02:45:42
15:51:11 03:41:11 00:50:19 02:50:52
16:01:04 03:51:04 00:55:11 02:55:53
CLASS C (TRAINING BOATS)
Finish Elapsed Correct. Corr. time
15:49:21 03:34:21 00:40:07 02:54:14
16:01:05 03:46:05 00:37:32 03:08:33
16:07:05 03:52:05 00:40:07 03:11:58
16:19:00 04:04:00 00:46:35 03:17:25
16:14:56 03:59:56 00:35:48 03:24:08
OVERALL


Fnlsh
15:26:04
15:25:36
15:41:24
15:35:35
15:36:39
15:37:37
15:46:01
15:51:11
15:49:22
16:01:04


Elapsed
03:16:04
03:15:36
03:31:24
03:25:35
03:26:39
03:27:37
03:36:01
03:41:11
03:39:22
03:51:04


mineral spirits although there will usually be a yellowish
stain left. These stains as well as blood may be removed
by bleaching only the area of the stain. Again, completely
rinsing the area with fresh water. The chemical solution
used to remove rust caused by shrouds or metal fittings is
not harmful to the sail, but it is caustic and should be used
only by professional cleaners.
Another damaging item to sails is ultraviolet light. Sails
should be kept covered when not in use. Proper storing is
also important. Never put a sail in a locker with a con-
tainer of oil, transmission fluid or other liquid as the obvi-
ous will eventually happen. Sails should also never be
stored until completely dry.
Your sails are an expensive and vital part of your boat.
A little maintenance and care will increase the life of your
sails and add to the performance of your boat.

(Gary Roberts has been a sail cleaner since 1981 in Fort
Lauderdale. He learned the trade from a sail cleaning com-
pany with eight years of experience in Newport Beach,
California. Gary is currently race committee chairman for
the Cataina Association of Broward.)



I--re U


00:44:38
00:43:49
00:54:22
00:44:38
00:45:27
00:44:38
00:50:19
00:50:19
00:45:27
00:55:11


02:31:26
02:31:47
02:37:02
02:40:57
02:41:12
02:42:59
02:45:42
02:50:52
02:53:55
02:55:53


--- -


SYD MILLMAN
President


REPAIR WORK
RECUT SAILS
CUSTOM SAILMAKING


01 S.W. 7th Street Fort Lauderdale, Florida (305) 522-7360
Local sailmaker for personal service



THE SAIL CLEANERS
4711 L N. DIXIE HWY.
FT.LAUDERDALE, FL33334

Have You Cleaned

Your Sails Lately?

Unsightly dirt, rust and oil can
damage your sails, affect their
performance and reduce their
longevity.
Here's five good reasons why The Sail
Cleaners should clean your sails:
1. We are the only sail cleaning facility
in South Florida.
2. Our plant has the most modern,
scientific method for treating sails.
3. We pick up and deliver.
4. We are licensed and insured.
5. Our prices are low and quality high.
Give your sails a new life.
Call 491-3327 for a free estimate.

THE SAIL CLEANERS


Complete Yacht Services
Mobile Repair U it

522-5789
MAJOR & MINOR REPAIRS ON ALL GAS I DIESEL
ENGINES GENEIIAIORS CUSIOM INSIAlt AIONS
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. 13


A SPORT THAT'S

HERE TO STAY

by Jon Grau

Here's another question for you sports and boating fans.
What's the fastest growing sport for all ages in S. Florida?
Jogging? Swimming?
No, its sailboarding! Invented back in 1968, when Hoyle
Schweitzer and Jim Drake added a sailing rig to a twelve
foot surfboard, sailboarding (or windsurfing, as it's com-
monly called) is beginning to soar in popularity in the S.
Florida area.
One reason that this report is receiving more attention
is the recent decision to include windsurfing in the Sum-
mer Olympic games. Competition will consist of triangle
around-the-buoys racing and a freestyle event, in which
competitors make their bodies and boards perform an
aquatic ballet.
Another reason for the increased popularity can be attri-
buted to the direct efforts of a local sailboarding club, the
Greater Ft. Lauderdale Boardsailing Association
(GFtLBSA), an organization formed one year ago to pro-
vide a medium for all windsurfing and sailing fans to get
together to promote their sport.
One misleading image of the club has attempted to alter
is that windsurfing is only for the young and athletic, that
it requires great strength and stamina. "Not really," says
Peter McNaughton, a club member and owner of the
Beachside Boardsailing concession behind the Yankee
Clipper Sheraton. "It takes balance and some coordination
but as in any sport, it takes practice. When you feel
comfortable on the board, you fall less and use your
weight and energy more efficiently. Then it's a breeze. It's
a very satisfying feeling to see yourself improve every
time you sail."
As more people realize that it is actually possible for
them to windsurf, the sport is sure to grow even more.
This author can attest to that. Just ask my mother -
she's 47 and I taught her how to sail on the lake behind
her house
Another factor which has influenced the surge in
popularity is the relatively low cost of owning a sailboard.
The initial investment fo a new board is between $500.00
and $1300.00, depending on style and quality of equip-
ment purchased.
According to Skip Commagere, owner of Force
E/Nautilus water sports stores, the average prize for a
good quality board is about $850.00. However, he adds,
"once you get past the initial purchase, you hardly spend
anything. No gas, storage, or maintenance program. .
Actually, the amount you pay to own a board on a cost
per hour of use basis is less than going to the movies or
most other forms of entertainment. And a whole lot more
funl"
Since its creation one year ago, the GFtLBSA (or the
"association", as its fondly referred to) has grown con-
tinuously to its present size of 80 members. While matur-
ing, the club's goals and activities have also become more
defined.
One of its primary functions has been to promote and
organize local sailing activities in this area. Monthly regat-


tas are slated to begin In May, and major national regat-
tas, such as the recent Ft. Lauderale News sponsored
Sunshine Regatta are held once or twice a year. And the
club has even created its versi on of the "little brown jug"
by having a Challenge Cup regatta against the rivalry
down south, the Key Biscayne Boardsailing Club. Every
three months the clubs face off to see who will win the
honor of holding this prestigious cup.
The association also sponsors informative sailing
clinics, group cruises, Informal sailing get-togethers, and
occasional parties. The monthly meetings are held on the
third Thursday of each month at the outside patio bar of
the Riverside Hotel on Las Olas in Ft. Lauderdale.
The effect of having sailboarding in the Summer Olym-
pic games and the recognition of the sport by the highly
revered United States Yacht Racing Union, under whose
auspices the Sunshine Regatta was held, has brought
new credibility to the sport, along with a demand for
knowledgeable sailboard personnel to help create rules
and guidelines by which the sport is governed. The club is
doing such an exceptional job in the professional manner
in which it runs its regattas that it has not only become a
model for other clubs nationwide, but has also become an
informal consultant to USYRU on major saiboard events.
Another area which the club has been focusing in on as
of late is the political arena. The power the club has from
its members has given it the clout to be recognized by
local (and national) government officials.
The boardsailing association was instrumental in lobby-
ing for the creation of a South Beach Committee, set up to
study the launching situation for sailboards and sailboats
at S. Beach in Ft. Lauderdale. The association has submit-
ted a proposal for both boaters and swimmers in a cost-
efficient manner. The proposal, still pending, recommends
a marginal increase in the physical launching area to
reduce overcrowding, and more signs to clearly designate
swimming and launching areas.
Also proposed is that a section of the North Beach area
be preserved as a permanent "regatta site". This would
require that no additional seawalls and parking meters be
installed in that area, thus giving small craft beach access
to that area once or twice a year for major regattas.
The next meeting of the city commission to consider
this proposal is at 10 a.m. on April 3 at City Hall. This
meeting is open to the public, and all those interested are
invited to attend.
You don't have to own a sailboard to be a member of
this club. In fact, you don't even have to know how to
sail. But if you think you may be interested in this
organization of healthy, fun-loving, individuals, go ahead
and attend the next meeting on April 19. Things get under
way about 7:30 p.m.
For more information, call Peter McNaughton at
522-1734 or call Jon Grau at 943-3483.
If you want to get out and see some of the local
sailboarding events, the following is a calendar of what's
happening for the next month or so.


April 14-15 Mad Max Regatta Stueart Causeway
April 28-29 Florida Pro-Am Atlantic Beach
April 28-29 Windsurfer Club Davis Island,
State Tampa
Championships
May 4, 5, 6 Windsurfer Class Sanibel Isl.
District 9 Champs


305-283-9990
904-241-1244
813-360-3788

813-472-0123


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Ft. Laud., FL 33315 524-8500


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Milling and Custom Millwork


2945 State Rd. 84
Ft. Lauderdale, FL 33312 (305) 584-8558

^ wjS


COMPASS ERRORS

by James Sullivan


Two errors effect the magnetic compass used as a
steering aid on small vessels. The first is variation caused
by the earth's magnetic field on the compass. It is named
east or west according to whether the direction of the
magnetic pole pies to the right or left of the true pole. In
the Ft. Lauderdale-area, the compass needle will align it-
self on a variation line of 2*1', west, next year (1985) the
alignment will be 3" west.
The second error named deviation is caused by the ves-
sel's own residual magnetism. While variation cannot be
eliminated from the compass, deviation can be reduced by
the use of secondary magnets found within the housing 3f
the magnetic compass. The systems used are either to
magnetic rods crossing beneath the magnet of the com-
pass or a set of gears each containing a small bar magnet
located in the base of the compass. Both systems contain
two drive slots labeled E/W and N'S. The screwdriver
used to turn these slots must be i-ferrous. Do make
your own by buying a 20 cent copper toilet lift-wire and
file the free end flat, if this had an imbedded anchor on the
wire it would list for $8.90 in the ship's store.
Deviation like variation is also labeled east or west. A
simple way to remove most of the deviation error is to use
a static buoy or marker on smooth water. Two able sea-
men are needed one to con the vessel the other to
turn the compass screws. Head the ship away from the
marker on a compass heading of 9"*. When about a or 4
hundred yards out make a Williamson turn and head
directly back towards the marker. If there is no deviation
the compass will read 270*. A reading other than this is a
deviation and 1/2 of this is removed by turning the E/W
drive screw. For example: if the compass reads 276*
turn the drive until it reads 273.
Do the same with north and south runs. Again remove
1/2 of the error by turning the N/S drive.



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14


WATERFRONT CUISINE

by Alexandra Howard L

The Fish Gri ... located directly cross from the Ft.
Lauderdale International Airport, is a unique little restau-
rant with a "down home" atmosphere complete with
bread crumbs on the floor, no doubt from eager customers
munching out on the tasty hot French bread served with
all entrees.
My luncheon partner considers himself an authority on
Clam Chowder and he rates the FISH GR chowder four-
star. It was very thick, almost a creamy Manhattan, with
much Clams and a wonderful peppery taste. Next came
the Special of the Day, charcoal grilled Blue Fish, which
was excellent They also offer grilled Red Salmon, Rain-
bow Trout, Snapper and Swordfish. We didn't try these
but Joe Maggi, owner of the FISH GRILL, told me that
these selections are even better than the Blue Fish ...
and that's saying something. In the traditional seafood
house style, the entree was served with good coleslaw
and "plump" french fries, which Is a rarity in inexpensive
restaurants.
Charcoal broiled lunches at the FISH GRILL run from
$2.95 to $5.95. At these prices, Joe is attracting quite a
following. We were there at 11:30 am and by 12:10 pm
the place was ful. They're open from 7:00 am to 9:30 pm
and offer quite a selection of unusual prepared seafood
Items such as Shrimp and Swordfish on a skewer,
Seafood Kabob and three types of Seafood Salad. The
"Lifeboat Salad," Interestingly enough, is not seafood but
a harty helping of hot roast beef, onion and tomato served
up on a toasted barge (Garlic Bread slab).
They do a big "take-out" business which is another
indication of the just plain good, but unusual menu with
pricing to suit everyone's wallet. From 4 6 pm they have
a tooterr dinner special" for $11.95, your choice of grilled
fish or NY Sirloin. If you like casual dining, come as you
re to the FISH GRILL, enjoy their great charcoal grilled
fish and have enough money left over to go out again
tomorrow.

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Selecting
Buying
Installing
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"I HO AX K. Cos6y

REVIEWED BY BRUCE WHEATLEY

I was asked to do this review for several reasons: my
years In the refrigeration business and my attitude
towards "a better mouse trap." This started as a simple
review, but as I finished the book by Howard Crosby, and
after much thought on his manipulation of the buying
pubic, I decided to make this a book review and a GUIDE
LINE FOR BUYING ANY TYPE OF MARINE REFRIGERA-
TION. This Is written on a Caveat Emptor (Buyer Beware)
theme. The review and the guide lines are written
together In what I hope is an easy to read understandable
format.
Lets start with the cover of Mr. Crosby's book. It states
"Guide book-selecting-buying-lnstaling-servicing." It Is
not as stated. What the book is, is a collection of excerpts
of the various owner manuals for Crosby's own brand of
equipment. The one and only function of the book is to sell
you Crosby equipment. To really understand how poor Mr.
Crosby thinks, one has only to look at the foreword writ-
ten by Mr. Crosby. It makes a stark statement about Cros-
by's psyche. It is about how his company serves Jesus
Christ. Why, poor Crosby has even given Jesus the title of
chairman of the boardll What Crosby's relationship with
Jesus, or any other insecurities he may have, have to do
with marine refrigeration, beats the hell out of me, but he
wrote the book, rse just a'teling you about it.
Now, let's look at the "betteiFmousetrap." Refrigeration
Is refrigeration is refrigeration! I have met MANY people
who have paid $4700.00 for what-should have cost
$2400.00. f you take a standard condensing unit that
sels for $475.00 and spray paint It (blue, green, white.)
stick a marine label on it, some companies actually find
people who will pay over $800.00 for til But this is
AMERICAII the land of UNWISE CONSUMERS. Any piece of
equipment sold by Crosby or any other "brand" name can
be bought from independent companies at a GREAT SAV-
INGS. Remember, Crosby, nor any other "brand" name
company, makes Its own equipment. They, as do indepen-
dent companies buy, from parts manufacturers and
assemble the parts under their own name. So, If you paid
$4700.00 for what should have cost you $2400.00... I
have some "nice" "clean" "low mileage" USED CARS to
sell you .. ."cheap"ll
Remember, the "better-newer-latest design" equipment
is more "costly-failure prone-harder to service." If you
need refrigeration, stick with refrigeration if you need
to keep up with or better the "Jones," you need this book.

The first few chapters are on selecting boxes, heat
loads, holding plates and other such drivel. This book has
a lot of Impressive data on the mentioned stuff. But It
won't do you any good. Most of us that own boats, bought
someone else's boat or a production boat We are stuck
with the ice box that comes with the boat. If you have on-
ly 2" of insulation, that's al you goti How many of you
want to go to the cost, mess, or have the room to loose,
to add the extra Insulation that Crosby "recommends"??
Heat loadsll who cares... If the box has a high heat load,
and the unit Crosby "recommends" to be used to handle
the heat load costs $4700.00, but you only have
$2400.00 ... what do you do??? Take out ANOTHER
mortgage ... sel your car... wait for ydur parents to
die??? No, you do the smart thing and buy what you can
afford. That Is the bottom Ine. No matter how great it


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sounds, no m matter how well t Is presented, no matter
how wel it works, F YOU CANT AFFORD IT YOU
CANT BUY mi
Then the Crosby book goes into his idea of how a unit Is
wired. There are many impressive drawings, but that only
fools those who can't read a schematic. Ask a builder
about blueprints. To you they look very confusing, but to a
boulder, they are very simple. The Important thing Is to
stick to the basics, let the other guy with money to Mow
buy the newest gadget on the market, once the warranty
Is over, so Is the party.
This book has many good drawings (on Crosby equip-
ment) and a lot of Impressive words, but the underlying
theme is to sel Crosby equipment. I have found that If
something works... it sells itself, the harder something
Is to sel, the more the need for double-talk, fancy draw-
ings and impressive datalll
Now, since Crosby thinks he should tell you how to buy
marine refrigeration, why shouldn't ?? Here is a novel ap-
proach, but it works. Look In the phone book under
"refrigeration suppliers, wholesale to the trade only," call
them and say .. I don't want your name, anything you
tell me will go no further, but could you please tell me who
do you feel is qualified to work on my marine refrigeration
unit?? or even better WHO ISN'T fit to do the work. I have
been here In business in Ft. Lauderdale for 5 years, and
you should hear some of the stories I hear from the
counter sales people at the supply houses. Many so-called
mechanics ask these sales guys all kinds of "interesting"
questions on which way is up. What would you think of a


1601 S.W. 26 St.
Ft. Lauderdale, Fla. 33315


305/525-2439


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Certified Compass Adjuster


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Member: Miami Marine Ass'n.-I.Y.A.


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The Best & Friendliest Yacht Service
In Town. PICK UP & DELIVER, all for
6nly 60 per pound (minimum 10 lb.).
All Folded with Shirts and Pants on
Mangers. We also do DRY CLEANING at
competitive prices. 7- 'c
21 SW 7th St. 1-
Ft. Lauderdale


Joel E. Treichel
MARINE REPAIR


Telephone:
583-3769




Yacht Refinishing
Yacht Delivery
Mechanical Systems
(Installation & Repair)


Engine Mechanical Electrical Pumps -
Toilets Generators Installation & Repairs
Engine Surveys, Absentee Owner Supervision
Crusader. Perkins, Borg Warner

TED HETTLER YACHT SER VICE
Serving Ft. Lauderdale Yacht Owners Since 1960

301 Bayberry Drive Telephone
Plantation, Floridr 33317 687-7282


I






T.V. ordice men asltg smile quaels f a d .ulRm
at yer loca IMas Wait nw ... It gets wrst... I,
jut by chance, you shold cal a company for rvie or a
quote on an Instalation, and the person that comes out to
see your boat.. we, If bh, just by chance, has a book
by Crosby, or a text type of book that explains hut loads
and a.that drivel, WATCH OUT. Text books are a great
LEARNING aid. But someone who makes a business out of
refrigeration should (we hope) know what Is going on.
Constant reference to text books shows one of two things
... poor memory or no self confidence... whichever, it Is
your boat. As the TV commercial says, do you want
somebody learning on your car???
Bruce Wheatly Ives with two cats and has practices
marine refrigeration for five years. Wheatley has been Into
refrigeration In general all his adult fte.

LOCAL NOTICE TO MARINERS
Hillsboro Inlet Ent Lt 2 (priv. aid),
Extinguished, Chart #11466.


Hillsboro Inlet Buoy 3 (priv. aid),
Off Station, Charts #11466 & 11467.


Port Everglades Lt 9, Destroyed/TRLB,
Charts #11470 & 11466
SOUTH CAROLINA-GEORGIA-FLORIDA-SEA-
COAST: Loran C-Interference 9960 and
7980 Chains.
We have received several inquiries on
and subsequently confirmed the pre-
sence of interfering signals on U.S.
East-Coast from Mayport, FL to Port-
land, ME. This new interference is on
77 KHz at a power level of approxim-
ately 100 KW PEP. The transmitter lo-


cation is
area.


apparently in Norfolk, VA


Bridge tenders would be glad to have
more boaters use VHF to request open-
ing: Channel 13.





LJLIM l r
MARINE ELECTRONICS SALES INSTALLATION
SERVICE* ENGINEERING
3229 SOUTH ANDREWS AVENUE. FORT LAUDERDALE. FL 3331

305/467-2695


(1 riCcI~g1


iII I'


BOATS WANTED
BOATS WANTED-NOTICE: we will haul
away or remove your unwanted boat.
Call 782-6228.


DOCKAGE
ECONOMICAL MARINA- Live-aboard
Dockage from $180/mo. Showers, Laun-
dry, Restaurant. DRY STORAGE for
Small Boats from $30/mo. 584-2500.
BANYAN MARINA APTS- 111 Isle of
enice, 8' Deepwater up to 53'.Pool
cable, phone, laundry. LIVE-ABOARD
or STORAGE. Phone 524-4430.
POMPANO- Near inlet. 35' $160.
Water, elec., storage. 942-4268.
FT LAUD- Deepwater dock, no fixed
bridges, electric & water, no live-
aboards. $lB0 mo/yr. 1472 SE 15 St.
Call 462-4234.
ISLE OF VENICE- Sailboat to 41'. No
live-aboards. Annual. Parallel.
Water & 110. 125 Isle of Venice.
Call 463-5621.
DOCK FINDERS, INC.- Yacht placement
service. Docks available to suit
your needs. 923-6885.



FOR SALE
MICROLOGIC 1000 LORAN-C. 110V A.C.
accessories reasonable. 525-2439.
DIESEL ENGINES (DUCATI) 9.5 HP,
$1875; 24 HP, $2850. Includes in-
struments, harness, oil pump, flex
mounts, coupler, reduction gear; &
freight. Call 587-85-18 :
ONAN 7.5 KW DIESEL GENERATOR w/ lhr
running time, $3750, other units
available, 462-3894 REPOWER SYSTEMS
PROPELLERS: 3 blade, 2 blade, 2
blade folding propellers priced
from $80 to $200. Call 587-8518.
WESTERBEKE NEW gas units: 4, 6 & 8
KW available. Phone 462-3894 for
details. REPOWER SYSTEMS.
INFLATABLE (MOTOMAR)- 81' to 151'
Call 587-8518.
1977 MG Midget convert. 524-9450.


MARINE SERVICES
Speak SPANISH or FRENCH in only 3
easy weeks, including marine vocab.
Interpretting available. 564-6962;
564-5822.
MARINE CARPENTRY- Planking, Framing
Joinery. Experienced, Reasonable.
922-8094 YACHT HUSBANDRY, INC.
Dave Weaver.
WEAPONS CONSULTANT
Boat & Homes, Defense weapons a
specialty. Call Craig 525-9216.
GOOD QUALITY MARINE WOODWORK & MAIN-
TENANCE, Call Lee Jensen @ 522-2189.
James Sullivan professes a knowledge
of CELESTIAL NAVIGATION, LORAN-C, &
PREP for USCG OPERATORS LICENSE.
Will teach same to seafarers for
$12. Call 462-2628.
REFRIGERATION A/C Repairs-
Installations, 12v-115v, Engine
Drive Systems. Cash-M/C-VISA-"Pay
as you go"- Do it yourself Equip-
ment Available. OFFSET YOUR COSTS
THRU BARTER- WE TRADE WORK FOR CARS
GUNS, etc.
CUSTOM REFRIGERATION 527-0540
527-4477.


EDS I5


HELP WANTED

INDEPENDENT PAPER CARRIERS needed!
Monthly delivery routes from Dania
to Lighthouse Point. Call 524-9450.


REAL ESTATE


(305) 462-5770 Ofc. r-I1
(305) 527-1304 Eves. MLS

ROBERT P. GARGANO
Lic. Florida Real Estate Broker REALTOR
\ WATERFRONT SPECIALIST


I r


I \ ./ 1700 E. Las Olas Blvd., Suite 204
..... Fort Lauderdale, Fla. 33301
Specializing in Waterfront Real Estate
Living & Working on the New River
SOUTH NEW RIVER ISLES (Citrus Isles)-
Deepwater w/7' at dock, Contemporary
2 Bdrm, Ig. Living Rm & Family Rm,
Central Air, Owner Motivated just
reduced by $10,000!!!
LANDINGS Deepwater 3 Bdrm 2 Bath
extra spacious & private BEST PRICED
deepwater in Landings area.
RIVERLAND Private Acre, 373' of deep
water surrounds this contemporary
3 Bdrm 5 Bath, Pool Residence. Cath-
edral Ceilings, Stone Fireplace, Wet
Bar & Roman Bath. 1 Acre Pt. Lot.
RIVER REACH condo Dock only $10/ft/yr
Golf*Tennis*Pools*Sauna*24hr Security
I. Spacious 2 Bdrm, 2 full private
Baths&Guest Bath w/covered Parking.
Price REDUCED must sell WANT OFFERS!
1I. 2 Bdrm 2 Bath Corner Unit', Wrap-
around Balcony on New River
III. 2 Bdrm 2 Bath 1350 Bldg. 4th Fl.
Southeast -Exposure:', ,Ohl'y $80,000: '









MANY OTHER WATERFRONT LISTINGS AVAIL.
"New wateAhAont tings needed;
I have qualified buyer~!"
ROBERTP.GARGANO
Lic. Real Estate Broker Realtor 462-5770 Ofc.
527-1304 Eves.




WATERFRONT NEWS
ADVERTISING RATES:
Classifieds (35 Characters/Line)
First Line ................ $4.00
Each Additional Line ......$3.00
Per Column Inch ............. $12.50
Business Card................ $25.00
Minimum Art Set-Up Fee ....... $5.00
Insert Fee per Insert ......... 1.5C
(Maximum Size 8" x 11")
Call concerning Photos & Color

For more information call
524-9450
or stop by our office

ADVERTISING DEADLINE THE FIRST DAY
OF THE MONTH
CIRCULATION 12,000

WATERFRONT NEWS
320 S.W. 2nd Street
Ft. Lauderdale, FL 33312
Phone: (305) 524-9450







MONIYAV


COMMUNITY CALENDAR & TIDE TABL65
TUESDAY WEDNESDAY THURSDAY


FRInYAV


SAT-1I JRflAv


April 15 16 17 18 19 20 21
FULL t1003 FT. LAUD CITY
COMMISSION MTG
8:00 & 10:00 a.m.
CITY HALL


+2.5' +2.5' +2 7' 2. + .6' +2. +2. +2.4' 2.4'1 +2.2' +1.9' +2.0' +1.7'
0226"081i*1444"2046 031"*0901*1531*2135 0402*094L7*161 '2223 0451'1033"1704o2312 0538"1!9 1754 0002o"028o12091842 0056'"724013061940
-0.5' -0.8 -0 5' -0.8' -n.4 -0.8 -0 -0.6' -0. +0 -0 .2' +0.3 0.0'

22 LAST QUARTER .23 .24 25 26 27 28

EASTER YMCA National Swim WEEK OF THE OCEAN
&Diviing Champ. thru May 6th
Swimming Hall of Fame Call462-5573
Thru April 28
REEFS & SHORE
Conference,
see story on
+1.8 +1.5 +i 7' +1.5' 7' 1 +1 7+ 1.7' +1.6' 1t 8' +).7 1. 8' +1.9' page 1 .9' +2.0'
0155*0827"' i06 '2043 0258"0931"1515*2148 0358'1033"*121"2208 00L54"0 291717"234L 0541*121'iQ807 0029"0623"1253"1848 0112O0700'-28*1927
+0.41 +0.2' +0.5' +0.3 0.4' +0.3' +0.3' +0.3' +0.2 +0.2' +0.1' +0.1' -0. '
DAY LIGHT SAVINGS69
TIME BEGINS +HSAVI 30 May 1 2 3 4 5

NEW MOON
BILL FISH TOUR- MARITIME DAY HALL OF FAME INT'L DIVING MEET DANIA MARINE FLEA AETS & CRAFT SHOW
NAMENT-BIMINI Brow. Cnty INDUCTIONS SWIMMING HALL/FAME MARKET @ Dania COOLIE HAMMOCK
Gondola Parade Library 10:00 a.m. Through the 5th Jai Alai Fronton Thru the 6th
ICW to 6:00 p.m. FT LAUD FT. LAUD CITY MARINE thru May 6
CITY COMMISSION ADVISORY MTG.7:30p.m. Call 920-7877
City Hall
+2 0' +2.1 + 2.0 +2.2 +2.0 +2.2 2.0' +2.2 +2.0' +2.? +1.9' +2. +t .9'
0250'"03351503"2104 0329O9090*1537 2141 0404"0943"1512*2218 04401 018'1649*2256 0519"1055"1727"2336 0559"1136'1809 7') i.;h*1223'1859
+0.1' --0.2 +0.1 -0.3 0. -0.-0 1 +0.1' -0.3' +0.2' -0.3' +0.3' -0.2

6 7 FIRST QUARTER 8 9 10 11 12






2 .0 '' 8 +8 ,.:. :., + s 9,- .9 + .7 '0 ,'?+ 12 .4 --2 .2 2 .5 '
251107' 02090837 211 2520 05i09"0 5555 '?5 0027 50:']0 252 1 S57 823z0712 q3 5,-19 8
El 3 i955 0206. ...831 ] " ' _ 5 4-9
0.3' -O. +0 3' .0 + 0.0 0 0 -' -0. -' .2 -0.5'

13 14 FULL MOON 15 TIME ADJUSTMENTS FOR TIDE TABLE

MOTHER'S DAY Hig'h Wat +r Low Watez
Hillsboro Inlet --- -31 mir tes -50 min.
i Bahia Mar ------ ------ -20 mire -18 min.
,Port Everglades niet -45 minL -62 min.
Tidal Data at Andrews Av Playboy ------------- +45 mir4 +28 min.
2:.0 +. ;. rldge, .ft. o n Summerfield ---------- +40 mi +40 min
0217 0030145. 2040_ j0350 C '36 1', 2 o, water, 3 ..
M SATU-RDAY. ,


S;I INNAV