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Waterfront news
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00072837/00001
 Material Information
Title: Waterfront news
Physical Description: Serial
Language: English
Publisher: Ziegler Pub. Co.
Place of Publication: Ft. Lauderdale Fla
Creation Date: March 1, 1984
Frequency: monthly
regular
 Subjects
Genre: periodical   ( marcgt )
serial   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Broward -- Fort Lauderdale
Coordinates: 26.135833 x -80.141944 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 1, issue 9 (Nov. 15-Dec. 15, 1984); title from cover.
Funding: Funded in part by the University of Florida, the Library Services and Technology Assistance granting program of Florida, the State Library and Archives of Florida, and other institutions and individuals.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 11455814
lccn - sn 84001937
issn - 8756-0038
System ID: UF00072837:00001

Table of Contents
    Cover
        Cover
    Main
        Page 1
        Page 2
        Page 3
    Main: Powerboating
        Page 4
    Main: Sailing
        Page 5
    Main continued
        Page 6
        Page 7
    Main: Diving
        Page 8
    Main continued
        Page 9
        Page 10
    Main: Classifieds
        Page 11
    Main: Community Calendar & Tide Tables
        Page 12
Full Text


march-April 1984


Circulation 10,000


lews


LUhats Inside
Community Calendar
Tide Table
Horse Latitudes
A Word On Rigging
Scrimshaw
A whale of an art


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(305)524-9450


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Waterfront


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WATERFRONT NEWS


TALE


OF


TWO


BOAT


BUILDERS


by Moreland Gamble-Swift


A friend phoned me a month ago with news that a
wooden steamboat was being built at Riverbend Marine's
boatyard. A few weeks later at the Miami International
Boat Show three marine industry colleagues and I were
given an awe-inspiring grand-tour of a futuristic vinylester
motorsailer the one you've seen in all the boating pub-
lications with the'movable wishbone mast, fibreglass
cleats and stancheons, and sliding "Star-Trek" doors.
This vessel was built just upriver from Riverbend at 84
Marina & Nautical Engineering Corporation; and in fact,
another larger prototype 70' is in the works there even as
you read these words.
So consider this a tale of two boat builders, building two
very different, yet equally exciting craft. A tradition of
boat-wrights on the river continues as it has since Pre-
Columbian times.

Bill Healey would rather work at the wood "ribs" of his
latest project building from scratch a 30-foot wooden
open steam launch than talk to a nosey reporter who
doesn't know the shipwright's art from a picket fence.
Lucky for this reporter, Healey's work speaks louder than
words, as he laid slats upon each other commenting on
the mixed blessings of epoxy glue. But, Bill did relent
some and kindly showed me around his workshop sharing
with me some insights into the boat's plans. He also gave
me a tour of his half-completed sailboat which he tinkers
at on his free time and within which Healey lives in a cor-
ner of the boatyard.
This is not Bill Healey's first boat building project nor is
his domicile. Bill has been building vessels in Fort Lauder-
dale for over twelve years. By his own reckoning, he's
built five so far at Riverbend and there have been others
done elsewhere: a cat rig, a New England dory, a Bahama
Sharp Shooter, other steamboats in fact, to name just a
few.
The unfinished steam launch, to be named "Vesper," is
being built for James Van Voast using plans Van Voast
has drafted himself. Jim lives only a few blocks away,
almost in the shadows of the masts of the Riverbend yard.
An avid steamboater, Van Voast has designed, con-
structed, and showed at competitions many of his scale
model functioning steamboats. Jim's "Vesper" is a dream
quickly taking on the lines of reality.
The guts of this steamboat: boiler, dynamo, and the
drive, are in large part being tooled at local shops like
Blackie's Boiler works and Lauderdale Tool & Die Com-
pany. Vesper will indeed be a New River boat through and
through, and an instant classic of sorts. Van Voast plans
to trailer her to steamboat shows throughout the conti-
nent. Perhaps, Vesper can become a common sight plying
our waterfront as well.


At Marina 84, "Infinity" on the other hand is a whole
other universe. About the "only things that are not 'glass'
on her are people." Harry Schoell envisioned, designed
and guides the construction of the two Infinity yachts cur-
rently being built at Marina 84. Done without molds or
refrigerated "pre-pregs", Chief Boat Builder Jim Gardiner
(also skipper of "Cake Walk") and "Gel Coat" John Payne
are engineering a process that they feel is "on the fron-
tier" and "going to change the way boats are made from
here on out."
Vertical grain balsa provides a lightweight core, making
for lighter hull weights, something lost when wooden hulls
gave way to fibreglass in the 1950's. Unwoven fibreglass
and vinylester resin are applied to the core on a formica
surface which is then subjected to a vacuum to increase
the glass-to-resin ratio on the core skin (70% glass on the
hull), removes air from the layers of glass and saturates
the balsa wood core with resin. "It's like making 'pre-
prag" on the spot without a resin layer forming on the sur-
face (like the skin on cooling pudding)," says Schoell.,
These very strong, flexible, and impact-resistant sheets
(4 make up the hull) are set onto an external frame work
that holds these panels in place. Schoell's patented
"deltaconic" hull is built from the outside in, the hull's
geometry and panel shapes dictating inward construction.
Engineers Gardiner and Payne along with Mike Hodges
and Von Benjamin, among others, can turn out a hull in
about three months. Another six months is the required to


"Flesh out" "Infinity" and then it is at last operational. 67'
"Infinity 001" went on line in August, but Schoell is still
fine-tuning his "covergirl" with features like a soon-to-be-
added wind generator which will be attached to the
movable wishbone mast un forward.
The bridge controls, like the Star-Trek doors and the
hatches, are pneumatically operated. (Oh, by the way, In-
finity's selling price is from $800,000 to $1,000,p00.)
Harry Schoell, Jim Gardiner, and their shipwrights are a
group of visionaries on the leading edge of their technolo-
gy. There is an excitement among Harry and his engineers-
that one quickly senses they know they are breaking
new ground. As "Gel Coat" John noted,there is no tried
and true method in this, their new procedures; it's at;
'experimental, virgin territory.
I mentioned to Harry Schoell his colleagues Bill Healty
and Jim Van Voost's "Vesper" going up over at Shelly
Lake's Riverbend yard. Harry seemed to perk up mention-
ing a fascination for steamboats. Then Harry flashed back
to growing up in Miami, sharing with me his experiences
dabbling with making crude wood boats in his youth. He
said he'd have to go down river and check out "Vesper"
and compare notes with Bill. Their styles may differ
diametrically, but the love they have for their art is the
same.
So the tale of two boat builders has a common thread: a
passion for boats and their creation. For those of us who
are into the art of creation, whether it is creating a suc-
cessful business or a family, or writing a good right, story
- we can share in the excitement and satisfaction had by
Bill, Jim and Shelly; and Harry, Jim, John, Mike and Von.
Finally, I reflect back to the New River Raft Race last fall
pondering if there were any future Harry Schoell's and
Bill Healty's trying out their first prototypes made of inner
tubes and cardboard boat builders for the 21st Century
on the waterfront.


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NEWS


FROM THE EDITOR
Dear Readers,
WATERFRONT NEWS is new to the Broward Water-
front. But most of us have been covering the waterfront
community for many moons, some for over fifty years. So
we bring to your waterfront and Waterfront News both
freshness and experience.
But most vitally, WATERFRONT NEWS provides you
with waterfront information you need and use everyday.
The community calendar/tide tables will provide you with
an itinerary of waterfront community events and tidal
heights and times (based at Andrews Avenue Bridge; time
adjustments for selected locations on Broward's water-
ways are given)- WATERFRONT NEWS includes a three-
color map of the waterfront serving as a river pilot and ad-
vertiser's guide. Not only will WATERFRONT NEWS treat
topics on sailing, but also: powerboating, sportfishing, div-
ing, the community the traditions and history, and this
vulnerable environment that has drawn us all to this
"Venice of America."
View WATERFRONT NEWS as your paper, your forum
of communication with the waterfront. Whether you live
in a condo or aboard a boat, whether you have been here
since Warren G. Harding was "kidnapped" or are merely
taking on provisions, consider this monthly publication as
your pilot to Broward County's waterfront. I look forward
to hearing from you.
Welcome Aboard! The WATERFRONT NEWS staff is ex-
cited and eager to serve you. Keep in touch!

John Ziegler
Editor


NEW SPRING BOAT SHOW

PLANNED FOR

FORT LAUDERDALE

The Marine Industries Association of South Florida and
Yacht Promotions are planning a spring "Consumer
Show": the Fort Lauderdale Spring Boat and Sport Show.
Plans call for it to be held Friday, May 25th, through Sun-
day, May 27th. There will be in-water, land and booth dis-
plays featuring boat and selected sports items and equip-
ment (diving, camping, fishing, ultra lights, waterfront
publications, etc.). The Spring Boat and Sport Show will
be staged at Bahia Mar.




MARINE ADVISORY BOARD

The Marine Advisory Board of Ft. Lauderdale recom-
mended at its March 1st meeting that the City Commis-
sioners lower dockage rates at the city's Birch/Las Olas
docks from the current 45 cents/foot to 34 cents per foot.
South Beach area launch sites and permanent moor-
ings/tiedowns for Hobie-Cat type craft were recommended
by the advisory board to be constructed. The city Parks
and Recreation Board opposes such a move.
The Fort Lauderdale City Commission meets March
20th at 10 a.m. in City Hall, 100 N. Andrews. Both these
items should be on the agenda for consideration.


EDITOR'S MAILBAG


Dear Editor:
Please bring it to the attention of your sailboat readers
who own the new type of mainsail "inside-the-mast" furl-
ing there is a way to remedy the most disturbing noise
created by this new system.
When the wind blows (even just a breeze) the groove
that is still partly open in the mast when the sail is
furled, creates a flute effect, like a musical instrument, or
like one blowing across an open bottle ... only a thou-
sand times louder. This wailing and howling is pure tor-
ture to the surrounding neighborhood.
Any sailmaker will make you what they call a "Flute
Stopper". This is a narrow strip of canvas, hoisted by the
halyard and fastened to the mast to cover the groove. If
you wish it is simple enough to make one yourself.
Attention to this matter will certainly be appreciated by
we nearby house-dwellers, who will be able to once again
open our windows and also get a night's sleep.

Sincerely yours,
Gloria Marshall


VOLUME ONE ISSUE ONE
Copyright by Ziegler Publishing Co., Inc.


MARCH/APRIL 1984


WATERFRONT NEWS
320 SW 2nd Street
Ft. Lauderdale, FL 33312

Phone: (305) 524-9450

Published by Ziegler Publishing co., Inc.
Editor: John Ziegler
Illustrators: Teri Cheney
Laurie Cahill
Julie Gepfrich
Photographer: Greg Dellinger
,Carriers: Tom Gepfrich
Jason Welles
Andrew Moyes
Bud Alcott
Scott Moore
Darin Gleichman
Craig Merry
Lee Jensen
Swen Neufeldt
Matt Moore
Fred Castonguay
Todd Clarke
Printers: Prestige Printing
Sir Speedy Printing Center


To The Editor:
As Executive Director of the Marine Industries Associa-
tion of South Florida, Inc., I believe your readers should be
made aware that Governor Graham has proposed a new
formula for the calculation of standard annual lease fees
for use of state-owned submerged lands. Through rule-
making authority, he proposes a standard annual lease
fee of 7 percent of the total potential annual revenues
from wet slip rentals or the base fee, whichever is great-
er. (The current base fee of 6.5 cents/sp. ft. would remain
the same. Marinas and other facilities open to the general
public would receive a 30 percent discount; thus having a
base rate of 4.55 cents/sq. ft. or 4.9 percent of the total
potential annual revenues.
You, as a boater in Florida, may ask "What does this
have to do with me?" If the Governor and his cabinet vote
to enact this rule, you will see a major increase in
dockage rates for those business' who currently lease
submerged land from the state. Some local marinas are
affected as well as a number of the City of Ft. Lauderdale
docks.
Most importantly, the long term affects are far reaching.
Most marinas and waterfront/water dependent facilities
are having a difficult time financially due to maintenance,
equipment, and other operational cost. Some will go out of
business and marina development for our continually
growing industry will come to a slow halt. The Governor
appointed a Blue Ribbon Marina Committee in 1982 who
provide recommendations to the Governor and his staff in
a final report in January 1983. The proposed rate struc-
ture is contrary to the recommendations made by this
committee, the very committee the Governor established.
You, as a boating enthusiast, should let the Governor
and his Cabinet know your opinion of this rate structure
which will not benefit you, rereational boating, or the
State of Florida. Time is very short. The Cabinet meets on
March 20th for a vote on this rule. Please write the fol-
lowing Cabinet members at the common address of: The
Capital, Tallahassee, FL 32301: George Firestone, Sec. of
State; Jim Smith, Attorney General; Bill Gunter, Treasur-
er; Gerald A. Lewis, Comptroller; Doyle Conner, Commis-
sioner of Agriculture; and Ralph D. Turlington, Commis-
sioner of Education.
Your support on this issue and effort to inform the
Cabinet is appreciated by all your fellow boaters and the
industry members who are trying "To Keep Pleasure In
Boating."

Sincerely,
Van W. Snider, Jr.
Executive Director
Marine Industries Association
of South Florida, Inc.


FAU PROFESSOR TO STUDY

SHIP MOTION IN WATERWAYS

A Florida Atlantic University professor is conducting
research to help establish guidelines for marine traffic
control and provide design criteria for mooring facilities.
Dr. Newman K. Lin, FAU assistant professor of ocean
engineering, is conducting the study with the help of a
$23,100 Florida Sea Grant, which will finance the first
year of the two-year study.
The research will enable Dr. Lin to develop and verify a
mathematical model for predicting the interaction of
forces and movements induced on moored vessels by
moving ships. The study, which will be conducted in
FAU's Fluid Laboratory, will include the effects on the
moored vessel by waves created by the moving ships.
Dr. Lin earned his doctoral degree in ocean engineering
at the University of California, Berkeley.
He also is currently engaged in research on coastal
edge-wave generation, supported by the National Science
Foundation, and on spectrum fatigue prediction for off-
shore structures.

MARITIME LIBRARY & MUSEUM

The Broward Public Library Foundation, Inc., is in-
terested in establishing a MARITIME LIBRARY & MUSEUM
within the structure of the Broward County Library
organization. Mr. Donald Elliott Pardi, a volunteer for the
Foundation has already made arrangements to donate
approximately 100 volumes of various maritime subjects
and some ship models. Since Fort Lauderdale is the
center of pleasure boating and an ocean seaport, the Task
Force believes that such a library specialty could be de-
veloped as an attraction to yachtsmen, other seafarers,
and young people of the area. Mr. Pardi invites assistance
as either a donor of books, maritime artifacts, money, or
as a source of information leading to donors. By the way,
gifts need not be made during the giver's lifetime. Dona-
tions are deductible.
For more information call Mr. Pardi at 792-5804, or call
the Broward Public Library Foundation at 765-4063.



U. S. COAST GUARD

AUXILIARY SELECTS

NEW OFFICER


Leonard Dellaera, 9512 N.W. 46th St., Sunrise, Florida,
has been selected as Vice-Captain Third Division 7th
District United States Coast Guard Auxiliary.
The U. S. Coast Guard Auxiliary is the civilian Compo-
nent of the United States Coast Guard dedicated to saving
lives thru Safe Boating.
Dellaera has served as Flotilla Commander and Division
Staff Officer prior to his current office. He is the holder of
the coveted AUXOP Award presented to Auxiliary all
around specialists.



I QUALITY PRINTING IS OUR BUSINESS
IWEB & SHEET FED

LEVI HENRY, JR.

Prestige Printing
of Broward County, Inc.
545 N.W. 7th Terr. Ft. Lauderdale, FL 33311
(305) 522,2553










NOW... NON SKID YOUR DECK ONCE


& FOREVER!


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against stains, abrasions, scuffing, or yellowing exactly as a
fiberglass boat would be.


These panels are suitable forall types of decks (fiberglass. wood,
steel, aluminum or concrete). Put them on your deck, engine room floor,
steps, or anywhere a firm footing is a"must". the diamond pattern provides a
beautiful surface to look at, diffuses sunlight and most importantly is easily cleaned.
Simply cut panels to size with a saw or tin snips, chamfer edges with file, bond to surface
and you have a beautiful deck that will last for years.
This is definitely an easy do-it-yourself project that comes out with a professional look. In fact,
it looks as if it's molded in non skid.
We have developed this product because everything presently on the market is sadly
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easily and will look good for years.
As a step it features a 7/ inch stainless steel railing to
grasp at those crucial moments when the boat rocks.
Salvation for those not too sure of foot!
Loosening two wing nuts easily converts the step into a
cart with six inch wheels and a center of gravity that
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The Step Cart is 24"
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MARINE INNOVATORS, LTD. is proud to introduce a two
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POWER BOATING ,,,


MOTOR BOAT MECHANIC

by Al Reiser

It's the time of year when the water is calm the
Manatee are gone and you're ready for boating. But, it can
also mean trouble if your equipment has not been
checked and maintained.
All aboard and you're ready to go only to find your
steering is frozen. A common problem. Proper care and
maintenance is necessary to avoid a disappointing and
potentially dangerous day.
Have your steering cable properly lubed. A Marine
grease is greatly recommended. You will find in most
cases grease fittings near the cable end. Do not force
grease into the fittings as you may rupture the casing of
the cable. Also, the cable end at the motor should have
marine grease covering the portion that retracts and ex-
tends. An important thing to remember is to work the
Steering system several times back and forth while lub-
ing. Steering cables are expensive so carefully check
your link arm which attaches to your motor. I have found
many a link arm rusted and weak. This is also a safety
factor. A link arm can break causing the boat to turn to
one side very quickly which may result in personal injury.
Here is an Inboard and Outboard Motor Boat check-list:


FUEL SYSTEM


(Florida weather will crack brittle
hoses)


Proper Ventilation (gas vents clog)

Check for Leaks (carburetor, fuel pump and gas tank)
Moisture In Fuel (this is very common in Florida. There
Tank are additives, but some cannot be
used on outboard motors. Some addi-
tives will disipate the fuel mix. Use
fuel additives that say for Out-
boards. One very good fuel addi-
tive is OMC's 2+4 Fuel Conditioner.
This is excellent for Inboards and Out-
boards.)


ELECTRICAL


Wires
Battery

Alternator Belts
Fuse Panel



Crankcase Oil
Oil Filter
Transmission/
Outdrive


(no bare or corroded wires)
(fully charges, check level and have
clean terminals)
(check for worn or cracked belts)
(check for corrosion)

OIL SYSTEM

(check if clean and for-proper level)
(check for leaks and clean)
(make sure its properly lubed and for
proper level. This is very important
and goes as well for outboard gear
cases)


Please look forward to our next publication when we
will discuss the above, and much more. The information
should enable you to have a safe and enjoyable boating
season.

(Al Reiser is a marine technician with his own business in
Hollywood. Al has been a factory mechanic for many ma-
jor outboards and stern drives and has held a dealership in
Hawaii. Reiser taught marine engineering at the University
of Hawaii.)


SAFETY ON THE WATER

by H. W. Lange

In most ways safety afloat is your responsibility. What
you know, what you do and what you have foreseen are
vital factors in protecting your life.
Not that the water or boating are to be feared the
problem is that you are in an element and situation at the
time that you encounter some difficulty, such that:
Syou cannot get out and walk away
Syou cannot lie down and rest awhile
you may not get help
your difficulty likely will aggravate into severe danger
as a skipper the lives of your companions are at stake,
or you may lose your investment.
Among those who would like to help you, as a public
service, are the United States Coast Guard Auxiliary and
the United States Power Squadrons. Both organizations
include power and sailboaters.
USCGAUX and USPS schedule frequent public educa-
tion courses in basic boating matters. The only small
charge is for the educational material which you may wish
to purchase. Graduation from these short courses entitles
you to a certificate. USCGAUX also has a "Boating Course
Graduate" cloth patch.
Certain insurance companies offer a reduction in premi-
ums to holders of a certificate. Some insurers insist that
the boater complete the basic course and also have an an-
nual USCGAUX Courtesy Marine Examination (a CME).


CAPTAIN'S LICENSE
U.S. COAST GUARD EXAM PREP COURSES

Experience on any type of small power
or sailboat can qualify you for a license.


SEA SCHOOL
I L -llAWSCHOOl Of THL S1A
712SE 17th St. Cswy.
Ft. Lauderdale, FL 3316 (305) 463-7001



THE BULLETIN B
Ft. Laud. HISTORICAL SOCIETY
219 SW 2nd Ave, 463-4431
MARINE SCIENCES UNDER SAILS
PHONE: 983-7015.
VOLUNTEER ACTION CENTER- 522-6761
INTERNATIONAL YACHTMAN's ASSOCIATION
525-7444, at 12 SW 6th St. Ft. L.
South Florida Sailinq Association-
662-2667
For more information about the Seven
SL*as' Cruisinq As',ociation write:
SSCA
P.O. Box 2190
Crvinqton, Louisiana 70434
or call Ginny Osttrholt at
504-892-3096.
For information about the HOLLYWOOD
AMATEUR RADIO CLUB call 652-8869.
CATALINA SAILING CLUB- 485-4316
GULFSTREAM SAILING CLUB- 523-7482.


The uniformed Examiner will be glad to check your boat
for a CME at a marina, a launching ramp, or other conveni-
ent place. Flotilla 32 USCGAUX has a base with docks on
the Intracoastal Waterway at 601 Seabreeze Avenue,
Fort Lauderdale (between Bahia Mar Marina and the
Swimming Hall of Fame Pool), telephone 463-0034.
This boat examination is voluntary on your part. You
will be given a complete courtesy safety check covering
the USCG Federal Regulations, the USCG Auxiliary
Requirements, and State Safety-Related 'Equipment Re-
quirements. These vary with the size and type of vessel.
Examiner places a decal on your vessel showing that all
required aspects are complete, or will suggest the rea-
sons why you should take corrective action. The
USCGAUX members often have boating tips or can direct
you to others with the information you need.
Some of the items checked during a CME include:
boat identification and numbering and that papers are
in order
-appropriate sound producing devices
-personal flotation devices
fire extinguishers
visual distress signals
-navigation lights
-venitlation, fuel tanks, and fuel systems
-anchor, anchor line, and other lines
pumps, bailers, bilges
electrical installation
stoves
general condition of vessel
that the skipper has heard of whatever local matter
the Examiner thinks might be unknown and which could
affect the safety or pleasure of the boating period.

(H. S. Lange has been an active member of the Fort
Lauderdale CGAUX & USPS for 14 years. He instructs in
weather, safety, vessel equipment and other marine
topics. Mr. Lange writes for numerous local, national and
international publications on many topics.)
Rf"i/ ~; fmo a w rt ftr, r, RIp,'t r i s


SAll MARINE
Z,01, e TC ''/ I(v,{< Cea'r .'"
,jt-. a Nrv T?- 1,vi c n w r 7(,, Small


MIKE McDONNELL
ADRIANO NETO
(305) 587 8435


2955 St Rd 84
Ft Lauderidde. Fhi
Pit. r- p -1) r,


BOARD
U.S. Coast Guard Auxiliary Flotilla
has a new phone number: 463-0034.
Week of the Ocean, a citizen's ocean
awareness group, invites area agen-
cies, educational institutions.
foundations, museums and clubs with
marine-related programs to be listed
in a brochure beinq compiled for dis-
tribution during the Week of the
Ocean Festival. Deadline is Friday.
March 23rd.
Information required includes name
of agency, institution or group.
telephone; and type of program or ser-
vice.
For further information, contact
Cynthia Hancock, 462-5573 or mail
your information to Week of the Ocean,
Inc., P.O. Box 179, Ft. Laud., FL
33302.


TYLER DIESEL POWER SYSTEMS, INC
9.5 to 2200 H.P.

floai nfc



8.5' to 25'
The finest fleet of Inflatables afloat

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New Electrical Systems
Custom Panels & EQuipmen't


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252 SW 31st SI
Fort La'Cocr-ale Fl 33315
,3051 523 9312


Hoses In Fuel
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SAILING


A WORD ON RIGGING

by Walter Ivison

Most sailors would agree that there are four areas you
ought to keep a sharp on, if you want your boat to stay in
top form: your boat's hull, rigging, electronics and cos-
metics.
So how often do you see folks concentrating on elec-
tronics and cosmetics, at the expense of hull and rigging?
Let's talk rigging. In tropical areas such as Florida, the
Caribbean and the Gulf of Mexico, a stock rigging job by
today's sailboat manufacturers tends to show sings of
deteriorating after one or two years. This is the result of a
price-conscious manufacturer's choice of materials, and
yes, terminations o terminals. Terminals are those little
metal objects that appear where the hull intersects with
the rigging, and what they are made of can mean the dif-
ference between sound rigging and a dismasting.
They should be made of stainless steel. But if stainless
steel is successfully deformed, it becomes workhardened,
the tensile strength increases, the steel becomes brittle
- and also susceptible to "stress corrosion," a form of
corrosion accelerated by cracking. This process is aggra-
vated by the two catalysts of salt-water and hot tempera-
tures as in the tropical marine environment and less
pronounced in fresh water and moderate temperatures -
as in the Great Lakes region.
Terminals have varying degrees of resistance to stress
corrosion, depending on the type of stainless steel and the
process used in making them. The alloy of stainless steel
identified by the numbers "316" is not only nonmagnetic
but much more corrosion resistant than the other alloys
302 and 304.
The process most commonly used in the industry for
making terminals is the swaging system. There are
several manufacturers of swaging machines, and this
results in several methods of swaging. All of the
machines, no matter what their design, result in deformed
stainless which causes work-hardening. This, coupled
with the high finish, leads to stress "cracks" in your rigg-
ing.
The first indication that a terminal may fail will be
hairline cracks appearing around the mouth and/or along
the body of the swage. This is serious. The cracks are not
"planned into" the hardware, and the problem will not go
away. If the cracks exceed half the diameter of the wire,
do not take any chances. Have them replaced.
It is generally accepted that a mechanical termination
should be used. There are three systems available to the
marine industry Cast-Lok, StaLok, and Norseman. Each
of these systems has its merits and drawbacks as out-
lined below.
The Cast-Lok fitting was.originally developed in England
and marketed in the U.S.A. by a now defunct company,:
York Engineering in Maine, and is now manufactured and
marketed in the United States. This fitting, made of 304
stainless steel and susceptible to surface rust, made use
of a special formula of resin impregnated with aluminum
type fittings in the shape of fish scales. Because of the
use of resin, a watertight bond is formed around-the wire,
a great asset.
Some hints and precautions:
1. When the wire is pulled down into the chamber, it is
difficult to visually confirm that the wire is still correctly
unlaid.

OFFICE 1500 S.W. 17th St.
(305)525-4726 Ft. Lauderdale, FL33312

SUMMERFIELD
BOAT WORKS INC.
Complete Marine Repairs
TOM CORRELL PAUL WHITE
Manager Asst. Manager
(OVER)


2945 State Rd. 84
Ft. Lauderdale, FL 33312

M UnunnU nh.Mr3


2. A twenty-four hour curing period for the resin seal is
advisable. This does not present a real problem until you
are obliged to make emergency repairs at sea. Providing
the wire you have used is of good quality, unlaid correctly,
clean, and the resin mixed well, your failure rate with this
assembly should be negligible.
3. If you carry this fitting as a spare, keep the resin in
a cool place to prevent premature curing.
The Sta-Lok was developed by a former Norseman
engineer in England eleven or twelve years ago and is pre-
sently marketed throughout North America by several im-
porters who have several prices. It utilizes a tapered cone
which is available for 1x19, 7x7 and 7x19 wire and has
become increasingly popular due to its conformity with
United States Standards, ease of assembly and minimal
tool requirements. The amateur or professional can as-
semble these fittings by merely following the enclosed in-
structions. Precautions should be taken on the larger
sizes to prevent gauling. The fitting is machined from 316
stainless steel bar stock and is Lloyds of London ap-
proved. It exhibits excellent manufacturing and work-
manship. The fittings are completely reusable by replace-
ment of the cone and former.


The Norseman fitting was developed in England some
twenty-eight years ago and still has its basic, style. The
new Mark VI has greatly improved the ease of assembly
and coupled with the use of a stainless steel cone has fur-
ther improved the estimated longevity. Manufactured from
crack tested solid 316 stainless steel bar, the Norseman
is available for lifelines, insulators, standard terminations
and chain to wire steering assemblies. Used throughout
he world on wire cables of any configuration and up to 11/2
inch diameter wire, the Norseman rates as the best
known and most widely accepted mechanical terminal.
There are some copies of the Norseman assembly and
care should be taken to secure the real thing. Again, the
amateur or professional can assembly these fittings by
merely following the enclosed instructions (written in four
languages) and can be reused by merely changing the
cone.
It is recommended when using either Staylock or
Norseman terminals that the chamber be filled with 5200
or equivalent non bonding sealer for a completely water
tight assembly.
For "at sea" repair I suggest that any blue water cruis-
ing yacht carry a length of wire equal to the longest


FULL SERVICE
Cruising & Racing Sails
B imi ni s'Dodgers*'Awni ngs

CARIBBC N
lT C AN


1610 r' 3 AME
F; Li- CALC FL 33315 (305) 594-8500


(305)584-8558


shroud aboard and two mechanical terminals so that
effective "at sea" repairs could be conducted. It's a good
idea to carry a length of steering cable and a Norseman
steering cable terminal aboard to cover this area also.



THE SAIL CLEANERS
4711 L N. DIXIE HWY.
FT. LAUDERDALE, FL 33334

Have You Cleaned
Your Sails Lately?
Unsightly dirt, rust and oil can
damage your sails, affect their
performance and reduce their
longevity.
Here's five good reasons why The Sail
Cleaners should clean your sails:
1. We are the only sail cleaning facility
in South Florida.
2. Our plant has the most modern,
scientific method for treating sails.
3. We pick up and deliver.
4. We are licensed and insured.
5. Our prices are low and quality high.
Give your sails a new life.
Call 491-3327 for a free estimate.

THE SAIL CLEANERS.



CUTTERS OR A PINCH
Norseman's new hydraulic cut-
ter is one of those unpleasant
safety musts for the racing or
-o cruising yacht. In the event of
a dismasting, the Norseman
cutter operates equally well
underwater or on deck. Fully
serviceable world wide, the
six-pound cutter is painted
i_ \ safety yellow and comes in a
\ handy carrying bag..For fur-
Sther information write
NORSEMAN MARINE,
INC., Dept. SB, 516
W. Las Olas Blvd.,
\ Ft. Lauderdale,





I I



WE ARE THERE...
WHEN YOU NEED US!



* New Sails Sail Repair Complete
Rigging Service at your boat *
Tremendous Hardware Inventory
* Furling Systems Spinnaker Poles
* Immediate Delivery











Mack-Shaw Sailmakers, Inc.
100 S.W. 15th Street. Fort Lauderdale, FL 33315
[305] 522-6767


Marine Lumber & Plywood
Milling and Custom Mllwork


a I a I =- I L~ '- ~L III ~





WATERFRONT NEWS'
WATERWAY/ROAD
PILOT
&
ADVERTISERS GUIDE
ol ADVERTISER's BUSINESS
1 LOCATION & AD PAGE f


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DIVING


REEF GLIDING

by Sam Rich

A wise man once said, "If it makes diving easier, I like
it because it's more fun and probably right."
It's true. Diving is meant to be exciting fun, and usually
anything that makes diving easier and more comfortable
is better. In fact, if it's uncomfortable or stressful,
whatever you are doing is probably wrong (and possibly
dangerous). Every great inventor starts with that premise.
Make it easier and it will be better. Reef gliding is one of
the easiest diving techniques, and therefore one of the
best.
The best diving in the world is
Fill in the blank. Divers can argue forever about which is
the best spot for lobster or photography, where the best
spearfishing can be had, or which is the most beautiful
reef. But if the dive can be done as a reef glide or a drift
dive, it will be even better. Sailing along underwater, aid-
ed by a gentle current, reduces air consumption. Instead
of using energy to kick, you just hang on and move with
the current. You see more with less effort. If you decide to
stop and explore, just secure the anchor until you decide
to continue your trip.
The most important safety rule to remember when drift
diving is: Always stay with the floatline.
Drift diving is most enjoyable where a mild (1 to 3
knots) movement of water exists. The current must be
predictable, especially tidal currents (which must be pro-
perly timed for direction, speed and duration before mak-
ing an entry). The ideal currents are those that are steady
and continuous, like a long-shore current, which is a later-
al current that moves parallel to the shoreline.
If you are planning to make a beach dive where a
longshore current runs, you should first make a survey of
the conditions from a vantage point (see sketch). Plan
your entry well ahead of your objective, allowing for drift
while swimming out (an integral factor of navigation). A
surface flat with a flag can be snapped to a "D" ring on
your buoyancy compensator or clipped to your weight belt
for the tow. Once you have reached the required distance
from shore, drop a 4-pound weight to the bottom and des-
cend down the line. If you decide to stop while riding the
current, just secure the weight and your flag and float will
wait for you. When it's time to head in, wrap the weight
as you ascend, toss it in the float, and snap your surface
support station to your "D" ring for the tow back to shore.
An alternative to this exit.is to start in with a surplus of air
and exit underwater. This is easier than swimming on the
surface and you can navigate via the "sand ripples" that
always run parallel to the beach. In any case, you should
never end up with less than 300 psi in your tank(s) when
you reach shore.
Some beaches are shaped in such a way that, as the
waves crash on shore, water is "piled up." Usually this
happens where there is a reef close to the surf zone. If
there is a break in the reef, this water will flow back out
beyond the breaking surf and the reef or sand bar. This
particular condition is called a "rip current" (see sketch).
If, when you are making your survey, you observe a rip
current, you can ride it out to your dive site if its motion
fits into your plan. Make sure the rip current will dump
you off well ahead of your final objective so your drift dive
stars at the right spot. This is another entry that elim-
mates swimming out and can make your dive easier.
Reef gliding from a boat is even easier. There are two
basic ways to go.
The first approach to drift diving from your boat requires
some additional gear. You'll need a surface float for each
team of divers. The type used for beach diving is best, but
the ordinary Styrofoam cylinder type with a weighted pole
through the middle (flying the diver's down flag) is OK,
too. Even the large, red plastic ball-markers are fine as
long as the boat flies a flag and stays within 100 feet of
the floats. (This can be a bit tricky if more than one team
of divers is in the water.) Lines from the floats should be
attached to a grapnel hook and should be at least 10 to
20 feet in excess of the depth of the dive to prevent the

DOCKSIDE YACHT MAINTENANCE
DIVING SPECIALS
Prop & Rudder Cieaning: '30.00
Bottom Cleaning: 1.25/foot

FfBERGLASSING CLEANING
S TEAK TREATING PAINTING
CARPENTRY WELDING
VARNISH ING WAXING
DELIVERIES DIVING
COMPLETE YACHT CARE. PAINTING & REPAIR
522-6454


floats from submerging. Some offshore currents (such as
the Gulf Stream) can be too swift for a weight to hold,
therefore a grapnel hook is a must.
The dive will not be a success if the captain cannot pin-
point the location and depth of the objective, or estimate
the drift encountered while descending. If you are the cap-
tain, leave a margin for error and drop your divers slightly
farther upstream than you estimate. You should be
familiar with the overall dive plan, including entry, depth,
time and exit. It is your responsibility to pick up the same
number of divers you drop off! You do that by dropping
your divers off in groups. Let the first team go once you
have entered the drop zone. Circle back quickly for each
successive team's entry into the same drop zone. When
all the divers are in the water, drift along with the floats,
staying within 100 feet, and pick them up in groups as
they surface by the floats.
The dive goes like this: As the boat reaches the drop
area, the divers enter together holding on to the float line.
When clear of the boat, they follow their designated
leader down the line to the site. More experienced divers
can drift along within sight of the leader. They should take
care not to get down current of the others. Fighting the
current to get back to the group is not fun. (If this should
happen, use the bottom for handholds to pull yourself or
stop your drif and get out of the situation. Swimming
against the current is much harder.) Staying with the
group will also avoid your coming back tired and red-
faced.
Less experienced divers should not let go of the line.
Only when the group or buddy team stays together is drift
diving safe. If someone wants to stop for something (big
juicy lobster, Spanish treasure chest, photo of mermaid),
he should signal the leader, who has the grapnel hook and
float line. (The correct signal to stop is a clenched fist
pointing toward the surface held at eye level alongside
you, facing the person being signaled.) It is his decision to
do so, or not, depending on depth, time, current speed,
and so on. He must consider the group's needs and safe-
ty, not just his own or that of one member. If he signals
OK and stops, everyone-stops. If not, the minute you
come up, start planning another dive to go back-and get
that mermaid.
The last thing that should happen on the drift dive is for
someone to get separated from the float line and get lost.
The first diver to reach the agreed upon limit of air signals
the leader, and the group ascends the float line to the sur-
face. Divers should have no less than 500 psi of air left in
their tanks when they are back on the boat.
If no stops are planned, a weight can be used instead of
a grapnel hook. It should hang just above the bottom for
the drift over it. This type of reef gliding is exceptionally
easy and exciting. Hanging on the line or weightlessly
drifting over the edge of the continental shelf at 130 feet
is commonly done off Bimini and other islands in the
Bahamas where the shelf drops off or the wall descends
as deep as 2,000 feet or more. It remains one of the most
remarkable experiences a diver can have in life.
I . r ,r










__J
The second method of drift diving, also called current
riding, is done by taking the anchor with you. You should
set up like this: After anchoring upstream of the area to
be covered, trail two lines from the anchor line on the sur-
face so that one floats along each side of the boat. They
should be long enough to reach past the stern about five
feet.
Float another line 100 feet off the stern and attach a
float with a flag. This is your safety line in case a diver
misses the boat when returning. Finally, hoist up the
diver's flag on the boat.





IRS Ws

INFLATABLE REPAIR SERVICES
124 S.W 5th Street
Ft. Lauderdale. FL 33301
(305) 462-6208 ALAN R. HARRIS
ZODIAC Authorized Service Station
Liferafts & Boats
| I


CHAMBER ENCOURAGES

REEF PARTICIPATION

By Cynthia Hancock

The Fort Lauderdale/Broward County Chamber of Com-
merce Directors and Marine Task Force members are
encouraging their members to investigate and support the
Week of the Ocean programs, particularly the Reef Pre-
serve Proposal.
Since its founding in 1977, Week of the Ocean, a
citizens awareness group, has initiated educational pro-
grams focusing on our. interdependence with our marine
environment. These programs including the School
Marine Fair; the 1983 community festival involving 25
co-sponsors and 17 events; and National Week of the
Ocean supported by Congressman E. Clay Shaw and
astronaut/aquanaut Scott Carpenter.
This past fall, Week of the Ocean launched a program to
protect the reefs adjacent to John U. Lloyd State Park.
Such a sanctuary would provide many benefits to Brow-
ard, both educational and economic.
From an educational standpoint, the area (south of Port
Everglades, north of the Dania Pier and bordering the park
on the east) could extend a living classroom already con-
taining a barrier island, a mangrove estuary and natural
turtle nesting areas.
The adjacent coral reef community includes elkhorn,
staghorn, brain and star corals, and provides a habitat for
a diverse population of plant and animal forms.
The preservation of our offshore reefs also has an
economic impact on our tourism industry particularly in
the summer season.
With its own natural reef area, Broward could promote
its esthetics to a clean market of divers from all over the
world since 65% pursue their sport during the summer
season.
Lastly, this reef area can provide a role model to.the na-
tion showing that Broward County is properly protecting
and utilizing the many unique features of its marine en-
vironment.


Before the divers enter the water, they take hold of the
lines trailing from the anchor line. After they have made
their entry, they can pull themselves up to the anchor line
and descend. This avoids struggling to reach the anchor
line and the possibility of fatigue and overexertion. When
everyone is on the bottom, the leader frees the anchor
and the group drifts along the bottom.
If a stop is necessary, just secure the anchor and the
group, along with the boat, stops. The leader should put
some additional air in his buoyancy compensator to offset
the weight of the anchor. He should be very careful, how-
ever, not to forget and set the anchor down without first
letting the extra air out. He could wind up launching
himself toward the surface like a Polaris missile. Being too
buoyant has serious consequences, just as being over-
weighted does.

Sam Rich, a Certified N.O.A.A. Recompression Chamber
Operator and N.A.U.I. Instructor, is a noted underwater
photographer and author published in numerous
periodicals specializing in diving topics. Mr. Rich is owner
and operator of Adventure Divers and is a diving instruc-
tor for the City of Fort Lauderdale, Plantation and Broward
County Schools.


PHILIP L. SIROTA
114 Lake Shore Drive
Hallandale, FL 33009
(305) 981-1340


PADI No. 18310
Open Water Scuba Instructor


CAVERN & CAVE INSTRUCTOR


Diving Adventures. Multi-Level Cert


BAFEHN THROUQHhJ'


Travel and Photogra
- ADVENTURE DIV
5;
S. Rich
NAUI 5620
CMAS M2 US 273 N
"If you really want to kr
GO


ifications
phy
ERS -
23-8354




low .
NAUII"


CALL FOR NEXT CLASS DATES


I_ I _


I









THE HORSE LATITUDES

by James E. Sullivan
Webster's dictionary backs off when it comes to the
origin of the Horse Latitudes: "reason for name is ob-
scure." Other resources claim that here the calm winds
prevented a sailing vessel from making progress and the
seaman had to eat the horses to sustain themselves. Van-
Dorn, in his excellent "Oceanography and Seamanship,"
is here quoted: "called the Horse Latitudes, because
ships carrying horses to the Americas from Europe
frequently were becalmed there; with the result that many-
horses perished from thirst." None of this is necessarily
true.
Back in the old days the man in real control of the ships
was not the master or captain but the super cargo. It was



SCRIMSHAW: A WHALE

OF AN ART

By Bob Hammack

Whaling men of the 19th century were a crafty lot judg-
ing from the "numerous ingenious contrivances" they
roughed out "in their hours of ocean leisure." They are
credited with producing the most as well as the best of
scrimshaw pieces during the "golden age of whaling" be-
tween 1820 and 1870.
Sometimes criticized as "goldbrickers," the scrim-
shanderers practiced their toothy trade on sperm-whale
teeth, walrus tusks, shells and a variety of other
materials. Some pieces were simply decorative while
others were practical. The latter include jewelry boxes,
bird cages, kitchen utensils, sewing implements and
pastry crimpers. Whale bone with decorative touches
even found use as a corset stay.
Those "numerous ingenious contrivances" were men-
tioned in the classic American work by Herman Melville,
Moby Dick, which devotes a full (although short) chapter
to the whaler's art. "Throughout the Pacific .. you will
come across lively sketches of whales and whaling
scenes, graven by the fishermen themselves on sperm
whale-teeth, or ladies' busks wrought out of right whale-
bone, and other like scrimshander articles."
What the word actually: means is subject to debate. One
source says it comes from a Dutch word for "idle fellow",
another from the French meaning "to work hard for small
results."
Whaling ships rarely touched port staying at sea for
months away from home. Much of the leisure was taken
up with the preparation of the whale for market, and the
remaining hours making ready the teeth for carving.
Pulling a whale's teeth is no mean feat if we are to
believe Melville's description. Generally though, the
ivories were extracted from the lower jaw after it had
been allowed to hang in the sun and dry for a few days.
They were soaked in brackish water or hot liquids treated
with lye to soften the enamel. The teeth were filed, buffed
with sharkskin, and burnished to a high luster by hand.
Some seamen, says Melville, had "little boxes of
dentistical-looking implements, specially intended for the
scrimshandering business," but others used jackknives
only.
Working from original designs or from ornate magazine
illustrations, they scribed and dyed their handiwork.
Sweat of the brow and tobacco juice and sometime blood
were used to color the work.
To many, the small (usually four to six inch-long) carv-
ings and etchings are priceless, but the cost is usually
determined by the age, quality and workmanship of the
engravings. Patriotic themes or commemorations of
famous persons usually command a higher price. At least
that is the mark used by Mrs. Barbara E. Johnson, owner
of one of the world's largest and most beautiful private
scrimshaw collections which has been displayed at the
Museum of American Folk Art in New York. As a trustee
and one time president of the board, she helped promote
the appreciation of the fine work.
Fifty years of the "golden age" produced hundreds of
pieces. F.T. Bullen's Cruise of the Cachelot says that the
"great jawpans (of the whales) were sawn off, and placed
at the disposal of anybody who wanted pieces of bone for
'scrimshaw' or carved work." It is likely that one might
come across later items at good prices. Recently, two
pieces were offered at under $250, an excellent price.
The trade has enjoyed a mild renaissance due to
dealers such as S.T. Preston & Sons, once a ship's
chandlery that now serves the memory of whaling and
seacraft with reproductions.
Stock is slim due to a federal regulation which has put
the bite on selling whale teeth with scrimshaw and on all
teeth taken after the summer of 1973.
George H. Rowsom, executive vice president of the
firm, advised that such material could not be shioped out-


his job to supervise the handling and the selling and trad-
ing of the goods carried aboard the vessel, for unless a
profit was realized the trip was a wash. In a sense this is
true today but the radio allows the super cargo to control
the cargo from an office desk. In the case of the horses,
the super cargo would assure that they were kept alive at
least until sold.
Then where did the name Horse Latitudes come from?
British merchant seamen, when "on the beach," took
room and board in sailors' inns located in the shipping
ports of Liverpool, London, Portsmouth, etc. To avoid the
Press Gangs most would carry liberty tickets or protection
signed by a Justice of the Peace. Not at all qualified for
other trades, the lower deck seamen would soon exhaust
their funds and await the horse.
The horse bore a recruiter for the merchant ships and


SAILBOAT BEND

by Sue Moesly



Fifty years ago Sailboat Bend was simply a wide sweep-
ing bend in New River. Folks thereabouts hardly gave it a
thought as being different from any other part of the river,
except that at the bend where the river comes closest to
West Las Olas there was the Englishman Jimmy Ducane's
Boatyard. He also had a machine shop in the large sheet
metal building that was home as well as business for the
family who all pitched in and helped. Now, the building
houses a mast and rigging operation. Later in the thirties
Paul Vicentius started up another boatyard right next to
Ducane's. Today that boatyard is Chinnock Marine.
South of Paul's Boatyard and next to what is now the
launching ramp was a chicken farm. Young boys looking
material to make sails for their tin boats could buy used
feed sacks there for a nickel apiece. With their imprinted
designs of chickens and such the cotton sacks gave a
distinctive air to the sails that resembled crazy quilts. The
feed sacks were also put to use making boy's underwear.
Store-bought clothes were mostly hard to come by in the
days of the Great Depression.
It was on the south bank near Sailboat Bend at South-
west Third Avenue where the first dredge:was built for
Governor Broward's massive plan to dig canals for drain-
ing the Everglades. The governor and his family were pre-
sent at the festivities on April 2, 1906 when the boat was
commissioned and duly named the EVERGLADES. Sail-
boat Bend was also the site for an encampment of
Seminole Indians. They were often seen paddling their
canoes up and down the river. But the squaws who were
always barefoot and wore their colorful native dress with
strings and strings of tiny glass beads around their necks
were quite shy about mingling with the townspeople in
public places. In fact some say they may have been for-
bidden to speak with the white man. Now long gone from
that area, the Seminoles could hardly foresee a highrise
apartment in the future that would be built on the grounds
where once their chickees stood. Nowadays there's even
a white man's Sailboat Bend Association to protect the in-
terests of what used to be their part of the river.


WATERFRONT NEWS


he would pay the innkeeper the debts of the sailor. This
was usually an advance payment of about one month, the
recruiter would receive an additional tithe when he placed
the seaman on the deck of the vessel. The sailor now fac-
ed a month of hard work until the horse was paid.
A month's sailing to the Caribbean Isles of Britain would
place a ship just north of the Tradewinds (300N. latitude).
Here the seaman, having served out his horse, was now
alive on the payroll, they aptly called this zone the Horse
Latitudes.
By the way, until the ship reached this zone the
masters found that it was useless to flog the seaman to
make him toil properly, for it is useless to "beat a dead
horse."


W I'Z .-
There at the bend on West Las Olas Boulevard across
the street from Ducane's Boatyard and overlooking New
River was the Rickard's two story home. Miss Rickard
was a schoolteacher at Fort Lauderdale High and very
well liked by her students. Following the river west along
the north shore and just past Eighth Avenue was Mayor
Tidballs estate and across the river on the south shore
was the Hood estate. Fifty years ago there was no Mar-
shall bridge over Fourth Avenue. Most of the traveling
south or west went over the Seventh Avenue bridge or
over the 11th Avenue bridge.
Back in those days Fort Lauderdale's main post office
was in town on the north shore of the bend on Southwest
Second Street where a post office branch is today. When
a new post office was built on Southeast First Avenue, ag
few doors north of the Governor's Club Hotel, the old post
office down by the river became the A and P supermarket.
Sunny and Feed Supply was west of the southwest corner
corner of Southwest Fourth Avenue and Southwest Se-
cond Street.
Now the old post office has been restored as a branch
office and the old Bryan homes east of it and on the
waterfront have been restored as well. Once the homes of
some of the founding families of Fort Lauderdale, they
have become a fine new restaurant. It was P.N. Bryan,
father of Reed and Tom, who in 1905 contracted with Ed
King to build the New River Inn that later became the city
building and zoning board. Now it has been restored to a
more fitting memorial as the Discovery Center. Next to
that is the restored King-Cromartie House that was moved
from its original site on the south shore of New River, east
of the Andrews Bridge.
Fort Lauderdale's past is being reawakened and recog-
nized. The archives of that past are now carefully guarded
and tended by Fort Lauderdale's Historical Society,
situated in that same cluster of restored pieces of history
along Southwest Second Avenue.


"CHINNOCK MARINE INC.

518 W. Las Olas Blvd.
Ft. Laud., FL 33312
We Invite you to Join us in a Tradition of
Quality Craftsmanship and Service. Conveniently Located
on New River at Sailboat Bend and the 7th Avenue Bridge.


WE OFFER THE FOLLOWING
YEAR ROUND SERVICES:


side of New York State. "It is a bit difficult to prove when
the whale lost his teeth," but collectors' pieces of an
earlier vintage are not under the ban, nor are smaller
items.
Beef bone and horn have helped make up for the lack of
whale teeth and bone for items such as tie-tacks, cuff-
links, and belt buckles. "The new scrimshaw moves in
the other direction" from the old. The old was an escape
from the tedium of the sea so much of it pictures scenes
of the land. Karl Kortum, director of the San Francisco
Maritime Museum pointed to that fact in his introduction
to The Scrimshander by William Gilkersoh.
There is romance in the collecting of the scrimshaw of
old, a search resembling that of the whalers who
searched the seas.


Hauling
Bottom Work
Carpentry
Electrical
Painting/Refinishing
Storage
Marine Air Dealer


Pressure Spraying
Sand Blasting
Mechanical/Repairs
Diesel/Gas
Rigging/Spars
Awlgrip/Imron
Westerbeke Dealer


< Full Line Parts, Supplies and Hardware

Estimates and Quotations
Available on Request
Do it Yourself Welcome
On A Space Available Basis.



763-2250
^fixxyoa ..aoa aax to^









,"SPLICE THE MAIN BRACE"
a food & drink guide
\


WATERFRONT CUISINE


by Alexandra Howard

The LEFT BANK Restaurant

The luster of the LEFT BANK is a direct by-product of
the lusty Chef/Owner Jean Pierre Brehier. When was the
last time you dined at the hand of a soon-to-be multi-
millionaire? Yes, Monsieur Behier is exactly that. Vitality
radiates from this young French Gentleman as he as-
tounds you with his superb dexterity, preparing table-side,
one of the most superb meals available in Ft. Lauderdale.
This delightful workaholic puts in practically 24 hours a
day between spaghetti and culinary art.
His food is wonderful! Escargot hides in heavenly cream
sauce within a light, fluffy pastry, crust and the Coquille
St. Jacques, in a creamy Mornay Sauce extraordinaire.
Along with these personal favorites of his, exists an array
of equally delectable dishes, ranging from Shrimp Marsale
to Caneloni Provencal, the latter being a delicious blend of
Ground Sirloin and Filet Mignon with fresh spinach and
tasty tomatoes covered with a creamy cheese sauce roll-
ed in a crepe.
When I visited the LEFT BANK, the "piece de resis-
tence" was without doubt the Lamb Loin in Three
Mustards Sauce. Perfect medalions of lamb loin were sau-
teed lightly then laced with three distinct sauces.
Jean Pierre's tableside skill, together with the precise,
polite service affords a guarantee of a fine evening at this
classic French restaurant.
In essence, as with our host himself, the Left Bank ex-
udes an aura of richness, warmth and endlessly luscious
surprises. Decidedly a spot for the most special of even-
ings!


I


Coliple.e Yaclit Services
Mobile RepairU Uit

522-5789
MAJOR MINOR REPAIRS ON ALL GAS DIESEL
ElGlINIS (;fNLIIAI:OIIS CLIUIOM IISIAII A IONS
ELECTRICAL / AIR CONDITIONING. RFRAiGERAIION


sales & service

INTERNATIONAL MARINE INSTRUMENTS / COMBI


ADL EFl BARBOUR
CRUISAIR
MARINE AIR
RARIIAN
GIENDENNING
ONAN
FORD LEHMAN


CATERPILLAR
DEIROI! DIESEL
PERKINS
PI.ASURECRAFT
UNIVERSAL
WESIERBEKE


DAVE ODHAM, PRESIDENT


17 TEAIS EXPERIENCE/ALL SERVICES GUARANTEED


TEMR CIHENEY







I L L U S T n A T 0 2
524-7129


BOATS & YACHTS HAND WAXED
PROFESSIONAL AUTO GROOMING
CAR SPA
HAND WASH & WAX
COMPLETE DETAILING
"',, CARPET SHAMPOOING
ENGINE CLEANING
PICK- UP & DELIVERY

1700 E Commercral Blvd
928-0801 Ft Lt.uderdale FL 33334


1976 2076


EENTURT


-.__ ; Insuraice Agency. Inc
Personal & Commercia'
DENNIS J. & MARY DeROLF


6908 Cypress Road Office 792-1074
Plantation. Fla 33317 584-140:'
S8S8SS8SS8888888S88888S88SS.SS

CONSULTATION AND ABSENTEE MANAGEMENT


Telephone:
583-3769




Joel E. Treichel Yacht Refinishing
MARINE REPAIR Yacht Delivery
Mechanical Systems
v(Installdtion & Repair)



ARTS & LETTERS




GYOTAKU fish rubbings by Jim Williams. Each fish rub-
bing made by the artist is a signed original GYOTAKU
created by lightly applying ink on rice paper covering the
fish. GYOTAKU means to "proudce an image by rubbing."
Jim Williams fishes, sculpts and paints in Fort Lauder-
dale. Many of the fish specimens are personally caught by
the artist. He states that, "the fish is a very powerful
S creature, and the image of a fish has power, too, as a
creative and healing symbol."
For more information call Jim at 467-1114.


1984 CRUISING GUIDE TO THE FLORIDA KEYS by Capt.
Frank Papy. 208 Hendricks Isle, Ft. Lauderdale, FL
33301. Call 463-7856.

appendix i, an anthology of poetry, photos and
Ozark Mountain crafts by Bob Hammack. Send
$5 check to John Ziegler, Ziegler Publishing Co.,
320 2nd St., Fort Lauderdale, FL 33312.


10


ANCIENT MARINER, 501 S. New River Dr., E. 525-8100.
Flnatinn restaurant, fabulous view.
BRYANT HOMES RESTAURANT, 301 SW 3rd Ave.
523-0177. On the New River.
THE CANDY STORE, 1 N. Atlantic Blvd. 761-1888. Beach
cuisine, drinks.
COCONUTS, 429 Seabreeze Blvd. 467-6788. Seafood.
CRABBIE JOHN'S CRAB HOUSE, 2020 South S.R. 7.
584-8680. Baltimore style & garlic crabs.
DOWN UNDER, 3000 E. Oakland Park Blvd. 563-4123.
FIFTEENTH STREET FISHERIES, 1900 S.E. 15th-St. (at Ft.
Laud. Marina) 763-2777. Seafood.
FRANK & VINNY'S PIZZA SHACK, 2884 E. Sunrise Blvd.
564-9522.
FISH GRILL, 1434 N. Federal Highway (Dania), 923-1001.
Best Broiled Fish buy in town!
HARRISON'S ON THE WATER, 3000 NE 32nd Ave.
566-9667.
LA RESERVE, 3115 NE 32nd Ave., 563-6644. Come by
car or boat. European entrees.
THE LEFT BANK, 214 SE 6th Ave., 462-5376. French
tableside cooking. Reservations.
LAGNIAPPE CAJUN HOUSE, E. Las Olas near 3rd Ave.
Great crawdads!
LESTER'S DINER, 250 SR 84, 525-5641. 14 oz. coffee.
Open 24 hours.
MR. LAFF'S, 1135 N. Federal Hwy., 561-3440. Restau-
rant & Bar (Great Music).
PELICAN'S ON THE WATER, 620 E. Las Olas Blvd. By
boat or car. Behind Riverside Hotel.
POETS, 904 E. Las Olas Blvd., 523-5001. Saloon &
Eatery.
SHOOTERS ON THE WATER, 3033 N.E. 32nd Ave.,
566-2855. Food & Drink.
STAN'S, 3300 E. Commercial Blvd., 772-3777. By car or
boat.
SUMMERS, 219 S. Atlantic Blvd. 462-8978. Beach Cafe
& Bar. Concerts, too!
YESTERDAY'S, ICW at Oakland Park Blvd., 561-4400.


Wood Signs
Interior Graphics


REVIEW--


"HOW TO LIVE ABOARD

A BOAT"

Janet Groene
Hearst Marine Books
New York 1983

The jacket photograph of a classic boat interior gleams
with the domestic richness of a Flemish Renaissance
painting. A small child looks out at you, waiting for you to
enter the image is the promise of the good life.
Janet Groene has followed the dream of the live-aboard
life and is wise about its realities, in this book she
presents them in full spectrum. She charts the transition
from a static life on land to the innovative economy of the
mobile life on the water. We are led through the decision
to change and the testing of our resolve, to the trauma of
a major life shift and the joy of new options and horizons.
Practical consideration is given to: choice of an
appropriate boat and equipment, financial and medical
matters, pets and kids, safety and security, pests and
cleaning, and other hum-drums of daily life. Cast-histories,
photographs and sources of products and information are
presented along with those resourceful, ingenious ways of
getting things done that are the trademark of the success-
ful live-aboard. In fact, the book's pleasant style seems to
characterize those desirable traits of self-reliance, a
sense of adventure and perspective and humor "in the
face of it all" that this way of life encourages.
The last chapter discusses "the road back." All dreams
end, but the living-out of a dream often generates a new
dream, and the wit and means to follow it. This is a useful
book for dreamers, and an inspirational book for realists.

Reviewed by David Lewis


HOW TO LIVE ABOARD A BOAT by Janet Groene ($17.95,
Hearst) is sold in book stores or can be ordered by mail for
$19.50 ppd. from BOTEBOOKS, 11 Highland, Menands,
NY 12204.


LETTERS FROM A CCC PEEVIE by Francis Pike. Send $6
to Francis Pike, 1502 Anthony St., Columbia, MO 65201.


"Who said you didn't like poetry?" Order your copy of:
DYSLEXIA by John Ziegler. Send your $3 check to John
Ziegler, Ziegler Publishing Co., 320 SW 2nd St., Fort
Lauderdale, FL 33312.


For $2 sent to: Sailspar Design, P. 0. Box 292, Larch-
mont, New York, 10538, you receive "Good Rigs for
Small Boats" by Christopher Wentz. This is a little bedside
chat of a book, tull of sprits and gaffs, loose foot and snot-
ters, dipping lugs and lateens. It is a change from the
mega-bucks world of motor driven self-furlers and
hydraulic vangs and a reminder of the tradition of small
boat sailing that has evolved, out of the limelight, all these
centuries.


WATERFRONT NEWS



LAURIE CAHILL
S (305) 763-2186


SIGNS 21


& SIGNS


tA---~~--~- -r~~_ _rr~~_r~~~~~~~p~l~:~:~Zr~-)-f~-~-;-:- -~ i;rij-~ClrtC~C~1~I~'~Y~~~'~jij~~;)~;~-~


'V*~'~----l-'----------'---~-~~---~I~N~


Yacht Lettering
Custom Graphics








LOCAL NOTICE TO MARINERS
SPECIAL BRIDGE NOTICE
For many years the only sanction
against improper or unreasonable oper-
ation of a drawbridge, or for an unnec-
essary request to open a drawbridge
has been a criminal penalty of no more
than $2000, or for imprisonment of one
year or less, or both.
This is to inform all concerned that
civil penalties against refusal to open
or unreasonable delay in opening a
drawbridge; as well as unnecessarily
requesting a drawbridge openg have been
instituted by the Coast Guard Author-
ization Act of 1982 (PL 97-322).
No vessel owner or operator shall sig-
nal a drawbridge to open for any non-
structural vessel appurtenance which
is not essential to navigation or which
is easily lowered and no person shall
unreasonably delay the opening of a
draw after the signal required by rules
or regulations.
Whoever violates any rule or regula-
tion shall be liable to a civil pen-
alty of not more than $1000. No penal-
ty may be assessed under this subsec-
tion until the person charged is given
notice and an opportunity for a hear-
ing on the charge.
In accordance with 33 CFR 117.1e, com-
plaints against bridge or vessel own-
ers or operators for such incidents
within the 7th Coast Guard District
shall be sent to:
Commander 7th Coast Guard Dist.
51 SW ist Avenue
Miami, FL 33130


;.LAUDERDALE je-

SELF-SERVICE

MARINE INC. "M
801 SW 201n S 1Ot iSl Rd 4 ajt 1-95 bn l Solh Fork New Rpr
aOlio0 in Lauoerdale vYacn Biasin
DO IT YOURSELF FAST IN & OUT
EXPERT HANDLING OF POWER-& SAILBOATS
FULLY FENCED & PATROLLED
(305) Ft. Laud. 525-0443 Miami 947-7941
~ NmK)j


S24


4 7129



S CHIN


CLASSIFIED


DOCKAGE
LAS OLAS ISLES- behind private home.
No live-aboards, prefer annual. $200
/mo 110 & water incl. Brooks 761-8791
LAUDERDALE ISLES- deep water*no fixed
bridges*no live-aboards*water & elec.
available. $100/mo. 581-3832


ECONOMICAL MARINA- Live-aboard DOCKAGE
from $180/mo. Showers,Laundry,Restau-
rant. DRY STORAGE for small boats from
$30/mo. Call 584-2500.

FOR SALE
WESTERBEKE New 6KW Diesel Generator
3 cyl. F/W cooled $4995. REPOWER
SYSTEMS call 462-3894.
1977 MG MIDGET convert. 524-9450.

ONAN 7.5KW Used Generators. Call for
details. REPOWER SYSTEMS 462-3894.
WESTERBEKE 4-107 DIESEL Engine Com-
plete w/gear & panel $1695. REPOWER
SYSTEMS 462-3894.

MARINE SERVICES
MARINE CARPENTRY- Planking, Framing,
Joinery. Experienced, Reasonable.
922-8094 YACHT HUSBANDRY, INC.,
Dave Weaver.
GOOD QUALITY MARINE WOODWORK & MAIN-
TENANCE, CALL Lee Jensen @ 522-2189
James Sullivan professes a knowledge
of CELESTIAL NAVIGATION, LORAN-C, &
PREP for USCG OPERATORS LICENSE. Will
teach same to seafarers for $12.
CALL 462-2628.
Female crew seeking passage to Europe
in May. Call Petra & Tina @ 527-4477.


PURE WATEi
by Reverse Osmosis

Guaranteed safe Drinking Water
by R/O, removes pollutants like
asbestos, pesticides, industrial
wastes, bacteria, viruses,
sodium, magnesium, etc.
No electricity or chemicals,
works on water pressure alone. I
Ideal for use in home or on
board any boat with pressure
water system. For demonstration
or more information call:

525-2645


varnish & cleaning


SOUTHWEST LAUNDRY
The Best & Friendliest Yacht Servicel
in Town. PICK UP & DELIVER, all for
only 60 per pound (minimum 10 1b.).
All Folded with Shirts and Pants on
Hangers. We also do DRY CLEANING at
competitive prices. ~-
21 SW 7th St. 761-976
Ft. Lauderdale 76-9768



- 1976 2076

E CENTURY" ",
RELTOR [ENTUR .s

PROPERTIES, INC.
k 6908 Cypress Road Plantation, Fla. 33317

Dennis J. DeRolf- Broker/President
\ Office 584-1400 Eve: 584-3735 J


HELP WANTED
INDEPENDENT PAPER CARRIERS needed
for once per month delivery in
MIDDLE RIVER area, along the ICW
north of Sunrise Blvd to Palm Beac
County Line, and the Dania Cut-of
Canal. Call 524-9450 (8am-6pm).


REAL ESTATE


(305) 462-5770 Ofc. -
(305) 527-1304 Eves. ASS

ROBERT P. GARGANO
Lic. Florida Real Estate Broker REALTOR
""-.WATERFRONT SPECIALIST
/ 7(^ -. WATERFRONT SPECIALIST
170 E.jjj- La lsBv.\ut 0


"/' 1700 E. Las Olas Blvd., Suite 204
....... Fort Lauderdale, Fla. 33301
Specializing in Waterfront Real Estate
Living & Working on the New River
DEEPWATER HOMES & CONDOS
CITRUS ISLES Deepwater, Move right
in! 2 Bdrm, Completely Remodeled,
Central Air, Tile Floors, Ig. Fl Rm.
LANDINGS Deepwater, 3 Bdrm 2 Bath
extra spacious & private. BEST PRICED
deepwater in area. Only $259,900
RIVERLAND Private Acre, 373' of deep
water surrounds this contemporary
3 Bdrm 5 Bath, Pool Residence. Cath-
edral Ceilings, Stone Fireplace, Wet
Bar & Roman Bath. 1 Acre Pt. Lot.
RIVER REACH condo Dock only $10/ft/yr
Golf*Tennis*Pools*Sauna*24hr Security
I. 2 Bdrm 2 Bath 1350 Bldg. 4th Fl.
Southeast Exposure, Only $80,000
II. 2 Bdrm 2 Bath Corner Unit, Wra.nr
around Balcony on New River
III. Spacious 2 Bdrm, 2 full private
Baths'ZGuest kBath w/coverej Parking


...f. .-^ wL ; ,, .... l
.. .



MANY OTHER WATERFRONT LISTINGS AVAIL.
"New wateArtont litings needed;
I have qualified buyeAs!"
ROBERT P.GARGANO
Lic, Real Estate Broker Realtor 462-5770 Ofc.
527-1304 Eves.



WATERFRONT NEWS

ADVERTISING RATES:

Column Inc .................... $12.50
Business Card ................. $25.00
Full Page (10"xl6") ............ $400.00
Half Page (10"x8") ............. $240.00
Minimum Art SetUp Fee ............ $5.00
Insert Fee per Insert. ............... 1.5c
(Maximum Size 8"x11")
Call conering Photos & Color
For more information call
524-9450
or stop by our office

ADVERTISING DEADLINE THE FIRST DAY
OF THE MONTH
CIRCULATION 10,000


WATERFRONT NWUS
320 SW 2nd Street
Ft. Lauderdale, FL 33312


Phone: (305) 524-9450


I LI -







Si IflAV


MN DlNI-AV


COMMUNITY CALENDAA & TIDE TABLES
TUESDAY WEDNESDAY THURSDAY


FRlnlAV


SATURDAY


TIME ADJUSTMENTS FOR TIDE TABLE March 15 16 17
High Water Low Water
Hilsboro Inlet ------- -31 minutes -0 min. SAILBOAT BEND CIVIC BROWARD SYMPHONY ORCH 6th ANNUAL ST. PAT's
Hi sboro Inlet --31 minutes -5 mm. ASSOCIATION MEETING with DOC SEVERINSON PARADE
Bahia Mar ------------- -20 min. -18 min. Bally Hall, BCC 815 pm on Las Olas Blvd.
STHE SALVATION ARMY between SE 15 & SE 5
Port Everglades Inlet -45 min. -62 min. 90 SW TH AVE starts at NOON
Playboy ------------- +45 min. +28 min. +2.3 2.3 .4' 2.6
Summerfield ----------- +40 min. +40 min. Tidal Data at Andrews Av 0059*0703*1311*1921 015*0752*119*201. 024*0856*15082104
Bridge, ft.+ or mean 005907031311*1921 015407' -5214192014 0244*085615' -0.8'2104
low water, E.S.T. -0.6' -0.4' -0.7' .7( -0.8' -0.8'

18 19 20 21 22 23 24

24th ANNUAL 7 LIVELY SPRING IS HERE!!! FROM THE COTTON CLUB ON GOLDEN POND FORT LAUDERDALE's
ARTS FESTIVAL TO BROADWAY theatre presented by STREET DANCE
S tret fair a Harlem Nocture THE POMPANO PLAYRS fireworks, continuous
srle od fair fFT. LAUDERDALE CITY th us costumes 1300 NE 6th St. 8:30pr live entertainment,
Hollywood Blvd. from COMMISSION MEETING Ht St. Ambrose Church Pompano Beach ethnic food booths,
Dixie Hwy. to Young Cir. 8 am & 10 am S. New River Or.East
10-5 pm FREE City Hall 3-11 pm
+2.5' +2.6' +2.4' +2.5' +2.2' +2.3' +2.1i' +2.1' 1.9' +1.9' l..7'.7 +1.5'
0333"0927*1555*2154 0422*1012*1643*2244 0512*1059*1730"2336 0602*1147*1821 time 0030*06541237*1915 0126*0753*1334*2012 0228*0857*1437*2117
-0.8' -0.9' -0.7' -0.9' -0.6' -0.8' -0.3' -0.6' ,0:1' -0.4' +0.1' -0.2' +0.3' 0.0

25 26 27 28 29 30 31
SEA CREATURES, GREAT
LAS OLAS ARTS FEST and SMALL SURFING CHAMPIONSHIP
arts & crafts, food & family performance by Island Water Sports/
drink on East Las 01as award-winning marine
educators Mr. & Mrs. East Coast Region
eucatorsh. r. rs. @ Deerfield Beach
@ Int. Swimming Hall of Pier (all weekend)
Fame, 7 pm
+1.6' +1.4' +1.6' +1.4' +1.7' +1.57'+1.7 +1.6' +1.8' +1.8' +1.9' +1.9' *1.9' +1.9'
0336*1006*1547*2225 0442*1111*1651*2327 0538*1208*1751 0020*0626*1253*1837 0107*0705*1331*1921 0146*0741*1407'1958 0224*0814*1439*2034
+0.4' +0.1' +0.4' +0.1' +0.3' +0."1 +0.2' 0.0 0.0 -0.1' '0.1' -0.1' -0.2'

April 1 2 3 4 5 6 7

FORT LAUDERDALE CITY FT. LAUD. CITY IARI.NE GREATER MIAMI ANNUAL
COMMISSION MEETING ADVISORY BOARD MEETING BILLFISH TOURNAMENT
8 am & 10 am "7:30pm, City Hall thru April 8th
City Hall Phone: 1-858-3237

high
+2.0' +2.0' +2.1' +1.9' +2.1' +1.9' 2. +.8 +1.9 .7' +1.7' +1.7'
0258*0846*1514*2109 0333*0918*1546*2143 0407*0949*1618*2220 0443*0922*1653*2257 0520*1057*1732*2340 0602*1139*1815 time 00290651*1246*1910
-0.1' -0.2' -0.1' -0.3' -0.1' -0.3' 0.0 -0.3' +0.1' -0.2' +0.2' -0.2' +0.3' -0.1'
low

8 9 10 11 12 13 14

FLORIDA OFFSHORE MULTIHULL
ASSOCIATION MEETING
Filippo's Restaurant, 1166
N. S.R. 7, Lauderhlll,
7:30 pm

+1.8' +1.6' +1.8' +1.7' +1.8' +1.8' +1.9' +2.0' +2.1' +2.2' +2.3' +2.4' +2.4' +2.6'
0125*0748*1330"2014 0231*0857*1440*2124 0339*1009*1520*2238 0445*1115*1707*2344 0544*1214*1810 time 0043*0655*1307*1905 0136*0727*1357*1957
+0.4' 0.0 +0.4' 0.0 +0.3' -0.1 0.0 -0.2 -0.2' -0.4' -0.5' -0.5' -0.7'