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A LEAP FOR LEGAL EDUCATION GATOR LAW IN THE FAMILY INTERNATIONAL ENGAGEMENT CHECK & BALANCE The speaker, the justice and the future of Florida’s judicial system UF LAW UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA FREDRIC G. LEVIN COLLEGE OF LAW  SPRING 2011

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Editor Associate Director of Communications Richard Goldstein Assistant Editor Media Relations Manager Matt Walker Director of Communications Debra Amirin, APR Communications Coordinator Whitney Smith Online Communications Coordinator Mike Davis Contributing Writers Brandon Breslow (3LAS) Kara Carnley-Murrhee (1L) Jared Misner (4JM) Roberta O. Roberts (4JM) Contributing Photographers Vincent Massaro (JD 11) Nicole Safker (2L) Design JS Design Studio Printer The Hartley Press Inc. Correspondence / Address Changes alaw@law.u .edu University of Florida Levin College of Law P O. Box 117633 Gainesville, FL 32611-7633 For More Information www.law.u .edu/about/contact.shtml As part of the University of Florida’s sustainability initiative, UF LAW magazine is printed on paper and at a facility certi ed to FSC standards. Visit www.fscus.org for more information. “At Holland & Knight we go for the best of the best. We are looking for mature, practice-ready young lawyers who can immediately deliver client services in a thoughtful way. We believe in their professionalism, and we know the values that are instilled in them at the University of Florida College of Law. As an alumna, I know the value of the Gator Nation.” —MARTHA BARNETT (JD 73) Holland & Knight senior partner and former chairwoman; past president of the American Bar AssociationHire a UF Law graduate. Cert no. SCS-COC-001376

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UF LAW Vol. 47, Issue 2, SPRING 2011CONTENTS513214 DEAN’S MESSAGE 8 NEWS BRIEFS  Florida Supreme Court welcomed  Former ABC News president visits  U.S. News & World Report rankings  3L wins best advocate at ABA competition 11 CONFERENCES & LECTURES 25 PARTNERS  UF Florida Tomorrow Campaign  Student Division of the Law Alumni Council  Glasser Barbecue beefs up ALUMNI PROFILES 28 Michael T. Moore (JD 74) 30 Stacy A. Scott (JD 95) 33 James D. Camp Jr. (JD 51) 35 Charles Egerton (JD 69) 37 Natalie Jackson (JD 02) 32 CLASS NOTES  Heritage of Leadership  In Memoriam 53 FACULTY  Spotlight  Media hits  Welcome/Farewell  Book Round-up  Moffatt remembered 63 UP AND COMING  Margaret Rowell Good (2L) NEWSMission & VisionCheck & BalanceGator Law in the FamilyLevin College of Law takes a curricular turn with new mission statement UF Law grads at heart of contest for future of Florida’s system of justice Three family trees intertwined with UF Law Alumni solving problems in South Sudan, Micronesia, Haiti and North Korea WEB-XTRAS 1314COVER: Florida House Speaker Dean Cannon (JD 92) and Florida Supreme Court Justice Jorge Labarga (JD 79) standing in front of the Old State Capitol in Tallahassee. PHOTO BY NICOLE SAFKER (2L)Visit UF LAW online at www.law.u .edu/u aw to view:  Family trees intertwined with UF LAW  3L Ryan Moseley serves on the gubernatorial transition team  A list of UF Law alumni deaths reported since May 1, 2010  Webcasts of special guest lectures and other events at www.law.u .edu/news/webcasts/ 5 21 4848Global GatorsFind us on facebook www.facebook.com/u aw Follow us on Twitter at www.twitter.com/u aw

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No one reading this column needs to be reminded that the legal profession is experiencing extraordinarily rapid change. The recession, the trend toward globalized business, the pace of technological change, and the constant evolution in how we communicate with each other and transfer knowledge are but a few of the factors forcing changes in how law is practiced and the legal profession is structured. Our ABA President Steve Zack (JD 71) has said that the legal profession will change more in the next 10 years than it has in the last 100 years, and I fully agree with this prediction. With changes in the practice of law and the legal profession must come changes in legal education. If law schools ignore the various factors driving change in the practice and the profession, we will end up investing our time, energy and resources in preparing students to practice in a world that no longer exists. Since 2007, when the Carnegie Report was published, the faculty at the Levin College of Law, working largely through a process involving the strategic planning committee along with some others, has been engaged in a serious conversation about how the curriculum should change in light of these signi cant changes in the profession. The starting point for this review was to look at the articulated “vision and mission statement” for the college. Our “vision” remains unchanged from the purposes articulated many years ago: to be a law school “dedicated to advancing human dignity, social welfare, and justice through knowledge of law.” But in November 2010, the faculty voted unanimously to amend our “mission statement.” The prior mission statement called for the college to pursue four indisputably valuable and important aspirations — “Excellence in educating professionals, advancing legal scholarship, serving the public, and fostering justice” — and these are retained in the new mission statement. But the new mission statement goes further and calls us to train our students in the “highest ideals of the legal profession,” in not only the knowledge of the substantive law, but also “the skills necessary to use that knowledge in practice” and in the “core competencies essential to begin the practice of law.” Core competencies are further de ned, and include “the ability to conduct independent legal research and produce legal writings of professional quality,” “fundamentals of client services,” “interviewing and counseling skills,” “fundamentals of dispute processing and legal problem solving,” “knowledge of the shared values of the legal profession,” “the skills to create a professional identity” and “the skills to work with people from diverse backgrounds.” This new mission statement is a compelling statement of what the faculty and I believe constitutes the essential characteristics of a 21st-century lawyer. The statement shows a recognition of the importance of melding practical skills, emotional intelligence and substantive knowledge into the pre-graduation training of a law student. What we are now doing is working on a re-design of the curriculum to achieve the goals outlined in the new mission statement. Alumni have provided input on the re-design, including through a faculty retreat held in April with alumni representatives on the Law Center Association Board of Trustees. The path on which your law school has embarked is a far distance from the image of a law school built in an ivory tower and disconnected from the real world into which our students graduate and will practice law. Our path values the real work lawyers do, the awesome responsibilities owed to our clients and the system of justice, and the high standards of ethics and integrity that must guide our daily decisions in the practice. As the dean of your law school, I have several hopes as we embark on this process of change. I hope you are pleased with the path we are choosing. I hope that you will share your suggestions and insights about the speci c steps we should consider as we build a curriculum to ful ll the goals in our new mission statement. This being a time of great nancial stress for all of us, I hope you will consider, if you are not already a contributor to your college, a gift that shows your willingness to participate in our work and communicates an endorsement of our efforts. As always, I am grateful for your past support, and I take great pride in the honor and privilege I have to serve as the dean of your college. DEAN ROBERT JERRY Levin Mabie & Levin Professor of LawFROM THE DEAN4 UF LAWToward a new UF Law mission

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SPRING 2011 5With an eye toward changing technology, economics and expectations in the legal profession, the University of Florida Levin College of Law has adopted a new academic mission statement that will help guide the school’s curriculum so students can hit the ground running in the legal world upon earning their degree. “This is a time of great change for the legal profession, and we recognize that to better prepare students for this new world, legal education needs to adapt,” said UF Law Dean Robert Jerry. “The new vision and academic mission statement sets the table for more detailed discussion of curricular changes the college will make.” In addition to establishing the goals of advancing legal scholarship, serving the public and fostering justice, the new mission statement emphasizes the importance of providing a well-rounded legal education that includes competency in five main areas. These core competencies are: legal analysis; legal research and writing; fundamentals of client services; fundamentals of dispute processing and legal problem solving; and fundamentals of professional responsibility and identity. Jerry explained that the establishment of the fundamentals of professional identity necessary to understand what it means to be a lawyer goes beyond traditional textbook curriculum. “Being a very good lawyer means having a sense of self-awareness; having a sense of how one projects confidence and has the substance to back it up; understanding what’s involved in working collaboratively with a team and how one most effectively solves a problem. That is all connected to legal doctrine and to understanding how legal institutions work,” Jerry said. Jerry added that the mission statement also focuses the law school on preparing students for their jobs upon graduation. “Graduates should step into the profession and be ready to represent clients. Our mission is more VISION & MISSIONUF LAW ALIGNS CURRICULUM WITH PRACTICE OF LAW VisionA law school dedicated to advancing human dignity, social welfare, and justice through knowledge of law.Academic Mission StatementThe mission of the University of Florida Fredric G. Levin College of Law is to achieve excellence in educating professionals, advancing legal scholarship, serving the public, and fostering justice. We aspire to prepare lawyers to serve their clients, the justice system, and the public with a high level of accomplishment and a commitment to the highest ideals of the legal profession. We strive to provide students with a well-rounded legal education. Our curriculum is designed to teach students about the law and to help them develop the skills necessary to use that knowledge in practice. Our goal is for our graduates to possess the core competencies essential to embark on the practice of law. These core competencies include: 1. Legal Analysis (including knowledge of laws and rules, the ability to apply laws and rules to different factual settings, and the ability to engage in legal argumentation); 2. Legal Research and Writing (including the ability to conduct independent legal research and produce legal writings of professional quality); 3. Fundamentals of Client Services (including interviewing and counseling skills); 4. Fundamentals of Dispute Processing and Legal Problem Solving (including litigation, settlement, and transactions); and 5. Fundamentals of Professional Responsibility and Identity (including knowledge of the shared values of the legal profession and ethical problem solving, the skills to create a professional identity, and the skills to work with people from diverse backgrounds).BY MATT WALKERMISSION continued on next page …

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“THE NEW MISSION STATEMENT WILL PROVIDE A CONSENSUS THAT ENSURES THAT, IN OUR EFFORTS AT REFORM, WE ARE ALL PULLING IN THE SAME DIRECTION.”6 UF LAWVISION & MISSIONUF Law Professor Amy Mashburn explains the Levin College of Law’s new mission statement to a group of alumni, faculty and staff during a Law Center Association Trustees-faculty retreat at the law school.than just understanding what the law is or just understanding the process of the law’s application.” Alumni and other legal employers have echoed the need for graduates with these skills. “It is more important than ever for law school graduates to be prepared for the legal world on both a theoretical and practical level,” said Andrew Fawbush (JD 74), a partner in the tax section of Smith Gambrell & Russell, LLP in Jacksonville. “The economics have changed over the past 40 or 50 years in the legal profession and young people must be prepared for this new model.” The new mission statement was put forth by a strategic planning committee chaired by UF Law Professor Amy Mashburn and was approved by the faculty in November. The more detailed academic mission statement represents a commitment by the faculty to focus on providing UF Law graduates with the specific skills they need to begin the practice of law, she said. “We all want to provide our students with the best legal education we can, but we do not always agree on which methods are best or how to set institutional priorities,” Mashburn said. “The committee is hopeful that the new mission statement will provide a consensus that ensures that, in our efforts at reform, we are all pulling in the same direction.” Mashburn said the strategic planning committee hopes to implement the new academic mission statement by winning approval from the law school’s Faculty Senate for significant curricular changes. MashburnAMY MASHBURN, UF LAW PROFESSOR AND CHAIR OF THE STRATEGIC PLANNING COMMITTEEMISSION continued …

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As the University of Florida Levin College of Law sets forth a new academic mission statement in the spirit of better preparing students for the working world, administrators are evaluating how the Center for Career Development can best keep up with the rapidly changing legal eld. “We want to instill con dence in those using the of ce — primarily students and employers,” said Rachel Inman, associate dean for student affairs and interim assistant dean for career development. Last September, when Assistant Dean for Career Development Linda Calvert-Hanson announced she was stepping down, UF Law Dean Robert Jerry chose Inman to guide the center through the transition and help assess its effectiveness. Jerry said the search for a permanent replacement was a good time to evaluate the Center for Career Development. “Dean Inman not only understands student services functions extremely well, she also has great skill in organizing an of ce staff and building a team-oriented working environment,” Jerry said of the former Carson-Newman College basketball player in Jefferson City, Tenn. “I remember her once giving an explanation of how her varsity basketball playing days in college taught her the importance of teamwork, a metaphor I thought was excellent. Rachel (Inman) is the right person to help us in this transition phase.” Inman became UF Law associate dean for student affairs in 2006. Similar to the current effort, the college was interested in revitalizing student affairs and making sure students were getting the best of what the of ce had to offer. She brought a wealth of student services experience from the University of Tennessee College of Law, where she was an assistant dean for student affairs for 12 years. She said students can bene t from Career Development’s services, and she wants students to know that the staff is there to help. “I think students believe that if you’re going to have a Center for Career Development that it should be there to assist and help them with the areas they are unsure about,” she said. Inman wants the center to assist students and employers with their needs, build relationships with employers, and increase employer participation in on-campus interviews. This will involve working more with the local legal community in providing programming and mentoring services. The center is also seeking to build and maintain relationships with UF Law faculty who have strong connections in the profession and can offer valuable feedback for the center. Inman said this path hasn’t been explored previously, partially due to the somewhat isolated location of the Center for Career Development of ces. That has changed. In May, the Center for Career Development moved from the second oor to the rst oor of Bruton-Geer Hall, former home to John Marshall Bar Association and other student organization of ces. “The reason for that was to make the of ce more accessible to students and employers,” Inman said. “That is a heavy traf c area at the college — certainly for students — and it’s easy to describe how to get there for employers.” The law school is searching for the perfect candidate to ll the position of assistant dean for career development with assistance from the respected academic search rm The Spelman & Johnson Group. Inman has been maintaining her duties as associate dean for student affairs during this time, and lling both positions has resulted in a busy year for her. The workload is worth it, she said, because it’s important for students to have the best possible resources available to them. SPRING 2011 7TeamworkBY MATT WALKER INMAN EMPLOYS TEAMWORK FOR CAREER DEVELOPMENTRachel Inman, associate dean of student affairs and interim assistant dean for career development, stands in the space under renovation on the rst oor of Bruton-Geer, former home to the John Marshall Bar Association and other student organizations.

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8 UF LAWFlorida Supreme Court welcomed to UF LawThe University of Florida Levin College of Law welcomed all seven Florida Supreme Court justices for the 27th annual Maguire Appellate Advocacy Competition in the Martin H. Levin Advocacy Center courtroom. The Feb. 25 exhibition allowed moot court team members to receive useful critiques regarding their oral arguments as they prepared for the American Bar Association’s National Appellate Advocacy Competition held in April. “I just want to say that we’ve heard some outstanding advocacy today,” said Chief Justice Charles T. Canady, following the competition. “It is obvious that the people arguing here before this court today were well prepared and are skillful advocates who have a very promising future as advocates in the law, so we want to congratulate all of you.” The competition is named after Raymer F. Maguire Jr. (JD 15), son of the founder of Maguire, Voorhis & Wells, P.A., and managing partner of the rm. In the summer of 1998, Maguire, Voorhis & Wells, P.A. merged with the law rm of Holland & Knight LLP, which continued the tradition of sponsoring the competition. Former ABC News president visits UF LawDavid Westin, the immediate past president of ABC News, delivered the keynote address in February at the courtroom opening celebration in the Martin H. Levin Advocacy Center at the University of Florida Levin College of Law. In his keynote speech, Westin discussed how advocacy can be used for social good. He said the media could learn from how the court system settles disputes as the media turns to ever-more rancorous commentary and opinion to generate audiences. For example, he said the contentiousness of news programs could be moderated if hosts question political adversaries about how they agree as well as how they disagree. As ABC News president from 1997 to 2010, Westin oversaw all editorial and business aspects of the news division, supervised coverage of President Bill Clinton’s impeachment, the 9/11 attacks, the Afghanistan and Iraq wars and the recent economic crisis. While Westin was president, ABC News was awarded 11 George Foster Peabody Awards, 13 Alfred I. duPont Awards, ve George Polk Awards, more than 40 News and Documentary Emmys and more than 40 Edward R. Murrow Awards.U.S. News & World Report rankingsNew U.S. News & World Report rankings of the nation’s top graduate schools place the University of Florida Levin College of Law in a tie for 24th among public law schools and tie for 47th overall. The UF Law Graduate Tax Program continues to rank rst among publics and was second overall this year. Its Environmental Law Program rose to sixth among publics and 13th overall. The law school’s growing strength in the area of dispute resolution was recognized with a specialty area ranking of seventh among publics and 19th overall. UF Law continues to be rated highly in terms of reputation — tying at 17th among publics and 38th overall in peer assessment, and 17th among publics and 39th overall in lawyer/ judge assessment. UF Law Dean Robert Jerry sounded a note of caution about the report. “We are, of course, pleased with this recognition of our strong tax, environmental and dispute resolution programs, and that we continue to be ranked as a top-tier school, with a peer reputation ranking in the 30s. However, I am on record every year, regardless of how well we do, in stating my belief that rankings such as these are not a true re ection of institutional quality,” Jerry said. NEWS BRIEFSUF LAW HAPPENINGS, EVENTS & ACHIEVEMENTS NEWS BRIEFS continued on page 10 ... Westin Florida Supreme Court justices stand Feb. 25 with UF Law students who are members of the Florida Moot Court team inside the Martin H. Levin Advocacy Center courtroom. See the webcast of the Maguire Appellate Advocacy Competition at www.law.u .edu/news/webcasts/

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SPRING 2011 9NEWS BRIEFS The law school celebrated the o pening of the Martin H. Levin Advocacy Center courtroom with a ceremony (See the webcast at www. law.u .edu/news/webcasts/) that featured remarks by UF President Bernie Machen, as well as college namesake Fredric G. Levin (JD 61), his son, Martin H. Levin (JD 88), Teri Levin, who is Fredric Levin’s sister-in-law and wife of the late Allen Levin, and a keynote speech by the immediate past president of ABC News, David Westin. The ceremony was held at the Martin H. Levin Advocacy Center courtroom on Feb. 24. The new Advocacy Center courtroom will serve as a key component in placing UF Law at the forefront of legal advocacy education. The fully functional trial and appellate courtroom contains a 98-seat gallery, a bench for seven judges, a jury box, attorneys’ tables, judge’s chambers and a jury deliberation room. “I hope with the facility here, the advocacy center, that it will become the goto place for young law students who want to become trial lawyers and they certainly have the facility to do it,” said Fredric Levin, a renowned trial lawyer. “I have tried cases all over the country. I’ve never seen a more beautiful courtroom or a more well-equipped courtroom.” The Martin H. Levin Advocacy Center and courtroom was made possible by donors including Fredric Levin and Teri Levin. Fredric Levin contributed $2 million to the center as the lead gift to this project and Teri Levin contributed a $1 million gift in honor of her late husband, Allen Richard Levin. Teri Levin’s contribution brought the total of Levin family gifts to the law school to almost $30 million, including state matching funds. Other donors who helped make the Advocacy Center possible include the Baynard Trust, the late Robert M. Montgomery of West Palm Beach and Robert Kerrigan of Kerrigan, Estess, McLeod & Thompson in Pensacola. Opening doorsUF Law celebrates opening of Advocacy Center courtroom, welcomes Levins, WestinAdvocacy Center wins conservation gold The Martin H. Levin Advocacy Center has been awarded the gold LEED rating for its environmentally friendly and energy ef cient design. The rating is based on features such as the use of lowow faucets, waterless urinals, re ective building materials and designs to optimize energy performance. According to the March 14 LEED report, 1.5 tons of construction waste were diverted from land lls during the building’s construction and potable water use has been reduced by 55 percent from ttings and xtures. Energy ef ciency measures include high ef ciency glazing, reduced interior lighting power density, occupancy sensors and a district chilled water system. The Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design Rating System was designed by the U.S. Green Building Council to encourage more environmentally sustainable buildings. The rating has four levels: certi ed, silver, gold and platinum.ADVOCACY CENTER continued on next page ... Fredric Levin (JD 61) The University of Florida community dedicates the Martin H. Levin Advocacy Center courtroom on Feb. 24.

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Dedication of the Martin Levin Advocacy CenterBY MARTIN LEVIN S “We carefully track our own progress, and we know that we are very good and getting better every year in the things that matter — including class credentials, our reputation in the legal and academic communities, employment and graduate study opportunities and bar passage rates,” Jerry said. “Couple that with our long history of producing national leaders, including current ABA President Stephen N. Zack (JD 71), and it’s easy to see why we are widely regarded as one of the nation’s best values in legal education.”3L wins best advocate at ABA competitionThe American Bar Association says UF Law student Wilbert Vancol (3L) was the best advocate at the nation’s top moot court competition. Vancol won the National Best Advocate Award at the ABA National Moot Court Competition in Chicago on April 8. It is the highest award given to an individual in the competition and goes to the competitor who demonstrates the strongest advocacy skills. Vancol’s award is like being named the Most Outstanding Player in the NCAA men’s basketball tournament, said UF Law Professor Henry T. Wihnyk, the Florida Moot Court Team faculty adviser. That’s because he was going up against the best students on the nation’s best moot court teams. “I am proud of and impressed by Wilbert’s achievement. The ABA National Appellate Advocacy Competition is the premier moot court event of the year. Law schools from every region of the United States participate each year,” Wihnyk said. “Wilbert’s selection as the best in the nation is a testament to his talent, hard work and dedication. This highlights the excellence of the Florida Moot Court Team and the superb skills training the students receive at the University of Florida Levin College of Law,” Wihnyk said. Scores for oral arguments range from 50 to 100. Vancol said a typical average for an advocate is in the upper 80s. His average score for the competition was 95, the highest among any of the competitors on the 24 teams. Vancol comes from Miami and he transferred to UF Law from Florida A&M College of Law after his rst year. ADVOCACY CENTER continued …Feb. 24, 2011 As I stand up here today, it’s obviously a great honor to have this incredible building bear my name. However, the reality is that I have done nothing to earn it. The sole reason my name is on this building is because my father gave $2 million cash. Not only did he give the lead gift, but he approached two of his friends, Bob Kerrigan and Bob Montgomery, to each give $300,000, and then he approached his sister-inlaw Teri to give $1 million cash in memory of her husband, Allen, the brother and closest of friends to my father and to me. Thus, the real issue is not why my name is on this building, but why my father chose to have this building created. It’s not like he needed his name on another building here at the university. The answer to why my father did it is actually quite simple, and it’s the same answer as to why he provided $1 million in property to this university in the 1980s, and $10 million in cash to this university in the 1990s. Dad believes that a commitment to advocacy in this country could be the single most important action that assures this country’s success, and certainly that guarantees justice. Why is this? What is it about advocacy that is so important to my father? Isn’t advocacy nothing more than trial law? Not to my father. My father doesn’t limit advocacy to trial attorneys, or even to lawyers. Instead, Dad sees advocacy as the process of someone critically and objectively considering an issue, meticulously researching it, logically reaching a conclusion, and then having the con dence and the ability to convey that conclusion even when it’s unpopular and contrary to the opinions being expressed by the vast majority of people. Dad’s concern with the importance of advocacy has become even more heightened in recent times. Why? Because in today’s time everyone with a computer has the ability to disseminate opinions to millions of people in a matter of seconds even though the opinions might be baseless and meant solely to cause harm. In fact, these opinions can be highly targeted to individuals who think the same as the writer, and who are more than happy to act upon them. The dissemination of opinions no longer requires great oratory skills, physical presence and an arduously earned platform to convey them. This makes the world much more volatile and potentially hostile. For the past 50 years of my father practicing law, he has spoken at great lengths regarding the importance of advocacy. In fact, I vividly recall a discussion my father and I had when I was 12 years of age on this very topic, and it has stuck with me to this day. But more signi cantly than speaking about his beliefs, my father has lived them even when it has been to his own detriment. As is well known, Dad has often spoken out against the majority, against the authority, against the established and against the popular. He did this without consideration or concern for the consequences. When he perceived hatred, bigotry, prejudice or any other form of injustice, he made sure he was heard, even while others who did not like his voice made sure he paid the consequences. Dad never backed down, and he wants to make sure we are training all future lawyers to do the same. My father wants to make sure we have a facility at this law school that is teaching students not to become just lawyers but to become advocates. I would like to end my remarks with some quotes by various historical gures who have echoed my father’s belief. • Ten people who speak make more noise than ten thousand who are silent. – Napoleon Bonaparte • To be neutral in a situation of injustice is to have chosen sides. – Archbishop Desmond Tutu • To sin by silence when thou shall protest makes cowards of men. – Abraham Lincoln • The hottest place in hell is reserved for those who in times of great moral crises maintain neutrality. – Dante’s Inferno • The world is a dangerous place to live; not because of the people who are evil, but because of the people who don’t do anything about it. – Albert Einstein • The greatest sin of our time is not the few who have destroyed, but the vast majority who have sat idly by. – Martin Luther King Jr. • In Germany they came rst for the communists, and I didn’t speak up because I wasn’t a communist. Then they came for the Jews, and I didn’t speak up because I wasn’t a Jew. Then they came for the trade unionists, and I didn’t speak up because I wasn’t a trade unionist. Then they came for the Catholics, and I didn’t speak up because I wasn’t a Catholic. Then they came for me, and by that time no one was left to speak. – The Rev. Martin Niemoeller • Speaking out and being wrong does not shame me. Failing to speak out when I know I should makes my entire existence unbearable and pointless. – Fred Levin speaking to me at the age of 12. I would like to thank my father, Aunt Teri, Bob Kerrigan, Bob Montgomery, President Machen and Dean Jerry for everything you have done and continue to do to make this university, this law school and this facility one of the top educational institutions in the world. I also would like to thank each of you and the remainder of Gator Nation for all you have done and will continue to do to make this world a much better place to live. Go Gators. 10 UF LAWNEWS BRIEFS continued … Vancol

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The spring semester at the University of Florida Levin College of Law brimmed with interesting guest speakers, educational lectures and panel discussions. Lecture topics ranged from Florida coastal issues to property law and how it impacts our democratic system. NELSON SYMPOSIUM DRAWS NATIONAL EXPERTS National experts addressed a variety of environmental, property and governmental concerns before practitioners, professors and students at the 10th annual Richard E. Nelson Symposium on Feb. 11. J. Peter Byrne, professor of law and director of the Environmental Law and Policy Institute at Georgetown University Law Center, and William Rodgers, Stimson Bullitt Professor of Law at University of Washington School of Law, delivered a lecture entitled “Global Warming and its Newest Challenges: Mitigation and Acidi cation.” Byrne, a shareholder recipient of the Nobel Peace Prize, discussed ways humans can adapt to sea-level rise while also attempting to mitigate climate change’s effects. He predicted that we will have to re-evaluate our existing laws to deal with climate change. The presentations focused on sea-level rise mitigation, oil spill litigation, the drilling moratorium, ocean acidi cation, judicial takings and the U.S. Supreme Court decision in Stop the Beach Renourishment, Inc. v. Florida Department of Environmental Protection. The Florida Bar Environmental and Land Use Law Section and The Florida Bar City, County, and Local Government Section co-sponsored the event. PIEC DRAWS NATIONAL EXPERTS, FOCUSES ON ‘GREEN’ ENERGY UF Law hosted the 17th annual Public Interest Environmental Conference Feb. 24-26. This year’s conference was themed “It’s Not Easy Being Green: Our Energy Future.” The conference focused on renewable and non-renewable sources of energy, how that energy is distributed and its relationship to economic development, environmental protection and social justice. Although energy affects everyone’s daily activities, from driving a car to turning on lights, “we often don’t consider the broader consequences of our daily activities,” conference Co-Chair Carli Koshal said. Panelists represented a broad range of perspectives including government agencies, public interest organizations and industry, as well as internationally known scholars. Panels addressed energy sectors including solar, wind, biofuels, nuclear and fossil fuels as well as the overlying land use, transportation and environmental justice issues. The student-run conference in its 17th year continues to draw people from across the country. UF Law Professor Alyson Flournoy credits the conference’s success to an interesting, broad agenda featuring a diverse group of speakers. FTC COMMISSIONER DISCUSSES GLOBAL COMPETITION AT HEATH LECTURE Federal Trade Commission Commissioner William E. Kovacic discussed global competition policy standards at the Bayard Wickliffe Heath Memorial Lecture. The March 14 lecture, titled “From Dominance to Oligopoly: The United States and the Future Development of Global Competition Policy Standards,” was the second in the Heath Lecture series. The United States’ best opportunity to remain a major player in the eld of international competition law is to develop better ideas, Kovacic said. “Dominance no longer permits the United States to set global standards, and it will have to use persuasion.” Kovacic has served as an FTC commissioner since 2006 and as chairman from March 2008 to March 2009. He was previously the FTC’s general counsel. The Heath Memorial Lecture Series was made possible by a gift from Inez Heath, Ph.D., widow of Bayard “Wick” Heath. Heath, who died in 2008, was the senior competition consultant with Info Tech, a Gainesville rm specializing in statistical and econometric consulting, expert witness testimony and antitrust law. HARVARD’S OGLETREE DISCUSSES TODAY’S RACIAL ISSUES AT CSRRR LECTURE See the webcast at www.law.u .edu/ news/webcasts/ Harvard Law Professor Charles Ogletree delivered the UF Center for the Study of Race and Race Relations’ 2011 Spring Lecture. The lecture, titled “Are We in A PostRacial Society? Race in America Today,” was held on March 24 at UF Law. Ogletree’s latest book, The Presumption of Guilt: The Arrest of Henry Louis Gates, Jr. and Race, Class and Crime in America, details the arrest of Henry Louis Gates, Jr., an African-American Harvard professor who was arrested by a white police of cer while entering his own home. Ogletree served as Gates’ attorney in the case.CONFERENCES & LECTURES SPRING 2011 11PANELS, SPEAKERS EXPLORE LEGAL QUESTIONS

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12 UF LAWThe case raised issues at the intersections of race and class, and the constitutionally required presumption of innocence by the justice system. Gates’ situation also cast serious doubt on the notion of America as a post-racial society. It is the validity of that assumption — that Americans are treated the same regardless of the color of their skin — that served as fodder for Ogletree’s talk. About 120 students, faculty, staff and community members gathered in the Chester eld Smith Ceremonial Classroom for the lecture. The University of Florida Levin College of Law Center for the Study of Race and Race Relations is committed to fostering communities of dialogue on race. The center creates and supports programs designed to enhance race-related curriculum development for faculty, staff and students in collegiate and professional schools. RENOWNED SCHOLAR DISCUSSES WALL STREET REFORM ACT AT 30TH DUNWODY LECTURE See the webcast at www.law.u .edu/ news/webcasts/ A handful of judges, alumni of the Florida Law Review law school professors and students lled the Chester eld Smith Ceremonial Classroom to hear one of the nation’s pre-eminent law and economics scholars deliver a lively and entertaining lecture on the Wall Street Reform Act. Richard A. Epstein, the inaugural Laurence A. Tisch Professor of Law at New York University Law School, spoke to more than 100 guests March 25 at the 30th Annual Florida Law Review Dunwody Distinguished Lecture in Law. Although the lecture was entitled “The Constitutionality of the Wall Street Reform Act,” Epstein admitted that he had not read the entire “sprawling conglomeration of multiple provisions” and proposed instead that he discuss one section of the act, a subject “dear to the hearts of everybody” — debit interchange rates. Section 1075, commonly known as the Durbin Amendment, is the only section of the Act that has been subject to constitu tional scrutiny. The Federal Reserve, as the agency responsible for implementing the Durbin Amendment, will require debit interchange fees to be reduced by about 75 to 90 percent. As an example, Epstein explained that for a bank like TCF Financial Corporation — Epstein is serving on the corporation’s legal team that is challenging the act’s constitutionality — with overall pro ts of $200 million, “the loss of interchange fees is about $80 million.” The government argues that banks can make up for the interchange loss by imposing higher fees on their retail customers, who, in theory, should be paying less for consumer items because of the transaction fee regulation. Epstein believes that this compensation is not suf cient so the action constitutes a regulatory taking. The Dunwody Distinguished Lecture in Law was established by the law rms of Dunwody, White and Landon, P .A. and Mershon, Sawyer, Johnston, Dunwody and Cole and the U.S. Sugar Corporation in honor of Elliot and Atwood Dunwody. UF LAW’S MUSIC LAW CONFERENCE EXPLORES CHANGING UNIVERSE OF MUSIC INDUSTRY Over the past decade, the music industry has transformed signi cantly due to a number of advances in digital technology, as well as changes in policy, law and attitudes within the industry. On March 26, UF Law’s Music Law Society addressed these issues at the ninth annual Music Law Conference. The conference, entitled “DON’T PANIC: Navigating the Changing Universe of the Music Industry,” focused on the marked shift in the fundamental tenets of the music industry. The conference brought musicians, lawyers, students, academics, policymakers and entertainment professionals together for a conversation on how to handle these shifting dynamics. The conference hosted a variety of panels and breakout sessions that were comprised of music industry experts and professionals, from entertainment attorneys and record label owners to producers and recording artists. Topics included online music sharing, do-it-yourself techniques versus traditional commercial avenues, contract negotiation, changes and adaptations of the copyright law, and a demo-listening panel. WOLF FAMILY HOSTS HARVARD PROFESSOR FOR PROPERTY LAW LECTURE Harvard Law Professor Joseph Singer, a nationally recognized expert in property law, discussed what William the Conqueror, the subprime crisis and the Tea Party have in common before a packed audience at the fourth annual Wolf Family Lecture at UF Law. The lecture titled, “Property Law as the Infrastructure of Democracy,” explored how American property law has served as the foundation for democracy in the United States. Singer nds it odd that the subprime crisis spurred the Tea Party, which believes in smaller government. Singer said the government should have had more power for oversight of the nancial industry. Singer discussed the contradiction between traditional principles of contract law and property law. “You can’t have absolute freedom of contract and full ownership rights,” he said. The question we should ask ourselves, he said, is “what are the minimum standards for market and property relationships in a free and democratic society that treats each person with equal concern and respect?” The Wolf Family Lecture in the American Law of Real Property was endowed by a gift from UF Law Professor Michael Allan Wolf and his wife, Betty. The Wolf family organized the lecture series for several reasons, Wolf said, one of which was to bring outstanding property law experts to the UF to expose them to the “excellent student body and our outstanding set of colleagues.” Singer’s lecture will be published in Powell on Real Property the most referenced real property treatise in the country. Wolf is the general editor of the 17-volume treatise. CONFERENCES & LECTURESCONFERENCES & LECTURES continued ...

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SPRING 2011 13Check and BalanceThe speaker, the justice and the future of Florida’s judicial system BY RICHARD GOLDSTEINJustice Jorge Labarga (JD 79) Speaker Dean Cannon (JD 92)Two University of Florida Levin College of Law alumni shape Florida government at its highest levels. Justice Jorge Labarga (JD 79) took of ce in January 2009 as a Justice of the Florida Supreme Court, and Speaker Dean Cannon (JD 92) was elevated to a two-year term as speaker of the Florida House of Representatives two years later. The men operate on different sides of a divide de ned by the Founding Fathers — the Separation of Powers — and are writing the latest plot twist in the never-ending-story of American government. By the time you read these words, proposals in the Legislature for revamping the state’s system of justice may have died in the Legislature. But they also may continue as living questions of public policy awaiting an argument before the Florida Supreme Court, a vote by the people or a signature by the governor. Disparate views prevail among lawmakers, judges and lawyers about the best way forward for Florida’s judicial system. But there is substantial agreement that Separation of Powers maintained by a system of checks and balances will continue to generate much heat and light among the executive, judicial and legislative branches of government.Continued on next page ...

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14 UF LAWMr. Chief Justice, justices. May it please the court: My name is Dean Cannon, and I represent the Florida Senate and the Florida House of Representatives.” So began an unusual, if not unique, oral argument. On Aug. 18 Cannon, a trim, tenorvoiced Republican from Winter Park, took his case before the Florida Supreme Court while also preparing to take of ce as the next speaker of the Florida House of Representatives, the House’s top job. As an attorney, Cannon represented the legislative branch of government. As speaker-designate, you might say he embodied it. Cannon grew up in Lakeland and was, he said, “That nerdy kid in high school who read The Federalist Papers and loved it before I ever became a real practicing lawyer.” He was the third generation of his family to attend the University of Florida, where he earned an undergraduate degree in telecommunications. You could say Cannon had a successful run at the university. He was inducted into the UF Hall of Fame, became Florida Blue Key vice president and in his second year of law school was elected president of the UF student body. “I had a great opportunity to both study the law from an academic perspective and also study government by winding up sitting next to Justice (Stephen H.) Grimes (LLB 54) of the Supreme Court during UF football games,” Cannon said. “It was a tremendous opportunity to get to know some of the real players in government at the same time I was studying about the Constitution, the Separation of Powers and the way government operates.” In the fall 1991 issue of University of Florida Lawyer the predecessor publication to UF LAW Cannon said: “One thing that I have learned from all of this is that I don’t want to be a politician. The pursuit of politics will really wear you out.” Cannon would embark on a legal practice focused on the intersection of law, politics and government policy, working in several Republican campaigns along the way. When the opportunity arose in 2004, Cannon proved his younger self wrong. He mobilized his contacts and won election to the House of Representatives, rising quickly to the top of the House hierarchy. Cannon stepped before the justices in August as an AV Martindale-Hubbell rated attorney and member of The Florida Bar. He had never delivered an oral argument before the justices. But he had argued before lower appellate courts and prepared rigorously for this case, spending hours anticipating justices’ objections and studying cases that would bear on the topic. “Basically, I moot-courted it as much as possible,” Cannon said, referring to the well-worn law school tradition of arguing mock appellate cases to hone skills in appellate argument. Cannon deployed legislative staff, outside lawyers, even a former state Supreme Court justice, to grill him in preparation for the oral argument. Andy Bardos (JD 04, LLM 05 in tax) was one who helped prepare the future House speaker. Bardos worked in Tallahassee for the law rm GrayRobinson, where his job included assisting the Legislature in appellate cases. Shortly before the 2010 election, he came on as special counsel to Sen-“

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SPRING 2011 15 ate President Mike Haridopolos, R-Merritt Island. Bardos helps develop legislation and oversees the Senate Judiciary Committee. “That was a great experience because he’s an outstanding attorney in addition to what he does in the Legislature,” Bardos said. “I was really impressed with how hard he worked and how much time he dedicated to it. We wanted him to be, and he wanted to be, ready for every possible argument and every possible question.” Cannon gured he was just doing his duty. “I think I briefed 70-something cases and went back to the basics and sort of put everything else on hold to prepare because as someone who respects the court and cares very deeply about the practice of law and the importance of our profession, I wanted to present the best argument that I could,” Cannon said. FROM CASTRO TO BUSH V. GORE Inside the Supreme Court, seated on the bench with six other justices, Labarga gazed down while Cannon delivered his oral argument. As a member of the Supreme Court since January 2009, Labarga was new to the high court but not to the judiciary. He has been a judge for 15 years, and in 2000 Labarga presided over one of several Bush v. Gore trials when the fate of a presidential election was submitted to the courts in Palm Beach County. It was Labarga who rst considered whether “hanging chads” were to be counted as votes. He ruled that the notquite-punched-out bits of paper should be counted because they indicate voters’ in-“It shouldn’t be up to a political super-committee, super-legislature of ve justices to decide that something we’ve passed with a threefths majority of both the House and Senate might confuse people. That’s the underlying argument for the Separation of Powers.”—SPEAKER DEAN CANNON (JD 92)Speaker Dean Cannon lays out his agenda March 8 in the Florida House of Representatives on the rst day of the spring session. PHOTO COURTESY OF THE FLORIDA HOUSE

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tentions. Labarga ruled against a revote of the presidential election in the face of claims that the election resulting in a virtual tie in Florida and the nation had been fatally awed. He said the Constitution provided for presidential elections to be held on one day only. And after court had closed for the day, the lean Cuban-American, who came to Florida as an 11-year-old when his family ed the soldiers of Fidel Castro, donned a baseball cap to go with jeans and a Tshirt. Labarga was working late during that weeklong trial and a nighttime stroll appealed to him. An international media storm enveloped Labarga during the day. In darkness he meandered anonymously among the humming satellite trucks that lined the boulevard at West Palm Beach County Courthouse like an occupying army. Labarga paused next to the CNN truck where up-and-coming TV news host Greta Van Susteren conducted an interview. “I was standing right behind the person she was interviewing. She did not recognize me and she was asking questions about what I was doing. Who was I? Where did I come from? Who was this judge who was going to rule on all these cases? And this guy is going on — and he was a local guy — going on and on about me. Of course, he had his back to me. He couldn’t see me. I’m standing there listening to him. And she’s looking straight at me and had no clue that I was standing there listening to her.” Labarga wanted to be a lawyer for as long as he can remember, and some of his formative experiences with the administration of justice came years before when confronted with Castro’s blossoming police state. Labarga’s father had raised money for the Cuban revolution to overthrow the Fulgencio Batista regime. He said his father, Jorge Labarga Sr., believed Castro’s promises that he would install an American-style democracy in the Caribbean nation. After Castro took power in 1959, he would nd out otherwise. The elder Labarga turned against the new regime, and, to avoid retribution, ed the country. Justice Labarga recalls that his father left his family home on a Monday. On Wednesday, the soldiers arrived. “They would come late at night with a truck full of soldiers to instill terror among the neighborhoods, and the soldiers would surround the house and come in and ransack it, and they would eventually drag the person they were looking for out to the truck and take him away,” Labarga said. “They did that at my house, and I recall my brothers and me hiding behind my mother as they were searching my house and my grandfather, who was in his mid-80s, started protesting only to be told to shut up or be shot.” The soldiers left and arrested his father’s friends. One was soon executed. There was no check on the power of the executive branch in Castro’s Cuba. “Needless to say, I have an acute appreciation for the Fourth Amendment of our Constitution and its prohibition of illegal searches and seizure,” Labarga said. “The whole idea of police of cers kicking somebody’s door open and entering somebody’s house and searching somebody’s home illegally is obviously something that I nd abhorrent. On the other hand, when it is done legally for a lawful purpose it is something that obviously needs to be done. My concern as a judge, as a lawyer, even as a prosecutor, always has been that police of cers show the requisite probable cause to enter somebody’s home.” RHETORICAL CONFIDENCE During the August oral argument in the Supreme Court on the fate of the proposed constitutional amendment, Cannon yielded no rhetorical ground to justices. Cannon answered skeptical questions in a polite but con dent tone. JUSTICE R. FRED LEWIS: I’m concerned that here it is the actual language that goes to the voter, not a sophisticated legislator or judicial of cers. The public — what will the public think this means? CANNON: The public will hopefully give the words the meaning that they give to them just like if they were voting on the right to privacy or the right to due process. We gave the words to the voters, your honor, so they would have the ability to read them themselves and choose to add them to their organic law or not. 16 UF LAW “A Constitution is basically words on a piece of paper. It is what we the people do with it that make it work.—JUSTICE JORGE LABARGA (JD 79)

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SPRING 2011 17Months later, Labarga declared himself impressed by Cannon’s performance. “He did an outstanding job, and whenever he goes back into practice he’s going to be an outstanding lawyer. I think I told him at a reception that he’s wasting his talents,” the justice said with a grin. Florida Department of State vs. Florida State Conference of NAACP Branches concerned a constitutional amendment proposed by the Legislature and slated for a statewide ballot that would have changed Florida’s methods of legislative redistricting. The state NAACP and other groups led suit, claiming the measure would invite radical gerrymandering and that the ballot summary was misleading. In a sense, the case was also directed at the power of the Florida Supreme Court itself. Cannon contended that the state Supreme Court had no authority under the state Constitution to remove a constitutional amendment proposed by the Legislature from the ballot, since the language of the amendment itself was to be given to the voters. In this contest between the legislative and judicial branches, the judicial branch exed its muscles. A 5-2 court majority that included Labarga ruled against Cannon and the state. The court threw out the ballot measure and, in doing so, reaf rmed its authority to dismiss constitutional amendments proposed by the Legislature before voters could weigh in. The majority held that the ballot summary and its headline were misleading despite the fact that it repeated language of the proposed amendment. “We hold that the ballot language setting forth the substance of Amendment 7 does not inform the voter of the true purpose and effect of the amendment on existing constitutional provisions and, further, is misleading,” the court majority wrote in an unsigned opinion. That opinion may not represent the nal word. Speaking in his Tallahassee legislative of ce where a parchment copy of the U.S. Constitution hangs above his desk and a book about former President Ronald Reagan stands prominently on his bookshelf, Cannon explained a fundamental disagreement with the court. “If we propose a bad question then the St. Pete Times editorial board and the Gainesville Sun editorial board and everyone on the Internet and the blogosphere will know that it’s a bad question. It shouldn’t be up to a political super-committee, superlegislature of ve justices to decide that something we’ve passed with a three fths majority of both the House and Senate might confuse people. That’s the underlying argument for the Separation of Powers,” Cannon said. “We pass something and they don’t like it and it doesn’t go to the voters. There’s no check, there’s no balance to that.” A spokeswoman said Cannon favors new checks on the Supreme Court to allow more constitutional proposals to appear before voters. And during the spring legislative session, Cannon helped push legislation through the House and the Senate that would set a timeline for legal challenges of proposed ballot summary language. Days after Cannon spoke to UF LAW he unveiled a far-reaching package of reforms to change the way Florida’s system of justice operates. A constitutional proposal would make it easier for the Legislature to overturn rules regarding the practice and procedures in state courts. It would require a simple majority of the Legislature to overturn new Supreme Court rules instead of the current two-thirds majority. Another constitutional change would divide the Supreme Court into two divisions — with one division deciding criminal cases and the other division ruling on civil cases. The proposal would add three justices, bringing the total to 10 — ve in each division. Proponents of splitting the Supreme Court into civil and criminal divisions say it would promote ef ciency and decrease the backlog of cases weighing down the judicial system. Texas uses a similar system. The ideas are stirring consternation within the legal community. At each turn, UF Law alumni are on the frontlines confronting these questions. Mayanne Downs (JD 87), president of The Florida Bar, placed the justice-system proposals at the top of her legislative lobbying agenda during the spring and toured the state speaking about their consequences. Meanwhile, UF Law alumnus Stephen N. Zack (JD 71), president of the American Bar Association and a past president of The Florida Bar, asserts that increasing the state’s funding of the judiciary from its current level of $462 million would do more to clear a backlog of cases than would dividing the state Supreme Court and adding justices. “Some people would see it as just another type of court packing,” Zack said, alluding to President Franklin Delano Roosevelt’s bid to increase the number of justices on the U.S. Supreme Court. Roosevelt was incensed by the court’s habit of declaring his domestic policy initiatives unconstitutional, and in 1937 he proposed adding up to six Supreme Court justices to the nine-member court who would be appointed by the president and who would presumably vote in sympathy with his agenda. Roosevelt’s court-packing proposal turned into a legislative failure and a political disaster. Florida Supreme Court Justice Jorge Labarga’s attitudes toward the law were shaped by his family’s victimization at the hands of the Castro regime.NICOLE SAFKER (2L)

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18 UF LAWPettigrew and Sessums: 1970-1974 In the 1960s, the U.S. Supreme Court noticed that representation was out of whack in many state legislatures. In Florida, for example, representation was tilted steeply in favor of rural residents. By some estimates as few as 13 percent of the state’s voters could elect a majority of the legislators. The Supreme Court responded with the “one-man, one-vote” standard. Pettigrew and Sessums came in as part of the political sea change ushered in by that Supreme Court decision. Reapportionment meant out with rule by the “Pork Chop Gang,” conservative North Florida Democrats who opposed desegregation, and in with progressive Democrats, who tended to represent urban constituencies and whose mission it was to expand state-government capacity. “Reapportionment brought in a whole raft of new players who were elected locally and were not being dominated by statewide associations and organizations that were doling out money,” explained Pettigrew, speaker from 1971 to 1972. “We like to refer to it as Florida’s Camelot.”The Speakers Club During its 102-year history, the University of Florida Levin College of Law has supplied more than its share of graduates to sit in the catbird seat of the Florida House of Representatives. Florida House Speaker Dean Cannon (JD 92) is the eighth UF Law graduate to hold the top job in the Florida House. The other House speakers were William V. Chappell Jr. (LLB 49)*, Mallory E. Horne (LLB 50)*, Richard A. Pettigrew (LLB 57), Terrell Sessums (LLB 58), Donald L. Tucker (LLB 62), Jon Mills (JD 72) and Tom Gustafson (JD 74). Meet the UF Law speakers club.BY RICHARD GOLDSTEINPettigrewTucker SessumsIn Florida during the spring, a sudden decline in mortgage ling fees threatened to shut down the state courts temporarily for lack of money. However, one of the proposed constitutional changes would provide a guaranteed minimum appropriation for the courts from all revenue sources equal to 2.25 percent of General Revenue. Had the proposal been law during the 2010-2011 scal year the courts’ budget would have received an additional 16 percent, or $73 million, according to the Speaker’s Of ce. “The House proposal addresses the longstanding criticism that the courts are underfunded and judicial dockets are overcrowded by providing a minimum appropriation for the courts,” Cannon said. “This proposal provides stable funding for the court, but offers exibility to the Legislature in terms of allocating that funding each year.” But late in the legislative session, the Senate removed elements of the constitutional amendment as passed by the House, including the minimum funding provision and adding justices to the Supreme Court. Remaining in the constitutional proposal was a change that would give the state Senate the power to accept or reject Supreme Court nominees, introducing the same system used for the federal judiciary. A separate legislative proposal that died in the Senate would have changed the makeup of Florida’s nine-member judicial nominating commissions, the bodies that recommend appellate and Supreme Court nominees to the governor. Under current law, the nine commission members are appointed by the governor, the Florida Bar and commission members themselves. For Zack, who participated in the selection of judges as general counsel to former Gov. Bob Graham, it would be a mistake to send the governor’s nominees before the state Senate for approval. Zack said it is impossible to remove politics from judicial selections, but placing nominees before the state Senate would only make it worse. “When I started practicing law 40 years ago, the de nition of a judge was someone who was a friend of the governor. We don’t want that to be the de nition of a judge today,” Zack said. “I never asked nor knew the political philosophy of a judge, nor did we ask their position on any issue. In a United States Senate con rmation that’s exactly what happens, and I don’t think that people who have watched that process think that it is one that we should bring to Florida.” AN UNEXPECTED COMPLICATION Labarga is intimately familiar with the current system of nominating appellate court judges and justices in Florida. It

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SPRING 2011 19 During his speakership the Legislature pushed through a corporate income tax, and judicial reforms that included distancing judicial selections from politics with judicial nominating commissions and retention votes. The Legislature instituted home rule to devolve decision-making power to cities and counties. It initiated statewide land and water management policies, including major environmental legislation based on a model law by UF Law Professor (later Dean) Sheldon Plager and UF Law Dean Frank Maloney. Sessums focused much of his legislative effort, before and during his 1973 to 1974 speakership, on property tax relief through statutory and constitutional limits on local ad valorem taxes and education. “We found there were 33 large senior high schools where student test scores were at or below the random chance level. You could have brought in a tribe of non-English-speaking illiterates who would have done about as well. That was sort of horrifying.” The response, Sessums said, was The Educational Accountability Act of 1971. It required statewide tests for students in a variety of academic subjects and grade levels. Finally, he secured the enactment of the Florida Education Finance Act to equalize and increase state support of public schools. Tucker: 1974-1978 In the one-term-and-out world of Florida House speakers, Tucker was unique. He was the only person to hold the position in two consecutive terms, or four sessions, of the Florida House. Tucker said part of the reason for this was that he didn’t try to impose a substantive political agenda on the Legislature but acted as a facilitator. The Tallahassee Democrat did push through procedural changes that he gures have contributed to good governance. These initiatives include requiring that spending proposals added to appropriations bills be taken from money already included in the legislation or that they be paid for with new taxes or fees. “It’s kind of like a pie. If you’re going to increase, for example, the money for the highway patrol, it has to come from somewhere else,” Tucker explained. “Otherwise, you have to raise it from a tax.” He also slowed the process to require the mandated three readings of legislation happen on three different days. This has helped keep errors out of bills that were being rushed MillsGustafsonCannonwas two months before he was scheduled to appear before the Judicial Nominating Commission as an applicant for the Supreme Court when he met an unexpected complication. “I grew up in Palm Beach on the beaches so I was in the sun my entire young life. I found a little spot underneath my nail in my index nger, and it was diagnosed to be melanoma, and I had to have my nger amputated. “I had to undergo a regimen of chemotherapy for 30 shots and that nearly killed me, and I lost about 20 pounds, and I had not eaten in three days. And my last shot was two days before my interview with the Judicial Nominating Commission in Tampa. I was so skinny my suits didn’t t me. I could not y because I would get nauseous. So my wife (Zulma) drove me to the interview from West Palm Beach to Tampa and it was at The Florida Bar of ce at the Tampa Airport. “The trip itself nearly killed me so I went to bed to sleep and my wife woke me up around 4:30.” He forced down a bagel “and somehow the adrenalin kicked in because I went in and gave an interview, and I don’t remember it all, but obviously I did something right because I was able to be nominated and beat out a great number of other very quali ed people. “I never asked nor knew the political philosophy of a judge, nor did we ask their position on any issue.”—ABA PRESIDENT STEPHEN N. ZACK (JD 71)Zack

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through on the same day they were introduced, Tucker said. Tucker’s name graces Tallahassee’s multipurpose arena — The Donald L. Tucker Center — which is home to Florida State University’s basketball teams. Tucker notes that he and E.T. York, chancellor of the State University System of Florida from 1975 to 1980, teamed up to nd an unused trove of state money for that project. Tucker said the Legislature used accumulated student fees to build the Tucker Center, UF’s Stephen C. O’Connell Center arena, and the University of South Florida Sun Dome in Tampa. Mills and Gustafson: 1986-1990 When Mills, a Democrat from Alachua County, assumed the speakership in the 1980s, questions of growth management including wetland conservation were at the top of his to-do list. Mills, who is director of UF Law’s Center for Governmental Responsibility and dean emeritus, laid the groundwork for his 1987 to 1988 term with the Sunrise Report on the future of Florida. The House dealt with “issues ranging from economic development to enhancing science and technology to training and education so we had a very substantial agenda and it went very well,” Mills said. “We passed a very signi cant amount of that.” Mills was followed in the speaker’s chair by Gustafson, whose primary legislative focus was children and adolescents. Money was shifted into nurturing children from birth to age 4 in a bid to improve the life chances for those at risk for negative social outcomes. The Fort Lauderdale Democrat’s second major children’s initiative was moving juvenile delinquents into group homes instead of jails when their family structure breaks down. That policy died with the administration of Gov. Lawton Chiles (JD 55), who took of ce after Gustafson left the Legislature. At the behest of the Senate president, Gustafson used his UF Law training to write new constitutional rules for open meetings that cover legislative leaders and the governor. “I booked Con Law at the University of Florida,” Gustafson said, referring to the law school’s book awards given to students with the highest grades in a course. “I rewrote it in its appropriate constitutional form.” Cannon: 2010-2012 Cannon, a Winter Park Republican, says his term as speaker will be marked by the consequences of revenue contraction brought on by the 2008 nancial collapse as federal stimulus money, which softened the initial blow, fades into the background. During an interview with UF LAW before the spring session, Cannon said he would like to be remembered for dealing intelligently with the budget shortfall. “I hope among the things that I’ll be able to say when I’m nished is that I made thoughtful, careful, hard decisions during a very challenging time and helped steer the ship of state through some really rough waters,” Cannon said. “I hope that they will also say that I helped positively transform government to make it better serve the people who send us all up here and who pay all of our salaries in all three branches of government.” *Chappell of Marion County and Horne of Leon County are deceased.“I have spoken to so many of those members of that commission since and I asked them, ‘Did you not realize something about me that day?’ They said, ‘No, you looked ne to me.’ I said, ‘Well, I was dying.’” Labarga’s cancer is now in remission and his suits t just ne. HISTORY REPEATS ITSELF To appear on a statewide ballot, the constitutional proposals must pass both houses of the Legislature with suf cient majorities. But they also could wind up before the Florida Supreme Court before appearing on the ballot. And that would return to where this story began — the Legislature confronting the Supreme Court. This tension between the branches, experts say, is the way of our American system of government. Cannon agrees with the notion that Separation of Powers and an independent judiciary are important principles, but he added, “Independent does not mean unaccountable or omnipotent and it will be great to continue this debate going forward.” Jon Mills (JD 72), director of UF Law’s Center for Governmental Responsibility and UF Law dean emeritus, co-authored part of the state Constitution as a member of the Florida Constitution Revision Commission from 1996 to 1998. From 1986 to 1988 Mills held the the speaker’s job. Since then, he has taught constitutional law to hundreds of students, including Cannon, whom he remembers as a very good student. Mills is a Democrat, but he recognizes the frustration expressed by his fellow alumnus and Republican successor in the speaker’s chair. “That tension was designed by the drafters of our constitution and the federal Constitution. The court interprets legislative action all the time. When I was in the Legislature I agreed with it sometimes, and I didn’t agree with i t other times,” Mills said. “We have to preserve the separation and even preserve the tension.” Labarga draws another lesson from the history of his homeland and the ease with which an apparently just constitution established in the 1940s was overturned by a determined dictator. “A Constitution is basically words on a piece of paper. It is what we the people do with it that make it work. In Cuba, the first thing Fidel did when he came to power was to get rid of the judicial branch of government creating his own, and you had military tribunals deciding cases because he wanted control. He did not want an independent body telling him — as a dictator — what you’re doing is wrong, it’s unconstitutional,” Labarga said. “So a judicial branch of government plays a crucial role in our democracy, but we need to have the liberty, the independence to make those decisions without the fear of any type of retaliation — whether political or financial.” 20 UF LAW THE SPEAKERS CLUB continued …

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Gator LawFamily in theBY BRANDON BRESLOW (3LAS)SPRING 2011 21Three family trees are intertwined with the heritage of UF Law

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22 UF LAW(Above) Judge Elizabeth Jenkins (JD 76) and Tyler Hudson (1L); (Right) Judge Elizabeth Jenkins (JD 76) and her father Joe C. Jenkins Jr. (JD 49) stand on the steps of the Florida Supreme Court in 1984 after she is sworn in as a judge; (Below) State Rep. Joe C. Jenkins Sr. (JD 32), second from left, looks on as Florida Gov. Millard Caldwell signed the 1947 Minimum Foundation legislation. Many UF Law alumni and students claim to bleed orange and blue. It’s more unusual for the colors to course through the branches and roots of their family trees. For them, attending the University of Florida Fredric G. Levin College of Law has become a proud tradition that has produced multiple generations of UF Law alumni. Many also remain involved in the UF Law community as active alum ni: returning to campus as guest lecturers on their eld of practice, becoming members of the Law Center Association’s Board of Trustees or creating an endowment at the college. “Multiple generations of the same family attending UF Law create a very strong sense of loyalty that is evidenced in how they volunteer their time and nancial support as alumni,” said Kelley Frohlich, senior director of development and alumni affairs. The tradition also helps students look to their family for guidance and support in tackling the worries, woes and workload inevitable in law school since family members have usually been in their seats, guratively and sometimes literally. “The shared bond among family members who can re ect over a lifetime of experiences about the law and their time at UF Law, both the good and the bad, provides a two-way street of learning,” Frohlich said. Following is a close-up of just three of these families, each with a student currently attending UF Law, each active in alumni activities, and, like many others, each proud of their tradition of Gator lawyers. THE HUDSON/JENKINS FAMILY Tyler Hudson (1L) took a long and winding road to UF Law, but ultimately genetics won out. “My mom has always said with orange hair and blue eyes, I was marked as a Gator at birth,” Hudson said. “It just took me a while to get here.” Hudson was never far away from UF Law in his heart or home. He was born into a Gainesville family with three generations of Gator lawyers: his mother, Judge Elizabeth Jenkins (JD 76), his grandfather, Joe C. Jenkins Jr. (JD 49), and his great-grandfather, Joe C. Jenkins Sr. (JD 32). “Family was de nitely a part of my decision to come here,” he said, “but it really came down to wanting a change of pace and to come back home.” Hudson graduated with a bachelor’s degree in philosophy in 2007 from George Washington University in Washington, D.C. He began his political career in 2004 as a press intern for U.S. Sen. John Edwards’ presidential primary campaign in New Hampshire. That same year, he was the youngest staff member of the Democratic National Convention, where he worked as a speechwriter for party leaders. “I decided that it wasn’t something I wanted to make a career out of,” Hudson said, “but I’m tremendously grateful for the lessons I learned from the experience.” He went on to work in Florida on President Barack Obama’s campaign and the gubernatorial campaign of former U.S. Rep. Jim Davis, D-Fla. The Jenkins family is no stranger to Florida politics. Joe C. Jenkins Sr. was a member of the Florida House of Representatives from 19391948, representing Alachua County. “My son inherited my grandfather’s love for the political arena and public service,” said Elizabeth Jenkins, a federal magistrate judge for the Middle District of Florida in Tampa.

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After his tenure in the state Legislature, her grandfather opened the law practice of Jenkins and Jenkins with his son, Joe C. Jenkins Jr. The rm handled mainly real property cases. “Everybody in Gainesville knew about them and their of ce,” Elizabeth Jenkins said. “They were leaders in the community for decades.” When Joe C. Jenkins Sr. passed away in 1958, his son took over the law rm. Joe C. Jenkins Jr. was known for spending hours at property closings explaining to his clients the importance and responsibilities of the asset they were acquiring. “He was one of the great attorneys in Gainesville at the time who took a higher level of care in closing matters,” Elizabeth Jenkins said. Joe C. Jenkins Jr. also worked as a part-time municipal judge for the 8th Judicial Circuit of Florida, handling traf c citations and misdemeanors. His passion for adjudication was inherited by his daughter Elizabeth. She served as a federal prosecutor in Orlando and then West Palm Beach after serving with the Department of Justice immediately after graduating from UF Law. She became a federal magistrate judge in 1985. “What I learned from the judges I would argue in front of as a prosecutor is what in uenced my decision to become a judge,” Elizabeth Jenkins said. Elizabeth Jenkins has returned to UF Law on many occasions to speak about the female role in the legal community and judicial clerkships. She is also a proud member of the Law Center Association’s Board of Trustees. “Although I never pushed him, I am proud Tyler was able to continue our family’s tradition at UF Law,” she said. “He understands the importance of good judgment and solid legal skills.” THE THACKER/OVERSTREET FAMILY As graduation from Wake Forest University loomed for Celia Thacker (2L), the choice of which law school to attend weighed heavy. With three generations of graduates from UF Law preceding her, could she turn away from her chance to of cially become a Gator? “While I had several options for law school,” Thacker said, “I realized that Florida was the best choice for me.” Thacker grew up as a Gator fan, attending her rst football game at seven years old with her mother, Jo Overstreet Thacker (JD 87), an active UF alumna and member of the Law Center Association’s Board of Trustees. “There is a tradition in my family that you must learn ‘We Are the Boys from Old Florida’ before you can attend your rst football game,” Celia said. When it came time to decide on law school, her mother and her grandfather, Murray Overstreet Jr. (LLB 53), gave Celia the opportunity to make the decision on her own. “My family was really good about not pressuring me, but subtly dropped hints that Florida would be the best option for law school,” she said. The same could be said for Jo, who was preceded by her father and her grandfather, Murray Overstreet Sr. (BLW 27). In the end, she made the decision based on what she wanted for her life. “The glorious thing about our family’s tradition is that everyone decided on their own that they wanted to attend Florida for law school, independent of what the family may have wanted,” Jo said. Celia also has family ties to UF Law on her father’s side. Her great-grandfather, O.S. Thacker (JD 29), who is also the great-grandfather of Jonathan Graessle (2L). Jonathan is a fourth generation student of UF Law as well. In addition to O.S. Thacker, preceding Jonathan are his father William Graessle (JD 85) and grandparents Lois Thacker-Graessle (LLB 41) and Albert W. Graessle (LLB 41). Like individual bricks placed together to form a building, the Overstreet, and now Thacker, presence at UF Law stands tall, similar to the family’s presence in its hometown of Kissimmee. Murray Overstreet Sr. opened his practice in Kissimmee immediately after his graduation in 1928. The rm handled real estate law, wills, trusts and estate planning. Murray Overstreet Jr. joined the rm when he graduated from UF Law and went on to become county attorney for Osceola County in 1960, a part-time position then. Murray stepped down as county attorney in 1985 and again focused on the family’s private practice. Two years later, Jo joined the rm. “Law school taught me to be prepared or suffer the consequences,” Jo said. After 10 years in the family’s rm, Jo became county attorney in 1997, a full-time position. She held that of ce until last year. “The glorious thing about our family’s tradition is that everyone decided on their own that they wanted to attend Florida for law school ...” —JO OVERSTREET THACKER (JD 87) (Left) Murray Overstreet Sr. (BLW 27); (Below) At Celia’s graduation from Wake Forest are, from left, Jo Overstreet Thacker (JD 87), Celia Thacker (2L), father Clarence Thacker, sister Celeste Thacker and Murray Overstreet Jr. (LLB 53).SPRING 2011 23

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Murray has since retired from his practice. Through their work, the Overstreet family has influenced a lot of Kissimmee’s residents, something Celia is reminded of on a regular basis. “When I go out in Kissimmee, I have people come up to me that I don’t recognize and tell me how great my family is and what (my family) has done to help them,” she said. But now it is Celia’s family that gets to tell people about her accomplishments in moot court — as an active coach — and as a researcher for Professor Michael Allan Wolf, the Richard E. Nelson Chair in Local Government Law. “We are extremely proud of her ability to hit the ground running and get involved,” Jo said. THE BOONE FAMILY Caroline Boone (3L) remembers receiving her letter of acceptance from UF Law like it was last week. “I ran up the driveway from the mailbox and all the feelings of uncertainty came to rest,” Boone said. In May, she became the fourth graduate in her family from UF Law, carrying on the Boone family’s proudest traditions. However, law school was not always part of her plan. “Towards the end of my undergraduate years, I was leaning toward becoming a teacher because I wanted to help people,” Boone said. “Eventually I talked to my dad about the decision and he helped me realize that lawyers can help people too.” Her father, Jeffery Boone (JD 82), was speaking from experience. Jeffery Boone, his brother, Stephen Boone (JD 83), and their father, E.G. “Dan” Boone (LLB 54), run the Venice law firm of Boone, Boone, Boone, Koda & Frook. Their practice specializes in civil litigation, business and commercial law, land use, zoning, wills, trusts and estate planning. The of ce’s orange and blue carpet and Gator-packed staff leave little question as to where the Boones earned their law degrees. “I used to hire lawyers from all of the Florida law schools and out-of-state schools,” said E.G. Boone, “but I started only hiring Gators when I realized the education at UF was far above the education of these other schools.” Caroline started as a law clerk at the rm last summer. She surprised the partners with her ability to apply the skills she learned at UF Law, and her personal savvy to complete the research, writing and other tasks required of her. “I was really impressed with how quickly she would pick up on the goal of the assignments we gave her,” Jeffery Boone said. Caroline also attended City Commission meetings with family members as the rm handled zoning and land use issues in Venice. “It was great to see the rapport that my family has with their clients and the respect that the community has for them,” Caroline said. “They really do give back to their community through different service clubs and our church.” The Boone family has been prominent in the Venice community since E.G. Boone opened his rm in 1956. The rm helped establish the national banking charter for the First National Bank of Venice, now SunTrust Bank, and played a key role in implementing central water and sewage for Venice by founding the Civil Action Association. The family never strayed from UF as they made the transition from students to alumni. E.G. Boone has served on the Law Center Association’s Board of Trustees since 1987 and as a member of the President’s Council. Boone’s rm also sponsored the barbeque luncheon at UF Law’s centennial celebration in 2009. “I credit a lot of my success to what I learned at UF Law,” Jeffery Boone said. After she graduates, Caroline will begin working as a fulltime attorney at her family’s rm. The rest of the family is hopeful for more generations of Gator lawyers in the future. “We de nitely want a fourth generation and are optimistic for a fth and sixth,” Jeffery Boone said. 24 UF LAW “ We de nitely want a f o for a fth and sixth,” Jeffer y Tell Us Your StoryWe want to know about your family’s heritage at UF Law. If you have photos and a story about more than one generation who attended UF Law, send them to us and we will post them on our website. The site is linked to this story — which uses one member of each class at the Levin College of Law to explore a family heritage — in the online version of UF LAW magazine. We will post up to two photos and 300 words for each family. Send your story and photos to UF LAW editor Richard Goldstein, Goldstein@ law.u .edu or Attn: Law in the Family; Communications Of ce; P.O. Box 117633; 244 Bruton-Geer; Gainesville, FL 32611.(Above) In front are Caroline Boone (3L) and E.G. “Dan” Boone (LLB 54), her grandfather. In the back are Caroline’s grandmother, Freda Boone, father Jeffery Boone (JD 82) and uncle Stephen Boone (JD 83); (Right) From left, Jeffery, Caroline and Dan Boone pose at a UF football game.

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PARTNERSUF LAW DEVELOPMENT & ALUMNI AFFAIRS Distinguished Donors 2009-2010 UF Law Honor Roll Corrections The Trusler Society description should have been: Annual Gifts of $1,000-$4,999 Trusler Society members receive special recognition in the annual report. Donors mistakenly reported at a lower giving level Here is the correct listing: Dean’s Council – Partners (Gifts and ve-year pledges of $10,000-$24,999) Ausley & McMullen Jeffrey P. and Jan M. Brock Casey Ciklin Lubitz Martens & O’Connell Anne C. Conway Mayanne A. Downs Jacksonville Bankruptcy Bar Association K. Judith Lane Michael D. and Mary P. Minton James E. and Lori G. Thomison Dean’s Council – Associates (Gifts and ve-year pledges of $5,000-$9,999 ) Kendall Coffey and Joni Armstrong Coffey Gary J. Cohen Richard C. and Marjory E. Grant Russell H. and Karen H. Kasper Purcell, Flanagan, Hay & Greene John T. and Leah A. Rogerson Mark & Shari L. Somerstein Andrew K. and Marie S. Strimaitis Timothy W. and Roslyn B. VolpeHow giving a little can add up to a lotAn appeal to give often comes with a comment to the effect that every little bit helps. This is certainly true at the UF Levin College of Law. As an example, if half of the law school alumni who do not give annually gave just $100 a year, it would have the same impact as a new $21 million endowment. Here’s how this works: Half of the 16,800 nondonor law alumni total 8,400. If each of these alumni gave $100 a year the law school would receive $840,000 a year. The university can spend 4 percent a year from an endowment so it requires $21 million to generate the same $840,000 annual income (see graphic). The annual fund supports current critical needs of the law school, from providing supplemental awards to partial scholarships to providing de brillators now accessible throughout the law school. The fund also supports the Gator TeamChild Juvenile Law Clinic, student organizations, technology upgrades, guest lecturers, student support services and much more. This brings us to the status of the Florida Tomorrow Campaign. As of March 31, 2011, the law school had raised $25,410,919, which is 54.1 percent of the $47 million goal. The campaign period closes in 2012. UF overall has reached almost 86 percent of the $1.5 billion goal, so we have substantial ground to cover in the nal phase of the campaign. UF Law relies on alumni and friends to be successful. How to help UF Law reach its campaign goals: • Make an annual gift. Contact Grace Northern: northern@law.u .edu, 352273-0640. • If you are already making annual gifts, consider documenting your annual gift in a ve-year pledge. The total amount of your pledge made before June 30, 2012, counts in the campaign even if your payments continue past 2012. Also, our of ce will send you gift reminders annually so you don’t forget to make your gift each year. Contact Grace Northern: northern@law.u .edu, 352-273-0640. Corrections to 20092010 Annual Report published November 2010SPRING 2011 25

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26 UF LAW • Sponsor a Book Award. If you are already making generous annual gifts, you can sponsor a Book Award in a course of your choosing for just $2,500 per year with a ve-year commitment. Contact Grace Northern: northern@law.u .edu, 352-2730640. • Document a simple bequest of any size. If you will be age 65 or older by June 30, 2012, the full amount of your documented bequest gift counts in the campaign. Become a member of the Bequest Society by completing a simple form and allowing us to recognize your generosity during your lifetime. Or make UF Law a bene ciary of a life insurance policy or retirement plan. Contact Lauren Lehr: lehr@law.u edu, 352-273-0640. • Become a Law Firm Giving Champion where you solicit your colleagues to participate in annual giving and receive recognition as a law rm. Go to www.law.u .edu/ lfg for more details. Contact Grace Northern: northern@law.u .edu, 352-273-0640. • There are many other creative gift vehicles through which you can nancially support your law school, which remains one of the greatest quality bargains in legal education in the world. For additional information on gift-giving options and naming opportunities contact Kelley Frohlich: frohlich@law.u .edu, 352-273-0640. We list new commitments of $25,000 or more through May 1 to the Levin College of Law. Thanks to: • A group of alumni who have created a $50,000 endowment in Water Law. • Buddy Savary (JD 56), who has established the Johnson S. “Buddy” and Mary Savary Scholarship in Law. Savary is retired from the former Sarasota law rm Abel Band. • Mandell and Joyce Glicksberg, who made a $25,000 gift to the Law Review Endowment. Mandell is a retired UF Law professor and the Glicksbergs continue to reside in Gainesville. • John McNatt Jr. (JD 57), who made a gift of just over $200,000 through the cash value of insurance policies to supplement the Judge McNatt Scholarship Endowment. McNatt is retired from Holland & Knight in Jacksonville. • Marti Cochran (JD 73), who made a $25,000 pledge to the annual fund. Cochran is a partner with Arnold & Porter in Washington, D.C. • Jack Clarke, who made a $100,000 commitment to establish the Dean Robert H. Jerry, II Scholarship Clarke, a graduate of Cornell Law, is retired from Exxon Corp. and lives in Gainesville. • Betsy Gallagher (JD 76) with Kubicki Draper in Tampa, who replaced a previously gifted $75,000 insurance policy gift with a $100,000 insurance policy gift. • UF Law Dean Robert Jerry, who together with his wife Lisa, will document a $100,000 bequest gift to establish the Robert H., II and Lisa Nowak Jerry Dean’s Discretionary Fund. • Edward (JD 84) and Julia Downey who made a $100,000 gift to establish The Downey Florida Opportunity Scholarship in Law. Edward is a partner with Downey & Downey, P.A. in Palm Beach. • Joseph P. Milton (JD 69), documented a $100,000 bequest gift to establish the Joseph P. Milton Professionalism Fund Milton is a partner with Milton, Leach, Whitman, D’Andrea & Milton, P.A. • Robert E. Glennon Jr. (JD 74, LLMT 75) and his son Michael Glennon, who made a $50,000 gift to establish the Helen Gibel Blechman Endowment Robert is with Hogan Lovells in Washington, D.C. Announcing the Student Division of the Law Alumni CouncilIn fall 2010 the Law Alumni Council Student Division debuted to great success. The organization was founded by the Law Alumni Council Executive Committee based on feedback from prior class gift committee members. The council believes that involving students while they are in law school helps them feel invested in the school’s success and promotes the idea of giving back. Students are invited to join by making a suggested $20 donation to the annual fund. Student division members receive invitations to special events, including regional alumni receptions. These events help connect student members to our large network of alumni and give them an opportunity to interact with alumni throughout the state. More than 70 students joined immediately when the program was launched, and the members have participated in events such as a Law Alumni Council social at 2-Bits Lounge at the UF Hilton Hotel and an event in Gainesville for alumni to honor Federal District Court Judge Stephan Mickle. For more information on the Student Division, contact Jennifer Beback at 352-273-0640 or bebackjl@law.u .edu.

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SPRING 2011 27 PARTNERSSPRING 2011 27Bringing UF Law togetherGlasser Barbecue to beef up with additional $50K commitmentWhen Gene K. Glasser (JD 72) looks back on law school, more than statute books come to mind. “Anytime someone said ‘JMBA barbecue pit, law school, 1 p.m.,’ we all knew exactly what you were talking about,” he said. The law school community may look forward to the barbecue with even more anticipation now that Glasser and his wife, Elaine, have increased their endowment by $50,000 to make the event “bigger and better,” as Senior Development Director Kelley Frohlich said. He set up the endowment as a way to promote a sense of community at the law school, and to commemorate the special relationships and experiences that he credits to UF Law. “The endowment is not something that most would call ‘conventional,’” said Glasser, a member of the UF Law Center Association Board of Trustees. “But there are needs that are important that just cannot be budgeted.” Each fall, the Glasser Barbecue is one of the most popularly anticipated events at UF Law, providing an opportunity for students, faculty, staff and administration to take a short break while enjoying some good food and company. The goal is to allow the Of ce of Student Affairs to serve more people and be able to host events like the barbecue more than once a year. The larger endowment may also qualify for state matching funds. “The purpose of the additional endowment is the same as it has always been — to help fund activities that create a sense of community at the law school,” Frohlich said. “We’ve generally held the barbecue in the fall, and a smaller event, such as an ice cream social in the spring. By providing the additional funds, the Glassers hope to enhance what the fund already supports.” Frohlich, who has been working with the Glassers on the endowment since it began in 2005, said that it’s unique to have a donor interested in contributing to the law school in this way. “The barbecue is one of the only social events the law school offers on a regular basis that brings the entire law school community together at the same time and the same place,” she said. Anitra Raiford (2L) attended the barbecue last year. “It sponsors a sense of fellowship between us, allows us to take a break and communicate with each other. It reminds us that we have a great network of attorneys out there,” Raiford said. Glasser, managing partner at Greenspoon Marder, P.A., in Ft. Lauderdale, is the second of his family to have graduated from UF Law. The rst was his father-in-law, Sidney Aronovitz (JD 43), for whom the U.S. Courthouse in Key West was named in 2009. He also shares the tie with his son, Evan (JD 02), who is an associate at Greenspoon Marder, P.A. BY KARA CARNLEY-MURRHEE (1L)“The endowment is not something that most would call ‘conventional,’ but there are needs that are important that just cannot be budgeted.”—GENE K. GLASSER (JD 72) Gene and Elaine Glasser

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Michael Moore (JD 74) has served A-list clientele and the interests of science during more than 30 years as a maritime lawyerBY BRANDON BRESLOW (3LAS)Lawyer of the sea28 UF LAW

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Michael T. Moore (JD 74) was a freshfaced graduate of the University of Florida Fredric G. Levin College of Law looking to stand out as he went in search of a job. Tax law didn’t interest him and criminal law made his stomach turn. When he looked toward the ocean, he found his passion: maritime law. For more than 30 years, Moore has practiced as a maritime lawyer, “a lawyer of the sea.” He litigates and handles cases focusing on marine, aviation and art law. “The choice was an early question of differentiating myself from other graduates and removing the subject matters that I did not like,” he said. “Maritime law interested me in law school, and I was given an opportunity to try it out.” The opportunity came while serving tables at a restaurant in Cape Cod. Moore met a man who suggested that he apply as a law clerk at the maritime law rm of Burlingham, Underwood & Lord in New York. This allowed him to dive into the world of yacht owners, glamour and romance, Moore said. Moore’s love for nature and passion for litigation reinforced the choice he made to enter maritime law. He has handled cases for Donald Trump and industrialist Faisal Al Matrook, who owns engineering and natural resource companies in the United Arab Emirates. “Maritime law takes into account international and personal injury laws,” Moore said. “It’s warfare, which is why I think I love it so much.” Moore owns his own 36-foot sailboat, Island Girl, and a wooden canoe given to him by his wife, Leslie Lott (JD 74). “The canoe has allowed me to really get at water level with nature,” Moore said. It wasn’t until 2004, after Moore moved to Miami and opened his own law rm, that he was introduced to a nonpro t organization known as The International SeaKeepers Society. The organization, comprised mainly of yacht owners, retrieves meteorological and oceanographic information through monitors attached to its members’ yachts. The information is given to a panel of scientists, who act as advisers. Government and private entities use the data, which includes air temperatures, oxygen levels, pH levels, humidity and barometric pressure, for observation and research into issues such as global warming and pollution. “The great thing about yacht owners is that they have nowhere to go and all day to get there,” Moore said. “Some of the members have even changed their courses for the sake of gathering information.” Moore became chairman of the organization in 2008, bringing its membership from 100 members to 10,000 in just three years. But it was through a chance happening with a public relations consultant for YachtWorld, an online yacht dealer, that Moore put SeaKeepers on the map. Moore had the opportunity to meet Jessica Muffet, founder of YachtWorld, who wanted to make SeaKeepers its rst bene ciary. As bene ciary, SeaKeepers was given contributions and public relations tools to expand its work and corporate identity. “Their website’s two million discrete hits a day translated into a higher pro le for SeaKeepers,” Moore said. “It’s a very important alliance.” As Moore continues to pull double duty as head of his law rm and chairman of SeaKeepers, he remains enamored with maritime law. “It may be a story of being at the right place at the right time,” Moore said, “but, all things considered, I know this is the law I was meant to practice.” “The great thing about yacht owners is that they have nowhere to go and all day to get there.”—MICHAEL T. MOORE (JD 74) ALUMNI LEADERSHIP SPRING 2011 29 Michael T. Moore (JD 74)

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Alumna replaces alumnus as 8th Circuit public defenderBY KARA CARNLEY-MURRHEE (1L)30 UF LAWMoving On & Moving Up

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ALUMNI LEADERSHIP SPRING 2011 31Since her 1995 graduation from the UF Levin College of Law, 8th Judicial Circuit Public Defender Stacy Scott has maintained close ties with UF Law. She is an adjunct faculty member teaching trial practice and served as interim director for the Public Defender Clinic, which involved training and supervising a class of interns each semester. Scott is an instructor in the Trial Practice program and Gerald T. Bennett Prosecutor and Public Defender Trial Training Program. She led the Trial team to two national civil rights championships in 2005 and 2007.Just as one door closes, another one opens — for two UF law alumni working in the Public Defender’s Office of the 8th Judicial Circuit. Stacy A. Scott (JD 95) took office Dec. 1 for a two-year term as the new public defender for the 8th Judicial Circuit. She succeeds C. Richard Parker (JD 72), who resigned in November to go to work overseas after winning seven elections to the Gainesville-based office. “When Rick told me he was retiring and that he was going to recommend I be appointed to replace him, I was really honored, humbled and thrilled all at the same time,” Scott said. Although Scott’s appointment was a gubernatorial decision, Parker said he knew he was going to recommend Scott for the position. “I was the past and she was the future, and I was hoping that the governor would appoint someone like her, but all I could do was make the recommendation,” Parker said. “My primary reason for recommending Stacy is that she has not only demonstrated the ability as an outstanding trial lawyer but also an excellent ability in managing people. And particularly in the Public Defender’s Office, having someone that is committed to providing high quality service to poor people is just very important.” Scott’s professional experience since UF Law fit the bill: almost 12 years in the Public Defender’s Office, nearly two years as an assistant state attorney and a stint in private practice. She leads an office of 35 attorneys, manages a $5 million budget and oversees nearly 22,000 cases this year. One of the biggest challenges Scott faces in her new role as public defender is the threat of significant budget cuts. The Public Defender’s Office handles almost three times as many cases per year than is recommended by the American Bar Association, Scott said. “If we followed their guidelines, we should have almost 90 lawyers, but we have only 35,” she said. “The right to counsel is a fundamental right and is what really gives meaning to the presumption of innocence and the right to a fair trial. If there isn’t a PD who can be there to represent the client, then justice can’t be served.” Parker reinforced that view. “The problem is that we have already cut an organization that in my judgment couldn’t be cut and continue to provide the level of service that I prefer,” Parker said. “When you take an organization that is already operating at a minimal funding level and tell the boss that he or she has to cut it more — it’s just going to be very dif cult.” The 8th Judicial Circuit is composed of Alachua, Baker, Bradford, Gilchrist, Levy and Union counties. Parker started in the Public Defender’s Of ce in Gainesville in 1973. In 1976, he became the chief assistant, the of ce’s No. 2 of cial, and remained in that position for eight years before becoming the public defender in 1984. Parker is now employed by a private rm working with the U.S. State Department in Afghanistan as justice adviser to the Afghanistan Ministry of Justice. “As advisers, our role is to provide the bene t of our knowledge and experience to Afghanistan government of cials. The context might be answering questions, providing comments, offering suggestions or making recommendations,” Parker explained. “Generally, the advice is at the policy level but the range may include practice and procedure. We assist the local nationals in the performance of their duties.” Parker retired from the 8th Judicial Circuit in November, but you would be hard pressed to call his new life “retirement.” “It’s all new and different,” Parker said of his position in Kabul. “I worked in the Public Defender’s Of ce in Gainesville for 38 years so this is a second career for me. And if I can keep my employer satis ed and the people that I am working with happy — and I continue to enjoy the work — this is s omething that I plan to do for a while.” “I was the past and she was the future, and I was hoping that the governor would appoint someone like her.”—C. RICHARD PARKER (JD 72) C. Richard Parker (JD 72)

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1957William L. Hendry retired 19th Circuit Court ju dge, was honored in June by the Board of County Commissioners of Okeechobee County and the County Bar Association by naming the Historic Okeechobee Courthouse courtroom the “Judge William L. Hendry Courtroom.” A bronze plaque was placed at the courtroom entry to commemorate the event. Hendry was also the keynote speaker at the dedication of the renovated historic courthouse. 1961David L. Levy stepped down in 2009 after 24 years as president of the Children’s Rights Council. This national organization based in Maryland works for increased emotional child support (parenting – joint custody) for children of separated, divorced and never-married parents. Since leaving CRC, Levy has nished his rst environmental fantasy novel, Revolt of the Animals. See www. earthhomepublishing.org. Levy’s rst law school roommate was Fred Levin, for whom the law school is named.1962 J. Charles Gray, chairman of the board and founding director of GrayRobinson, P .A., received the Lifetime Achievement Award at the 33rd Annual Leadership Prayer Breakfast, hosted by Purpose Orlando on Nov. 19. The annual breakfast is to honor community leaders who made signi cant contributions to the welfare of the community during the year. Gray received the Lifetime Achievement Award for his extensive involvement in the community. 1963Larry S. Stewart of the Stewart Tilghman Fox Bianchi & Cain law rm in Miami, received the Barney J. Masterson lifetime achievement award from the Florida Justice Association. He was also named Miami Personal Injury Lawyer of the Year for 2010 by the Best Lawyers in America where he has been listed for more than 20 years. He recently published three articles on tort law.1964Gerald F. Richman president of Richman Greer, P.A. law rm, was named as the Best Lawyers West Palm Beach “Bet-theCompany” Litigator of the Year for 2011. He was also named to the 2011 South Florida Legal Guide Top Lawyers section. This section recognizes attorneys who have been in practice for at least 15 years.1965Sidney A. Stubbs, Jr. of Jones, Foster, Johnston & Stubbs, P.A., was included in the 2011 edition of the South Florida Legal Guide as one of just seven South Florida “Distinguished Attorneys” for 2011, calling him “a lawyer’s lawyer.” He was also named to the Top Lawyers section. This section recognizes attorneys who have been in practice for at least 15 years.UF LAW ALUMNI LAURELSCLASS NOTES32 UF LAW Slesnick II 68 SHARE YOUR NEWS Send your class notes to classnotes@law.u .edu or to: UF Law magazine, Levin College of Law, University of Florida, P.O. Box 117633, Gainesville, FL 32611. If you wish to include your e-mail with your class note, make the additions to the class note and provide permission to print. Notes are due Sept. 15 for the fall issue. TALBOT “SANDY” D’ALEMBERTE (JD 62), an attorney and president emeritus of Florida State University, has been named by the trustees of The Rotary Foundation as recipient of the 2010-11 Global Alumni Service to Humanity Award. D’Alemberte accepted the honor in May at the Rotary International Convention in New Orleans. He was honored at the American Bar Association Rule of Law Initiative anniversary gala last year for co-founding the Central and Eastern European Law Initiative 20 years ago. D’Alemberte championed the initiative’s work during his tenure as ABA president and he serves on the Europe and Eurasia Council. Stewart 63 Richman 64 Normile 67 Gray 62

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SPRING 2011 33DISTINGUISHED ALUMNI Foundation for successCamp named UF Distinguished Alumnus1967 Hubert Normile an attorney in the Melbourne of ce of GrayRobinson, P .A., has been certi ed by the Florida Supreme Court as a circuit court mediator.1968Alan A. Dickey who has been a judge in Seminole County for 34 years, will be the new chief judge of the 18th Judicial Circuit (Seminole and Brevard counties) starting July 1. He was elected by a unanimous vote of other judges in the circuit. O.H. Eaton Jr. of the 18th Judicial Circuit retired last year after 24 years on the bench. Eaton is a nationally recognized expert on the death penalty. Donald D. Slesnick II mayor of Coral Gables and managing partner for the law rm Slesnick & Casey, has been appointed to serve on the American Bar Association's Commission on Civic Education in the Nation's Schools. Its stated objective is to develop young people's interest and knowledge of civics, community service, politics and government. 1969Charlie Egerton, one of the founding shareholders at Dean, Mead, Egerton, Bloodworth, Capouano & Bozarth, P .A., has been named in the 2010 Who’s Who Legal for international corporate tax lawyers. Alan G. Greer a shareholder in Richman Greer, P .A., was named to the 2011 South Florida Legal Guide Top Lawyers section. This section recognizes attorneys who have been in practice for at least 15 years. Egerton 69 Greer 69James D. Camp Jr. (JD 51), a longtime champion of the university and the Levin College of Law, was named a distinguished alumnus of the University of Florida during graduation ceremonies in May. The University of Florida recognizes Distinguished Alumni who have excelled in their elds or who have performed outstanding service to the university. Camp, a founder and shareholder of Camp & Camp of Fort Lauderdale, is a native of Broward County. He graduated from the University of Florida in 1949 and went on to earn his law degree from the College of Law in 1951 where he was a member of the Florida Law Review staff. Since graduating, he has served the university as a former member of the University of Florida Foundation Board of Trustees and is past chairman of the Board of Trustees of the Law Center Association. He served on the University of Florida Presidential Search Committee in 1985. He is a life member of the Broward County Chapter of the University of Florida Alumni Association and is an honorary member of Florida Blue Key. Along with his wife Suzanne, Camp’s contributions to the University of Florida Levin College of Law have supported the Florida Law Review Endowment. With Suzanne, his contribution to the college led to the establishment of the Camp Center for Estate and Elder Law Planning at the Levin College of Law. The Camp Center integrates teaching, research and service in the area of estate planning and elder law, and administers the college’s Certi cate Program in Estates and Trust Practice. Camp is involved in a wide variety of local public service work including a six-year stint on the Fort Lauderdale Charter Review Committee. He has been active in Florida banking as well as serving on the board of directors of SunTrust in Atlanta. His professional legal accomplishments are no less wide ranging. Camp was recognized as among the top lawyers in South Florida for his work in trusts, estates and probate by the 2006 South Florida Legal Guide. Camp is a past member of the Florida Board of Bar Examiners, past chairman of the Florida Bar Probate Rules Committee and a fellow of the American College of Trusts and Estate Counsel. Camp is admitted to the bar of the U.S. Supreme Court.

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CLASS NOTES Henry E. Mallue Jr. retired from the faculty of the Mason School of Business at the College of William and Mary at the end of December. 1970John M. Brumbaugh a shareholder in Richman Greer, P .A., was named to the 2011 South Florida Legal Guide Top Lawyers section. This section recognizes attorneys who have been in practice for at least 15 years. John C. “Skip” Randolph of Jones, Foster, Johnston & Stubbs, P .A., was named to the 2011 South Florida Legal Guide Top Lawyers section. H. Adams Weaver was named to the 2011 South Florida Legal Guide Top Lawyers section. William E. Scheu has been elected as a board member to the Rogers Towers, P .A. board of directors in Jacksonville. 1971Larry B. Alexander of Jones, Foster, Johnston & Stubbs, P .A., was named to the 2011 South Florida Legal Guide Top Lawyers section. 1972Gene K. Glasser managing partner specializing in tax, trusts and estates at Greenspoon Marder, P .A., was named a "Top Attorney" by South Florida Legal Guide 2011. Manuel Menendez Jr. was elected by his colleagues to serve another two-year term as chief judge of the 13th Judicial Circuit (Hillsborough County). His sixth term of of ce begins July 1.1973Gerald A. Rosenthal senior partner in Rosenthal, Levy & Simon, P.A.'s West Palm Beach of ce, has been elected to the National Academy of Social Insurance. Academy members are recognized experts in Social Security, Medicare and health coverage, workers' compensation, unemployment insurance and related social assistance and private employee bene ts. 1974Barry W. Bennett, of Winter Haven, has been appointed to the Polk County Court by former Gov. Charlie Crist. Bennett will ll the vacancy created by the elevation of Judge Beth Harlan to the 10th Judicial Circuit Court. Frederick W. Leonhardt a shareholder in the Orlando of ce of GrayRobinson, P.A., has been appointed to the Florida Technology, Research and Scholarship Board by former Gov. Charlie Crist. Leonhardt will oversee criteria for the creation and funding of Florida's Centers of Excellence and the 21st Century World Class Scholars awards.1975Howell Melton a partner in Holland & Knight LLP's Orlando of ce, has been elected vice chair of Enterprise Florida's board of directors. Tito Smith became a shareholder in Rogers Towers, P.A.'s St. Augustine of ce. He has experience in the areas of banking law, real estate, probate and estate planning. 1976Jerry Currington has been named general counsel to the Florida Department of Transportation by Gov. Rick Scott. Currington was previously general counsel to the Florida Department of Children and Families. He has served as a deputy general counsel in the Executive Of ce of the Governor and in private practice with several Florida rms. He previously was the assistant deputy Florida attorney general, where he oversaw the work of more than 200 lawyers. He has served as deputy general counsel of the Florida House of Representatives. Ralph J. Humphries was selected in February to be a judge in the Jacksonville District Compensation Claims Court. 1977Lauren Y. Detzel, shareholder and chair of the Estate and Succession Planning Department at Dean, Mead, Egerton, Bloodworth, Capouano & Bozarth, P.A., was named as the Orlando Best Lawyers Tax Lawyer of the Year for 2011. Dennis J. Wall of Winter Springs and Orlando, spoke at the American Conference Institute's 21st National Advanced Forum on Bad Faith Litigation at the Hyatt Regency Grand Cypress in Orlando on Nov. 30. He spoke on the subject of "Dealing with Catastrophic Disasters: How to Properly Investigate and Handle Overwhelming Claims." 34 UF LAW Brumbaugh 70 Rosenthal 73 Smith 75 Detzel 77 Wall 77 Leonhardt 74ROY B. “SKIP” DALTON JR. (JD 76), a partner in the law rm of Dalton & Carpenter, P.A. in Orlando, has been nominated by President Barack Obama to the United States District Court for the Middle District of Florida.

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SPRING 2011 35When President Barack Obama announced tax reform as a major priority in his State of the Union Address in January, it meant more to Charles Egerton (JD 69) than to most of us. You see, in addition to serving fulltime as a practicing tax and corporate law attorney in Orlando, Egerton is chairman of the American Bar Association’s Section on Taxation. With 24,000 members, it’s the largest professional tax attorney group in the nation. “It’s almost a second job,” said Egerton, a founding shareholder of Dean, Mead, Egerton, Bloodworth, Capouano & Bozarth, P.A. in Orlando. “When all is said and done, I will have probably at least 1,000 hours in this year — during my term — and it’s something I’ve really enjoyed.” The prospects for tax reform received a signi cant boost from the report issued in December by the National Commission on Fiscal Responsibility and Reform, which called for comprehensive tax reform as one of the central components of a plan to restore scal responsibility to the government. One month later, the national taxpayer advocate issued her annual report to Congress in which she listed the need for comprehensive tax reform as the No. 1 priority for the tax system this year. In addition, both the House Ways & Means Committee and the Senate Finance Committee have begun hearings on tax reform. Because of the potential for wide-ranging federal tax reform, Egerton said he has asked each of the ABA Tax Section’s substantive committees — there are more than 30 — to look at their areas of responsibility in the internal revenue code and prepare a paper on what is working and what isn’t. The committees will examine how their areas of tax law could be reshaped to make the laws simpler, fairer and easier to administer “This is probably the largest project the tax section has undertaken in a good 20 or 30 years,” he said. Egerton said the ABA Tax Section is “saying if you’re going to undertake tax reform, we’re going to give you some nutsand-bolts-type recommendations on how to improve the code, make it more workable.” Once the papers are in, they will be submitted to the House Ways and Means Committee the Joint Committee on Taxation and the Senate Finance Committee “The Finance Committee is just beginning the long process of tax reform, and Chairman (Max) Baucus places great value on input from experts and stakeholders, including the ABA,” said a Finance Committee aide. “Analysis of tax reform from the ABA and other well-respected groups will certainly be taken into consideration as the process moves forward.” Michael Friel, UF Law professor, associate dean and director of the Graduate Tax Program, along with UF Law Professor and Alumni Research Scholar Dennis Calfee recently delivered a tax policy presentation with Egerton. “Charlie is the ideal person to be leading the ABA Tax Section at a time when the possibility of fundamental tax reform is in the air,” Friel said. Friel said that since the ABA Tax Section is the leading professional tax organization in the country, its reports and recommendations will be the result of careful analysis and will receive serious attention as the tax reform debate moves ahead. “Charlie — the tax lawyer’s tax lawyer — is so highly regarded for his fairness, legal expertise and leadership skills that the Tax Section’s ambitious agenda could not be in better hands,” Calfee said. Egerton said that while the ABA Tax Section does not enter into the political debate, it will weigh in on the technical aspects of the code. He said the rules have become so cumbersome because policymakers have stacked one change on top of another for the past 30 years. “That’s something hopefully we can really make a contribution on and have an impact on the tax system.” With such a big undertaking, it begs the question of whether the task will be completed by the time Egerton’s term ends in July. “It’s supposed to be; they probably won’t let me leave without nishing it,” Egerton said with a laugh. Laying down the lawUF Law alumnus and ABA Tax Section chair prepares ground for tax reform BY MATT WALKER Despite his busy schedule of tax reform and tax law practice, Charles Egerton maintains his connection to the University of Florida Levin College of Law. Egerton’s rm, Dean, Mead, Egerton, Bloodworth, Capouano & Bozarth, P.A. in Orlando, co-sponsored last year’s holiday party at Dean Robert Jerry’s house in Gainesville and sponsors a scholarship to the UF Law Graduate Tax Program. “Charlie is the ideal person to be leading the ABA Tax Section at a time when the possibility of fundamental tax reform is in the air.” —MICHAEL FRIEL, UF LAW PROFESSOR, ASSOCIATE DEAN AND DIRECTOR OF THE GRADUATE TAX PROGRAM ALUMNI LEADERSHIP Egerton

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36 UF LAWCLASS NOTES 1978Kendall Coffey, the former U.S. Attorney for the Southern District of Florida, who represented Al Gore in the 2000 election recount and the family of Elian Gonzalez, released a new book in October called Spinning the Law: Trying Cases in the Court of Public Opinion with an introduction by Alan Dershowitz. Robert E. Gordon of Gordon & Doner, P.A., was named to the AV Preeminent Legal Ability & Ethical Standards 2010, Florida Super Lawyers 2010 and Best Lawyers in America 2010. Robert E. Holden of Liskow & Lewis, A Professional Law Corporation in New Orleans, was named New Orleans Best Lawyers 2011 Environmental Lawyer of the Year.1979Fred D. Franklin Jr. has been elected chairman of the board and managing director for Rogers Towers, P.A. in Jacksonville. Franklin has more than 30 years of legal experience, with his practice primarily focused on commercial litigation. Michael A. Wodrich has been elected as a board member to the Rogers Towers, P.A. board of directors in Jacksonville. 1980Gregory M. Keyser of Boca Raton, was appointed by former Gov. Charlie Crist to the Palm Beach County Court.1981David E. Bowers of Jones, Foster, Johnston & Stubbs, P.A., was named to the 2011 South Florida Legal Guide Top Lawyers section. Alexander R. Christine was appointed to the St. Johns County Court by former Gov. Charlie Crist. Christine will ll the vacancy created by the appointment of Judge Patti Christensen (JD 82) to the 7th Circuit Court. Doug Cooney, of Los Angeles, is the 2010 recipient of the Charlotte B. Chorpenning Playwright Award presented by the American Alliance for Theatre & Education in recognition of his body of work for young audiences. Cooney is the 25th playwright to be selected for this honor. His name will be engraved on the of cial Chorpenning Cup that resides in the archives of the Arizona State University library.1982Jeffery Boone, of Boone, Boone, Boone, Koda & Frook, P.A. in Venice, Fla., was recognized in Scene magazine for his community service. Richard Jacobson a shareholder in the Tampa of ce of Fowler White Boggs PA, has been re-elected to the board of directors of TerraLex. TerraLex is an International network of 160 leading international and U.S. law rms serving the interests of clients whose requirements transcend their state, provincial or national borders. Michael D. Minton president of Dean, Mead, Egerton, Bloodworth, Capouano & Bozarth, P.A. and a member of the rm's tax department and estate and succession planning department, has been appointed to the board of directors of the Central Florida Partnership.1983Adam G. “Lep” Adams III has joined Foley & Lardner LLP's Construction and Business Litigation and Dispute Resolution Practices as a partner in its Jacksonville of ce. Stephen Boone, of Boone, Boone, Boone, Koda & Frook, P.A. in Venice, Fla., was recognized in Scene magazine for his community service. Scott G. Hawkins of Jones, Foster, Johnston & Stubbs, P.A., was named to the 2011 South Florida Legal Guide Top Lawyers section. Elizabeth M. Hernandez has joined Akerman Senter tt's Miami of ce as a shareholder in the litigation practice. Hernandez has spent the last 16 years serving the city of Coral Gables as city attorney.1984David R. Punzak, the managing shareholder of Carlton Fields, P.A.'s St. Petersburg of ce, was honored as a Hero Among Us by the St. Petersburg Bar Foundation on Jan. 29, 2011. The Hero Among Us Award is presented annually to a local lawyer who, through volunteering their time and abilities, has made a difference in the St. Petersburg community. Brian D. Stokes, a partner in the Orlando of ce of Wicker, Smith, O'Hara, McCoy & Ford, P.A., has been named to the 2010 Florida Super Lawyers in the eld of personal injury medical malpractice defense. Jacobson 82 Minton 82 Punzak 84 Adams III 83

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Natalie Jackson (JD 02) doesn’t have pictures of herself on the sets of CNN, Fox News or The Today Show hanging in her of ce. Instead of photos of the UF Law alumna speaking in the media about her high-pro le cases, she surrounds herself with images of family, friends and clients who have become as close as family, like 7-year-old Jurnee Woodard, who she represented in a wrongful death case after a NASCAR plane crashed into her house and killed two members of her family. The Orlando-based lawyer and Navy veteran, who specialized in satellite technology for aviation intelligence, has become something of a media star, with several highly publicized cases in the last few years, appearing on a plethora of national news networks. But she hasn’t let the glamour go to her head. “I believe in giving back to the community above all,” Jackson said. One recent case involved a homeless man, Sherman Ware, who was hit by a police of cer’s son in early January, according to numerous Central Florida news reports. The man punched Ware in the head outside a Sanford bar on the night of Jan. 4, while a witness caught the incident on video. The attack left Ware with a concussion and facial injuries, including a broken nose. They reached a settlement at the end of January that required the attacker to pay for Ward’s medical bills and donate money to various nonpro t organizations, such as the Seminole County Branch of the NAACP, CrossRoads Drug Rehabilitation Center and Seminole Action Coalition Serving our Needy. In addition to the money for Ware’s medical bills, he also received a con dential monetary settlement. A case Jackson took on last year that gained national attention was of a teenage boy who was wrongly accused of abducting a child. Perhaps the most important case for her career, however, came in 2008, when Jackson represented Jurnee and her father, Joe Woodard. Woodard lost his wife, Janise, and 6-month-old son Josiah in a freakish accident when a NASCAR plane crashed into their home. Janise was a paralegal who had worked with Jackson before the crash, which made the case very personal for her. Jackson even helped plan the memorial service and all media events for the family. “It was easy working with Natalie,” Woodard said. “She was like a close sister to me, and whenever I had questions, she had the answers.” Jackson had worked on wrongful death cases in the past, but she had never dealt with an airplane case. Besides researching aviation law, she hired an aviation accident reconstructionist, an economist and a media coordinator. Her background in naval aviation aided her understanding of aviation terms and systems, she said. Ultimately, the case settled for a con dential eight gure sum. And it was this case, she said, that allowed her to revamp her law rm, the Women’s Trial Group. Originally opened in 2006, Jackson said that after nine years in the military, she was “tired of the male environment” and wanted to work in a female milieu for a change. But she had to close the rm due to insuf cient pro ts after just one year of operation. Jackson took a job at a friend’s rm in 2007, and after the NASCAR case she reopened the Women’s Trial Group, which caters to women and their families. Now on rm nancial footing, the Women’s Trial Group averages 200 cases per year. “I don’t think being a mother and a wife and making money have to be mutually exclusive,” she said. Jackson’s rm exempli es the idea that money isn’t everything. She offers pro bono services and payment plans, and her interest in service doesn’t end with her clients. She believes more experienced rms, like hers, should help newer rms succeed by assisting with rent, education, classes, and legal or business advice. “I kind of believe in karma,” she said. A practice in the spotlightUF Law alumna seeks justice in high-pro le casesBY AMANDA ADAMS (3JM)SPRING 2011 37 “It was easy working with Natalie. She was like a close sister to me, and whenever I had questions, she had the answers.” —JOE WOODARD, CLIENTALUMNI LEADERSHIP AMANDA ADAMS (3JM)

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38 UF LAW 1985Donald C. Dowling Jr., a partner at White & Case LLP in New York City, leads a team of lawyers who practice outbound international employment law (advising multinational headquarters on workforce issues that cross borders, such as global reductions-in-force, codes of conduct, whistleblower hotlines, and expatriate matters). Dowling has been recognized by Chambers and Partners ; The Legal 500 ; PLC Which Lawyer? ; ABA/ IBA Who’s Who ; Expert Guides ; and Ethisphere Attorneys Who Matter. Dowling just published an article in the ABA law review The Labor Lawyer, which reprinted his piece published last year in another ABA law review, The International Lawyer. He was recently appointed to the board of the New York University Center for Labor & Employment Law, and as vicechair of the IBA Discrimination Law Committee. Being in New York, the only UF Law classmate Don runs into regularly is his wife, Nancy Hill Dowling (JD 87) Nancy is associate general counsel heading up the advertising law function at The Dannon Company, Inc. in White Plains, N.Y. Eugene Pettis co-founder of Haliczer Pettis & Schwamm, was selected again for inclusion in the 2011 Best Lawyers in America. He is continuously recognized by Florida Trend’s peer-voted "Legal Elite," Florida Super Lawyers and South Florida Legal Guide as a top lawyer Beyond the legal practice, he serves on The Florida Bar's Board of Governors holding various leadership positions and is currently on the board of trustees at the University of Florida Levin College of Law. He served eight years on the University of Florida Foundation board of directors. He was keynote speaker for the UF Association of Black Alumni Weekend 2010.1986H. William “Bill” Perry, chairman of Gunster business law rm, has been named a Key Partner by the South Florida Business Journal The Key Partners awards honors the area's top attorneys and accountants based on demonstrated success over the past year to 18 months. 1987Larry Brant, owner of Garvey Schubert Barer Law in Portland, Ore., has been appointed chair of the Oregon State Bar's Tax Law Section for 2011-2012. Brant is the chair of Garvey Schubert Barer's tax and bene ts practice group and co-chair of the rm's business practice group. John “Buddy” Dyer, mayor of Orlando, was appointed as a member to the Advisory Committee for Trade Policy and Negotiations by President Barack Obama. Paul Quinn, shareholder in the Orlando of ce of GrayRobinson, P.A., has been recerti ed by The Florida Bar as a specialist in real estate law through 2015. He was originally board certi ed in 1995. 1988Barry B. Ansbacher, managing shareholder of Ansbacher & Associates, P.A. in Jacksonville, has become the rst and only attorney in the state of Florida to receive board certi cation from The Florida Bar in both real estate and construction law. Kevin E. Hyde, managing partner in Foley & Lardner LLP's Jacksonville of ce, has been named Best Lawyers 2011 Jacksonville Labor and Employment Lawyer of the Year. Charles J.F. Schreiber Jr. was recently promoted to partner with the rm McConnaughhay, Duffy, Coonrod, Pope & Weaver, P.A. Schreiber has been with the rm's Tallahassee of ce since 2005 practicing in the area of civil litigation defense.1989Mark E. Stein a Florida Bar Board Certi ed intellectual property attorney with the law rm of Higer Lichter & Givner LLP, presented an intellectual property seminar to members of the Miami Chapter of the American Institute of Architects on Feb. 12 at the Miami Dadeland Marriott. The title of the seminar was "Architectural Work and Intellectual Property: A Blueprint for IP Protection." J. Kim Wright is the publisher and managing editor of CuttingEdgeLaw.com. Wright is the author of Lawyers as Peacemakers: Practicing Holistic, Problem-Solving Law, an American Bar Association 2010 bestseller and agship book. In 2009, the ABA named her as one of their Legal Rebels who are " nding new ways to practice law, represent their clients, adjudicate cases and train the next generation of lawyers."CLASS NOTES Stein 89 Dowling Jr. 85 Pettis 85 Brant 87 Hyde 88 Schreiber Jr. 88 Perry 86JOHN L. MILLER (JD 86), general magistrate of Pensacola, was appointed by former Gov. Charlie Crist to the 1st Judicial Circuit Court.

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CLASS NOTES1991Todd L. Bradley, a principal in the Cummings & Lockwood LLC Naples of ce, chaired the Leadership Collier Class of 2011 Kick-off Reception in October. Bradley has also been appointed to the 2010-2011 Finance Committee for The Education Foundation of Collier County, Inc. and received the AV Preeminent Lawyers Rating by LexisNexis Martindale-Hubbell He was also named to the FIVE STAR Professionals Wealth Managers list for 2011. David Gold and another Gator, Sal A. Richardson (JD 01) have been named comanaging partners for the Florida of ces of Adelson, Testan, Brundo & Jimenez. Mark Rosman is a new partner in the Washington, D.C., of ce of Wilson Sonsini Goodrich & Rosati and a member of the rm's antitrust practice. Rosman represents and counsels clients in connection with a variety of national and international antitrust matters, including cartel defense, criminal enforcement investigations, and merger and civil nonmerger cases. Last summer, Rosman served as assistant chief of the National Criminal Enforcement Section in the U.S. Department of Justice's Antitrust Division. Rosman was lead attorney for the investigation into air transportation price xing, which resulted in a record $1.8 billion in nes. Edwin A. Scales III of counsel in the Key West of ce of GrayRobinson, P .A., has been re-elected by the attorneys in Florida's 16th Judicial Circuit (Monroe County) to a fourth term on The Florida Bar's Board of Governors. 1992Heather A. Owen an attorney in Constangy, Brooks & Smith, LLP's Jacksonville of ce, has been promoted to equity partner. John W. Randolph Jr., of Pressly & Pressly, P.A. in West Palm Beach, was recently admitted into the American College of Trusts and Estates Counsel. Stephen S. Stallings former assistant U.S. Attorney for the U.S. Department of Justice, has been hired as chair of Burns White law rm's white collar criminal defense practice group. 1993Erik P. Shuman an attorney in the Melbourne of ce of GrayRobinson, P.A., has recently been elected to the board of directors for the Space Coast Early Intervention Center. SCEIC is a nonpro t preschool organization dedicated to nding new ways of educating children with and without disabilities in their early childhood years.SPRING 2011 39 Rosman 91 Scales III 91 Shuman 93 Owen 92 GRAND GUARDMembers of the University of Florida class of 1960 stand with UF Law Dean Bob Jerry, far left, and UF Law Emeritus Professor Joseph Little, far right, at the grand Guard alumni lunch Nov. 5.

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40 UF LAW 1994Jack R. Reiter a partner in Yoss LLP, received high honors in the 2011 South Florida Legal Guide Reiter, board certi ed in appellate practice and an AV-rated attorney, is chair of the rm's appellate practice department. He concentrates his practice in the areas of state, federal and administrative appeals, as well as trial support and general commercial litigation. Marc A. Wites authored the 2010 edition of Florida Causes of Action which is published by James Publishing, and the 2010 edition of The Florida Litigation Guide which is available for free at www. oridalitigationguide.com. Both books are annual publications, which Wites began authoring in 2007, and 1997, respectively. Wites was also included in the 2010 Super Lawyers and the 2010 Legal Elite by Florida Trend magazine.1995Jonathan M. David was elected district attorney for Brunswick, Columbus and Bladen counties in North Carolina and began his new position this year. Michael “Mike” Murphy of Orlando, has been appointed as judge to the 9th Judicial Circuit Court by former Gov. Charlie Crist. 1996Kenneth Curtin has joined Adams and Reese LLP as special counsel in the Litigation Practice Group in the rm's Tampa and St. Petersburg of ces. He represents individual and corporate clients such as developers, interior designers, architects, engineers, general contractors, subcontractors and temporary help agencies in state and federal courts and in arbitral proceedings. Frank Fletcher general counsel at Nero AG, had his essay "Talking Travel" published in the December 2010 edition of the ACC Docket Charles E. Hodges II has joined Kilpatrick Townsend & Stockton LLP's Atlanta of ce as chair of the rm's tax controversy and litigation practice. Hodges concentrates his practice in civil and criminal federal tax controversies/litigation. F. Scott Westheimer managing partner at Syprett Meshad in Sarasota, was elected president of the Sarasota County Bar Association and was named to the 2010 Florida Super Lawyers Rising Stars list for his work in plaintiff's personal injury.1997Marve Ann Alaimo of the Cummings & Lockwood LLC Bonita Spring of ce, was named to the FIVE STAR Professionals Wealth Managers list for 2011. Juan D. Bendeck has joined the partnership at Hahn Loeser & Parks LLP's Naples of ce. Bendeck focuses his practice in estate planning, estate administration and asset protection planning. Sherri L. Johnson has opened the new law of ce of Johnson Legal of Florida, P.L. in Sarasota. Johnson will focus her practice on property tax and exemption disputes throughout Florida, as well as general commercial litigation and appeals. Elena Paras Ketchum, a partner with the rm of Stichter Riedel Blain & Prosser, P.A. in Tampa, has been elected to serve as president of the Tampa Bay Bankruptcy Bar Association for the 2010-2011 term. Ketchum has served on the board of directors for the association since 2006. Tammie L. Rattray, a partner in Ford & Harrison LLP's Tampa of ce, was recently voted a 2010 Florida Legal Elite Honoree by Florida Trend magazine.CLASS NOTES Reiter 94 Wites 94 Westheimer 96 Bendeck 97 Rattray 97 Curtin 96FRIENDS OF UF LAWRobert Kerrigan won the Tobias Simon Pro Bono Service Award from The Florida Bar. This is the Florida legal profession's highest public service honor. Some of Kerrigan's service includes reviving Helping Hands Legal Aid Center in 1999, a facility created and nanced by his law rm, Kerrigan, Estess, Rankin, McLeod & Thompson, to provide legal services to the poor, with Kerrigan donating more than 500 hours. His rm also established a hotline for people to call with hurricane-related questions, worked with Legal Services of North Florida to resolve emergency housing and consumer needs, and Kerrigan made generous contributions to Habitat for Humanity after Hurricane Ivan. Cynthia F. O’Connell has been appointed by Gov. Rick Scott to serve as secretary of the Florida Lottery. O'Connell is a longtime trustee at the University of Florida, has been an executive with the Lottery in the past, and has served in a number of other Florida government posts. She is the widow of the late Stephen C. O’Connell (JD 40) a former UF president and chief justice of the Florida Supreme Court.

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CLASS NOTESMargaret P. Zabijaka an attorney in Constangy, Brooks & Smith, LLP's Jacksonville of ce, has been promoted to equity partner. 1998Mary Beth Crawford of the Cummings & Lockwood LLC Bonita Spring of ce, was named to the FIVE STAR Professionals Wealth Managers list for 2011. Francis Gibbs has been named chief of staff of the Florida Department of Transportation by Gov. Rick Scott. Gibbs advised Congressmen Ander Crenshaw and Connie Mack on transportation policy matters while serving on their staffs from 2001 through 2010. He was most recently Congressman Mack's chief of staff and chief policy adviser. Charles E. “Chuck” Hobbs II, a Tallahassee trial lawyer, recently garnered rst place in the 55th annual Florida Bar Media Awards. Hobbs was lauded for a series of articles in the Tallahassee Democrat newspaper regarding the United States Supreme Court and the Florida Supreme Court, including analyses of the Florida v. Sullivan and Florida v. Graham cases that overturned life sentences for certain juvenile offenders. Hobbs has been elected chair of the Leon County Public Safety Council Recidivism Committee, which will analyze methods to reduce jail overcrowding by addressing the needs of repeat offenders. Kevin P. Jacobs founding member of the litigation boutique Herron Jacobs Ortiz, P .A. in Miami, was appointed by Chief Judge Federico A. Moreno to chair the local rules committee for the United States District Court for the Southern District of Florida. He was voted onto the executive board for the South Florida Chapter of the Federal Bar Association and will be the chapter's national delegate at the Federal Bar Association's national midyear meeting. Jacobs was also named a Top Up and Comer in the 2011 edition of the South Florida Legal Guide Daniel A. Thomas joined Leopold~Kuvin, P .A. in Palm Beach Gardens as the rm's newest partner. Thomas has experience in the areas of complex commercial and construction litigation, construction claims counseling and contract and business disputes. Prior to joining Leopold~Kuvin, Thomas was a shareholder in the Business Litigation Practice Group of the Gunster law rm. Lori Vaughan has been certi ed by the American Board of Certi cation as a business bankruptcy specialist. She is a shareholder in Trenam Kemker Attorneys and is based in the Tampa of ce.1999Paul A. Giordano, a shareholder in the Fort Myers of ce of Fowler White Boggs PA, has been elected to the board of directors of the American Red Cross Lee County Chapter. Bryan S. Gowdy a partner and shareholder in Creed & Gowdy in Jacksonville, and his wife, Barbara, and children (Fabrizio, age 8, and Lucrezia, age 4) welcomed a new baby girl, Graziana Gowdy, to their family on Jan. 19. Gowdy received The Florida Bar President's Pro Bono Service Award for the 4th Judicial Circuit (Duval, Clay and Nassau counties) on Jan. 27 for his work with poor and indigent clients. He has donated more than 350 hours of pro bono service in the last year. Chris Morrison, of GrayRobinson, P.A.'s Orlando of ce, has been promoted to Of counsel. Morrison practices in the health care practice group and is board certi ed in health law by The Florida Bar. Ginny R. Neal recently joined J.P Morgan's Palm Beach of ce as a senior private banker. She will be responsible for advising clients SPRING 2011 41 Zabijaka 97 Hobbs II 98 Giordano 99 Jacobs 98 MAKING A DIFFERENCEU.S. District Court Judge Paul C. Huck (JD 65), center, poses Nov. 13 with UF Law students at the Minority Mentoring picnic.

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It was a night for remembering two men who helped make modern Florida. D. Burke Kibler III (JD 49) and Warren M. Cason (JD 50) were inducted posthumously into the Heritage of Leadership Society during a ceremony April 8 at the Levin College of Law and sponsored by Florida-based Holland & Knight. “There is no place that I’d rather be today than here, honoring two of the best lawyers to come out of the University of Florida and certainly the best lawyers to come out of Holland & Knight,” Martha Barnett (JD 73), told a crowd of more than 160 in the Chester eld Smith Ceremonial Classroom. Barnett, a senior partner with Holland & Knight and a past president of the American Bar Association, recalled that the early 1970s, when she was interviewing for a job, was a time when most blue chip law rms were only beginning to think about women as lawyers. It was Burke Kibler, then the recruiting partner at the rm, who hired her. “I always thought that Burke’s hiring me was an example of the vision and courage that marked his life,” she said. “He always said — with a twinkle in his eye — that it was just because he liked being around smart, pretty little girls.” Barnett noted Kibler’s accomplishments in war, politics, the law and education. “By every possible measure, Burke Kibler’s life story is one of a man who lived his life to the fullest and along the way made such a difference in the lives of so many people and so many institutions: His alma mater, the University of Florida; the state of 42 UF LAW on overall investing, wealth transfer, credit and philanthropic services. Hoang Vu, a partner in Andrews Kurth LLP's Houston of ce, was named to the 2011 Best Lawyers in America list for his work in public nance law. 2000Douglas A. Cherry has been named a partner in Shumaker, Loop & Kendrick, LLP's Sarasota of ce. Cherry is board certi ed in intellectual property law. Cherry's practice focuses on intellectual property (patent, copyright, trademark, trade secrets and unfair competition) consulting, acquisition, licensing and litigation. Scott M. Fischer of Gordon & Doner, P.A., has been named a Top Up and Comer for the last two years in the 2011 South Florida Legal Guide Matthew C. Lucas a former partner at Bricklemyer, Smolker & Bolves in Tampa, was appointed by former Gov. Charlie Crist to replace retiring Judge Raul Palomino Jr. in the Hillsborough County Court's family law section. Brenda Ezell recently celebrated her growing law practice, the Ezell Law Firm, by re-branding, launching a new website (www.EzellFirmPA.com) and opening new of ces in the Mandarin area of Jacksonville. S. Jarret Raab was recently elected as a member of Shaw Gussis Fishman Glantz Wolfson & Towbin LLC in Chicago. Raab is part of the rm's commercial litigation practice group focusing on complex business disputes and related litigation matters.CLASS NOTES Heritage of LeadershipTwo UF Law grads honored at annual ceremonyBY RICHARD GOLDSTEINFlorida; Holland & Knight; most of you in this room and certainly to me.” Doug Wright, (JD 86, LLMT 87), a tax lawyer for Holland & Knight, took to the podium and lauded Cason, his long-time friend. “Somebody observed recently that there are three types of people in the world: People who make things happen, people who watch what’s happening, and people who don’t know what’s happening,” Wright said. “Warren Cason made things happen.” Wright noted Cason’s struggles growing up as he had to help “There is no place that I’d rather be today than here, honoring two of the best lawyers to come out of the University of Florida and certainly the best lawyers to come out of Holland & Knight.”–MARTHA BARNETT (JD 73)

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SPRING 2011 43Charles B. Shields Jr. was recently named a partner in Duane Morris LLP's Boca Raton of ce. Shields practices in the rm's estates and asset planning practice group. Jeremy Sloane, of Orlando, is now a member of Community Coordinated Care for Children, Inc.'s (4C) board of directors. As a member of the 4C Board, Sloane will help the organization raise much-needed funds to support early childhood education for children and families throughout Central and Southwest Florida. Lisa A.G. Smith, a senior associate attorney with Aikin Family Law Group in Winter Park, has received the highest rating of AV from Martindale-Hubbell She practices family law and is married to fellow JD 00 alumnus Roy Smith. Roy J. Smith IV formerly a partner with Weiss Legal Group, P.A., has formed his own law rm, The Smith Family Law Firm, P.A., which is dedicated to the representation of family law clients as well as individuals who have been injured in automobile accidents. He was selected as a Rising Star by Florida Super Lawyers for 2010 and received an AV rating from Martindale-Hubbell Sloane 00 Smith IV 00 run his farm after his father died and then joined the Navy, performing underwater demolitions during World War II. The adversity “created somebody who was not going to shrink from problems,” Wright said. Kibler’s and Cason’s families accepted plaques commemorating the induction ceremony. Cason was a senior partner with Holland & Knight, and Kibler served as the rm’s chairman from 1983 to 1995. Cason, 1924-2010, was chairman of the Law Center Association Board of Trustees, director of the UF Athletic Association and president of the UF Foundation. He was a State Road Board member, Tampa city attorney and Hillsborough County attorney. Kibler, 1924-2009, served as second lieutenant during World War II in Europe where he was a forward artillery observer and was awarded the Bronze Star and Purple Heart. He was a tireless advocate of higher education and served as chairman of the Board of Regents, governing body for Florida’s university system. Cason and Kibler’s images and a few of their most signi cant accomplishments are etched into glass on the second oor of Holland Hall as a permanent tribute to their contributions to the nation, the state and the university. An electronic interactive display accompanies the glass etching. “For every person who walks by that display, and most of us do that at least once a day, it’s an inspiring presentation for what we as lawyers try to accomplish for the good of others,” UF Law Dean Robert Jerry said during the induction ceremony. The Heritage of Leadership Recognition Society represents illustrious personalities in the history of the University of Florida College of Law since it was founded in 1909. Members are pre-eminent graduates and others who have been involved in the college in very signi cant ways. They assumed national leadership positions and distinguished themselves in legal, governmental, academic and corporate sectors. They labored to improve the administration of justice and received the highest commendations for contributions to the profession and service to education, civic, charitable and cultural causes. Members of the Heritage of Leadership Recognition Society are selected by the Heritage of Leadership Committee, which presents the slate for discussion and approval to the full membership of the University of Florida Law Center Association, Inc. Board of Trustees. Kibler CasonCLASS NOTES

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44 UF LAW Christopher R. Strohmenger became a shareholder in Rogers Towers, P .A.'s Jacksonville of ce this year. His practice consists of representing clients engaged in the acquisition, development, sale and nance of commercial and large-scale real estate projects.2001Anitere Flores was elected in November to represent Florida Senate District 38 in southwest Miami Dade County. Flores, a Republican, serves as chairwoman of the Senate Judiciary Committee. Jim Paine of Kilpatrick Townsend & Stockton LLP Atlanta's Commercial Transactions Team, was named to the partnership this year. He was also named a 2011 Georgia Super Lawyers Rising Star. Sarah P. L. Reine r, an attorney in the Orlando of ce of GrayRobinson, P .A. with a focus on employment and labor law and related commercial litigation, has been named to the BETA Center board of directors executive committee. BETA Center is a private, nonpro t organization that provides parenting and educational assistance to young teenage mothers and their children. Sal A. Richardson and another Gator, David Gold (JD 91), have been named comanaging partners for the Florida of ces of Adelson, Testan, Brundo & Jimenez. Jennifer A. Schwartz was recently chosen for partnership at Jackson Lewis LLP in Miami. Peggy A. McGovern Stumhofer of Page, Mrachek, Fitzgerald & Rose, P .A. in West Palm Beach, was selected as a "Top Up and Comer" in civil litigation by the South Florida Legal Guide 2011. 2002T. Robert Bulloch, of Quarles & Brady's Naples of ce, was selected as a 40 Under 40 recipient by Gulfshore Business magazine. Bullock practices in the areas of estate planning, estate and trust administration, probate litigation and closely held business planning. Alexa Sherr Hartley, president of Premier Leadership Coaching in Delray Beach, has been selected as a guest blogger for The Miami Herald 's "The Balancing Act" column. Her post included suggestions for maintaining a work-life balance. LaShawnda K. Jackson has been elected partner in Rumberger, Kirk & Caldwell's Orlando of ce. Jackson practices in the areas of casualty defense, product liability and insurance coverage. She currently serves as a member of The Florida Bar's Young Lawyers Division Board of Governors and is the current president of the Orange County Bar Association Young Lawyers Section, as well as a member of that organization's board of governors. Jennifer Page Killen was recently named a partner with the rm McConnaughhay, Duffy, Coonrod, Pope & Weaver, P .A. Killen has been with the rm's Ocala of ce since 2003 practicing workers' compensation defense. Kim Madison, an associate at Adams and Reese LLP's Tampa of ce in the rm's Transactions and Corporate Advisory Services Practice Group, will serve as vice chair of the Hillsborough County Human Relations Board for 2011-2012. Madison has been a member of the board since 2008. The board reviews complaints led under Hillsborough County's Human Rights Ordinance, which promotes fair treatment and equal opportunity for all of the county's residents. George Moraitis, of Fort Lauderdale, has been elected as the Republican representative in the Florida House of Representatives for District 91 in Fort Lauderdale. David Scileppi a banking and nancial services attorney in Gunster's Fort Lauderdale of ce, was appointed to shareholder. 2003Christopher Benvenuto an environmental and land use law attorney in Gunster's West Palm Beach of ce, was appointed to shareholder. Brian Crevasse, an associate with Bachara Construction Law Group in Jacksonville, was recently named a Florida Rising Star by Law & Politics Publishing. Wojciech Jackowski has joined Menaker & Herrmann in New York City as an associate. He was previously a senior assistant district attorney for Kings County, N.Y., where he served in the Money Laundering and Revenue Crimes Bureau and the Rackets Division. Beverly A. Pascoe became a shareholder in Rogers Towers, P.A.'s Jacksonville of ce this year. Pasc oe practices in the areas of health care law and general business law. She has also been appointed to the board of directors for Pine Castle, a Jacksonville organization dedicated to enriching the lives of adults with developmental and acquired disabilities. Dexter Smith is the new dean of admissions at Campbell University's Norman A. Wiggins School of Law in Raleigh, N.C. CLASS NOTES Derr 04 Strohmenger 00 Paine 01 Jackson 02 Killen 02 Pascoe 03 Reiner 01

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CLASS NOTES2004V. Nicholas Dancaescu, of GrayRobinson, P .A.'s Orlando of ce, has been promoted to a senior associate. Dancaescu practices eminent domain law and general litigation with GrayRobinson's eminent domain practice group. Christine Lynne Derr, of the Law Of ce of Christine L. Derr, P .A. in Tampa, was awarded the 2010 Theodore Millison Professionalism Award given by the Tampa Family Law Inn of Court. The award recognizes an attorney who has distinguished herself professionally and is the only award given by the Tampa Family Law Inn of Court. She was also named to the 2010 Florida Super Lawyers Rising Stars list in the area of marital and family law. Nelson D. Diaz of the Becker & Poliakoff, P .A. Coral Gables of ce, has been elected as a shareholder of the rm. He is an attorney in the rm's government law and lobbying practice. Diaz is also a member of the Levin College of Law Alumni Council. Vanessa Sisti Snyder having practiced as an attorney for several years in South Florida, spent a year in England as a Rotary Foundation Ambassadorial Scholar and earned a graduate degree at the University of Oxford. She recently completed a term as a law clerk to Chief U.S. District Judge Federico A. Moreno of the Southern District of Florida and is currently serving a term as a law clerk to Senior Circuit Judge Peter T. Fay (JD 56) on the 11th Circuit Court of Appeals in Miami. James E. Walson of Lowndes, Drosdick, Doster, Kantor & Reed in Orlando, became a partner in January. Walson previously served as senior associate at the rm. Walson focuses his legal practice on commercial litigation, particularly real property disputes.2005Christopher M. Chestnut founder of the Chestnut Law Firm, won the inaugural 2010 Nation's Best Advocate of the Year Award: 40 Lawyers Under 40 at a special gala at the National Bar Association's 85th annual convention in New Orleans. Chestnut was voted the top AfricanAmerican attorney (under 40) in the nation by his peers. Ben Bain-Creed, an assistant United States attorney, received the Director's Award for Superior Performance by a Special Assistant United States Attorney for his outstanding contributions to the Department of Justice's forfeiture efforts and to ensuring that the maximum amount of restitution is paid to victims of crimes in a timely manner. Since August 2008, BainCreed has completed cases resulting in the forfeiture and distribution to victims of over $25 million. A. Felipe Guerrero an associate at Dean, Mead, Egerton, Bloodworth, Capouano & Bozarth, P .A. and a member of the rm's litigation department, was named presidentelect of the Hispanic Bar Association of Central Florida. Erin Houck-Toll, an associate in Henderson, Franklin, Starnes & Holt, P .A.'s Fort Meyers of ce's business and tax division, has become board certi ed in tax law by The Florida Bar. Carolyn Zegeer entered the nal round of a global competition to nd a new host for the travel show, "Paradise Hunter." There were over a thousand initial applicants from all over the world, and she made it to the round of 10 nalists. 2006Natalia Medina Burnett was sworn in Nov. 22 as an assistant United States attorney in the District of Columbia. Gregory Lefkowitz has joined as an associate of Duane Morris LLP's Boca Raton of ce in its intellectual property practice group. Lefkowitz concentrates his practice on patent, trademark and copyright procurement and litigation, as well as the protection of trade secrets. He holds three patents (with another inventor) from his time as a research scientist for SPRING 2011 45 Walson 04 Guerrero 05 Chestnut 05 Husband and wife Lauren Fackender Carmody (JD 06) and Chris Carmody (JD 05) pose with a Gator banner on the Great Wall of China on Day 2 of their eight-day trip last fall. Houck-Toll 05

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46 UF LAW a major consumer products company. He received his B.S. with high honors in chemical engineering from the University of Florida in 1999. William Snyder having practiced as an attorney for several years in South Florida and recently completed a graduate degree at University College London, is currently serving as a law clerk to James Lawrence King (JD 53) senior district judge for the Southern District of Florida. In the fall, he will begin serving as a law clerk to Peter T. Fay (JD 56) senior circuit judge on the 11th Circuit Court of Appeals. James Stowers, an attorney with Cobb Cole in Daytona Beach, was recently elected to the Ormond Beach City Commission. He was also recently appointed to the Volusia/ Flagler YMCA Corporate Board and was named to the 2010 Florida Super Lawyers Rising Stars list for his work in land use/ zoning and environmental law.2007Yelizaveta “Liz” Batres Herman of Rosenbaum Mollengarden Janssen & Siracusa, PLLC in West Palm Beach, moderated a judicial luncheon, "Juror Misconduct in the Social Networking Age," presented by the Palm Beach County Bar Association. The panel consisted of Judge Kenneth A. Marra, U.S. District Court, Southern District of Florida, Judge Dorian K. Damoorgian, 4th District Court of Appeal, and Judge Robin L. Rosenberg, 15th Judicial Circuit. Michael A. Nardella has joined Burr & Forman LLP's Orlando of ce as an associate in the Creditors' Rights & Bankruptcy Practice Group. Steven J. Wernick an associate in Sumberg Baena Price & Axelrod LLP's Land Use & Government Relations Group, was elected vice president of Miami Habitat for Humanity's Habitat Young Professionals Group. 2008Sam Horovitz has become an associate in Rogers Towers, P .A.'s labor and employment department. Samantha Alves Orender has joined the Rogers Towers, P .A. Jacksonville of ce as an associate in the commercial litigation department. Her practice will focus on commercial litigation, torts and civil trial practice. Anthony M. Rodriguez of Foley & Lardner LLP has been named to the 2010 Tampa Bay Business Journal Up and Comers. Rodriguez is an associate of the rm's real estate practice, the hospitality, resort and golf industry team and the tax and individual planning and tax and employee bene ts practices. Tae Shin has joined the Roetzel & Andress Orlando of ce as an associate attorney. Shin focuses his practice in corporate law, mergers and acquisitions, business taxation, and business succession planning. S. Carey Villeneuve has joined Fowler White Boggs in the Fort Lauderdale of ce. Villeneuve practices in the rm's Business, Banking and Insolvency Practice Group and will concentrate his practice in all types of business litigation. 2009Kimberly E. Bevis recently joined Quarles and Brady LLP's Naples of ce's Trusts & Estates Group. David N. Torre of The Torre Law Firm, P .L. in Winter Park, began a term as a member of the Board of Supervisors for the Seminole County Soil and Water Conservation District. Members are elected countywide and serve without party designation. 2010Cary Aronovitz has joined the Holland & Knight LLP Miami of ce as an associate. Aronovitz is a member of the rm's litigation department and focuses on commercial litigation and product liability. Dustin Butler has become an associate in CLASS NOTES Aronovitz 10 Butler 10 Cohen 10 Gavigan 10 Novak 10 Vazquez 10 Williams 10 Wernick 07 Horovitz 08 Orender 08 Rodriguez 08 Shin 08 Villeneuve 08 Bevis 09

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In MemoriamThe Martin Law Firm's Cape Coral of ce. His practice focuses on family law and civil litigation. Andrew B. Carrabis has announced his campaign as a candidate for the Florida House of Representatives in House District 85, which includes part of Palm Beach County. Da’Morus Cohen has joined the Holland & Knight LLP Miami of ce as an associate. Cohen is a member of the rm's business law department and concentrates his practice in the areas of securities, mergers and acquisitions, corporate law and corporate governance. James C. Gavigan has joined the Jones, Foster, Johnston & Stubbs, P.A. West Palm Beach of ce as an associate attorney. Michael V. Leeman joined the Quarles & Brady LLP Tampa of ce as an attorney in the commercial litigation group. Susan Novak has become an associate in Rogers Towers, P.A.'s litigation department. She will practice in the areas of commercial litigation, torts and civil trial practice. A. Daniel Vazquez, an attorney with Fine, Farkash & Parlapiano, P.A. in Gainesville, was recently elected to serve on the Suwannee-St. Johns Sierra Club executive board of directors for a twoyear term. He also has been selected to serve on the Levin College of Law's Oil Spill Working Group research team developing response and policy solutions to issues related to the BP Deepwater Horizon oil spill. Frederick N. Vinson received the second place award in the national 2010 Tannenwald Student Writing Competition in the eld of tax law. Ashley Williams has become an associate in Rogers Towers, P.A.'s litigation department. Her practice will focus on commercial litigation, asset recovery and civil trial. SPRING 2011 47 OBITUARIESA practicing lawyer and academic who graduated in 1967 from the University of Florida College of Law, E. John Wherry Jr. passed away on March 21, 2010. Wherry died in Southington, Conn., at the age of 67. He served as a criminal defense attorney, was a law professor at Widener University, taught trial advocacy to students and professionals through the National Institute of Trial Advocacy and served as the rst dean of the Orlando College of Law. Before taking on those jobs, Wherry was a student at UF Law where he came after graduating from Villanova in 1964. It was at UF Law that he received a D in a class with law professor Fletcher Baldwin. Nancy Baldwin (JD 93), Fletcher’s wife and a lawyer in Gainesville, remembers that Wherry had a few choice words for his law professor. Wherry told him: “I’m going to take every course you’ve got till I get an A.” He did, and the Baldwins became lifelong friends with Wherry, Nancy Baldwin said. The Baldwins have donated a gift in Wherry’s memory to UF Law. A defense lawyer who lost part of his tongue to cancer in his 40s, Wherry was told by doctors that he would never speak again. Instead after surgery, extensive speech therapy, and sheer determination he learned to speak again and used the af iction to help mesmerize juries, Nancy Baldwin said. Wherry was an associate professor of law from 1992 to 1995 at Widener Law School, which has campuses in Wilmington, Del., and Harrisburg, Penn. He co-founded the Intensive Trial Advocacy Program. He was a collector of antique inkwells and an avid fan of the Florida Gators football team. His wife of 38 years, Sherlene (Lang) Wherry, preceded him in death. He is survived by three children, Dr. E. John Wherry III of Havertown, Pa., Christopher Lang Wherry of Southington, Conn., and Patricia Convery Wherry-Harris of West Hartford, Conn.Judge John L. “Papa” Hall Jr. (LLB 58) passed away Sept. 15, at his home in Altamonte Springs at the age of 79. He was an accomplished Florida jurist and before that he was an accomplished intercollegiate athlete for the University of Florida. At the university, he was a member of Florida Blue Key. He was Cadet Colonel of the Army ROTC, which is the highest ranking student member of Florida’s ROTC. He served in the Army from 1953 to 1955 as a 1st lieutenant and entered UF Law after completing his military service. Hall became president of the Tallahassee Bar Association in 1967 and was elected circuit judge in 1980. He served two terms as chief judge of the 2nd Judicial Circuit. He was chairman of the Florida Conference of Circuit Judges and he served on many committees of the Florida Supreme Court to enhance the quality of justice. He was a teacher and lecturer to lawyers and judges at judicial conferences, law schools, seminars and bar association meetings. He is a member of the University of Florida Hall of Fame and the UF Letterman’s Association Hall of Fame thanks to his exploits as a punt returner and leading the Gators to their rst appearance and win in a college bowl game, the Gator Bowl. Hall’s high jumping skills were renowned and he won the 1951 and 1953 NCAA titles. He was preceded in death by a son, Bruce Rivers Hall. He is survived by his son, William Douglas Hall; a daughter, Sara Page Hall; and his brother, Thomas M. Hall, as well as his companion, Vivian Feist Garfein. Wherry Hall For a list of alumni deaths reported to the Levin College of Law since May 2010 go to www.law.u .edu/u aw/11spring/

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A UF Law graduate advises the residents of a newly independent and desperately poor region of Africa how to set up a tax system from scratch after years of civil war. Here is her letter from Southern Sudan.About a year ago, a friend in Washington, D.C., said to me, “Sharon, we need you in Southern Sudan. Would you go there?” Without hesitating, I said, “Yes,” thereby making the decision to leave my job as a tax attorney with the IRS National Of ce and take a position with the U.S. Agency for International Development (USAID) at its mission in Juba, Southern Sudan. I had returned to the United States in May 2008 after ve years of working with USAID in Kosovo, part of the former Yugoslavia, helping it prepare for independence in February 2008. I committed to the same job for Southern Sudan. In January, Southern Sudan held a week-long referendum to decide whether, after fighting with the northern part of Sudan for the better part of 50 years, it would stay with the North or separate and become an independent country. It voted overwhelmingly for independence and in July, it will become Africa’s newest country. With a literacy rate of 15 percent, and its status as one of the lowest ranked countries in the world on human welfare indexes, its challenges are huge. But as I visited referendum polling stations, I marveled at the resilience of these people, most of whom walked many miles to vote — some even swam across the Nile River to vote! Life in Southern Sudan is not easy. I live in a shipping container that is converted into living quarters but still reminds me of a railroad car. Small mud huts with conical thatched roofs are a stone’s throw from where I live. The chances of getting malaria are very good. However, I love my job, which is to manage one of the U.S. government’s largest and most highprofile projects in Southern Sudan. This project is helping Southern Sudan draft legislation and establish governing institutions, such as the Ministry of Finance, From Sub-Saharan Africa to North Korea and from Haiti to Micronesia, UF Law alumni are making their mark on international affairs. Gators use their law degrees to change the world, one corner at a time.Gator NationUF Lawyers in the Global48 UF LAW

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THE SUDANSharon Hester (LLMT 91) uses tax expertise to build brand-new Sub-Saharan African countryGATOR NATIONSPRING 2011 49

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the Central Bank, the Ministry of Legal Affairs and the Ministry of Cabinet Affairs among others. As in Kosovo, I am helping Southern Sudan to “stand up” its firstever tax administration. This work also involves me in policy discussions such as what laws are needed and how a new constitution will be drafted, as well as how Southern Sudan will print and manage its own currency, manage its large oil reserves and provide health and education to the people. Having been involved in this kind of work since 1998 in several other countries, I understand how challenging this will be, especially in Southern Sudan. While I no longer work as a lawyer, my law degree serves me well in helping developing countries establish modern and transparent laws and governing institutions. It was my LL.M in tax from the University of Florida Levin College of Law that enabled me to enter this field. In 1998, I moved to Moscow as part of a team of economists and tax experts to help Russia develop its first tax code. As I sat with the Russian Parliamentary committees, providing advice as they marked up various draft tax codes, I felt the satisfaction of helping a country improve its laws and government in order to improve the quality of life for its people “My law degree serves me well in helping developing countries establish modern and transparent laws and governing institutions. It was my LL.M in tax from the University of Florida Levin College of Law that enabled me to enter this eld.”—SHARON HESTER (LLMT 91)CLOCKWISE: A courthouse in Lakes State in Southern Sudan; Sharon Hester (LLMT 91) stands next to a soldier at a referendum polling center; Mud huts called tukuls sit on the edge of the Nile River. People walked many miles to vote in the referendum — some even swam across the Nile; A mother shows her ink-covered nger, signifying that she voted in the referendum.50 UF LAW

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In the past year, several Gator lawyers have made their presence felt far beyond our shores. Renwick Nelson (JD 75), Nathalie Nozile (JD 10) and Michael Cavendish (JD 98) show that the reach of the Gator Nation is everywhere. The Vietnam War veteran and former missile engineer landed in the Federated States of Micronesia, an archipelago of about 607 islands 500 miles east of the Philippines, on Nov. 11, 2010. It was the same date as Veterans Day in the United States, but this was no military adventure. Renwick Nelson (JD 75) arrived in Micronesia to oversee the development of Peace Corps programs created to teach English to Micronesian and Palauan primary school students as the Peace Corps country director in Micronesia and Palau. He will serve for 19 months with the possibly of serving another term. “I came here with three goals in mind: to positively impact those I came to serve and serve with, to be positively impacted by the people of Micronesia and Palau, and to make the experience a joyful one for me and my staff,” he said. “I tell people and I believe this to this day: this has been the most meaningful professional experience of my life.” Nelson had already traveled to this part of the world. He taught business and law courses in Tonga, a Paci c island nation, from 2000 to 2002 as a Peace Corps volunteer. Nelson was a successful engineer, lawyer and businessman until 1997, when he began to volunteer worldwide. “When I retired, initially I rode my bike, I played tennis, I played basketball, I worked out at the gym,” Nelson said. “After a while, that is not as satisfying as it may sound.” He prefers being part of something bigger than himself. “This year marks the 50th anniversary of Peace Corps, which has been a significant contributor to peace in the world in the last 50 years,” Nelson said. MICRONESIARenwick Nelson (JD 75) directs Peace Corps in South Paci c archipelagoGATOR NATIONSPRING 2011 51STORIES BY ROBERTA O. ROBERTS (4JM)

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52 UF LAWWhen Nathalie Nozile (JD 10) was last living in Haiti, she was sheltered in a children’s home with dreams of being a lawyer. Years later, Hollywood superstar and philanthropist Angelina Jolie helped make Nozile’s dreams of becoming a Haitian lawyer come true. Ten years since coming to the United States, Nozile returned Jan. 30 to her home country as the rst Jolie Legal Fellow. Sponsored by the Jolie-Pitt Foundation, this yearlong fellowship places Nozile as a special assistant to the Haitian government. Her job is to ensure the rights of vulnerable Haitian children. She may also have the option to continue in the position after she completes the rst year. Nozile said “there was no time to be star-struck” when she met Jolie. “A lot of kids are lost in the system in Haiti. Children who are in con ict with the law need representation,” Nozile said. “They need an advocate, they need a lawyer pushing through to make sure their voices are heard.” And Nozile is prepared to be that voice. “I am ready to go to work,” she said. HAITINathalie Nozile (JD 10) works on behalf of children as Jolie Legal Fellow NORTH KOREA Aijalon Gomes, an English teacher in South Korea, was arrested when he crossed the border into North Korea from China and was sentenced to eight years of hard labor and ned $700,000. Michael Cavendish (JD 98) knew he had to take action, even if he was more than 7,000 miles away from the scene. Cavendish began an international letter-writing campaign urging newspapers to publish his opinion pieces calling for Gomes’ freedom. “What discouraged me the most is the way the North Koreans behaved,” Cavendish said. “My conscience was shocked. (His story) grabbed me and didn’t let go.” According to Cavendish, the North Korean government gave Gomes a sentence that was grossly disproportionate. They made what would have been a civil infraction in the United States (entry without a visa) a criminal offense. Cavendish ended his almost ve-month campaign when Gomes was escorted home by former President Jimmy Carter in August. He cited the U.S. military slogan “no one gets left behind” and said American civilians should receive this same depth of governmental protection as do our soldiers, since Americans abroad are increasingly subject to detention based on geopolitics. Jon Mills, director of the Center for Governmental Responsibility and UF Law dean emeritus, said that Cavendish’s efforts “show a real commitment to higher principles and values.” “Frequently, lawyers are in a better position or better able to be advocates for individuals and their rights, so lawyers should take initiative and if they see something being done wrong, they should do something about it,” Mills said. “(Cavendish) is a perfect example of using skills and ability to help other people.” Michael Cavendish (JD 98) ghts for justice on behalf of imprisoned AmericanGATOR NATION

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UF LAW FACULTY IN THE NEWSMEDIA HITS “The system takes very seriously any time someone under oath is swearing that something is personal knowledge. But the law has to be careful. It matters who is complicit.”—AMY MASHBURN, Professor of Law NOV. 24, The Palm Beach Post, “Dormant foreclosure cases in Florida starting to trickle back into courts”SPRING 2011 53“This is the kind of case that raises the (First Amendment) issue very forcefully. … If it’s really a guide to pedophilia, I can’t see any community anywhere thinking that’s OK. ”—LYRISSA LIDSKY, Stephen C. O’Connell Chair, Professor of Law DEC. 21, AOL News, “Arrest of Author of Pedophile Book Raises Legal Issues”“Our populist birthright — with the Declaration of Independence serving as our anti-authoritarian birth certi cate — demands political struggle. It offers no guarantees that the most rational, fact-based argument wins. But it allows and encourages cries from the margins that challenge and can often renew a dysfunctional political system.” — MARK FENSTER, Professor of LawAPRIL 22, The New York Times “Our Populist Birthright” Fenster wrote an opinion piece on the continuing debate among Americans about President Barack Obama’s place of birth “They are themselves not prone to want to go out and get help because of the consequences to themselves, so it’s almost circular.”—BERTA HERNNDEZTRUYOL, Levin Mabie & Levin Professor of Law JAN. 24, WCJB-TV 20, “Modern Slavery” —DIANE MAZUR, Professor of Law DEC. 21, The New York Times, “Colleges Rethink R.O.T.C. After ‘Don’t Ask’ Repeal” Mazur doubts the military would reinstate ROTC at Ivy League colleges because it is expensive to operate there.“I think the military is much more persuaded by output, is much more persuaded by economic ef ciency.”

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54 UF LAWFACULTY SPOTLIGHT When Veronica Musa (LLM 11) earned her law degree and master’s degree in her native country of Argentina, she thought she was nished with higher education — and glad of it. As a human rights activist, she said academia was a means to an end; it wasn’t what she was passionate about. But after she came to the United States and began working at Florida Institutional Legal Services advocating on behalf of immigrant detainees in the state of Florida, she began to see the bene ts of having a stronger academic and theoretical background to be more effective in her job. After seeing how different the U.S. legal system is from her native country’s, and being inspired by a University of Florida Levin College of Law intern who worked with her at legal services, Musa decided to return to school. She completed her LL.M in Comparative Law in May. “The Comparative Law Program was designed to attract foreign lawyers to come to the University of Florida to learn about the United States and the United States’ legal system,” said UF Law Professor Pedro Malavet, who was named associate director of the UF Law LL.M in Comparative Law Program this year. “I think I gained a lot of perspective,” Musa said, “especially from the other attorneys from abroad. That’s really the feature that I think is most interesting.” Malavet says those international connections make a difference. “Our students are in the same classroom with students who already have their law degree from another country,” he said. “Those are relationships that you can develop. You can meet lawyers from all over the world here during your law studies.” In May, after 15 years of teaching comparative law at UF Law, Malavet will assume his duties as the Comparative Law Program’s new director. Malavet said his rst order of business as director will be to expand the Comparative Law Program and use UF Law’s partners around the world to help spread the word about its increased size. The program was originally intended to be small, only admitting 15 to 20 students per year, but based on its success over the years, Malavet said it is time to let it grow. The faculty will have to of cially approve the expanded program and its details since its original approval was based on a lower student limit. Once the proper approvals are secured, Malavet will be able to promote the program more aggressively. The reasons students are attracted to the program vary because the LL.M can be applied in a wide variety of ways, Malavet said. Some students plan to take a bar exam in the United States after graduating (some states allow foreign lawyers with an LL.M from an American law school to sit for the bar), while others want to serve as a liaison in legal affairs between the U.S. and their home countries. Still others are legal reformers — academics, judges or prosecutors — who are comparing the U.S. legal system to their home country’s for the purposes of legal reform. For Musa, the comparative angle is something she said will serve her well when she returns to Argentina. “The whole system is completely different,” Musa said. She has been able to see bene ts to the U.S. legal system — the transparency of the judicial process and administration of justice — and she also appreciates aspects of the Argentine system that she didn’t realize before. For example, her country’s incarceration rate is much lower than the United States’. Musa said when she returns to Argentina her LL.M will also bene t her as she looks for employment. “I will be more marketable, more competitive with a foreign degree, especially from a university with a good reputation.” Malavet also points out that the students who participate in the program aren’t the only ones who can bene t from it. “You need an expert in foreign law sometimes and how are you going to nd one? How are you going to know that they know what they’re talking about?” Malavet asked. “If you met them as students here, you know that they were good enough to get into law school, that they had the credentials. I think that gives an opportunity for our law students and law graduates to have connections abroad and develop that kind of connection.” Malavet will be assuming director duties from Professor David Hudson, who will return to his full-time faculty position after serving as the director of the Comparative Law Program since 1999. “David Hudson has served as director of the program for three-fourths of its life, providing the leadership that has delivered a high-quality educational experience to hundreds of students,” said UF Law Dean Robert Jerry. “The af nity of the program’s graduates for not only the college but also Professor Hudson personally is a testament to the tremendous personal attention and encouragement he gives the students, his professionalism, and his support for the graduates throughout their careers.” A new directionExtending comparative law’s global reach P P PE PE PE E E PE P PE P D DR D D D D D O O O MA MA MA MA MA MA A MA MA MA MA MA LA LA LA L LA LA LA LA LA LA A VE VE V TBY MATT WALKER Musa

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SPRING 2011 55 “The fact that they are even coming back is a good thing. A mediator can’t impose anything on either side.” —THOMAS HURST, Emeritus Professor, Sam T. Dell Research Scholar FEB. 28, The St. Petersburg Times, “For NFL, mediation is all about grinding forward” Hurst speaking on stalled labor negations between representatives of the NFL and the NFL players union.“If he never had the right to develop the property in that way ... then what the city gave him was worthless.”—MICHAEL ALLAN WOLF, Richard E. Nelson Chair in Local Government Law Feb. 25, The Miami Herald, “Air Force sues Homestead farmer, city” Wolf was referring to the case of John Alger, who was exempted from a Homestead ordinance prohibiting him from building residential homes on his property, only to be sued by the U.S. government, which says his property is too close to Homestead Air Reserve Base to build residences.“I would say most wrongful termination cases are settled or somehow dismissed, or given up before they actually get to a trial. So I would think that actually going through to a trial would be unusual but not unheard of.”—JOSEPH LITTLE, Emeritus Professor JAN. 2, Naples Daily News, “Former FGCU provost’s wrongful ring lawsuit moves toward trial in early 2011”“I’ve never seen a case of a person improving his chances by ring his lawyer. The big thing is he just doesn’t know what he’s doing. It is not a wise thing to do. It is going to be a challenge to make sure that all sorts of things don’t happen that shouldn’t happen in a courtroom.”— GEORGE “BOB” DEKLE, Legal Skills Professor JAN. 10, The Tampa Tribune, “Rape defendant to represent himself at trial” MEDIA HITS

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56 UF LAW Robin Davis (JD 88) thrives on helping others. Now serving as the director of the University of Florida Levin College of Law’s Institute for Dispute Resolution, Davis’ history of doing just that includes working as a middle school English and social studies teacher, a social worker, and alternative dispute resolution director of Florida’s 8th Judicial Circuit. The UF Law Dispute Resolution Program has received a boost from U.S. News & World Report’s 2012 rankings, which placed UF Law seventh in the eld of dispute resolution among public universities and 19th overall. UF’s reputation in the field of dispute resolution, faculty members said, is due in large part to the institute’s programs, including arbitration training for foreclosure mediation and collaborative law training. Partly supported by a $100,000 donation from Florida-based Upchurch Watson White and Max Mediation Group, UF’s Institute for Dispute Resolution was the rst of its kind established at a Florida law school following a trailblazing state law granting judges the broad authority to mandate mediation in civil cases. While dispute resolution might still be classi ed as a “specialty area,” Davis is quick to highlight its importance. “When there’s a con ict, and you let it go, it can actually become worse. It can become explosive,” Davis said. Mediation “is a healthy way to resolve con ict because you encourage the parties to engage in a dialogue.” Leonard Riskin, a Chester eld Smith professor of law, expanded on the growing importance of mediation he’s seen in recent years. “Mediation is now used in virtually every case you can imagine,” he said. Riskin also leads UF’s Initiative of Mindfulness in Law and Dispute Resolution where he works to improve the resolution abilities of law students and professionals. The program’s other faculty include Associate Professor and IDR Associate Director Jonathan Cohen; Professor and Director Emeritus Don Peters; Lecturer and Af liate Director Stephen Powell; and Lecturer and Af liate Director and Clinical Professor Iris Burke. The real bene t of mediation lies in creating a situation where both parties gain from the transaction. “In mediation, we like to say there can be a win-win situation,” Davis said, “working together is in the interest of both parties.” Cohen, the program’s associate director, added an important distinction between dispute resolution and other areas of law. “We try to train lawyers to be effective problem solvers and not just effective litigators,” he said. Taking that idea of working together, faculty members in UF’s dispute resolution program point to a new organization they hope will bring the entire UF community together. The Con ict Resolution Initiative, started in part by the IDR student organization Gators for Alternative Dispute Resolution along with the UF Student Affairs Of ce, will help law students mediate actual disputes on the UF campus as they train to become certi ed mediators by the Florida Supreme Court. The 27 law students trained to become part of the rst class of the organization’s Mediation Training Program in mid-March. They now must complete observation hours and submit applications before becoming Florida Supreme Court Certi ed County Court mediators. With a waiting list already in place for the organization’s help, Davis said the Con ict Resolution Initiative could help solidify the University of Florida’s prominence as a national leader in dispute resolution. “We hope the CRI can help change the landscape of the UF community to a more peaceable community,” Davis said. “Con ict resolution helps educate people to be more responsible citizens.” Defusing disputesUF Law dispute resolution program garners national attentionBY JARED MISNER (4JM)FACULTY SPOTLIGHT“When there’s a con ict, and you let it go, it can actually become worse. It can become explosive.”—ROBIN DAVIS (JD 88) UF LAW PROFESSOR RO RO RO RO RO O O BI BI BI BI BI BI BI B N N N N N N DA DA DA DA DA DA DA DA VI VI VI VI VI VI VI VI S S S S S S S S

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“It doesn’t matter whether the bankruptcy has started yet. If you are insolvent, you are not supposed to be giving your money away. If you don’t pay your creditors, the people who you gave the money to have to cough it up.”—JEFFREY DAVIS, Professor of Law NOV. 5, The Florida Times-Union, “Troubled horses face loss of St. Augustine home as Ponzi scheme impacts nonpro ts” —WINSTON P. NAGAN, FRSA Samuel T. Dell Research Scholar Professor of Law; Af liate Professor of Anthropology; Founding Director, Institute for Human Rights and Peace Development JAN. 31, The Gainesville Sun, OpEd, “Transformation to democracy in Egypt”“Should the U.S. promote some form of transitional justice seriously, it would be placing itself on the right side of history.”“It’s not going to be possible to use the space there as you would classrooms in a school, but the concept that every judge needs his own courtroom is just not true. It’s indefensible.”—JENNIFER ZEDALIS, Legal Skills Professor, Director of Trial Practice MARCH 5, The St. Petersburg Times, “Survey reveals Hernando County courtrooms not used half of the time” “I think it is all part of a package (demonstrating) Georgia is cleaning up its own house in terms of water ef ciency.”— CHRISTINE KLEIN, Professor of Law FEB. 3, The Atlanta Journal-Constitution, “Neighbors cautiously eye Deal’s reservoir push” MEDIA HITS

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SPRING 2011 58 For many companies, the trade secrets that make them successful are rarely discussed in public. But what happens when the Un ited States or international governments demand the information to keep up with federal regulations? This is one of many issues that Elizabeth Rowe helps students understand as the new director of the Levin College of Law’s Intellectual Property Law Program. “There is a misconception that intellectual property law is for people interested in science,” said Rowe, an associate professor at UF Law. “But the eld has integral relationships with pressing issues important to the economy, such as business, policy and technology.” The college’s program provides a wide view of these relationships, requiring completion of courses such as introductory patent and copyright law and offering seminars on corporate espionage, sports law and franchising. Upon completion of the program’s requirements, students are awarded the Certi cate in Intellectual Property Law at graduation. Since ac cepting an appointment to the position in 2010, replacing former UF Law Professor Thomas Cotter, Rowe began building a new student-oriented website to attract students interested in intellectual property law and provide coverage of the college’s program. “The website is meant to be a one-stop, comprehensive resource not just for those registered for the certi cate,” Rowe said. “I want to be able to reach the broader audience of students interested in (intellectual property) who aren’t in the certi cate program.” In addition to course information, the website includes resources in nding and applying for available jobs and internships. Rowe established and maintains relationships with government agencies such as the United States Patent and Trademark Of ce, as well as law rms and businesses in the private sector for the job placement of technical and nontechnical students in the intellectual property program. “Since taking over the program,” Rowe said, “I’ve taken a more proactive approach in providing job placements for students.” Coming directly from private practice in the area, Rowe is steeped in the practice of intellectual property law. After receiving her juris doctor from Harvard Law School in 1996, she worked as an associate specializing in intellectual property and employment litigation at Hale & Dorr LLP in Boston, where she eventually made partner. Since becoming an assistant professor at UF Law in 2005, Rowe has published several legal articles on issues facing the eld. Her most recent article, “Striking a Balance: When Should Trade Secret Law Shield Disclosures to the Government?” was published in March in the Iowa Law Review It focuses on the gap between the protection of trade secrets and government regulations that could require businesses to hand over those secrets if necessary. The article uses the hypothetical scenario of “black boxes” of information being in the more than 8 million vehicles recalled by Toyota in 2010. Rowe addresses whether the government could seize the black boxes as part of an investigation even if Toyota argued that the boxes contained trade secrets. “We need to be able to do the analysis in such a way that we are only protecting the information that is a trade secret,” Rowe said. “If it is a trade secret, then we need a better way to determine the government’s need for the information relative to the company’s need to keep it secret.” William Page, senior associate dean for academic affairs, said Rowe was a natural choice for the role of director considering her experience and investment in the eld. “We’ve already seen that she makes a great counselor to the students and administrator for the program,” Page said. While remaining immersed in the eld of intellectual property, Rowe’s focus remains on developing the college’s program into one of national prominence. Her plans include conferences to discuss trends and issues facing the eld and creating a board of alumni from graduates of the intellectual property program. “I’ve conceptualized the program in such a way that it will be something broader than providing the certificate,” she said. —Troy Hillier (JD 11) contributed to this story 58 UF LAW An intellectual challengeNew director broadens goals of IP programBY BRANDON BRESLOW (3LAS) EL EL EL E L L L E E E IZ Z IZ Z AB A AB ET ET ET T T H H RO RO O WE WE FACULTY SPOTLIGHT VINCENT MASSARO (JD 11)

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Librarian Rick Donnelly retires from UF Law Associate Director of the Legal Information Center Rick Donnelly retired in February, parting from a position he held with esteem for 25 years. Donnelly came to the University of Florida College of Law in 1981 as head of media services. In 1986 he was appointed associate director of the Legal Information Center, where he assisted in administration and acted as a team leader in the multi-million dollar renovation of the law library in 2005. Recently, Donnelly served two terms as a faculty senator and as the college administrator for design and construction of the Martin H. Levin Legal Advocacy Center. In March, he was awarded the 2011 University of Florida Superior Accomplishment Award. UF Law Dean Robert Jerry praised Donnelly as a valuable member of the UF Law team. Elizabeth Outler was appointed interim director of the library. Lindsay Segawa appointed accounting coordinatorLindsay Segawa joins the staff as UF Law’s new accounting coordinator III and nancial supervisor. Her responsibilities include reconciliation and review of budgets and scal transactions. Additionally, she will work closely with the Center for Governmental Responsibility on the management of its grants. Segawa, who has a bachelor of arts in business administration with a concentration in accounting, was previously an administrative of cer with the University of Hawaii where she worked in many areas of scal management, from procurement and payables to grant management and budgeting. SPRING 2011 59UF Law Senior Associate Dean for Academic Affairs William H. Page, wearing light blue shorts, runs among the 24,338 competitors in the Boston Marathon on April 18. In the background is the famed Newton rehouse at around mile 17, the start of the Newton hills. Page nished the 26.2-mile race in 4:02:31. The 60-year-old UF Law veteran recalls running the 1988 Boston Marathon in under three hours. Page said 23 years and a less rigorous training regimen account for his latest result. UF Law started its own half-mile tness trail during the spring semester (See back cover) marking the path with arrows on the pavement snaking through the campus. More details about the tness opportunities at UF Law and at the University of Florida are available at www.law.u .edu/about/ tness.shtml. Going the DistanceWELCOME / FAREWELL MARATHONFOTO

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60 UF LAW BOOK ROUND-UPJEFFREY HARRISON WITH ROGER BLAIR Monopsony in Law and Economics Harrison, a UF Law professor and Stephen C. O’Connell Chair, and Blair, Walter J. Matherly Professor of Economics and chair of the UF Economics Department, delve deeply into the topic of monopsony — an economic relationship in which there is only one buyer of a good or service — and how the law responds to such situations. The notion that if a monopolist — only one seller of a good or service — raises prices, then a monopsonist must lower prices, is dispelled here and the harmful aspects of monopsony are examined, including how consumers can be negatively affected by monopsonies. (Cambridge University Press) MARC A. WITES (JD 94) Florida Causes of Action This annual publication provides a comprehensive review of over 100 Florida causes of action that will assist attorneys in reviewing cases, drafting pleadings and motions, jury instructions and more. For each cause of action, the book includes case citations and excerpts from the most recent decision from each Florida District Court of Appeal and the Florida Supreme Court that address the action’s elements; as well as information about defenses and the applicable statute of limitations. The book comes with a CD, which contains the full text of the book in both Microsoft Word and in a searchable database. (James Publishing) DON PETERS AND CATHERINE ROSS DUNHAM Civil Procedure: Skills and Values This textbook co-authored by Peters, a UF Law professor, and Dunham, the associate dean for academic affairs, professor of law and director of the Trial Practice Program at Elon University School of Law, is part of the LexisNexis Skills and Values series and allows students to learn by working through exercises applying civil procedure concepts and doctrines to solve the kinds of problems that practicing lawyers face frequently. It features an extensive online teacher’s manual that contains information for role plays; model document drafts; sample interactive transcripts for interviewing, counseling and deposition exercises; and student self-assessment instruments. (LexisNexis) DIANE H. MAZUR A More Perfect Military: How the Constitution can Make Our Military Stronger A More Perfect Military opens a national conversation about the all-volunteer military and its relationship to civilian society. Mazur, a UF Law professor, examines how civil-military relations have changed since the end of the Vietnam-era draft, in no small part due to the United States Supreme Court. In a series of opinions in the 1970s and 1980s, the court chipped away at the military’s professional bond to law and the Constitution. This constitutional fracture weakened our system for civilian control and contributed to many of the military’s most challenging problems today: hidden troubles with military recruiting, dif cult transitions to equality for women and gay service members, erosion of professional ethics and a crisis of candor in military advice. Mazur offers recommendations to return the military to its traditional constitutional foundation. (Oxford University Press)

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SPRING 2011 61 NANCY DOWD The Man Question: Male Subordination and Privilege Although feminism is credited with helping our culture acknowledge that many factors contribute to a woman’s identity and status, we often forget to apply the same considerations toward males. Dowd, the David H. Levin Chair in Family Law at UF Law and director of the Center on Children and Families, draws from masculinities scholarship and feminist analysis to examine issues of manhood and masculinity. She demonstrates how both subordination and privilege are constructed for men and boys. She suggests how “the man question” should be asked and then explores some examples of where this leads. Her analysis looks at boys in terms of education and juvenile justice; and looks at men in terms of fatherhood and as adult male survivors of childhood sexual abuse. (NYU Press) MARGARET “PEGI” S. PRICE (JD 86) The Special Needs Child and Divorce: A Practical Guide to Evaluation and Handling Cases With a growing number of divorce cases involving special needs children, this book examines how special needs factor into a divorce and how lawyers can help the children and their families get through the process in the best way possible. Price also looks at how standard child support guidelines and divorce procedures can be adjusted to best meet the needs of a special needs child. Price has years of experience in family law cases involving special needs children and also has an autistic son, who was 6 years old when Price went through her own divorce. (American Bar Association) BUDDY MACKAY (JD 67) WITH RICK EDMONDS How Florida Happened: The Political Education of Buddy MacKay MacKay tells the story of the in uential Florida politician over the course of his three-decade political career in the Sunshine State. MacKay served as a Florida legislator, a member of the United States Congress, Florida’s lieutenant governor, and, following the unexpected death of Gov. Lawton Chiles, as Florida’s governor for 23 days before Jeb Bush took of ce. MacKay’s distinctive voice is noticeable throughout, with Edmonds — who has held various editing and publishing roles at The St. Petersburg Times and is currently a media business analyst for The Poynter Institute — lending editing advice along the way. The biography captures the shifting political tides in Florida and documents a state moving into the modern era. (University Press of Florida) ALAN GREER (JD 69) Choices & Challenges: Lessons in Faith, Hope, and Love In his “brief before the highest court there is,” Greer argues for the existence of God and how such a belief can t into our modern society. Writing from a lawyer’s perspective, he emphasizes ways in which the belief in God can enrich the human experience. He also addresses the concept that organized religion is a human construct — and therefore capable of fallibility — but that doesn’t mean there aren’t certain morals and beliefs that should be upheld; and as society changes over time, it makes sense for certain rules and laws to change. (Morgan James Publishing)

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Robert C. L. Moffat, University of Florida Levin College of Law professor and af liate professor of philosophy, sociology and criminology and law, passed away Nov. 14 in Gainesville after a long illness. He was 73 years old. Moffat joined the law school faculty in 1966 as an assistant professor and was promoted to associate professor in 1968 and tenured professor in 1971. During his 44-year teaching career at UF Law, Moffat specialized in law and public policy, jurisprudence, criminal law, and law and morality. Moffat leaves behind a lasting legacy of numerous articles, publications, speeches and presentations on a wide variety of topics, but his memory will also live on through the lives he impacted as a professor. “Professor Moffat cared deeply about his students and took a great deal of personal satisfaction in their achievements. The depth of his love for teaching and his affection for his students were demonstrated by his reluctance to leave the classroom even in the last days of a severe and painful illness,” UF Law Dean Robert Jerry said. His devotion also was evident toward his colleagues in the legal eld and to the ongoing pursuit of knowledge. “Bob had the respect of his colleagues as a dedicated and serious scholar. His immense knowledge of the legal philosophies of Lon Fuller and other in uential theorists was of great bene t to those of us who sought refreshment from time to time on jurisprudential issues,” said Stuart R. Cohn, John H. & Mary Lou Dasburg Professor of Law and associate dean for international studies at the Levin College of Law. “At the same time his feet were rmly planted in the here and now, and he was able to bridge chronological and philosophical gaps for the bene t of his students and in his scholarly articles. He was devoted to the law school and his students and he will be sorely missed.” After ear ning his B.A., M.A. and LL.B from Southern Methodist University in Dallas, where he was editor-in-chief of the Southwestern Law Journal Moffat went to the University of Sydney in Australia to earn his LL.M. Moffat was a Fulbright Scholar from 1962 to 1964 and earned First Class Honors when he graduated in 1966. Among the many professional associations Moffat took part in, the longest running was the American Section of the International Association for Philosophy of Law and Social Philosophy. He joined the organization in 1966, served as executive director from 1987 to 1999 and was elected president of the organization for the 20032005 term. Moffat consistently published scholarly works during his career. His most recent article, “Searching for Substantive Justice: Lessons from Lon Fuller’s Natural Law,” was published in the April 2010 issue of the Iowa Journal of Gender, Race & Justice Moffat is survived by a son, Iain, and daughter, Kaaren. Contributions in Robert Moffat’s memory may be made to the Professor Robert and Janette Moffat Memorial Scholarship in Law, University of Florida Foundation, Inc. Attn: Gift Processing, P.O. Box 14425, Gainesville, FL 32604. 62 UF LAWProfessor’s legacy of scholarship and teaching rememberedIN MEMORIAM “Professor Moffat cared deeply about his students and took a great deal of personal satisfaction in their achievements.”—UF LAW DEAN ROBERT JERRY

PAGE 63

UP & COMINGAs the current law student liaison for the section of state and local government law at the American Bar Association, Margaret Rowell Good (2L) has found her place in the huge and sometimes overwhelming 400,000-plus member organization. And she’s glad she did. “The section of state and local government law is really supportive of law students and has a lot of opportunities for law students to get involved,” Good said. “The section has given me a number of leadership roles.” Good said after she joined the ABA as a 1L, she received frequent e-mails from the organization, but because of the size and scope of the ABA, she didn’t really know where to start or how to make the most of her membership. Then she saw a message about student liaison positions. “I thought, ‘This seems like a great way to nd mentors and to network,’” Good said. She knew it was important to expand her reach beyond the law school walls and make the most of networking opportunities. A student liaison position seemed like a great way to make that happen. Through her liaison position, Good has seen how attorneys who specialize in state or local government can apply their knowledge — from lobbyists to state government employees to county attorneys. She has also seen how different state and local governments deal with the same types of issues, she said. Deciding on the state and local government law section was an easy choice for Good, mostly because of her involvement with the Florida Horse Park in Ocala. Good’s interest and experience in state and local government — and one of her main motivations for going to law school — began at the Horse Park, where she was director of development for four years. Because the nonpro t equestrian facility is on state-owned land, she interacted with state agencies and learned how state and local governments operate, Good said. In a way, she had already made her mark on Florida state government before she even entered law school. With the help of several dedicated volunteers, Good is largely responsible for the new “Discover Florida’s Horses” license plates, which bene t the Florida Agricultural Center and Horse Park Authority. Good said when she worked at the Horse Park, the idea of trying to get a special license plate made for the park had been oating around for a while, and she decided to act on it. Good took the idea to the board of trustees for approval, helped secure nancing for the project, held a contest to decide on artwork for the plate, and even made the trip to Tallahassee to try to get the plate legislation passed. The Legislature approved the plate after Good had left the Horse Park to attend law school, but she is happy that she was able to make an impact and with the experience that she gained along the way. Good has also accomplished a great deal during her time as an ABA member — not the least is being chosen in a competitive appointment process as law-student liaison to all law students in the country. One of Good’s major projects with the ABA has been developing and promoting a law student resume database for her section. The database, which can be found on the ABA website, will help connect law students and potential employers. “The section leaders reasoned that if the section could gure out a way to connect members with law students, it would help our law student members nd jobs in their area of interest,” Good said. Student makes mark on Florida, ABABY MATT WALKERSPRING 2011 63Good knew it was important to expand her reach beyond the law school walls and make the most of networking opportunities. 3L Ryan Moseley serves on gubernatorial transition team. See Web-Xtras at www.law.u .edu/u aw

PAGE 64

Levin College of Law P.O. Box 117633 Gainesville, FL 32611-7633 NON-PROFIT ORGANIZATION U.S. POSTAGE PAID JACKSONVILLE, FL PERMIT NO. 877www.law.u .edu THE FLORIDA BAR ANNUAL UF LAW ALUMNI RECEPTION June 23 6:30 p.m. to 8 p.m. Gaylord Palms Resort and Convention Center Kissimmee For more information, email khendrixson@law.u .edu COLLABORATIVE LAW TRAINING July 15 and 16 Levin College of Law Gainesville For more information, email davisr@law.u .edu LCA BOARD OF TRUSTEES / LAW ALUMNI COUNCIL BOARD MEETINGS Sept. 10 9 a.m. to noon Levin College of Law Gainesville For more information, email khendrixson@law.u .edu BEAT THE BULLDOGS LAW ALUMNI RECEPTION Oct. 27 5:30 p.m. to 7:30 p.m. Jacksonville River Club Jacksonville For more information, email khendrixson@law.u .edu UF Law Professor Lyrissa Lidsky, students and alumni take an inaugural stroll on a new half-mile walking trail snaking through the law school campus.NICOLE SAFKER (2L)


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A LEAP FOR
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GATOR LAW IN
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: an alumna, I know the
1iii. t rit e Gator Nation."
-MARTHA BARNETT (JD 73)
Holland b Knight senior partner
and former chairwoman,
past president of the
American Bar Association

U F UNIVERSITY of
hi UFNFLORIDA
Levin College of Law


H're a UF Law graduate.
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Editor
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^











UF LAW Vol. 47, Issue 2, SPRING 2011 CONTENTS


5 Mission & Vision 13 Check & Balance 21 Gator Law in the Family 48 Global Gators


Levin College of Law takes
a curricular turn with new
mission statement


UF Law grads at heart
of contest for future of
Florida's system of justice


Three family trees intertwined
with UF Law


Alumni solving problems in
South Sudan, Micronesia,
Haiti and North Korea


4 DEAN'S MESSAGE

8 NEWS BRIEFS
Florida Supreme Court welcomed
Former ABC News president visits
U.S. News & World Report rankings
3L wins best advocate at ABA competition

11 CONFERENCES
& LECTURES


25 PARTNERS
UF Florida Tomorrow Campaign
Student Division of the Law Alumni Council
Glasser Barbecue beefs up


ALUMNI PROFILES
Michael T. Moore (JD 74)
Stacy A. Scott (JD 95)
James D. Camp Jr. (JD 51)
Charles Egerton (JD 69)
Natalie Jackson (JD 02)


WEB-XTRAS


Visit UF LAW online at www.law.ufl.edu/uflaw to view:
* Family trees intertwined with UF LAW
* 3L Ryan Moseley serves on the gubernatorial transition team

91 Find us on facebook www.facebook.com/uflaw COVER


Labarg


Follow us on Iwitter at www.twitter.com/utlaw


32 CLASS NOTES
Heritage of Leadership
In Memoriam

53 FACULTY
Spotlight
Media hits
Welcome/Farewell
Book Round-up
Moffatt remembered

63 UP AND COMING
Margaret Rowell Good (2L)


* A list of UF Law alumni deaths reported since May 1, 2010
* Webcasts of special guest lectures and other events at
www.law.ufl.edu/news/webcasts/


: Florida House Speaker Dean Cannon (JD 92) and Florida Supreme Court Justice Jorge
a (JD 79) standing in front of the Old State Capitol in Tallahassee. PHOTO BY NICOLESAFKER (2L)


NEWS











FROM THE DEAN


Toward a new UF Law mission


DEAN
ROBERT
JERRY
Levin Mabie
& Levin
Professor
of Law


No one reading this column needs to be reminded
that the legal profession is experiencing ex-
traordinarily rapid change. The recession, the
trend toward globalized business, the pace of
technological change, and the constant evo-
lution in how we communicate with each other and transfer
knowledge are but a few of the factors forcing changes in how
law is practiced and the legal profession is structured. Our
ABA President Steve Zack (JD 71) has said that the legal pro-
fession will change more in the next 10 years than it has in the
last 100 years, and I fully agree with this prediction.
With changes in the practice of law and the legal profes-
sion must come changes in legal education. If law schools
ignore the various factors driving change in the practice and
the profession, we will end up investing our time, energy and
resources in preparing students to practice in a world that no
longer exists. Since 2007, when the Carnegie Report was pub-
lished, the faculty at the Levin College of Law, working largely
through a process involving the strategic planning committee
along with some others, has been engaged in a serious
conversation about how the curriculum should
change in light of these significant changes
in the profession.
The starting point for this review was
to look at the articulated "vision and mis-
sion statement" for the college. Our "vi-
sion" remains unchanged from the pur-
poses articulated many years ago: to be a
law school "dedicated to advancing
human dignity, social welfare,
and justice through knowledge
of law." But in November
2010, the faculty voted unani-
mously to amend our "mission
statement." The prior mission
statement called for the col-
lege to pursue four indisput-
ably valuable and important
aspirations "Excellence
in educating professionals,
advancing legal scholarship,
serving the public, and fos-
tering justice" and these
are retained in the new mis-


UF LAW


sion statement. But the new mission statement goes further and
calls us to train our students in the "highest ideals of the legal
profession," in not only the knowledge of the substantive law,
but also "the skills necessary to use that knowledge in practice"
and in the "core competencies essential to begin the practice
of law."
Core competencies are further defined, and include "the
ability to conduct independent legal research and produce legal
writings of professional quality," "fundamentals of client ser-
vices," "interviewing and counseling skills," "fundamentals of
dispute processing and legal problem solving," "knowledge of
the shared values of the legal profession," "the skills to create a
professional identity" and "the skills to work with people from
diverse backgrounds."
This new mission statement is a compelling statement of
what the faculty and I believe constitutes the essential charac-
teristics of a 21 st-century lawyer. The statement shows a recog-
nition of the importance of melding practical skills, emotional
intelligence and substantive knowledge into the pre-graduation
training of a law student. What we are now doing is working on
a re-design of the curriculum to achieve the goals outlined in
the new mission statement. Alumni have provided input on the
re-design, including through a faculty retreat held in April with
alumni representatives on the Law Center Association Board
of Trustees.
The path on which your law school has embarked is a far
distance from the image of a law school built in an ivory tower
and disconnected from the real world into which our students
graduate and will practice law. Our path values the real work
lawyers do, the awesome responsibilities owed to our clients
and the system of justice, and the high standards of ethics and
integrity that must guide our daily decisions in the practice.
As the dean of your law school, I have several hopes as we
embark on this process of change. I hope you are pleased with
the path we are choosing. I hope that you will share your sug-
gestions and insights about the specific steps we should consider
as we build a curriculum to fulfill the goals in our new mission
statement. This being a time of great financial stress for all of
us, I hope you will consider, if you are not already a contributor
to your college, a gift that shows your willingness to participate
in our work and communicates an endorsement of our efforts.
As always, I am grateful for your past support, and I take
great pride in the honor and privilege I have to serve as the
dean of your college. 0











VISION & MISSION


UF LAW ALIGNS CURRICULUM

WITH PRACTICE OF LAW

BY MATT WALKER

With an eye toward changing technol-
ogy, economics and expectations in
the legal profession, the University
of Florida Levin College of Law
has adopted a new academic mis-
sion statement that will help guide the school's curricu-
lum so students can hit the ground running in the legal
world upon earning their degree.
"This is a time of great change for the legal profes-
sion, and we recognize that to better prepare students
for this new world, legal education needs to adapt,"
said UF Law Dean Robert Jerry. "The new vision and
academic mission statement sets the table for more de-
tailed discussion of curricular changes the college will
make."
In addition to establishing the goals of advanc-
ing legal scholarship, serving the public and fostering
justice, the new mission statement emphasizes the im-
portance of providing a well-rounded legal education
that includes competency in five main areas. These
core competencies are: legal analysis; legal research
and writing; fundamentals of client services; funda-
mentals of dispute processing and legal problem solv-
ing; and fundamentals of professional responsibility
and identity.
Jerry explained that the establishment of the fun-
damentals of professional identity necessary to under-
stand what it means to be a lawyer goes beyond tradi-
tional textbook curriculum.
"Being a very good lawyer means having a sense of
self-awareness; having a sense of how one projects con-
fidence and has the substance to back it up; understand-
ing what's involved in working collaboratively with a
team and how one most effectively solves a problem.
That is all connected to legal doctrine and to under-
standing how legal institutions work," Jerry said.
Jerry added that the mission statement also focuses
the law school on preparing students for their jobs upon
graduation. "Graduates should step into the profession
and be ready to represent clients. Our mission is more
MISSION continued on next page ...


Vision
A law school dedicated to advancing human dignity,
social welfare, and justice through knowledge of
law.


Academic Mission Statement
The mission of the University of Florida Fredric
G. Levin College of Law is to achieve excellence in
educating professionals, advancing legal scholar-
ship, serving the public, and fostering justice. We
aspire to prepare lawyers to serve their clients, the
justice system, and the public with a high level of
accomplishment and a commitment to the highest
ideals of the legal profession. We strive to provide
students with a well-rounded legal education. Our
curriculum is designed to teach students about the
law and to help them develop the skills necessary
to use that knowledge in practice. Our goal is for
our graduates to possess the core competencies es-
sential to embark on the practice of law. These core
competencies include:
1. Legal Analysis (including knowledge of laws
and rules, the ability to apply laws and rules
to different factual settings, and the ability to
engage in legal argumentation);
2. Legal Research and Writing (including the abil-
ity to conduct independent legal research and
produce legal writings of professional quality);
3. Fundamentals of Client Services (including in-
terviewing and counseling skills);
4. Fundamentals of Dispute Processing and Legal
Problem Solving (including litigation, settle-
ment, and transactions); and
5. Fundamentals of Professional Responsibil-
ity and Identity (including knowledge of the
shared values of the legal profession and
ethical problem solving, the skills to cre-
ate a professional identity, and the skills to
work with people from diverse backgrounds).


SPRING 2011











VISION & MISSION


"THE NEW MISSION STATEMENT WILL PROVIDE A CONSENSUS THAT ENSURES THAT,

IN OUR EFFORTS AT REFORM, WE ARE ALL PULLING IN THE SAME DIRECTION.


AMY MASHBURN, UF LAW PROFESSOR AND CHAIR OF THE STRATEGIC PLANNING COMMITTEE


MISSION continued ...


than just understanding what the law is or just under-
standing the process of the law's application."
Alumni and other legal employers have echoed the
need for graduates with these skills.
"It is more important than ever for law school gradu-
ates to be prepared for the legal world on both a theoreti-
cal and practical level," said Andrew Fawbush (JD 74), a
partner in the tax section of Smith Gambrell & Russell,
LLP in Jacksonville. "The economics have changed over
the past 40 or 50 years in the legal profession and young
people must be prepared for this new model."
The new mission statement was put forth by a
strategic planning committee chaired by UF Law Profes-
sor Amy Mashburn and was approved by the faculty in
November.
The more detailed academic mission statement repre-
sents a commitment by the faculty to focus on providing
UF Law graduates with the specific skills they need to


begin the practice of law,
she said.
"We all want to pro-
vide our students with the
best legal education we
can, but we do not always
agree on which methods
are best or how to set insti-
tutional priorities," Mash-
burn said. "The commit-
Masburn j tee is hopeful that the new
mission statement will
provide a consensus that ensures that, in our efforts at
reform, we are all pulling in the same direction."
Mashburn said the strategic planning committee
hopes to implement the new academic mission statement
by winning approval from the law school's Faculty Senate
for significant curricular changes. 0


UF LAW
























INMAN EMPLOYS TEAMWORK FOR CAREER DEVELOPMENT


BY MATT WALKER
s the University of Florida Levin College
of Law sets forth a new academic mission
statement in the spirit of better preparing
students for the working world, adminis-
trators are evaluating how the Center for
Career Development can best keep up with the rapidly
changing legal field.
"We want to instill confidence in those using the of-
fice primarily students and employers," said Rachel
Inman, associate dean for student affairs and interim as-
sistant dean for career development.
Last September, when Assistant Dean for Career Devel-
opment Linda Calvert-Hanson announced she was stepping
down, UF Law Dean Robert Jerry chose Inman to guide the
center through the transition and help assess its effective-
ness. Jerry said the search for a permanent replacement was
a good time to evaluate the Center for Career Development.
"Dean Inman not only understands student services
functions extremely well, she also has great skill in orga-
nizing an office staff and building a team-oriented work-
ing environment," Jerry said of the former Carson-Newman
College basketball player in Jefferson City, Term. "I remem-
ber her once giving an explanation of how her varsity bas-
ketball playing days in college taught her the importance of
teamwork, a metaphor I thought was excellent. Rachel (In-
man) is the right person to help us in this transition phase."
Inman became UF Law associate dean for student af-
fairs in 2006. Similar to the current effort, the college was
interested in revitalizing student affairs and making sure
students were getting the best of what the office had to
offer. She brought a wealth of student services experience
from the University of Tennessee College of Law, where
she was an assistant dean for student affairs for 12 years.
She said students can benefit from Career Develop-
ment's services, and she wants students to know that the
staff is there to help.
"I think students believe that if you're going to have
a Center for Career Development that it should be there
to assist and help them with the areas they are unsure
about," she said.
Inman wants the center to assist students and employers
with their needs, build relationships with employers, and
increase employer participation in on-campus interviews.
This will involve working more with the local legal com-


munity in providing programming and mentoring services.
The center is also seeking to build and maintain rela-
tionships with UF Law faculty who have strong connec-
tions in the profession and can offer valuable feedback for
the center. Inman said this path hasn't been explored previ-
ously, partially due to the somewhat isolated location of the
Center for Career Development offices.
That has changed.
In May, the Center for Career Development moved
from the second floor to the first floor of Bruton-Geer Hall,
former home to John Marshall Bar Association and other
student organization offices.
"The reason for that was to make the office more ac-
cessible to students and employers," Inman said. "That is
a heavy traffic area at the college certainly for students
- and it's easy to describe how to get there for employers."
The law school is searching for the perfect candidate
to fill the position of assistant dean for career development
with assistance from the respected academic search firm
The Spelman & Johnson Group.
Inman has been maintaining her duties as associate dean
for student affairs during this time, and filling both positions
has resulted in a busy year for her. The workload is worth it,
she said, because it's important for students to have the best
possible resources available to them. 0


SPRING 2011










UF LAW HAPPENINGS, EVENTS & ACHIEVEMENTS


NEWS BRIEFS


Florida Supreme Court
welcomed to UF Law
The University of Florida Levin Col-
lege of Law welcomed all seven
Florida Supreme Court justices for
the 27th annual Maguire Appellate Advo-
cacy Competition in the Martin H. Levin
Advocacy Center courtroom.
The Feb. 25 exhibition allowed moot
court team members to receive useful
critiques regarding their oral arguments
as they prepared for the American Bar
Association's National Appellate Advocacy
Competition held in April.
"I just want to say that we've heard some
outstanding advocacy today," said Chief
Justice Charles T. Canady, following the
competition. "It is obvious that the people ar-
guing here before this court today were well
prepared and are skillful advocates who have
a very promising future as advocates in the
law, so we want to congratulate all of you."
The competition is named after Raymer
F. Maguire Jr. (JD 15), son of the founder
of Maguire, Voorhis & Wells, PA., and
managing partner of the firm. In the sum-
mer of 1998, Maguire, Voorhis & Wells,
PA. merged with the law firm of Holland
& Knight LLP, which continued the tradi-
tion of sponsoring the competition.


Former ABC News
president visits UF Law
Said Westin, the
immediate past
president of
ABC News, delivered
the keynote address in
February at the court-
room opening celebra-
tion in the Martin H. Westin
Levin Advocacy Center
at the University of Florida Levin College
of Law.
In his keynote speech, Westin discussed
how advocacy can be used for social good.
He said the media could learn from how
the court system settles disputes as the me-
dia turns to ever-more rancorous commen-
tary and opinion to generate audiences.
For example, he said the contentious-
ness of news programs could be moder-
ated if hosts question political adversaries
about how they agree as well as how they
disagree.
As ABC News president from 1997
to 2010, Westin oversaw all editorial and
business aspects of the news division,
supervised coverage of President Bill Clin-
ton's impeachment, the 9/11 attacks, the
Afghanistan and Iraq wars and the recent


economic crisis. While Westin was presi-
dent, ABC News was awarded 11 George
Foster Peabody Awards, 13 Alfred I. du-
Pont Awards, five George Polk Awards,
more than 40 News and Documentary Em-
mys and more than 40 Edward R. Murrow
Awards.

U.S. News & World
Report rankings
New U.S. News & World Report
rankings of the nation's top gradu-
ate schools place the University of
Florida Levin College of Law in a tie for
24th among public law schools and tie for
47th overall. The UF Law Graduate Tax Pro-
gram continues to rank first among publics
and was second overall this year. Its Envi-
ronmental Law Program rose to sixth among
publics and 13th overall. The law school's
growing strength in the area of dispute
resolution was recognized with a specialty
area ranking of seventh among publics and
19th overall. UF Law continues to be rated
highly in terms of reputation tying at 17th
among publics and 38th overall in peer as-
sessment, and 17th among publics and 39th
overall in lawyer/judge assessment.
UF Law Dean Robert Jerry sounded a
note of caution about the report.
"We are, of course, pleased with this
recognition
of our strong < F
tax, envi-
ronmental
and dispute rl
resolution
programs,
and that we
continue to
be ranked as a top-tier school, with a peer
reputation ranking in the 30s. However, I
am on record every year, regardless of how
well we do, in stating my belief that rank-
ings such as these are not a true reflection of
institutional quality," Jerry said.
NEWS BRIEFS continued on page 10 ...


UF LAW











NEWS BRIEFS 0


Opening doors

UF Law celebrates opening of Advocacy Center
courtroom, welcomes Levins, Westin


T he law school celebrated the open-
ing of the Martin H. Levin Advo-
cacy Center courtroom with a cer-
emony (See the webcast at www.
law.ufl.edu/news/webcasts/) that featured
remarks by UF President Bernie Machen,
as well as college namesake Fredric G.
Levin (JD 61), his son, Martin H. Levin (JD
88), Teri Levin, who is Fredric Levin's sis-
ter-in-law and wife of the late Allen Levin,
and a keynote speech by the immediate past
president of ABC News, David Westin. The
ceremony was held at the Martin H. Levin
Advocacy Center courtroom on Feb. 24.
The newAdvocacy Center courtroom will
serve as a key component in placing UF Law at
the forefront of legal advocacy education. The
fully functional trial and appellate courtroom
contains a 98-seat gallery, a bench for seven
judges, a jury box, attorneys' tables, judge's
chambers and a jury deliberation room.
"I hope with the facility here, the ad-
vocacy center, that it will become the go-


to place for young law students who want
to become trial lawyers and they certainly
have the facility to do it," said Fredric
Levin, a renowned trial lawyer. "I have
tried cases all over the country. I've never
seen a more beautiful courtroom or a more
well-equipped courtroom."
The Martin H. Levin Advocacy Cen-
ter and courtroom was made possible by
donors including Fredric Levin and Teri
Levin. Fredric Levin contributed $2 million
to the center as the lead gift to this project
and Teri Levin contributed a $1 million gift
in honor of her late husband, Allen Richard
Levin. Teri Levin's contribution brought
the total of Levin family gifts to the law
school to almost $30 million, including
state matching funds. Other donors who
helped make the Advocacy Center possible
include the Baynard Trust, the late Rob-
ert M. Montgomery of West Palm Beach
and Robert Kerrigan of Kerrigan, Estess,
McLeod & Thompson in Pensacola. .


Advocacy Center wins
conservation gold

he Martin H. Levin Advocacy Center
has been awarded the gold LEED rat-
ing for its environmentally friendly and
energy efficient design.
The rating is based on features such
as the use of low-flow faucets, waterless
urinals, reflective building materials and
designs to optimize energy performance.
According to the March 14 LEED
report, 1.5 tons of construction waste
were diverted from landfills during the
building's construction and potable wa-
ter use has been reduced by 55 percent
from fittings and fixtures. Energy effi-
ciency measures include high efficiency
glazing, reduced interior lighting power
density, occupancy sensors and a district
chilled water system.
The Leadership in Energy and En-
vironmental Design Rating System was
designed by the U.S. Green Building
Council to encourage more environmen-
tally sustainable buildings. The rating
has four levels: certified, silver, gold and
platinum.
ADVOCACY CENTER continued on next page ...


SPRING 2011


II "lll l 011,441












ADVOCACY CENTER continued


Dedication of the Martin Levin Advocacy Center
BY MARTIN LEVIN


Feb.24, 2011
As I stand up here today, it's obviously a great
honor to have this incredible building bear my name.
However, the reality is that I have done nothing to
earn it. The sole reason my name is on this building
is because my father gave $2 million cash. Not only
did he give the lead gift, but he approached two of his
friends, Bob Kerrigan and Bob Montgomery, to each
give $300,000, and then he approached his sister-in-
law Teri to give $1 million cash in memory of her
husband, Allen, the brother and closest of friends to
my father and to me.
Thus, the real issue is not why my name is on
this building, but why my father chose to have this
building created. It's not like he needed his name on
another building here at the university. The answer to
why my father did it is actually quite simple, and it's
the same answer as to why he provided $1 million
in property to this university in the 1980s, and $10
million in cash to this university in the 1990s. Dad
believes that a commitment to advocacy in this
country could be the single most important action
that assures this country's success, and certainly that
guarantees justice.
Why is this? What is it about advocacy that is
so important to my father? Isn't advocacy nothing
more than trial law? Not to my father. My father
doesn't limit advocacy to trial attorneys, or even to
lawyers. Instead, Dad sees advocacy as the process
of someone critically and objectively considering an
issue, meticulously researching it, logically reaching
a conclusion, and then having the confidence and
the ability to convey that conclusion even when
it's unpopular and contrary to the opinions being
expressed by the vast majority of people.
Dad's concern with the importance of advocacy
has become even more heightened in recent times.
Why? Because in today's time everyone with a
computer has the ability to disseminate opinions
to millions of people in a matter of seconds even
though the opinions might be baseless and meant
solely to cause harm. In fact, these opinions can be
highly targeted to individuals who think the same
as the writer, and who are more than happy to act
upon them. The dissemination of opinions no longer
requires great oratory skills, physical presence and
an arduously earned platform to convey them. This
makes the world much more volatile and potentially
hostile.
For the past 50 years of my father practicing law,
he has spoken at great lengths regarding the


importance of advocacy. In fact, I vividly recall a
discussion my father and I had when I was 12 years
of age on this very topic, and it has stuck with me to
this day. But more significantly than speaking about
his beliefs, my father has lived them even when it has
been to his own detriment.
As is well known, Dad has often spoken out
against the majority, against the authority, against
the established and against the popular. He did
this without consideration or concern for the
consequences. When he perceived hatred, bigotry,
prejudice or any other form of injustice, he made
sure he was heard, even while others who did not
like his voice made sure he paid the consequences.
Dad never backed down, and he wants to make sure
we are training all future lawyers to do the same. My
father wants to make sure we have a facility at this
law school that is teaching students not to become just
lawyers but to become advocates.
I would like to end my remarks with some quotes
by various historical figures who have echoed my
father's belief.
* Ten people who speak make more noise than ten
thousand who are silent. -Napoleon Bonaparte
* To be neutral in a situation of injustice is to have
chosen sides. Archbishop Desmond Tutu
* To sin by silence when thou shall protest makes
cowards of men. Abraham Lincoln
* The hottest place in hell is reserved for those who
in times of great moral crises maintain neutrality.
Dante's Inferno
* The world is a dangerous place to live; not because
of the people who are evil, but because of the
people who don't do anything about it. -Albert
Einstein
* The greatest sin of our time is not the few who
have destroyed, but the vast majority who have sat
idly by. Martin Luther King Jr.
* In Germany they came first for the communists,
and I didn't speak up because I wasn't a
communist. Then they came for the Jews, and I
didn't speak up because I wasn't a Jew. Then they
came for the trade unionists, and I didn't speak up
because I wasn't a trade unionist. Then they came
for the Catholics, and I didn't speak up because
I wasn't a Catholic. Then they came for me, and
by that time no one was left to speak. The Rev.
Martin Niemoeller
* Speaking out and being wrong does not shame me.
Failing to speak out when I know I should makes
my entire existence unbearable and pointless. -
Fred Levin speaking to me at the age of 12.
I would like to thank my father, Aunt Teri, Bob
Kerrigan, Bob Montgomery, President Machen and
Dean Jerry for everything you have done and continue
to do to make this university, this law school and this
facility one of the top educational institutions in the
world. I also would like to thank each of you and the
remainder of Gator Nation for all you have done and
will continue to do to make this world a much better
place to live.
Go Gators. E


NEWS BRIEFS continued ...
"We carefully track our own progress, and we
know that we are very good and getting better ev-
ery year in the things that matter including class
credentials, our reputation in the legal and academ-
ic communities, employment and graduate study
opportunities and bar passage rates," Jerry said.
"Couple that with our long history of producing
national leaders, including current ABA President
Stephen N. Zack (JD 71), and it's easy to see why
we are widely regarded as one of the nation's best
values in legal education."


3L wins best advocate at
ABA competition
T he American Bar As-
sociation says UF Law
student Wilbert Vancol
(3L) was the best advocate at
the nation's top moot court 4_
competition.
Vancol won the National
Best Advocate Award at the vancol
ABA National Moot Court
Competition in Chicago on April 8. It is the high-
est award given to an individual in the competi-
tion and goes to the competitor who demonstrates
the strongest advocacy skills.
Vancol's award is like being named the Most
Outstanding Player in the NCAA men's basket-
ball tournament, said UF Law Professor Henry
T. Wihnyk, the Florida Moot Court Team faculty
adviser. That's because he was going up against
the best students on the nation's best moot court
teams.
"I am proud of and impressed by Wilbert's
achievement. The ABA National Appellate Advo-
cacy Competition is the premier moot court event
of the year. Law schools from every region of the
United States participate each year," Wihnyk said.
"Wilbert's selection as the best in the nation
is a testament to his talent, hard work and dedica-
tion. This highlights the excellence of the Florida
Moot Court Team and the superb skills training
the students receive at the University of Florida
Levin College of Law," Wihnyk said.
Scores for oral arguments range from 50 to
100. Vancol said a typical average for an advo-
cate is in the upper 80s. His average score for the
competition was 95, the highest among any of the
competitors on the 24 teams. Vancol comes from
Miami and he transferred to UF Law from Florida
A&M College of Law after his first year. m


UF LAW










PANELS, SPEAKERS EXPLORE LEGAL QUESTIONS


CONFERENCES



& LECTURES


The spring semester at the University
of Florida Levin College of Law brimmed
with interesting guest speakers, educational
lectures and panel discussions. Lecture
topics ranged from Florida coastal issues
to property law and how it impacts our
democratic system.

* NELSON SYMPOSIUM DRAWS
NATIONAL EXPERTS

National experts addressed a variety of
environmental, property and governmental
concerns before practitioners, professors
and students at the 10th annual Richard E.
Nelson Symposium on Feb. 11.
J. Peter Byrne, professor of law and
director of the Environmental Law and Pol-
icy Institute at Georgetown University Law
Center, and William Rodgers, Stimson Bul-
litt Professor of Law at University of Wash-
ington School of Law, delivered a lecture
entitled "Global Warming and its Newest
Challenges: Mitigation and Acidification."
Byrne, a shareholder recipient of the
Nobel Peace Prize, discussed ways hu-
mans can adapt to sea-level rise while also
attempting to mitigate climate change's
effects. He predicted that we will have to
re-evaluate our existing laws to deal with
climate change.
The presentations focused on sea-level
rise mitigation, oil spill litigation, the drilling
moratorium, ocean acidification, judicial
takings and the U.S. Supreme Court deci-
sion in Stop the Beach Renourishment,
Inc. v. Florida Department of Environmen-
tal Protection.
The Florida Bar Environmental and
Land Use Law Section and The Florida Bar
City, County, and Local Government Section
co-sponsored the event.


* PIEC DRAWS NATIONAL EXPERTS,
FOCUSES ON 'GREEN' ENERGY

UF Law hosted the 17th annual Public
Interest Environmental Conference Feb.
24-26. This year's conference was themed
"It's Net Easy Being Green: Our Energy
Future." The conference focused on renew-
able and non-renewable sources of energy,
how that energy is distributed and its re-
lationship to economic development, envi-
ronmental protection and social justice.
Although energy affects everyone's dai-
ly activities, from driving a car to turning on
lights, "we often don't consider the broader
consequences of our daily activities," con-
ference Co-Chair Carli Koshal said.
Panelists represented a broad range of
perspectives including government agencies,
public interest organizations and industry, as
well as internationally known scholars. Pan-
els addressed energy sectors including solar,
wind, biofuels, nuclear and fossil fuels as
well as the overlying land use, transportation
and environmental justice issues.
The student-run conference in its 17th
year continues to draw people from across
the country. UF Law Professor Alyson
Flournoy credits the conference's success
to an interesting, broad agenda featuring a
diverse group of speakers.

* FTC COMMISSIONER DISCUSSES
GLOBAL COMPETITION AT
HEATH LECTURE

Federal Trade Commission Commis-
sioner William E. Kovacic discussed global
competition policy standards at the Bayard
Wickliffe Heath Memorial Lecture.
The March 14 lecture, titled "From
Dominance to Oligopoly: The United States


and the Future Development of Global
Competition Policy Standards," was the
second in the Heath Lecture series.
The United States' best opportunity to
remain a major player in the field of interna-
tional competition law is to develop better
ideas, Kovacic said. "Dominance no longer
permits the United States to set global stan-
dards, and it will have to use persuasion."
Kovacic has served as an FTC commis-
sioner since 2006 and as chairman from
March 2008 to March 2009. He was
previously the FTC's general counsel.
The Heath Memorial Lecture Series
was made possible by a gift from Inez
Heath, Ph.D., widow of Bayard "Wick"
Heath. Heath, who died in 2008, was
the senior competition consultant with
Info Tech, a Gainesville firm specializing
in statistical and econometric consulting,
expert witness testimony and antitrust law.

* HARVARD'S OGLETREE
DISCUSSES TODAY'S RACIAL
ISSUES AT CSRRR LECTURE
See the webcast at www.law.ufl.edu/
news/webcasts/

Harvard Law Professor Charles Ogletree
delivered the UF Center for the Study of
Race and Race Relations' 2011 Spring Lec-
ture. The lecture, titled "Are We in A Post-
Racial Society? Race in America Today," was
held on March 24 at UF Law.
Ogletree's latest book, The Presumption
of Guilt: The Arrest of Henry Louis Gates,
Jr. and Race, Class and Crime in America,
details the arrest of Henry Louis Gates, Jr.,
an African-American Harvard professor who
was arrested by a white police officer while
entering his own home. Ogletree served as
Gates' attorney in the case.


SPRING 2011












CONFERENCES & LECTURES



CONFERENCES & LECTURES continued ...
The case raised issues at the intersec-
tions of race and class, and the consti-
tutionally required presumption of inno-
cence by the justice system. Gates' situa-
tion also cast serious doubt on the notion
of America as a post-racial society.
It is the validity of that assumption
that Americans are treated the same
regardless of the color of their skin that
served as fodder for Ogletree's talk.
About 120 students, faculty, staff
and community members gathered in the
Chesterfield Smith Ceremonial Classroom
for the lecture.
The University of Florida Levin College
of Law Center for the Study of Race and
Race Relations is committed to fostering
communities of dialogue on race. The
center creates and supports programs de-
signed to enhance race-related curriculum
development for faculty, staff and students
in collegiate and professional schools.

RENOWNED SCHOLAR DISCUSSES
WALL STREET REFORM ACT AT
30TH DUNWODY LECTURE
See the webcast at www.law.ufl.edu/
news/webcasts/

A handful of judges, alumni of the
Florida Law Review, law school professors
and students filled the Chesterfield Smith
Ceremonial Classroom to hear one of the
nation's pre-eminent law and economics
scholars deliver a lively and entertaining
lecture on the Wall Street Reform Act.
Richard A. Epstein, the inaugural
Laurence A. Tisch Professor of Law at
New York University Law School, spoke
to more than 100 guests March 25 at the
30th Annual Florida Law Review Dun-
wody Distinguished Lecture in Law.
Although the lecture was entitled "The
Constitutionality of the Wall Street Reform
Act," Epstein admitted that he had not read
the entire "sprawling conglomeration of mul-
tiple provisions" and proposed instead that
he discuss one section of the act, a subject
"dear to the hearts of everybody" debit
interchange rates.
Section 1075, commonly known as
the Durbin Amendment, is the only sec-


tion of the Act that has been subject to
constitutional scrutiny.
The Federal Reserve, as the agency
responsible for implementing the Durbin
Amendment, will require debit interchange
fees to be reduced by about 75 to 90 per-
cent. As an example, Epstein explained that
for a bank like TCF Financial Corporation
- Epstein is serving on the corporation's
legal team that is challenging the act's con-
stitutionality with overall profits of $200
million, "the loss of interchange fees is about
$80 million."
The government argues that banks can
make up for the interchange loss by impos-
ing higher fees on their retail customers,
who, in theory, should be paying less for
consumer items because of the transaction
fee regulation. Epstein believes that this
compensation is not sufficient so the action
constitutes a regulatory taking.
The Dunwody Distinguished Lecture in
Law was established by the law firms of
Dunwody, White and Landon, RA. and Mer-
shon, Sawyer, Johnston, Dunwody and Cole
and the U.S. Sugar Corporation in honor of
Elliot and Atwood Dunwody.

* UF LAW'S MUSIC LAW CONFERENCE
EXPLORES CHANGING UNIVERSE OF
MUSIC INDUSTRY

Over the past decade, the music indus-
try has transformed significantly due to a
number of advances in digital technology, as
well as changes in policy, law and attitudes
within the industry. On March 26, UF Law's
Music Law Society addressed these issues at
the ninth annual Music Law Conference.
The conference, entitled "DON'T PANIC:
Navigating the Changing Universe of the
Music Industry," focused on the marked
shift in the fundamental tenets of the music
industry. The conference brought musicians,
lawyers, students, academics, policymakers
and entertainment professionals together for
a conversation on how to handle these shift-
ing dynamics.
The conference hosted a variety of
panels and breakout sessions that were
comprised of music industry experts and
professionals, from entertainment attorneys


and record label owners to producers and
recording artists.
Topics included online music sharing,
do-it-yourself techniques versus traditional
commercial avenues, contract negotiation,
changes and adaptations of the copyright
law, and a demo-listening panel.

* WOLF FAMILY HOSTS HARVARD
PROFESSOR FOR PROPERTY
LAW LECTURE

Harvard Law Professor Joseph Singer, a
nationally recognized expert in property law,
discussed what William the Conqueror, the
subprime crisis and the Tea Party have in
common before a packed audience at the
fourth annual Wolf Family Lecture at UF Law.
The lecture titled, "Property Law as
the Infrastructure of Democracy," explored
how American property law has served as
the foundation for democracy in the United
States.
Singer finds it odd that the subprime
crisis spurred the Tea Party, which believes
in smaller government. Singer said the gov-
ernment should have had more power for
oversight of the financial industry.
Singer discussed the contradiction be-
tween traditional principles of contract law
and property law. "You can't have absolute
freedom of contract and full ownership
rights," he said.
The question we should ask ourselves,
he said, is "what are the minimum stan-
dards for market and property relationships
in a free and democratic society that treats
each person with equal concern and re-
spect?"
The Wolf Family Lecture in the American
Law of Real Property was endowed by a gift
from UF Law Professor Michael Allan Wolf
and his wife, Betty. The Wolf family orga-
nized the lecture series for several reasons,
Wolf said, one of which was to bring out-
standing property law experts to the UF to
expose them to the "excellent student body
and our outstanding set of colleagues."
Singer's lecture will be published in Pow-
ell on Real Property, the most referenced real
property treatise in the country. Wolf is the
general editor of the 17-volume treatise. m


UF LAW














Check


and


J Balance
Speaker Dean Cannon (JD 92) Justice Jorge Labarga (JD 79)
The speaker, the justice and the future
of Florida's judicial system
BY RICHARD GOLDSTEIN
Two Universitl of Florida Let in College of Law alumni shape Florida government at
its highest leA els Justice Jor'e Labarga (JD 79) took office in Jainuiar 2009 as a Jus-
tice of the Floiida Supreme Court. and Speaker Dean Cannon (JD 92) was elevated to
a two-year term as speaker of the Flohi da House of Repireentai~ es I%\o years later. The
men operate on different sides of a di\ ide defined by the Founding Fathers the Sepa-
ration of Powers and are writing the latest plot twist in the never-ending-story of
American government. By the time you read these words, proposals in the Legislature
for revamping the state's system of justice may have died in the Legislature. But they
also may continue as living questions of public policy awaiting an argument before the
Florida Supreme Court, a vote by the people or a signature by the governor. Disparate
\ie\ s pre alil among lai\ makers. jiud'es-, and laW\ ers about the best \\ a\ for\\ard for
Florida, ludI icial \i stem But Ihere is subsainii.ial aireemenit thai Separatilion of Pow\ers
maintained bI a s\ stem of checks and balaiices \\ ill continue I0to 'enerate much heat and
Iihit amon,_, the execuliN e. judicial and le,~ islai\ e branches of ,o\ernmeni
:, ,r ,- .. ,, ,- I,) 2 ,-


S I I I I I











6M r. Chief Justice,
S I justices. May it
please the court:
My name is
Dean Cannon,
and I represent
the Florida Senate
and the Florida House of Representatives."
So began an unusual, if not unique, oral
argument. On Aug. 18 Cannon, a trim, tenor-
voiced Republican from Winter Park, took
his case before the Florida Supreme Court
while also preparing to take office as the next
speaker of the Florida House of Representa-
tives, the House's top job.
As an attorney, Cannon represented the
legislative branch of government. As speak-
er-designate, you might say he embodied it.
Cannon grew up in Lakeland and was, he
said, "That nerdy kid in high school who read
The Federalist Papers and loved it before I
ever became a real practicing lawyer."
He was the third generation of his family
to attend the University of Florida, where he
earned an undergraduate degree in telecom-
munications. You could say Cannon had a
successful run at the university. He was in-
ducted into the UF Hall of Fame, became
Florida Blue Key vice president and in his
second year of law school was elected presi-
dent of the UF student body.
"I had a great opportunity to both study
the law from an academic perspective and
also study government by winding up sit-
ting next to Justice (Stephen H.) Grimes
(LLB 54) of the Supreme Court during
UF football games," Cannon said. "It was
a tremendous opportunity to get to know
some of the real players in government at
the same time I was studying about the Con-
stitution, the Separation of Powers and the
way government operates."
In the fall 1991 issue of University of
Florida Lawyer, the predecessor publication
to UF LAW, Cannon said: "One thing that I
have learned from all of this is that I don't
want to be a politician. The pursuit of politics
will really wear you out."
Cannon would embark on a legal prac-
tice focused on the intersection of law, poli-
tics and government policy, working in sev-
eral Republican campaigns along the way.
When the opportunity arose in 2004, Cannon
proved his younger self wrong. He mobilized
his contacts and won election to the House of
Representatives, rising quickly to the top of
the House hierarchy.


Lu'


Cannon stepped before the justices
in August as an AV Martindale-Hubbell
rated attorney and member of The Flor-
ida Bar. He had never delivered an oral
argument before the justices. But he had
argued before lower appellate courts and
prepared rigorously for this case, spend-
ing hours anticipating justices' objections
and studying cases that would bear on the
topic.
"Basically, I moot-courted it as much
as possible," Cannon said, referring to the
well-worn law school tradition of arguing


I III lal


mock appellate cases to hone skills in ap-
pellate argument.
Cannon deployed legislative staff, out-
side lawyers, even a former state Supreme
Court justice, to grill him in preparation
for the oral argument.
Andy Bardos (JD 04, LLM 05 in tax)
was one who helped prepare the future
House speaker. Bardos worked in Tallahas-
see for the law firm GrayRobinson, where
his job included assisting the Legislature in
appellate cases. Shortly before the 2010 elec-
tion, he came on as special counsel to Sen-


UF LAW


. . .














mE li
locij


ate President Mike Haridopolos, R-Merritt
Island. Bardos helps develop legislation and
oversees the Senate Judiciary Committee.
"That was a great experience because
he's an outstanding attorney in addition to
what he does in the Legislature," Bardos
said. "I was really impressed with how hard
he worked and how much time he dedicated
to it. We wanted him to be, and he wanted
to be, ready for every possible argument and
every possible question."
Cannon figured he was just doing his
duty.


"I think I briefed 70-something cases
and went back to the basics and sort of put
everything else on hold to prepare because
as someone who respects the court and cares
very deeply about the practice of law and
the importance of our profession, I wanted
to present the best argument that I could,"
Cannon said.

FROM CASTRO TO BUSH V. GORE
Inside the Supreme Court, seated on the
bench with six other justices, Labarga gazed
down while Cannon delivered his oral argu-


ment. As a member of the Supreme Court
since January 2009, Labarga was new to
the high court but not to the judiciary. He
has been a judge for 15 years, and in 2000
Labarga presided over one of several Bush
v. Gore trials when the fate of a presidential
election was submitted to the courts in Palm
Beach County.
It was Labarga who first considered
whether "hanging chads" were to be
counted as votes. He ruled that the not-
quite-punched-out bits of paper should be
counted because they indicate voters' in-


SPRING 2011












tentions. Labarga ruled against a revote
of the presidential election in the face
of claims that the election resulting in a
virtual tie in Florida and the nation had
been fatally flawed. He said the Consti-
tution provided for presidential elections
to be held on one day only.


Jorge Labarga Sr., believed Castro's prom-
ises that he would install an American-style
democracy in the Caribbean nation. After
Castro took power in 1959, he would find
out otherwise. The elder Labarga turned
against the new regime, and, to avoid ret-
ribution, fled the country. Justice Labarga


And after court had closed for the day,
the lean Cuban-American, who came to
Florida as an 11-year-old when his family
fled the soldiers of Fidel Castro, donned
a baseball cap to go with jeans and a T-
shirt. Labarga was working late during that
weeklong trial and a nighttime stroll ap-
pealed to him.
An international media storm envel-
oped Labarga during the day. In darkness
he meandered anonymously among the
humming satellite trucks that lined the bou-
levard at West Palm Beach County Court-
house like an occupying army.
Labarga paused next to the CNN truck
where up-and-coming TV news host Greta
Van Susteren conducted an interview.
"I was standing right behind the per-
son she was interviewing. She did not rec-
ognize me and she was asking questions
about what I was doing. Who was I? Where
did I come from? Who was this judge who
was going to rule on all these cases? And
this guy is going on and he was a lo-
cal guy going on and on about me. Of
course, he had his back to me. He couldn't
see me. I'm standing there listening to him.
And she's looking straight at me and had
no clue that I was standing there listening
to her."
Labarga wanted to be a lawyer for as
long as he can remember, and some of his
formative experiences with the adminis-
tration of justice came years before when
confronted with Castro's blossoming po-
lice state.
Labarga's father had raised money for
the Cuban revolution to overthrow the Ful-
gencio Batista regime. He said his father,


recalls that his father left his family home
on a Monday. On Wednesday, the soldiers
arrived.
"They would come late at night with a
truck full of soldiers to instill terror among
the neighborhoods, and the soldiers would
surround the house and come in and ran-
sack it, and they would eventually drag
the person they were looking for out to the
truck and take him away," Labarga said.
"They did that at my house, and I recall my
brothers and me hiding behind my mother
as they were searching my house and my
grandfather, who was in his mid-80s, start-
ed protesting only to be told to shut up or
be shot."
The soldiers left and arrested his fa-
ther's friends. One was soon executed.
There was no check on the power of the
executive branch in Castro's Cuba.
"Needless to say, I have an acute ap-
preciation for the Fourth Amendment of
our Constitution and its prohibition of il-
legal searches and seizure," Labarga said.
"The whole idea of police officers kicking
somebody's door open and entering some-
body's house and searching somebody's
home illegally is obviously something that
I find abhorrent. On the other hand, when
it is done legally for a lawful purpose it is
something that obviously needs to be done.
My concern as a judge, as a lawyer, even as
a prosecutor, always has been that police of-
ficers show the requisite probable cause to
enter somebody's home."

RHETORICAL CONFIDENCE
During the August oral argument in the
Supreme Court on the fate of the proposed


constitutional amendment, Cannon yielded
no rhetorical ground to justices. Cannon
answered skeptical questions in a polite but
confident tone.
JUSTICE R. FRED LEWIS: I'm con-
cerned that here it is the actual language
that goes to the voter not a sophisticated
legislator or judicial ",.... The public
what will the public think this means?
CANNON: The public will hopefully
give the words the meaning that they give
to them just like if they were voting on the
right to privacy or the right to due process.
We gave the words to the voters, your hon-
or so they would have the ability to read
them themselves and choose to add them to
their organic law or not.


UF LAW


A Cosituionis baialywod


ona iee f apr.Itiswht e h


























































Months later, Labarga declared himself
impressed by Cannon's performance. "He
did an outstanding job, and whenever he
goes back into practice he's going to be an
outstanding lawyer. I think I told him at a
reception that he's wasting his talents," the
justice said with a grin.
Florida Department of State vs. Florida
State Conference of NAACP Branches con-
cerned a constitutional amendment proposed
by the Legislature and slated for a statewide
ballot that would have changed Florida's
methods of legislative redistricting. The state
NAACP and other groups filed suit, claim-
ing the measure would invite radical gerry-
mandering and that the ballot summary was
misleading. In a sense, the case was also di-


rected at the power of the Florida Supreme
Court itself. Cannon contended that the state
Supreme Court had no authority under the
state Constitution to remove a constitutional
amendment proposed by the Legislature from
the ballot, since the language of the amend-
ment itself was to be given to the voters.
In this contest between the legislative
and judicial branches, the judicial branch
flexed its muscles.
A 5-2 court majority that included La-
barga ruled against Cannon and the state.
The court threw out the ballot measure and,
in doing so, reaffirmed its authority to dis-
miss constitutional amendments proposed
by the Legislature before voters could weigh
in. The majority held that the ballot summa-
ry and its headline were misleading despite
the fact that it repeated language of the pro-
posed amendment.
"We hold that the ballot language setting
forth the substance of Amendment 7 does
not inform the voter of the true purpose and
effect of the amendment on existing consti-
tutional provisions and, further, is mislead-
ing," the court majority wrote in an unsigned
opinion.
That opinion may not represent the final
word.
Speaking in his Tallahassee legisla-
tive office where a parchment
copy of the U.S. Constitution
hangs above his desk and a
book about former President
Ronald Reagan stands promi-
nently on his bookshelf, Can-
non explained a fundamental
disagreement with the court.
"If we propose a bad ques-
tion then the St. Pete Times editorial board
and the Gainesville Sun editorial board and
everyone on the Internet and the blogosphere
will know that it's a bad question. It shouldn't
be up to a political super-committee, super-
legislature of five justices to decide that
something we've passed with a three-fifths
majority of both the House and Senate might
confuse people. That's the underlying argu-
ment for the Separation of Powers," Cannon
said. "We pass something and they don't like
it and it doesn't go to the voters. There's no
check, there's no balance to that."
A spokeswoman said Cannon favors
new checks on the Supreme Court to al-
low more constitutional proposals to appear
before voters. And during the spring legis-
lative session, Cannon helped push legisla-


tion through the House and the Senate that
would set a timeline for legal challenges of
proposed ballot summary language.
Days after Cannon spoke to UF LAW, he
unveiled a far-reaching package of reforms
to change the way Florida's system of justice
operates. A constitutional proposal would
make it easier for the Legislature to overturn
rules regarding the practice and procedures
in state courts. It would require a simple
majority of the Legislature to overturn new
Supreme Court rules instead of the current
two-thirds majority.
Another constitutional change would di-
vide the Supreme Court into two divisions
- with one division deciding criminal cases
and the other division ruling on civil cases.
The proposal would add three justices, bring-
ing the total to 10 five in each division.
Proponents of splitting the Supreme
Court into civil and criminal divisions say it
would promote efficiency and decrease the
backlog of cases weighing down the judicial
system. Texas uses a similar system.
The ideas are stirring consternation with-
in the legal community.
At each turn, UF Law alumni are on
the frontlines confronting these questions.
Mayanne Downs (JD 87), president of The
Florida Bar, placed the justice-system pro-
posals at the top of her legislative
lobbying agenda during the spring
and toured the state speaking about
their consequences.
Meanwhile, UF Law alumnus
Stephen N. Zack (JD 71), president
of the American Bar Association
and a past president of The Flori-
da Bar, asserts that increasing the
state's funding of the judiciary from its cur-
rent level of $462 million would do more to
clear a backlog of cases than would dividing
the state Supreme Court and adding justices.
"Some people would see it as just anoth-
er type of court packing," Zack said, alluding
to President Franklin Delano Roosevelt's bid
to increase the number of justices on the U.S.
Supreme Court. Roosevelt was incensed by
the court's habit of declaring his domestic
policy initiatives unconstitutional, and in
1937 he proposed adding up to six Supreme
Court justices to the nine-member court who
would be appointed by the president and who
would presumably vote in sympathy with his
agenda. Roosevelt's court-packing proposal
turned into a legislative failure and a political
disaster.


SPRING 2011












In Florida during the spring, a sudden
decline in mortgage filing fees threatened
to shut down the state courts temporarily
for lack of money. However, one of the
proposed constitutional changes would
provide a guaranteed minimum appro-
priation for the courts from all revenue
sources equal to 2.25 percent
of General Revenue. Had
the proposal been law dur-
ing the 2010-2011 fiscal year
the courts' budget would have
received an additional 16 per-
cent, or $73 million, according
to the Speaker's Office.
"The House proposal ad-
dresses the longstanding criticism that the
courts are underfunded and judicial dock-
ets are overcrowded by providing a mini-
mum appropriation for the courts," Can-
non said. "This proposal provides stable
funding for the court, but offers flexibility
to the Legislature in terms of allocating
that funding each year."


The



Speakers



Club
BY RICHARD GOLDSTEIN
During its 102-year history, the University of
Florida Levin College ofLaw has supplied
more than its share of graduates to sit in the
catbird seat of the Florida House ofRepresen-
tatives. Florida House Speaker Dean Cannon
(JD 92) is the ig li UF Law graduate to hold
the top job in the Florida House. The other
House speakers were William V Chappell
Jr (LLB 49) *, Mallory E. Home (LLB 50) *,
RichardA. Pettigrew (LLB 57), Terrell Sessums
(LLB 58), Donald L. Tucker (LLB 62), Jon
Mills (JD 72) and Tom Gustafson (JD 74).
Meet the UF Law speakers club.


But late in the legislative session, the
Senate removed elements of the constitu-
tional amendment as passed by the House,
including the minimum funding provision
and adding justices to the Supreme Court.
Remaining in the constitutional propos-
al was a change that would give the state
Senate the power to accept or
reject Supreme Court nominees,
introducing the same system
used for the federal judiciary. A
separate legislative proposal that
died in the Senate would have
changed the makeup of Florida's
nine-member judicial nominat-
ing commissions, the bodies that
recommend appellate and Supreme Court
nominees to the governor.
Under current law, the nine commis-
sion members are appointed by the gov-
ernor, the Florida Bar and commission
members themselves.
For Zack, who participated in the se-
lection of judges as general counsel to


former Gov. Bob Graham, it would be a
mistake to send the governor's nominees
before the state Senate for approval. Zack
said it is impossible to remove politics
from judicial selections, but placing nomi-
nees before the state Senate would only
make it worse.
"When I started practicing law 40 years
ago, the definition of a judge was someone
who was a friend of the governor. We don't
want that to be the definition of a judge to-
day," Zack said. "I never asked nor knew the
political philosophy of a judge, nor did
we ask their position on any issue. In
a United States Senate confirmation
that's exactly what happens, and I don't
think that people who have watched that
process think that it is one that we should
bring to Florida."

AN UNEXPECTED COMPLICATION
Labarga is intimately familiar with
the current system of nominating appel-
late court judges and justices in Florida. It


r-


4


Pettigrew


Sessums


Pettigrew and Sessums: 1970-1974
In the 1960s, the U.S. Supreme
Court noticed that representation was
out of whack in many state legislatures.
In Florida, for example, representation
was tilted steeply in favor of rural resi-
dents. By some estimates as few as 13
percent of the state's voters could elect
a majority of the legislators.
The Supreme Court responded with
the "one-man, one-vote" standard. Pet-
tigrew and Sessums came in as part
of the political sea change ushered in
by that Supreme Court decision. Reap-
portionment meant out with rule by


Tucker


the "Pork Chop Gang," conservative
North Florida Democrats who opposed
desegregation, and in with progressive
Democrats, who tended to represent
urban constituencies and whose mis-
sion it was to expand state-government
capacity.
"Reapportionment brought in a
whole raft of new players who were
elected locally and were not being
dominated by statewide associations
and organizations that were doling out
money," explained Pettigrew, speaker
from 1971 to 1972. "We like to refer to
it as Florida's Camelot."


UF LAW


,,














was two months before he was scheduled
to appear before the Judicial Nominating
Commission as an applicant for the Su-
preme Court when he met an unexpected
complication.


me, and I lost about 20 pounds, and I had
not eaten in three days. And my last shot
was two days before my interview with the
Judicial Nominating Commission in Tam-
pa. I was so skinny my suits didn't fit me.


I~~~~~~~~. nee se o ne h oiia


"I grew up in Palm Beach on the beach-
es so I was in the sun my entire young life.
I found a little spot underneath my nail in
my index finger, and it was diagnosed to
be melanoma, and I had to have my finger
amputated.
"I had to undergo a regimen of chemo-
therapy for 30 shots and that nearly killed


Mills


Gustatson


During his speakership the Legislature
pushed through a corporate income tax,
and judicial reforms that included distanc-
ing judicial selections from politics with
judicial nominating commissions and
retention votes. The Legislature instituted
home rule to devolve decision-making
power to cities and counties. It initiated
statewide land and water management
policies, including major environmental
legislation based on a model law by UF
Law Professor (later Dean) Sheldon Plager
and UF Law Dean Frank Maloney.
Sessums focused much of his legisla-
tive effort, before and during his 1973


I could not fly because I would get nau-
seous. So my wife (Zulma) drove me to the
interview from West Palm Beach to Tampa
and it was at The Florida Bar office at the
Tampa Airport.
"The trip itself nearly killed me so I
went to bed to sleep and my wife woke me
up around 4:30."


Cannon


to 1974 speakership, on property tax
relief through statutory and constitutional
limits on local ad valorem taxes and
education. "We found there were 33
large senior high schools where student
test scores were at or below the random
chance level. You could have brought in
a tribe of non-English-speaking illiterates
who would have done about as well.
That was sort of horrifying."
The response, Sessums said, was
The Educational Accountability Act of
1971. It required statewide tests for stu-
dents in a variety of academic subjects
and grade levels. Finally, he secured the


He forced down a bagel "and somehow
the adrenalin kicked in because I went in and
gave an interview, and I don't remember it all,
but obviously I did something right because I
was able to be nominated and beat out a great
number of other very qualified people.


enactment of the Florida Education Finance
Act to equalize and increase state support of
public schools.

Tucker: 1974-1978
In the one-term-and-out world of Florida
House speakers, Tucker was unique. He was
the only person to hold the position in two con-
secutive terms, or four sessions, of the Florida
House. Tucker said part of the reason for this
was that he didn't try to impose a substantive
political agenda on the Legislature but acted as
a facilitator.
The Tallahassee Democrat did push
through procedural changes that he figures
have contributed to good governance. These
initiatives include requiring that spending pro-
posals added to appropriations bills be taken
from money already included in the legislation
or that they be paid for with new taxes or fees.
"It's kind of like a pie. If you're going to
increase, for example, the money for the high-
way patrol, it has to come from somewhere
else," Tucker explained. "Otherwise, you have
to raise it from a tax."
He also slowed the process to require the
mandated three readings of legislation hap-
pen on three different days. This has helped
keep errors out of bills that were being rushed


SPRING 2011












"I have spoken to so many of those
members of that commission since and
I asked them, 'Did you not realize some-
thing about me that day?' They said, 'No,
you looked fine to me.' I said, 'Well, I was
dying."'
Labarga's cancer is now in remission
and his suits fit just fine.

HISTORY REPEATS ITSELF
To appear on a statewide ballot, the
constitutional proposals must pass both
houses of the Legislature with sufficient
majorities. But they also could wind up be-
fore the Florida Supreme Court before ap-
pearing on the ballot. And that would return
to where this story began the Legislature
confronting the Supreme Court.
This tension between the branches, ex-
perts say, is the way of our American sys-
tem of government.
Cannon agrees with the notion that
Separation of Powers and an independent
judiciary are important principles, but he
added, "Independent does not mean unac-


countable or omnipotent and it will be great
to continue this debate going forward."
Jon Mills (JD 72), director of UF Law's
Center for Governmental Responsibility and
UF Law dean emeritus, co-authored part of
the state Constitution as a member of the
Florida Constitution Revision Commission
from 1996 to 1998. From 1986 to 1988 Mills
held the the speaker's job. Since then, he has
taught constitutional law to hundreds of stu-
dents, including Cannon, whom he remem-
bers as a very good student.
Mills is a Democrat, but he
recognizes the frustration ex-
pressed by his fellow alumnus
and Republican successor in the
speaker's chair.
"That tension was designed
by the drafters of our constitution
and the federal Constitution. The
court interprets legislative action all the time.
When I was in the Legislature I agreed with
it sometimes, and I didn't agree with it other
times," Mills said. "We have to preserve the
separation and even preserve the tension."


Labarga draws another lesson from
the history of his homeland and the ease
with which an apparently just constitution
established in the 1940s was overturned
by a determined dictator.
"A Constitution is basically words on
a piece of paper. It is what we the people
do with it that make it work. In Cuba,
the first thing Fidel did when he came to
power was to get rid of the judicial branch
of government creating his own, and you
had military tribunals decid-
ing cases because he wanted
control. He did not want an
independent body telling
him as a dictator what
you're doing is wrong, it's
unconstitutional," Labarga
said. "So a judicial branch
of government plays a cru-
cial role in our democracy, but we need
to have the liberty, the independence to
make those decisions without the fear of
any type of retaliation whether politi-
cal or financial." m


THE SPEAKERS CLUB continued ...


through on the same day they were intro-
duced, Tucker said.
Tucker's name graces Tallahassee's
multipurpose arena The Donald L.
Tucker Center which is home to Florida
State University's basketball teams. Tucker
notes that he and E.T York, chancellor
of the State University System of Florida
from 1975 to 1980, teamed up to find an
unused trove of state money for that proj-
ect. Tucker said the Legislature used ac-
cumulated student fees to build the Tucker
Center, UF's Stephen C. O'Connell Center
arena, and the University of South Florida
Sun Dome in Tampa.

Mills and Gustafson: 1986-1990
When Mills, a Democrat from Alachua
County, assumed the speakership in the
1980s, questions of growth management
including wetland conservation were at the
top of his to-do list. Mills, who is director of
UF Law's Center for Governmental Respon-
sibility and dean emeritus, laid the ground-
work for his 1987 to 1988 term with the
Sunrise Report on the future of Florida.
The House dealt with "issues ranging


from economic development to enhancing
science and technology to training and
education so we had a very substantial
agenda and it went very well," Mills said.
"We passed a very significant amount of
that."
Mills was followed in the speaker's
chair by Gustafson, whose primary legisla-
tive focus was children and adolescents.
Money was shifted into nurturing children
from birth to age 4 in a bid to improve
the life chances for those at risk for nega-
tive social outcomes. The Fort Lauderdale
Democrat's second major children's initia-
tive was moving juvenile delinquents into
group homes instead of jails when their
family structure breaks down. That policy
died with the administration of Gov. Law-
ton Chiles (JD 55), who took office after
Gustafson left the Legislature.
At the behest of the Senate president,
Gustafson used his UF Law training to write
new constitutional rules for open meetings
that cover legislative leaders and the gover-
nor. "I booked Con Law at the University of
Florida," Gustafson said, referring to the law
school's book awards given to students with


the highest grades in a course. "I rewrote it
in its appropriate constitutional form."

Cannon: 2010-2012
Cannon, a Winter Park Republican, says
his term as speaker will be marked by the
consequences of revenue contraction brought
on by the 2008 financial collapse as federal
stimulus money, which softened the initial
blow, fades into the background.
During an interview with UF LAW before
the spring session, Cannon said he would
like to be remembered for dealing intelli-
gently with the budget shortfall.
"I hope among the things that I'll be
able to say when I'm finished is that I made
thoughtful, careful, hard decisions during
a very challenging time and helped steer
the ship of state through some really rough
waters," Cannon said. "I hope that they will
also say that I helped positively transform
government to make it better serve the
people who send us all up here and who
pay all of our salaries in all three branches of
government." m
*Chappell of Marion County and Home
of Leon County are deceased.


UF LAW




A\lpA


Gator Law

Fami
Three family trees are intertwined with
the heritage of UF Law
BY BRANDON BRESLOW (3LAS)
21


khls?








any UF Law alumni and students
claim to bleed orange and blue. It's
more unusual for the colors to course
through the branches and roots of their
family trees.
For them, attending the University
of Florida Fredric G. Levin College of
Law has become a proud tradition that
has produced multiple generations of UF Law alumni.
Many also remain involved in the UF Law community as active
alumni: returning to campus as guest lecturers on their field of practice,
becoming members of the Law Center Association's Board of Trustees
or creating an endowment at the college.
"Multiple generations of the same family attending UF Law create
a very strong sense of loyalty that is evidenced in how they volunteer
their time and financial support as alumni," said Kelley Frohlich, senior
director of development and alumni affairs.
The tradition also helps students look to their family for guidance
and support in tackling the worries, woes and workload inevitable in
law school since family members have usually been in their seats,
figuratively and sometimes literally.
"The shared bond among family members who can reflect over a
lifetime of experiences about the law and their time at UF Law, both the
good and the bad, provides a two-way street of learning," Frohlich said.
Following is a close-up of just three of these families, each with a
student currently attending UF Law, each active in alumni activities,
and, like many others, each proud of their tradition of Gator lawyers.

THE HUDSON/JENKINS FAMILY
Tyler Hudson (IL) took a long and winding road to UF Law, but
ultimately genetics won out.
"My mom has always said with orange hair and blue eyes, I was
marked as a Gator at birth," Hudson said. "It just took me a while to
get here."
Hudson was never far away from UF Law in his heart or home.
He was born into a Gainesville family with three generations of Gator
lawyers: his mother, Judge Elizabeth Jenkins (JD 76), his grandfather,
Joe C. Jenkins Jr. (JD 49), and his great-grandfather, Joe C. Jenkins Sr.
(JD 32).
"Family was definitely a part of my decision to come here," he said,
"but it really came down to wanting a change of pace and to come back
home."
Hudson graduated with a bachelor's degree in philosophy in 2007
from George Washington University in Washington, D.C. He began his
political career in 2004 as a press intern for U.S. Sen. John Edwards'
presidential primary campaign in New Hampshire. That same year, he
was the youngest staff member of the Democratic National Convention,
where he worked as a speechwriter for party leaders.
"I decided that it wasn't something I wanted to make a career out
of," Hudson said, "but I'm tremendously grateful for the lessons I
learned from the experience."
He went on to work in Florida on President Barack Obama's cam-
paign and the gubernatorial campaign of former U.S. Rep. Jim Davis,
D-Fla.
The Jenkins family is no stranger to Florida politics. Joe C. Jenkins
Sr. was a member of the Florida House of Representatives from 1939-
1948, representing Alachua County.
"My son inherited my grandfather's love for the political arena and
public service," said Elizabeth Jenkins, a federal magistrate judge for
the Middle District of Florida in Tampa.


UF LAW








After his tenure in the state Legislature, her grandfather opened
the law practice of Jenkins and Jenkins with his son, Joe C. Jenkins
Jr. The firm handled mainly real property cases.
"Everybody in Gainesville knew about them and their office,"
Elizabeth Jenkins said. "They were leaders in the community for de-
cades."
When Joe C. Jenkins Sr. passed away in 1958, his son took over
the law firm. Joe C. Jenkins Jr. was known for spending hours at prop-
erty closings explaining to his clients the importance and responsibili-
ties of the asset they were acquiring.
"He was one of the great attorneys in Gainesville at the time who
took a higher level of care in closing matters," Elizabeth Jenkins said.
Joe C. Jenkins Jr. also worked as a part-time municipal judge for
the 8th Judicial Circuit of Florida, handling traffic citations and mis-
demeanors.
His passion for adjudication was inherited by his daughter Eliza-
beth. She served as a federal prosecutor in Orlando and then West
Palm Beach after serving with the Department of Justice immediately
after graduating from UF Law. She became a fed-
eral magistrate judge in 1985. "The gr
"What I learned from the judges I would argue
in front of as a prosecutor is what influenced my de- traditic
cision to become a judge," Elizabeth Jenkins said.
Elizabeth Jenkins has returned to UF Law on their oA
many occasions to speak about the female role in
the legal community and judicial clerkships. She is Florida
also a proud member of the Law Center Associa-
tion's Board of Trustees.
"Although I never pushed him, I am proud Tyler
was able to continue our family's tradition at UF Law,"
she said. "He understands the importance of good judg-
ment and solid legal skills."

THE THACKER/OVERSTREET FAMILY
As graduation from Wake Forest University loomed
for Celia Thacker (2L), the choice of which law school
to attend weighed heavy. With three generations of grad-
uates from UF Law preceding her, could she turn away
from her chance to officially become a Gator?
"While I had several options for law school," Thack-
er said, "I realized that Florida was the best choice for
me.
Thacker grew up as a Gator fan, attending her first
football game at seven years old with her mother, Jo
Overstreet Thacker (JD 87), an active UF alumna and
member of the Law Center Association's Board of Trust-
ees.
"There is a tradition in my family that you must lea 11.1
Are the Boys from Old Florida' before you can attend you.! Ii I
football game," Celia said.
When it came time to decide on law school, her mothF. .i.1I
her grandfather, Murray Overstreet Jr. (LLB 53), gave Cel I. Il I
opportunity to make the decision on her own.
"My family was really good about not pressuring mn l,.,ii
subtly dropped hints that Florida would be the best option .
law school," she said.
The same could be said for Jo, who was preceded b- c!'
father and her grandfather, Murray Overstreet Sr. (BLW 2-
In the end, she made the decision based on what she waI ii..
for her life.


"The glorious thing about our family's tradition is that every-
one decided on their own that they wanted to attend Florida for law
school, independent of what the family may have wanted," Jo said.
Celia also has family ties to UF Law on her father's side. Her
great-grandfather, O.S. Thacker (JD 29), who is also the great-grand-
father of Jonathan Graessle (2L). Jonathan is a fourth generation
student of UF Law as well. In addition to O.S. Thacker, preceding
Jonathan are his father William Graessle (JD 85) and grandparents
Lois Thacker-Graessle (LLB 41) and Albert W. Graessle (LLB 41).
Like individual bricks placed together to form a building, the
Overstreet, and now Thacker, presence at UF Law stands tall, simi-
lar to the family's presence in its hometown of Kissimmee.
Murray Overstreet Sr. opened his practice in Kissimmee im-
mediately after his graduation in 1928. The firm handled real es-
tate law, wills, trusts and estate planning. Murray Overstreet Jr.
joined the firm when he graduated from UF Law and went on to
become county attorney for Osceola County in 1960, a part-time
position then.


glorious thing about our family's

)n is that everyone decided on

wn that they wanted to attend

for law school..." -.J OVERSTREET THACKER (JD


37)


Murray stepped down as county attorney in

* 'l n . .* ..i i l . I Ii i i.. l i vi i .i
I, .' I . JI i I. .ii .I I .il I n


.". 11r .' I .'. ii Ii .' I.Ii 1 I I i .1 1 .
>..n i!i.'.,,.1"i- i ,,!! .' !! '"' 1iii-I!iir.' |'.' !-
I %A i i L 1.' I !. i. '! ,. i l !.. II 1i .'. I .

(Lell Murray Oversieel Sr. IBLW 271; iBelow* Al Celia'i
graduation hornom Wake Forest are, hornom lell, Jo Overitreel
Thacker 0JD 87P. Celia Thacker (2LP, lather Clarence Thack
er, 4icter Celeste Thacker and Murray Overstreel Jr. iLLB 53P.


SPRING 2011


87)











Murray has since retired from his practice.
Through their work, the Overstreet family has influenced a
lot of Kissimmee's residents, something Celia is reminded of
on a regular basis.
"When I go out in Kissimmee, I have people come up to me
that I don't recognize and tell me how great my family is and
what (my family) has done to help them," she said.
But now it is Celia's family that gets to tell people about her
accomplishments in moot court as an active coach and as
a researcher for Professor Michael Allan Wolf, the Richard E.
Nelson Chair in Local Government Law.
"We are extremely proud of her ability to hit the ground
running and get involved," Jo said.

THE BOONE FAMILY
Caroline Boone (3L) remembers receiving her letter of ac-
ceptance from UF Law like it was last week.
"I ran up the driveway from the mailbox and all the feelings
of uncertainty came to rest," Boone said.
In May, she became the fourth graduate in her family from
UF Law, carrying on the Boone family's proudest traditions.
However, law school was not always part of her plan.
"Towards the end of my undergraduate years, I was
leaning toward becoming a teacher because I wanted to
help people," Boone said. "Eventually I talked to my dad about
the decision and he helped me realize that lawyers can help
people too."
Her father, Jeffery Boone (JD 82), was speaking from ex-
perience. Jeffery Boone, his brother, Stephen Boone (JD 83),
and their father, E.G. "Dan" Boone (LLB 54), run the Venice
law firm of Boone, Boone, Boone, Koda & Frook. Their prac-
tice specializes in civil litigation, business and commercial law,
land use, zoning, wills, trusts and estate planning.


(Above) In front are Caroline Boone (3L) and E.G.
"Dan" Boone (LLB 54), her grandfather. In the back
are Caroline's grandmother, Freda Boone, father
Jeffery Boone (JD 82) and uncle Stephen Boone
(JD 83); (Right) From left, Jeffery, Caroline and Dan
Boone pose at a UF football game.


The office's orange and blue carpet and Gator-packed staff
leave little question as to where the Boones earned their law de-
grees.
"I used to hire lawyers from all of the Florida law schools
and out-of-state schools," said E.G. Boone, "but I started only
hiring Gators when I realized the education at UF was far above
the education of these other schools."
Caroline started as a law clerk at the firm last summer. She
surprised the partners with her ability to apply the skills she
learned at UF Law, and her personal savvy to complete the re-
search, writing and other tasks required of her.
"I was really impressed with how quickly she would pick up
on the goal of the assignments we gave her," Jeffery Boone said.
Caroline also attended City Commission meetings with fam-
ily members as the firm handled zoning and land use issues in
Venice.
"It was great to see the rapport that my family has with their
clients and the respect that the community has for them," Caro-
line said. "They really do give back to their community through
different service clubs and our church."
The Boone family has been prominent in the Venice commu-
nity since E.G. Boone opened his firm in 1956. The firm helped
establish the national banking charter for the First National Bank
of Venice, now SunTrust Bank, and played a key role in imple-
menting central water and sewage for Venice by founding the
Civil Action Association.
The family never strayed from UF as they made the tran-
sition from students to alumni. E.G. Boone has served on the
Law Center Association's Board of Trustees since 1987 and as
a member of the President's Council. Boone's firm also spon-
sored the barbeque luncheon at UF Law's centennial celebration
in 2009.
"I credit a lot of my success to what I learned at UF Law,"
Jefferv Boone said.
Al['I' I. i....Ii.....es, Caroline will begin working as a full-
inmi .i.lli. in. i..I I family's firm. The rest of the family is
,.cl.l 1.i m,'ii _.'nerations of Gator lawyers in the future.
\'c .icl nchI, '. .nt a fourth generation and are optimistic
Ii .1 III .iiinl i,.lh Jeffery Boone said. m





Tell Us Your Story
."We want to know about your family's
heritage at UF Law. If you have photos
and a story about more than one
generation who attended UF Law, send
them to us and we will post them on our
website. The site is linked to this story
which uses one member of each class
at the Levin College of Law to explore a
family heritage in the online version of
UF LAW magazine. We will post up to two
photos and 300 words for each family.
Send your story and photos to UF LAW
editor Richard Goldstein, Goldstein@
law.ufl.edu or Attn: Law in the Family;
Communications Office; RP.O. Box 117633;
244 Bruton-Geer; Gainesville, FL 32611.


UF LAW









UF LAW DEVELOPMENT & ALUMNI AFFAIRS



PARTNERS


Corrections to 2009-
2010 Annual Report
published November 2010
Distinguished Donors 2009-2010
UF Law Honor Roll Corrections
The Trusler Society description
should have been:
Annual Gifts of $1,000-$4,999
Trusler Society members receive
special recognition in the annual
report.
Donors mistakenly reported
at a lower giving level
Here is the correct listing:
Dean's Council Partners
(Gifts and five-year pledges of
$10,000-$24,999)
Ausley & McMullen
Jeffrey P. and Jan M. Brock
Casey Ciklin Lubitz Martens &
O'Connell
Anne C. Conway
Mayanne A. Downs
Jacksonville Bankruptcy Bar
Association
K. Judith Lane
Michael D. and Mary P. Minton
James E. and Lori G. Thomison
Dean's Council Associates
(Gifts and five-year pledges of
$5,000-$9,999)
Kendall Coffey and
Joni Armstrong Coffey
Gary J. Cohen
Richard C. and Marjory E. Grant
Russell H. and Karen H. Kasper
Purcell, Flanagan, Hay & Greene
John T. and Leah A. Rogerson
Mark & Shari L. Somerstein
Andrew K. and Marie S. Strimaitis
Timothy W. and Roslyn B. Volpe


SFLORIDA


THE CAMPAIGN FOR THE UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA


How giving a little
can add up to a lot
ii .peal to give often comes with
.. momentt to the effect that every
,illc bit helps. This is certainly true
at the UF Levin College of Law. As an
example, if half of the law school alumni
who do not give annually gave just $100
a year, it would have the same impact as a
new $21 million endowment.
Here's how this works: Half of the
16,800 nondonor law alumni total 8,400. If
each of these alumni gave $100 a year the
law school would receive $840,000 a year.
The university can spend 4 percent a year
from an endowment so it requires $21 mil-
lion to generate the same $840,000 annual
income (see graphic).
The annual fund supports current criti-
cal needs of the law school, from provid-
ing supplemental awards to partial schol-
arships to providing defibrillators now
accessible throughout the law school. The
fund also supports the Gator TeamChild
Juvenile Law Clinic, student organizations,
technology upgrades, guest lecturers, stu-
dent support services and much more.
This brings us to the status of the
Florida Tomorrow Campaign. As of
March 31, 2011, the law school had raised
$25,410,919, which is 54.1 percent of the
$47 million goal. The campaign period
closes in 2012. UF overall has reached al-
most 86 percent of the $1.5 billion goal, so


6


I


UF
SLAW

How $100 annual contributions
can total a $21 million endowment


I


0


i


we have substantial ground to cover in the
final phase of the campaign. UF Law relies
on alumni and friends to be successful.
How to help UF Law reach its
campaign goals:
* Make an annual gift. Contact Grace
Northern: northem@law.ufl.edu, 352-
273-0640.
* If you are already making annual gifts,
consider documenting your annual
gift in a five-year pledge. The total
amount of your pledge made before
June 30, 2012, counts in the campaign
even if your payments continue past
2012. Also, our office will send you gift
reminders annually so you don't forget
to make your gift each year. Contact
Grace Northern: northem@law.ufl.edu,
352-273-0640.


SPRING 2011


22.milli

nntlwnie


















Announcing the

Student Division

of the Law Alumni

Council


n fall 2010 the Law Alumni Council
Student Division debuted to great suc-
cess. The organization was founded
by the Law Alumni Council Executive
Committee based on feedback from prior
class gift committee members.
The council believes that involving
students while they are in law school helps
them feel invested in the school's success
and promotes the idea of giving back. Stu-
dents are invited to join by making a sug-
gested $20 donation to the annual fund.
Student division members receive invi-
tations to special events, including regional
alumni receptions. These events help con-
nect student members to our large network
of alumni and give them an opportunity to
interact with alumni throughout the state.
More than 70 students joined immedi-
ately when the program was launched, and
the members have participated in events
such as a Law Alumni Council social at
2-Bits Lounge at the UF Hilton Hotel
and an event in Gainesville for alumni to
honor Federal District Court Judge Stephan
Mickle. For more information on the Stu-
dent Division, contact Jennifer Beback at
352-273-0640 or bt.i.. jljl !. ..11i c..I...


* Sponsor a Book Award. If you are
already making generous annual
gifts, you can sponsor a Book Award
in a course of your choosing for
just $2,500 per year with a five-year
commitment. Contact Grace North-
ern: northern law.ufl.edu, 352-273-
0640.
* Document a simple bequest of any
size. If you will be age 65 or older
by June 30, 2012, the full amount
of your documented bequest gift
counts in the campaign. Become
a member of the Bequest Society
by completing a simple form and
allowing us to recognize your gen-
erosity during your lifetime. Or
make UF Law a beneficiary of a life
insurance policy or retirement plan.
Contact Lauren Lehr: lehr law.ufl.
edu, 352-273-0640.
* Become a Law Firm Giving
Champion where you solicit your
colleagues to participate in annual
giving and receive recognition as a
law firm. Go to ww' l. ... ll ..I.../
lfg for more details. Contact Grace
Northern: northemrn@law.ufl.edu,
352-273-0640.
* There are many other creative gift
vehicles through which you can
financially support your law school,
which remains one of the greatest
quality bargains in legal education
in the world. For additional infor-
mation on gift-giving options and
naming opportunities contact Kelley
Frohlich: frohlich@law.ufl.edu,
352-273-0640.
We list new commitments of
$25,000 or more through May 1 to the
Levin College of Law. Thanks to:
* A group of alumni who have created
a $50,000 endowment in Water Law.
* Buddy Savary (JD 56), who has es-
tablished the Johnson S. "Buddy"
and Mary Savary Scholarship in
Law. Savary is retired from the for-
mer Sarasota law firm Abel Band.
* Mandell and Joyce Glicksberg, who
made a $25,000 gift to the Law


Review Endowment. Mandell is a
retired UF Law professor and the
Glicksbergs continue to reside in
Gainesville.
* John McNatt Jr. (JD 57), who made
a gift of just over $200,000 through
the cash value of insurance policies
to supplement the Judge McNatt
Scholarship Endowment. McNatt
is retired from Holland & Knight in
Jacksonville.
* Marti Cochran (JD 73), who made a
$25,000 pledge to the annual fund.
Cochran is a partner with Arnold &
Porter in Washington, D.C.
* Jack Clarke, who made a $100,000
commitment to establish the Dean
Robert H. Jerry, II Scholarship.
Clarke, a graduate of Cornell Law,
is retired from Exxon Corp. and
lives in Gainesville.
* Betsy Gallagher (JD 76) with
Kubicki Draper in Tampa, who
replaced a previously gifted
$75,000 insurance policy gift with a
$100,000 insurance policy gift.
* UF Law Dean Robert Jerry, who
together with his wife Lisa, will
document a $100,000 bequest gift to
establish the Robert H., II and Lisa
Nowak Jerry Dean's Discretion-
ary Fund.
* Edward (JD 84) and Julia Downey
who made a $100,000 gift to es-
tablish The Downey Florida Op-
portunity Scholarship in Law.
Edward is a partner with Downey &
Downey, P.A. in Palm Beach.
* Joseph P. Milton (JD 69), docu-
mented a $100,000 bequest gift
to establish the Joseph P. Milton
Professionalism Fund. Milton is a
partner with Milton, Leach, Whit-
man, D'Andrea & Milton, PA.
* Robert E. Glennon Jr. (JD 74,
LLMT 75) and his son Michael
Glennon, who made a $50,000 gift
to establish the Helen Gibel Blech-
man Endowment. Robert
is with Hogan Lovells in
Washington, D.C. m


UF LAW











PARTNERS


Bringing UF Law together

Glasser Barbecue to beef up with additional $50K commitment


BY KARA CARNLEY-MURRHEE (1L)

I, r Gene K. Glasser (JD 72) looks
1..,,k on law school, more than
statute books come to mind.
"Anytime someone said
'JMBA barbecue pit, law school, 1 p.m.,' we all
knew exactly what you were talking about," he
said.
The law school community may look forward
to the barbecue with even more anticipation now
that Glasser and his wife, Elaine, have increased
their endowment by $50,000 to make the event
"bigger and better," as Senior Development
Director Kelley Frohlich said.
He set up the endowment as a way to promote
a sense of community at the law school, and to
commemorate the special relationships and
experiences that he credits to UF Law.
"The endowment is not something that
most would call 'conventional,"' said Glasser,
a member of the UF Law Center Association
Board of Trustees. "But there are needs that are
important that just cannot be budgeted."
Each fall, the Glasser Barbecue is one of the
most popularly anticipated events at UF Law,
providing an opportunity for students, faculty,
staff and administration to take a short break
while enjoying some good food and company.
The goal is to allow the Office of Student
Affairs to serve more people and be able to host
events like the barbecue more than once a year.


The larger endowment may also qualify for state
matching funds.
"The purpose of the additional endowment is
the same as it has always been to help fund
activities that create a sense of community at the
law school," Frohlich said. "We've generally held
the barbecue in the fall, and a smaller event, such
as an ice cream social in the spring. By providing
the additional funds, the Glassers hope to enhance
what the fund already supports."
Frohlich, who has been working with the
Glassers on the endowment since it began in 2005,
said that it's unique to have a donor interested in
contributing to the law school in this way.
"The barbecue is one of the only social events
the law school offers on a regular basis that brings
the entire law school community together at the
same time and the same place," she said.
Anitra Raiford (2L) attended the barbecue last
year.
"It sponsors a sense of fellowship between
us, allows us to take a break and communicate
with each other. It reminds us that we have a great
network of attorneys out there," Raiford said.
Glasser, managing partner at Greenspoon
Marder, PA., in Ft. Lauderdale, is the second of
his family to have graduated from UF Law. The
first was his father-in-law, Sidney Aronovitz (JD
43), for whom the U.S. Courthouse in Key West
was named in 2009. He also shares the tie with
his son, Evan (JD 02), who is an associate at
Greenspoon Marder, PA. m


SPRING 2011


"The endowment
is not something
that most would
call 'conventional,
but there are needs
that are important
that just cannot be
budgeted "
-GENE K. GLASSER (JD 72)


























Lawyer of
Michael Moore (JD 74) has served A-list clientele and the interests
of science during more than 30 years as a maritime lawyer
BY BRANDON BRESLOW (3LAS)


UF LAW











ALUMNI LEADERSHIP O


ichael T. Moore (JD 74) was a fresh-
faced graduate of the University of
Florida Fredric G. Levin College of
Law looking to stand out as he went in
search of a job. Tax law didn't interest
him and criminal law made his stomach
turn. When he looked toward the ocean,
he found his passion: maritime law.
For more than 30 years, Moore has practiced as a
maritime lawyer, "a lawyer of the sea." He litigates and handles
cases focusing on marine, aviation and art law.
"The choice was an early question of differentiating
myself from other graduates and removing the subject matters that
I did not like," he said. "Maritime law interested me in law school,
and I was given an opportunity to try it out."
The opportunity came while serving tables at a restaurant in
Cape Cod. Moore met a man who suggested that he apply as a
law clerk at the maritime law firm of Burlingham, Underwood &
Lord in New York. This allowed him to dive into the world of yacht
owners, glamour and romance, Moore said.
Moore's love for nature and passion for litigation reinforced
the choice he made to enter maritime law. He has handled cases
for Donald Trump and industrialist Faisal Al Matrook, who owns
engineering and natural resource companies in the United Arab
Emirates.
"Maritime law takes into account international and personal
injury laws," Moore said. "It's warfare, which is why I think I love
it so much."
Moore owns his own 36-foot sailboat, Island Girl, and a wooden
canoe given to him by his wife, Leslie Lott (JD 74).
"The canoe has allowed me to really get at water level with
nature," Moore said.
It wasn't until 2004, after Moore
moved to Miami and opened his own "The great
law firm, that he was introduced to a yacht own
nonprofit organization known as The
International SeaKeepers Society. The have nowhere
organization, comprised mainly of yacht day to g
owners, retrieves meteorological and
oceanographic information through -MICHAEL T.
monitors attached to its members' yachts.
The information is given to a panel
of scientists, who act as advisers.
Government and private entities use the data, which includes air
temperatures, oxygen levels, pH levels, humidity and barometric
pressure, for observation and research into issues such as global
warming and pollution.
"The great thing about yacht owners is that they have nowhere to
go and all day to get there," Moore said. "Some of the members have
even changed their courses for the sake of gathering information."


t
rs
e
e
M


Moore became chairman of the organization in 2008, bringing
its membership from 100 members to 10,000 in just three years.
But it was through a chance happening with a public relations
consultant for YachtWorld, an online
yacht dealer, that Moore put SeaKeepers
hing about on the map.
is that they Moore had the opportunity to meet
Jessica Muffet, founder of YachtWorld,
to go and all who wanted to make SeaKeepers its first
t there." beneficiary. As beneficiary, SeaKeepers
was given contributions and public
OORE (JD 74) relations tools to expand its work and
corporate identity.
"Their website's two million discrete
hits a day translated into a higher profile
for SeaKeepers," Moore said. "It's a very important alliance."
As Moore continues to pull double duty as head of his law
firm and chairman of SeaKeepers, he remains enamored with
maritime law.
"It may be a story of being at the right place at the right time,"
Moore said, "but, all things considered, I know this is the law I
was meant to practice." m


SPRING 2011















Moving On
& Moving Up
Alumna replaces alumnus as 8th Circuit public defender
BY KARA CARNLEY-MURRHEE (1L)


UF LAW












ALUMNI LEADERSHIP 0


Sust as one door closes, another one opens for two
UF law alumni working in the Public Defender's
Office of the 8th Judicial Circuit.
Stacy A. Scott (JD 95) took office Dec. 1 for a
two-year term as the new public defender for the
8th Judicial Circuit. She succeeds C. Richard Parker
(JD 72), who resigned in November to go to work
overseas after winning seven elections to the Gainesville-based
office.
"When Rick told me he was retiring and that he was going to
recommend I be appointed to replace him, I was really honored,
humbled and thrilled all at the same time," Scott said.
Although Scott's appointment was a gubernatorial decision,
Parker said he knew he was going to recommend Scott for the
position.
"I was the past and she was the future, and I was hoping that
the governor would appoint someone like her, but all I could
do was make the recommendation."


to the presumption of
innocence and the right
to a fair trial. If there
isn't a PD who can be
there to represent the
client, then justice can't
be served."
Parker reinforced that
view.
"The problem is that
we have already cut an
organization that in my
judgment couldn't be cut
and continue to provide
the level of service that
I prefer," Parker said.
"When you take an


Parker said. "My primary reason for
recommending Stacy is that she has
not only demonstrated the ability as
an outstanding trial lawyer but also an
excellent ability in managing people.
And particularly in the Public Defender's
Office, having someone that is committed
to providing high quality service to poor
people is just very important."
Scott's professional experience since
UF Law fit the bill: almost 12 years in
the Public Defender's Office, nearly two


"I was the past and she
was the future, and I
was hoping that the
governor would appoint
someone like her."
-C. RICHARD PARKER (JD 72)


years as an assistant state attorney and a stint in private practice.
She leads an office of 35 attorneys, manages a $5 million budget
and oversees nearly 22,000 cases this year.


One of the biggest challenges
as public defender is the threat of

Since her 1995 graduation from the
UF Levin College of Law, 8th Judicial
Circuit Public Defender Stacy Scott has
maintained close ties with UF Law. She
is an adjunct faculty member teaching
trial practice and served as interim
director for the Public Defender Clinic,
which involved training and supervising
a class of interns each semester. Scott
is an instructor in the Trial Practice
program and Gerald T. Bennett
Prosecutor and Public Defender
Trial Training Program. She led the
Trial team to two national civil rights
championships in 2005 and 2007.


Scott faces in her new role
significant budget cuts. The
Public Defender's Office
handles almost three
times as many cases per
year than is recommended
by the American Bar
Association, Scott said.
"If we followed their
guidelines, we should have
almost 90 lawyers, but we
have only 35," she said.
"The right to counsel is a
fundamental right and is
what really gives meaning


organization that is already operating at a
minimal funding level and tell the boss that
he or she has to cut it more it's just going
to be very difficult."
The 8th Judicial Circuit is composed of
Alachua, Baker, Bradford, Gilchrist, Levy
and Union counties.
Parker started in the Public Defender's
Office in Gainesville in 1973. In 1976, he
became the chief assistant, the office's No.
2 official, and remained in that position
for eight years before becoming the public


defender in 1984.
Parker is now employed by a private firm working with the U.S.
State Department in Afghanistan as justice adviser to the Afghanistan
Ministry of Justice.
"As advisers, our role is to provide the benefit of our knowledge
and experience to Afghanistan government officials. The context
might be answering questions, providing comments, offering
suggestions or making recommendations," Parker explained.
"Generally, the advice is at the policy level but the range may
include practice and procedure. We assist the local nationals in the
performance of their duties."
Parker retired from the 8th Judicial Circuit in November, but
you would be hard pressed to call his new life "retirement."
"It's all new and different," Parker said of his position in Kabul. "I
worked in the Public Defender's Office in Gainesville for 38 years so
this is a second career for me. And if I can keep my employer satisfied
and the people that I am working with happy and I continue to
enjoy the work- this is something that I plan to do for a while." .


SPRING 2011











UF LAW ALUMNI LAURELS


CLASS NOTES


TALLBOT 5ANLY L DALEMLEERTE I I) ',: i, an atto niwv and pitsidmnt cm.i ituis of
Floi ida 'Statc lTni\ci sit has bc. n nam d bV the. ti lst, ccs o Thl Rotaiv Fol ndati, n as
iccipclnt of the 2 '010- I1 _G obal AIt lmni c i\ icc to HLun nit- aid. L) Alcmbc.I tc
,Iacptc the honol in i ala at the Rotaai Intci tioinal t Con\ention in Ntc.
L Oileans. He was honored at the Ameiican bat Association Rule of Law Initiative
anniversary gala last year for co-founding the Central and Eastern European Law
Initiative 20 years ago. D'Alemberte championed the initiative's work during his
k tenure as ABA president and he serves on the Europe and Eurasia Council.


1957
William L. Hendry, retired 19th Circuit
Court judge, was honored in June by
the Board of County Commissioners
of Okeechobee County and the County
Bar Association by naming the Historic
Okeechobee Courthouse courtroom the
"Judge William L. Hendry Courtroom."
A bronze plaque was placed at the
courtroom entry to commemorate the event.
Hendry was also the keynote speaker at
the dedication of the renovated historic
courthouse.

1961
David L. Levy stepped down in 2009
after 24 years as president of the
Children's Rights Council. This national
organization based in Maryland works for
increased emotional child support (parenting
-joint custody) for children of separated,
divorced and never-married parents. Since
leaving CRC, Levy has
finished his first environmental fantasy
novel, Revolt of the Animals. See www.


SHARE YOUR NEWS
Send your class notes to classnotes@law.ufl.edu
or to: UF Law magazine, Levin College of Law,
University of Florida, P.O. Box 117633, Gaines-
ville, FL 32611. If you wish to include your
e-mail with your class note, make the additions
to the class note and provide permission to print.
Notes are due Sept. 15 for the fall issue.


earthhomepublishing.org. Levy's first law
school roommate was Fred Levin, for whom
the law school is named.

1962
J. Charles Gray, chairman of the board
and founding director of GrayRobinson,
RA., received the Lifetime Achievement
Award at the 33rd Annual Leadership
Prayer Breakfast, hosted by Purpose
Orlando on Nov. 19. The annual breakfast
is to honor community leaders who made
significant contributions to the welfare of the
community during the year. Gray received
the Lifetime Achievement Award for his
extensive involvement in the community.

1963
Larry S. Stewart, of the Stewart Tilghman
Fox Bianchi & Cain law firm in Miami,
received the Barney J. Masterson lifetime
achievement award from the Florida Justice
Association. He was also named Miami
Personal Injury Lawyer of the Year for 2010
by the Best Lawyers in America, where he


has been listed for more than 20 years. He
recently published three articles on tort law.

1964
Gerald F. Richman, president of Richman
Greer, PA. law firm, was named as the
Best Lawyers West Palm Beach "Bet-the-
Company" Litigator of the Year for 2011.
He was also named to the 2011 South
Florida Legal Guide Top Lawyers section.
This section recognizes attorneys who
have been in practice for at least
15 years.

1965
Sidney A. Stubbs, Jr., of Jones, Foster,
Johnston & Stubbs, PA., was included
in the 2011 edition of the South Florida
Legal Guide as one of just seven South
Florida "Distinguished Attorneys" for
2011, calling him "a lawyer's lawyer."
He was also named to the Top Lawyers
section. This section recognizes attorneys
who have been in practice for at least 15
years.


Gray 62 Stewart 63


Normile 67


Slesnick II 68


UF LAW











DISTINGUISHED ALUMNI O


1967
Hubert Normile, an attorney in the Mel-
bourne office of GrayRobinson, RA., has
been certified by the Florida Supreme Court
as a circuit court mediator.

1968
Alan A. Dickey, who has been a judge in
Seminole County for 34 years, will be the
new chief judge of the 18th Judicial Circuit
(Seminole and Brevard counties) starting
July 1. He was elected by a unanimous vote
of other judges in the circuit.

O.H. Eaton Jr. of the 18th Judicial Circuit
retired last year after 24 years on the bench.
Eaton is a nationally recognized expert on
the death penalty.

Donald D. Slesnick II, mayor of Coral Gables
and managing partner for the law firm Slesn-
ick & Casey, has been appointed to serve on
the American Bar Association's Commission
on Civic Education in the Nation's Schools.
Its stated objective is to develop young peo-
ple's interest and knowledge of civics, com-
munity service, politics and government.

1969
Charlie Egerton, one of the founding share-
holders at Dean, Mead, Egerton, Blood-
worth, Capouano & Bozarth, RA., has been
named in the 2010 Who's Who Legal for
international corporate tax lawyers.

Alan G. Greer, a shareholder in Richman
Greer, RA., was named to the 2011 South
Florida Legal Guide Top Lawyers section.
This section recognizes attorneys who have
been in practice for at least 15 years.


Foundation for success

Camp named UF Distinguished Alumnus


J ames D. Camp Jr. (JD 51),
a longtime champion of the
university and the Levin
College of Law, was named
a distinguished alumnus of the Uni-
versity of Florida during graduation
ceremonies in May.
The University of Florida rec-
ognizes Distinguished Alumni who
have excelled in their fields or who
have performed outstanding service
to the university.
Camp, a founder and shareholder
of Camp & Camp of Fort Lauder-
dale, is a native of Broward County.
He graduated from the University of
Florida in 1949 and went on to earn
his law degree from the College of
Law in 1951 where he was a mem-
ber of the Florida Law Review staff.
Since graduating, he has served the
university as a former member of
the University of Florida Foundation
Board of Trustees and is past chair-
man of the Board of Trustees of the
Law Center Association. He served
on the University of Florida Presi-
dential Search Committee in 1985.
He is a life member of the Broward
County Chapter of the University of
Florida Alumni Association and is
an honorary member of Florida Blue
Key.
Along with his wife Suzanne,
Camp's contributions to the Univer-
sity of Florida Levin College of Law
have supported the Florida Law Re-
view Endowment. With Suzanne, his
contribution to the college led to the
establishment of the Camp Center
for Estate and Elder Law Planning at
the Levin College of Law. The Camp


Center integrates teaching, research
and service in the area of estate plan-
ning and elder law, and administers
the college's Certificate Program in
Estates and Trust Practice.
Camp is involved in a wide va-
riety of local public service work
including a six-year stint on the Fort
Lauderdale Charter Review Com-
mittee. He has been active in Florida
banking as well as serving on the
board of directors of SunTrust in At-
lanta. His professional legal accom-
plishments are no less wide ranging.
Camp was recognized as among the
top lawyers in South Florida for his
work in trusts, estates and probate by
the 2006 South Florida Legal Guide.
Camp is a past member of the Flor-
ida Board of Bar Examiners, past
chairman of the Florida Bar Probate
Rules Committee and a fellow of the
American College of Trusts and Es-
tate Counsel. Camp is admitted to the
bar of the U.S. Supreme Court. m


Egerton 69 Greer 69


SPRING 2011











CLASS NOTES



Henry E. Mallue Jr. i-li-,: tI.rn ihi 1i .:ult,

College ot William and Mary at the end ot
December.

1970
John M. Brumbaugh, a shareholder in Rich-
man Greer, RA., was named to the 2011
South Florida Legal Guide Top Lawyers sec-
tion. This section recognizes attorneys who
have been in practice for at least 15 years.

John C. "Skip" Randolph, of Jones, Foster,
Johnston & Stubbs, RA., was named to
the 2011 South Florida Legal Guide Top
Lawyers section.

H. Adams Weaver was named to the 2011
South Florida Legal Guide Top Lawyers
section.

William E. Scheu has been elected as a
board member to the Rogers Towers, RA.
board of directors in Jacksonville.

1971
Larry B. Alexander, of Jones, Foster,
Johnston & Stubbs, RA., was named to
the 2011 South Florida Legal Guide Top
Lawyers section.

1972
Gene K. Glasser, managing partner
specializing in tax, trusts and estates at
Greenspoon Marder, PA., was named a "Top
Attorney" by South Florida Legal Guide
2011.

Manuel Menendez Jr. was elected by his
colleagues to serve another two-year term
as chief judge of the 13th Judicial Circuit
(Hillsborough County). His sixth term of
office begins July 1.

1973
Gerald A. Rosenthal, senior partner in
Rosenthal, Levy & Simon, P.A.'s West


Brumbaugh 70
Brumbaugh 70


Rosenthal 73


SROY BL'. 5KIP[ DALTON II. iID a partner in the
law firm of Dalton & Carpenter, P.A. in Oriando, has
been nominated by President Barack Obama to
the United States District Court for the Middle
District of Florida.


Palm Beach office, has been elected to
the National Academy of Social Insur-
ance. Academy members are recognized
experts in Social Security, Medicare and
health coverage, workers' compensation,
unemployment insurance and related
social assistance and private employee
benefits.

1974
Barry W. Bennett, of Winter Haven, has
been appointed to the Polk County Court
by former Gov. Charlie Crist. Bennett will
fill the vacancy created by the elevation
of Judge Beth Harlan to the 10th Judicial
Circuit Court.

Frederick W. Leonhardt, a shareholder in
the Orlando office of GrayRobinson, PA.,
has been appointed to the Florida Tech-
nology, Research and Scholarship Board
by former Gov. Charlie Crist. Leonhardt
will oversee criteria for the creation and
funding of Florida's Centers of Excellence
and the 21st Century World Class Schol-
ars awards.

1975
Howell Melton, a partner in Holland &
Knight LLP's Orlando office, has been
elected vice chair of Enterprise Florida's
board of directors.

Tito Smith became a shareholder
in Rogers Towers, P.A.'s St. Augustine
office. He has experience in the areas
of banking law, real estate, probate and
estate planning.


Leonhardt 74


Smith 75


1976
Jerry Currington has been named gen-
eral counsel to the Florida Department of
Transportation by Gov. Rick Scott. Cur-
rington was previously general counsel to
the Florida Department of Children and
Families. He has served as a deputy gen-
eral counsel in the Executive Office of the
Governor and in private practice with sev-
eral Florida firms. He previously was the
assistant deputy Florida attorney general,
where he oversaw the work of more than
200 lawyers. He has served as deputy
general counsel of the Florida House of
Representatives.

Ralph J. Humphries was selected in Feb-
ruary to be a judge in the Jacksonville
District Compensation Claims Court.

1977
Lauren Y. Detzel, shareholder and chair
of the Estate and Succession Planning
Department at Dean, Mead, Egerton,
Bloodworth, Capouano & Bozarth, PA.,
was named as the Orlando Best Lawyers
Tax Lawyer of the Year for 2011.

Dennis J. Wall, of Winter Springs and Or-
lando, spoke at the American Conference
Institute's 21st National Advanced Forum
on Bad Faith Litigation at the Hyatt Re-
gency Grand Cypress in Orlando on Nov.
30. He spoke on the subject of "Dealing
with Catastrophic Disasters: How to Prop-
erly Investigate and Handle Overwhelming
Claims."


Detzel 77


Wall 77


UF LAW











ALUMNI LEADERSHIP 0




Laying down the law

UF Law alumnus and ABA Tax Section chair prepares ground for tax reform
BY MATT WALKER


When President Barack Obama
announced tax reform as a
major priority in his State of
the Union Address in Janu-
ary, it meant more to Charles Egerton (JD
69) than to most of us.
You see, in addition to serving full-
time as a practicing tax and corporate law
attorney in Orlando, Egerton is chairman
of the American Bar Association's Section
on Taxation. With 24,000 members, it's the
largest professional tax attorney group in
the nation.
"It's almost a second job," said Egerton,
a founding shareholder of Dean, Mead,
Egerton, Bloodworth, Capouano & Bo-
zarth, P.A. in Orlando. "When all is said
and done, I will have probably at least 1,000
hours in this year during my term and
it's something I've really enjoyed."
The prospects for tax reform received a
significant boost from the report issued in
December by the National Commission on
Fiscal Responsibility and Reform, which
called for comprehensive tax reform as one
of the central components of a plan to restore
fiscal responsibility to the government. One
month later, the national taxpayer advocate
issued her annual report to Congress in
which she listed the need for comprehensive
tax reform as the No. 1 priority for the tax
system this year. In addition, both the House
Ways & Means Committee and the Senate
Finance Committee have begun hearings on
tax reform.
Because of the potential for wide-rang-
ing federal tax reform, Egerton said he has
asked each of the ABA Tax Section's sub-
stantive committees there are more than
30 to look at their areas of responsibility
Despite his busy schedule of tax reform and tax law
practice, Charles Egerton maintains his connection
to the University of Florida Levin College of Law.
Egerton's firm, Dean, Mead, Egerton, Bloodworth,
Capouano & Bozarth, P.A. in Orlando, co-sponsored
last year's holiday party at Dean Robert Jerry's
house in Gainesville and sponsors a scholarship to
the UF Law Graduate Tax Program.


in the internal revenue code and prepare a
paper on what is working and what isn't.
The committees will examine how their ar-
eas of tax law could be reshaped to make the
laws simpler, fairer and easier to administer.
"This is probably the largest project the
tax section has undertaken in a good 20 or
30 years," he said.
Egerton said the ABA Tax Section is
"saying if you're going to undertake tax re-
form, we're going to give you some nuts-
and-bolts-type recommendations on how to
improve the code, make it more workable."
Once the papers are in, they will be sub-
mitted to the House Ways and Means Com-
mittee, the Joint Committee on Taxation and
the Senate Finance Committee.
"The Finance Committee is just begin-
ning the long process of tax reform, and
Chairman (Max) Baucus places great value
on input from experts and stakeholders, in-
cluding the ABA," said a Finance Commit-
tee aide. "Analysis of tax reform from the
ABA and other well-respected groups will
certainly be taken into consideration as the
process moves forward."
Michael Friel, UF Law professor, asso-
ciate dean and director of the Graduate Tax
Program, along with UF Law Professor and
Alumni Research Scholar Dennis Calfee
recently delivered a tax policy presentation
with Egerton.
"Charlie is the ideal person to be lead-
ing the ABA Tax Section at a time when the
possibility of fundamental tax reform is in
the air," Friel said.
Friel said that since the ABA Tax Sec-
tion is the leading professional tax organi-
zation in the country, its reports and rec-
ommendations will be the result of careful
analysis and will receive serious attention as
the tax reform debate moves ahead.
"Charlie the tax lawyer's tax lawyer
- is so highly regarded for his fairness, le-
gal expertise and leadership skills that the
Tax Section's ambitious agenda could not
be in better hands," Calfee said.


"Charlie is the ideal person
to be leading the ABA Tax
Section at a time when the
possibility of fundamental
tax reform is in the air."
-MICHAEL FRIEL,
UF LAW PROFESSOR, ASSOCIATE DEAN AND
DIRECTOR OF THE GRADUATE TAX PROGRAM


Egerton said that while the ABA Tax
Section does not enter into the political
debate, it will weigh in on the technical as-
pects of the code.
He said the rules have become so
cumbersome because policymakers have
stacked one change on top of another for the
past 30 years. "That's something hopefully
we can really make a contribution on and
have an impact on the tax system."
With such a big undertaking, it begs the
question of whether the task will be complet-
ed by the time Egerton's term ends in July.
"It's supposed to be; they probably
won't let me leave without finishing it,"
Egerton said with a laugh. m


SPRING 2011











CLASS NOTES


1978
Kendall Coffey, the former U.S. Attorney
for the Southern District of Florida,
who represented Al Gore in the 2000
election recount and the family of Elian
Gonzalez, released a new book in October
called Spinning the Law: Trying Cases
in the Court of Public Opinion with an
introduction by Alan Dershowitz.

Robert E. Gordon, of Gordon & Doner,
RA., was named to the AV Preeminent
Legal Ability & Ethical Standards 2010,
Florida Super Lawyers 2010 and Best
Lawyers in America 2010.

Robert E. Holden, of Liskow & Lewis,
A Professional Law Corporation in New
Orleans, was named New Orleans Best
Lawyers 2011 Environmental Lawyer of
the Year.


1979
Fred D. Franklin Jr. has been elected
chairman of the board and managing
director for Rogers Towers, PA. in
Jacksonville. Franklin has more than
30 years of legal experience, with his
practice primarily focused on commercial
litigation.

Michael A. Wodrich has been elected as
a board member to the Rogers Towers,
PA. board of directors in Jacksonville.


1980
Gregory M. Keyser, of Boca Raton, was
appointed by former Gov. Charlie Crist to
the Palm Beach County Court.


Jacobson 82


1981
David E. Bowers, of Jones, Foster,
Johnston & Stubbs, PA., was named to
the 2011 South Florida Legal Guide Top
Lawyers section.

Alexander R. Christine was appointed
to the St. Johns County Court by former
Gov. Charlie Crist. Christine will fill the
vacancy created by the appointment of
Judge Patti Christensen (JD 82) to the
7th Circuit Court.

Doug Cooney, of Los Angeles, is the
2010 recipient of the Charlotte B.
Chorpenning Playwright Award presented
by the American Alliance for Theatre &
Education in recognition of his body of
work for young audiences. Cooney is the
25th playwright to be selected for this
honor. His name will be engraved on the
official Chorpenning Cup that resides
in the archives of the Arizona State
University library.


1982
Jeffery Boone, of Boone, Boone, Boone,
Koda & Frook, PA. in Venice, Fla., was
recognized in Scene magazine for his
community service.

Richard Jacobson, a shareholder in the
Tampa office of Fowler White Boggs
PA, has been re-elected to the board
of directors of TerraLex. TerraLex is an
International network of 160 leading
international and U.S. law firms
serving the interests of clients whose
requirements transcend their state,
provincial or national borders.








?


Adams III 83


Michael D. Minton, president of Dean,
Mead, Egerton, Bloodworth, Capouano
& Bozarth, P.A. and a member of the
firm's tax department and estate and
succession planning department, has
been appointed to the board of directors
of the Central Florida Partnership.


1983
Adam G. "Lep" Adams III has joined
Foley & Lardner LLP's Construction
and Business Litigation and Dispute
Resolution Practices as a partner in its
Jacksonville office.

Stephen Boone, of Boone, Boone,
Boone, Koda & Frook, PA. in Venice,
Fla., was recognized in Scene magazine
for his community service.

Scott G. Hawkins, of Jones, Foster,
Johnston & Stubbs, P.A., was named to
the 2011 South Florida Legal Guide Top
Lawyers section.

Elizabeth M. Hernandez has joined
Akerman Senterfitt's Miami office as a
shareholder in the litigation practice.
Hernandez has spent the last 16 years
serving the city of Coral Gables as city
attorney.


1984
David R. Punzak, the managing
shareholder of Carlton Fields, P.A.'s St.
Petersburg office, was honored as a
Hero Among Us by the St. Petersburg
Bar Foundation on Jan. 29, 2011. The
Hero Among Us Award is presented an-
nually to a local lawyer who, through
volunteering their time and abilities, has
made a difference in the St. Petersburg
community.

Brian D. Stokes, a partner in the
Orlando office of Wicker, Smith, O'Hara,
McCoy & Ford, PA., has been named
to the 2010 Florida Super Lawyers
in the field of personal injury medical
malpractice defense.


Punzak 84


UF LAW











ALUMNI LEADERSHIP O


A practice in the spotlight

UF Law alumna seeks justice in high-profile cases
BY AMANDA ADAMS (3JM)


have pictures of herself on the sets
of CNN, Fox News or The Today
Show hanging in her office.
Instead of photos of the UF Law alumna
speaking in the media about her high-pro-
file cases, she surrounds herself with imag-
es of family, friends and clients who have
become as close as family, like 7-year-old
Jumee Woodard, who she represented in a
wrongful death case after a NASCAR plane
crashed into her house and killed two mem-
bers of her family.
The Orlando-based lawyer and Navy vet-
eran, who specialized in satellite technology
for aviation intelligence, has become some-
thing of a media star, with several highly
publicized cases in the last few years, appear-
ing on a plethora of national news networks.
But she hasn't let the glamour go to her head.
"I believe in giving back to the commu-
nity above all," Jackson said.
One recent case involved a homeless
man, Sherman Ware, who was hit by a po-
lice officer's son in early January, according
to numerous Central Florida news reports.
The man punched Ware in the head out-
side a Sanford bar on the night of Jan. 4,
while a witness caught the incident on vid-
eo. The attack left Ware with a concussion
and facial injuries, including a broken nose.
They reached a settlement at the end of
January that required the attacker to pay for
Ward's medical bills and donate money to
various nonprofit organizations, such as the
Seminole County Branch of the NAACP,
CrossRoads Drug Rehabilitation Center
and Seminole Action Coalition Serving our
Needy. In addition to the money for Ware's
medical bills, he also received a confidential
monetary settlement.
A case Jackson took on last year that
gained national attention was of a teenage
boy who was wrongly accused of abduct-
ing a child.
Perhaps the most important case for her
career, however, came in 2008, when Jack-


*t EE!U !l3I


son represented Jumee and her father, Joe
Woodard. Woodard lost his wife, Janise,
and 6-month-old son Josiah in a freakish
accident when a NASCAR plane crashed
into their home. Janise was a paralegal who
had worked with Jackson before the crash,
which made the case very personal for her.
Jackson even helped plan the memorial ser-
vice and all media events for the family.
"It was easy working with Natalie,"
Woodard said. "She was like a close sister
to me, and whenever I had questions, she
had the answers."
Jackson had worked on wrongful death
cases in the past, but she had never dealt with
an airplane case. Besides researching aviation
law, she hired an aviation accident reconstruc-
tionist, an economist and a media coordinator.
Her background in naval aviation aid-
ed her understanding of aviation terms and
systems, she said.
Ultimately, the case settled for a confi-
dential eight-figure sum.
And it was this case, she said, that al-
lowed her to revamp her law firm, the
Women's Trial Group. Originally opened in
2006, Jackson said that after nine years in
the military, she was "tired of the male en-
vironment" and wanted to work in a female
milieu for a change. But she had to close the


"It was easy working with
Natalie. She was like a
close sister to me, and
whenever I had questions,
she had the answers."
-JOE WOODARD, CLIENT


firm due to insufficient profits after just one
year of operation.
Jackson took a job at a friend's firm in
2007, and after the NASCAR case she re-
opened the Women's Trial Group, which ca-
ters to women and their families. Now on
firm financial footing, the Women's Trial
Group averages 200 cases per year.
"I don't think being a mother and a wife
and making money have to be mutually ex-
clusive," she said.
Jackson's firm exemplifies the idea that
money isn't everything. She offers pro bono
services and payment plans, and her interest in
service doesn't end with her clients.
She believes more experienced firms, like
hers, should help newer firms succeed by as-
sisting with rent, education, classes, and legal
or business advice.
"I kind of believe in karma," she said. m


SPRING 2011












CLASS NOTES


JOHN L. MILLER (JD 86), general magistrate of
Pensacola, was appointed by former Gov. Charlie
Crist to the 1st Judicial Circuit Court.
r


1985
Donald C. Dowling Jr., a partner at White &
Case LLP in New York City, leads a team of
lawyers who practice outbound international
employment law (advising multinational
headquarters on workforce issues that cross
borders, such as global reductions-in-force,
codes of conduct, whistleblower hotlines,
and expatriate matters). Dowling has been
recognized by Chambers and Partners;
The Legal 500; PLC Which Lawyer?; ABA/
IBA Who's Who; Expert Guides; and
Ethisphere Attorneys Who Matter. Dowl-
ing just published an article in the ABA
law review The Labor Lawyer, which re-
printed his piece published last year in
another ABA law review, The International
Lawyer. He was recently appointed to the
board of the New York University Center
for Labor & Employment Law, and as vice-
chair of the IBA Discrimination Law Com-
mittee. Being in New York, the only UF
Law classmate Don runs into regularly is
his wife, Nancy Hill Dowling (JD 87). Nan-
cy is associate general counsel heading up
the advertising law function at The Dannon
Company, Inc. in White Plains, N.Y.

Eugene Pettis, co-founder of Haliczer Pettis
& Schwamm, was selected again for inclu-
sion in the 2011 Best Lawyers in America.
He is continuously recognized by Florida
Trend's peer-voted "Legal Elite," Florida Su-
per Lawyers and South Florida Legal Guide
as a top lawyer. Beyond the legal practice,
he serves on The Florida Bar's Board of
Governors holding various leadership posi-


tions and is currently on the board of trustees
at the University of Florida Levin College of
Law. He served eight years on the University
of Florida Foundation board of directors. He
was keynote speaker for the UF Association
of Black Alumni Weekend 2010.


1986
H. William "Bill" Perry, chairman of Gun-
ster business law firm, has been named a
Key Partner by the South Florida Business
Journal. The Key Partners awards honors
the area's top attorneys and accountants
based on demonstrated success over the
past year to 18 months.


1987
Larry Brant, owner of Garvey Schubert
Barer Law in Portland, Ore., has been ap-
pointed chair of the Oregon State Bar's Tax
Law Section for 2011-2012. Brant is the
chair of Garvey Schubert Barer's tax and
benefits practice group and co-chair of the
firm's business practice group.

John "Buddy" Dyer, mayor of Orlando, was
appointed as a member to the Advisory
Committee for Trade Policy and Negotia-
tions by President Barack Obama.

Paul Quinn, shareholder in the Orlando
office of GrayRobinson, PA., has been re-
certified by The Florida Bar as a specialist
in real estate law through 2015. He was
originally board certified in 1995.


1988
Barry B. Ansbacher, managing sharehold-
er of Ansbacher & Associates, P.A. in Jack-
sonville, has become the first and only
attorney in the state of Florida to receive
board certification from The Florida Bar in
both real estate and construction law.

Kevin E. Hyde, managing partner in Foley
& Lardner LLP's Jacksonville office, has
been named Best Lawyers 2011 Jackson-
ville Labor and Employment Lawyer of the
Year.

Charles J.F. Schreiber Jr. was recently
promoted to partner with the firm McCon-
naughhay, Duffy, Coonrod, Pope & Weaver,
PA. Schreiber has been with the firm's
Tallahassee office since 2005 practicing in
the area of civil litigation defense.


1989
Mark E. Stein, a Florida Bar Board Certi-
fied intellectual property attorney with the
law firm of Higer Lichter & Givner LLP,
presented an intellectual property seminar
to members of the Miami Chapter of the
American Institute of Architects on Feb.
12 at the Miami Dadeland Marriott. The
title of the seminar was "Architectural
Work and Intellectual Property: A Blue-
print for IP Protection."

J. Kim Wright is the publisher and manag-
ing editor of CuttingEdgeLaw.com. Wright
is the author of Lawyers as Peacemakers:
Practicing Holistic, Problem-Solving Law,
an American Bar Association 2010 best-
seller and flagship book. In 2009, the ABA
named her as one of their Legal Rebels who
are "finding new ways to practice law, repre-
sent their clients, adjudicate cases and train
the next generation of lawyers."


Pettis 85 Perry 86


Brant 87


Hyde 88 Schreiber Jr. 88


Stein 89


UF LAW












CLASS NOTES


1991
Todd L. Bradley, a principal in the
Cummings & Lockwood LLC Naples office,
chaired the Leadership Collier Class of
2011 Kick-off Reception in October. Bradley
has also been appointed to the 2010-2011
Finance Committee for The Education
Foundation of Collier County, Inc. and
received the AV Preeminent Lawyers Rating
by LexisNexis Martindale-Hubbell. He was
also named to the FIVE STAR Professionals
Wealth Managers list for 2011.

David Gold and another Gator, Sal A.
Richardson (JD 01), have been named co-
managing partners for the Florida offices of
Adelson, Testan, Brundo & Jimenez.

Mark Rosman is a new partner in the
Washington, D.C., office of Wilson
Sonsini Goodrich & Rosati and a member
of the firm's antitrust practice. Rosman
represents and counsels clients in
connection with a variety of national and
international antitrust matters, including
cartel defense, criminal enforcement
investigations, and merger and civil
nonmerger cases. Last summer, Rosman
served as assistant chief of the National
Criminal Enforcement Section in the
U.S. Department of Justice's Antitrust


Division. Rosman was lead attorney for the admitted into the American College of
investigation into air transportation price- Trusts and Estates Counsel.
fixing, which resulted in a record $1.8


billion in fines.


Edwin A. Scales III, of counsel in the Key
West office of GrayRobinson, RA., has been
re-elected by the attorneys in Florida's
16th Judicial Circuit (Monroe County) to a
fourth term on The Florida Bar's Board of
Governors.


1992
Heather A. Owen, an attorney in Constangy,
Brooks & Smith, LLP's Jacksonville office,
has been promoted to equity partner.

John W. Randolph Jr., of Pressly & Pressly,
P.A. in West Palm Beach, was recently












Rosman 91 Scales III 91


Stephen S. Stallings, former assistant
U.S. Attorney for the U.S. Department of
Justice, has been hired as chair of Burns
White law firm's white collar criminal
defense practice group.


1993
Erik P. Shuman, an attorney in the
Melbourne office of GrayRobinson, P.A.,
has recently been elected to the board
of directors for the Space Coast Early
Intervention Center. SCEIC is a nonprofit
preschool organization dedicated to
finding new ways of educating children
with and without disabilities in their early
childhood years.


Shuman 93


Owen 92


SPRING 2011












CLASS NOTES


1994
Jack R. Reiter, a partner in Yoss LLP,
received high honors in the 2011 South
Florida Legal Guide. Reiter, board
certified in appellate practice and an
AV-rated attorney, is chair of the firm's
appellate practice department. He
concentrates his practice in the areas
of state, federal and administrative
appeals, as well as trial support and
general commercial litigation.

Marc A. Wites authored the 2010
edition of Florida Causes of Action,
which is published by James Publishing,
and the 2010 edition of The Florida
Litigation Guide, which is available for
free at www.floridalitigationguide.com.
Both books are annual publications,
which Wites began authoring in 2007,
and 1997, respectively. Wites was also
included in the 2010 Super Lawyers and
the 2010 Legal Elite by Florida Trend
magazine.


1995
Jonathan M. David was elected district at-
torney for Brunswick, Columbus and Bladen
counties in North Carolina and began his new
position this year.

Michael "Mike" Murphy, of Orlando, has
been appointed as judge to the 9th Judicial
Circuit Court by former Gov. Charlie Crist.


1996
Kenneth Curtin has joined Adams and Reese
LLP as special counsel in the Litigation Prac-
tice Group in the firm's Tampa and St. Pe-
tersburg offices. He represents individual and
corporate clients such as developers, interior
designers, architects, engineers, general con-
tractors, subcontractors and temporary help
agencies in state and federal courts and in
arbitral proceedings.

Frank Fletcher, general counsel at Nero AG,
had his essay "Talking Travel" published in the
December 2010 edition of the ACC Docket.


Charles E. Hodges II has joined Kilpatrick
Townsend & Stockton LLP's Atlanta office
as chair of the firm's tax controversy and
litigation practice. Hodges concentrates
his practice in civil and criminal federal
tax controversies/litigation.

F. Scott Westheimer, managing partner at
Syprett Meshad in Sarasota, was elected
president of the Sarasota County Bar
Association and was named to the 2010
Florida Super Lawyers Rising Stars list for
his work in plaintiff's personal injury.


1997
Marve Ann Alaimo, of the Cummings &
Lockwood LLC Bonita Spring office, was
named to the FIVE STAR Professionals
Wealth Managers list for 2011.

Juan D. Bendeck has joined the
partnership at Hahn Loeser & Parks LLP's
Naples office. Bendeck focuses his practice
in estate planning, estate administration
and asset protection planning.

Sherri L. Johnson has opened the new
law office of Johnson Legal of Florida,
PL. in Sarasota. Johnson will focus her
practice on property tax and exemption
disputes throughout Florida, as well as
general commercial litigation and appeals.

Elena Paras Ketchum, a partner with the
firm of Stichter Riedel Blain & Prosser,
PA. in Tampa, has been elected to serve
as president of the Tampa Bay Bankruptcy
Bar Association for the 2010-2011
term. Ketchum has served on the board of
directors for the association since 2006.

Tammie L. Rattray, a partner in Ford
& Harrison LLP's Tampa office, was
recently voted a 2010 Florida Legal Elite
Honoree by Florida Trend magazine.


Reiter 94 Wites 94


Curtin 96 Westheimer 96


FRIENDS OF UF LAW

Robert Kerrigan won the Tobias Simon Pro Bono Service Award from The Florida
Bar. This is the Florida legal profession's highest public service honor. Some of
Kerrigan's service includes reviving Helping Hands Legal Aid Center in 1999, a
facility created and financed by his law firm, Kerrigan, Estess, Rankin, McLeod
& Thompson, to provide legal services to the poor, with Kerrigan donating more
than 500 hours. His firm also established a hotline for people to call with
hurricane-related questions, worked with Legal Services of North Florida to
resolve emergency housing and consumer needs, and Kerrigan made generous
contributions to Habitat for Humanity after Hurricane Ivan.

Cynthia F. O'Connell has been appointed by Gov. Rick Scott to serve as secretary
of the Florida Lottery. O'Connell is a longtime trustee at the University of Florida,
has been an executive with the Lottery in the past, and has served in a number of
other Florida government posts. She is the widow of the late Stephen C. O'Connell
(JD 40), a former UF president and chief justice of the Florida Supreme Court.


Bendeck 97


Rattray 97


UF LAW












CLASS NOTES


Margaret P. Zabijaka, an attorney in Con- ham cases that overturned life sentences for a shareholder in the Business Litigation Prac
stangy, Brooks & Smith, LLP's Jacksonville certain juvenile offenders. Hobbs has been tice Group of the Gunster law firm.
office, has been promoted to equity partner. elected chair of the Leon County Public Safe-


1998
Mary Beth Crawford, of the Cummings &
Lockwood LLC Bonita Spring office, was
named to the FIVE STAR Professionals
Wealth Managers list for 2011.

Francis Gibbs has been named chief of staff
of the Florida Department of Transportation
by Gov. Rick Scott. Gibbs advised Congress-
men Ander Crenshaw and Connie Mack on
transportation policy matters while serving
on their staffs from 2001 through 2010. He
was most recently Congressman Mack's chief
of staff and chief policy adviser.

Charles E. "Chuck" Hobbs II, a Tallahassee
trial lawyer, recently garnered first place in
the 55th annual Florida Bar Media Awards.
Hobbs was lauded for a series of articles in
the Tallahassee Democrat newspaper regard-
ing the United States Supreme Court and the
Florida Supreme Court, including analyses
of the Florida v. Sullivan and Florida v. Gra-


Zabijaka 97


ty Council Recidivism Committee, which will
analyze methods to reduce jail overcrowding
by addressing the needs of repeat offenders.

Kevin R Jacobs, founding member of the
litigation boutique Herron Jacobs Ortiz, RA.
in Miami, was appointed by Chief Judge Fed-
erico A. Moreno to chair the local rules com-
mittee for the United States District Court
for the Southern District of Florida. He was
voted onto the executive board for the South
Florida Chapter of the Federal Bar Associa-
tion and will be the chapter's national dele-
gate at the Federal Bar Association's national
midyear meeting. Jacobs was also named
a Top Up and Comer in the 2011 edition of
the South Florida Legal Guide.

Daniel A. Thomas joined Leopold-Kuvin,
RA. in Palm Beach Gardens as the firm's
newest partner. Thomas has experience in
the areas of complex commercial and con-
struction litigation, construction claims coun-
seling and contract and business disputes.
Prior to joining Leopold-Kuvin, Thomas was


Hobbs II 98


Lori Vaughan has been certified by the
American Board of Certification as a business
bankruptcy specialist. She is a shareholder
in Trenam Kemker Attorneys and is based in
the Tampa office.


1999
Paul A. Giordano, a shareholder in the
Fort Myers office of Fowler White Boggs
PA, has been elected to the board of direc-
tors of the American Red Cross Lee County
Chapter.

Bryan S. Gowdy, a partner and sharehold-
er in Creed & Gowdy in Jacksonville, and
his wife, Barbara, and children (Fabrizio,
age 8, and Lucrezia, age 4) welcomed a
new baby girl, Graziana Gowdy, to their
family on Jan. 19. Gowdy received The
Florida Bar President's Pro Bono Service
Award for the 4th Judicial Circuit (Duval,
Clay and Nassau counties) on Jan. 27 for
his work with poor and indigent clients.
He has donated more than 350 hours of
pro bono service in the last year.

Chris Morrison, of GrayRobinson, P.A.'s
Orlando office, has been promoted to Of
counsel. Morrison practices in the health
care practice group and is board certified
in health law by The Florida Bar.

Ginny R. Neal recently joined J.R Morgan's
Palm Beach office as a senior private banker.
She will be responsible for advising clients


SPRING 2011











CLASS NOTES


on overall investing, wealth transfer, credit
and philanthropic services.

Hoang Vu, a partner in Andrews Kurth
LLP's Houston office, was named to the
2011 Best Lawyers in America list for his
work in public finance law.


2000
Douglas A. Cherry has been named a
partner in Shumaker, Loop & Kendrick, LLP's
Sarasota office. Cherry is board certified in
intellectual property law. Cherry's practice
focuses on intellectual property (patent,


copyright, trademark, trade secrets and
unfair competition) consulting, acquisition,
licensing and litigation.

Scott M. Fischer, of Gordon & Doner, RA.,
has been named a Top Up and Comer
for the last two years in the 2011 South
Florida Legal Guide.

Matthew C. Lucas, a former partner at
Bricklemyer, Smolker & Bolves in Tampa,
was appointed by former Gov. Charlie Crist
to replace retiring Judge Raul Palomino Jr. in
the Hillsborough County Court's family law
section.


Brenda Ezell recently celebrated her
growing law practice, the Ezell Law
Firm, by re-branding, launching a new
website (www.EzellFirmPA.com) and
opening new offices in the Mandarin area
of Jacksonville.

S. Jarret Raab was recently elected
as a member of Shaw Gussis Fishman
Glantz Wolfson & Towbin LLC in
Chicago. Raab is part of the firm's
commercial litigation practice group
focusing on complex business disputes
and related litigation matters.


Heritage of Leadership

Two UF Law grads honored at annual ceremony
BY RICHARD GOLDSTEIN

t was a night for remembering two men who helped make
modem Florida.
D. Burke Kibler III (JD 49) and Warren M. Cason
(JD 50) were inducted posthumously into the Heritage
of Leadership Society during a ceremony April 8 at the Levin
College of Law and sponsored by Florida-based Holland
& Knight.
"There is no place that I'd rather be today than here, honoring
two of the best lawyers to come out of the University of Florida
and certainly the best lawyers to come out of Holland & Knight,"
Martha Barnett (JD 73), told a crowd of more than 160 in the Ches-
terfield Smith Ceremonial Classroom.
Barnett, a senior partner with Holland & Knight and a past
president of the American Bar Association, recalled that the early
1970s, when she was interviewing for a job, was a time when most
blue chip law firms were only beginning to think about women as
lawyers. It was Burke Kibler, then the recruiting partner at the firm,
who hired her.
"I always thought that Burke's hiring me was an example of
the vision and courage that marked his life," she said. "He always
said with a twinkle in his eye that it was just because he liked
being around smart, pretty little girls."
Barnett noted Kibler's accomplishments in war, politics, the
law and education.
"By every possible measure, Burke Kibler's life story is one
of a man who lived his life to the fullest and along the way made
such a difference in the lives of so many people and so many in-
stitutions: His alma mater, the University of Florida; the state of


Florida; Holland & Knight; most of you in this room and certainly
to me."
Doug Wright, (JD 86, LLMT 87), a tax lawyer for Holland &
Knight, took to the podium and lauded Cason, his long-time friend.
"Somebody observed recently that there are three types of people
in the world: People who make things happen, people who watch
what's happening, and people who don't know what's happening,"
Wright said. "Warren Cason made things happen."
Wright noted Cason's struggles growing up as he had to help


UF LAW












CLASS NOTES


Sloane 00


Smith IV 00


Charles B. Shields Jr. was recently named
a partner in Duane Morris LLP's Boca
Raton office. Shields practices in the firm's
estates and asset planning practice group.


Jeremy Sloane, of Orlando, is now a
member of Community Coordinated
Care for Children, Inc.'s (4C) board
of directors. As a member of the 4C
Board, Sloane will help the organization
raise much-needed funds to support
early childhood education for children
and families throughout Central and
Southwest Florida.

Lisa A.G. Smith, a senior associate
attorney with Aikin Family Law Group
in Winter Park, has received the highest
rating of AV from Martindale-Hubbell.


She practices family law and is married
to fellow JD 00 alumnus Roy Smith.

Roy J. Smith IV, formerly a partner with
Weiss Legal Group, P.A., has formed
his own law firm, The Smith Family
Law Firm, P.A., which is dedicated to
the representation of family law clients
as well as individuals who have been
injured in automobile accidents. He
was selected as a Rising Star by
Florida Super Lawyers for 2010
and received an AV rating from
Martindale-Hubbell.


run his farm after his father died and then joined the Navy, per-
forming underwater demolitions during World War II.
The adversity "created somebody who was not going to shrink
from problems," Wright said.
Kibler's and Cason's families accepted plaques commemorat-
ing the induction ceremony.
Cason was a senior partner with Holland & Knight, and Kibler
served as the firm's chairman from 1983 to 1995.


Cason, 1924-2010, was chairman of the Law Center Associa-
tion Board of Trustees, director of the UF Athletic Association and
president of the UF Foundation. He was a State Road Board mem-
ber, Tampa city attorney and Hillsborough County attorney.
Kibler, 1924-2009, served as second lieutenant during World
War II in Europe where he was a forward artillery observer and
was awarded the Bronze Star and Purple Heart. He was a tireless
advocate of higher education and served as chairman of the Board
of Regents, governing body for Florida's university system.
Cason and Kibler's images and a few of their most significant
accomplishments are etched into glass on the second floor of Hol-
land Hall as a permanent tribute to their contributions to the nation,
the state and the university. An electronic interactive display ac-
companies the glass etching.
"For every person who walks by that display, and most of us do
that at least once a day, it's an inspiring presentation for what we
as lawyers try to accomplish for the good of others," UF Law Dean
Robert Jerry said during the induction ceremony.
The Heritage of Leadership Recognition Society represents
illustrious personalities in the history of the University of Flor-
ida College of Law since it was founded in 1909. Members are
pre-eminent graduates and others who have been involved in the
college in very significant ways. They assumed national leader-
ship positions and distinguished themselves in legal, governmen-
tal, academic and corporate sectors. They labored to improve the
administration of justice and received the highest commendations
for contributions to the profession and service to education, civic,
charitable and cultural causes.
Members of the Heritage of Leadership Recognition Society
are selected by the Heritage of Leadership Committee, which pres-
ents the slate for discussion and approval to the full membership
of the University of Florida Law Center Association, Inc. Board of
Trustees. m


SPRING 2011












CLASS NOTES


Christopher R. Strohmenger became
a shareholder in Rogers Towers, RA.'s
Jacksonville office this year. His practice
consists of representing clients engaged
in the acquisition, development, sale and
finance of commercial and large-scale real
estate projects.


2001
Anitere Flores was elected in November
to represent Florida Senate District 38 in
southwest Miami Dade County. Flores, a
Republican, serves as chairwoman of the
Senate Judiciary Committee.

Jim Paine, of Kilpatrick Townsend &
Stockton LLP Atlanta's Commercial
Transactions Team, was named to the
partnership this year. He was also named a
2011 Georgia Super Lawyers Rising Star.

Sarah P. L. Reiner, an attorney in the
Orlando office of GrayRobinson, RA. with
a focus on employment and labor law and
related commercial litigation, has been
named to the BETA Center board of directors
executive committee. BETA Center is a
private, nonprofit organization that provides
parenting and educational assistance to
young teenage mothers and their children.

Sal A. Richardson and another Gator,
David Gold (JD 91), have been named co-
managing partners for the Florida offices of
Adelson, Testan, Brundo & Jimenez.

Jennifer A. Schwartz was recently chosen for
partnership at Jackson Lewis LLP in Miami.

Peggy A. McGovern Stumhofer, of Page,
Mrachek, Fitzgerald & Rose, PA. in West
Palm Beach, was selected as a "Top Up and
Comer" in civil litigation by the South Florida
Legal Guide 2011.


2002
T. Robert Bulloch, of Quarles & Brady's
Naples office, was selected as a 40
Under 40 recipient by Gulfshore Business
magazine. Bullock practices in the areas
of estate planning, estate and trust
administration, probate litigation and closely
held business planning.

Alexa Sherr Hartley, president of Premier
Leadership Coaching in Delray Beach,
has been selected as a guest blogger for
The Miami Herald's "The Balancing Act"
column. Her post included suggestions for
maintaining a work-life balance.

LaShawnda K. Jackson has been elected
partner in Rumberger, Kirk & Caldwell's
Orlando office. Jackson practices in the areas
of casualty defense, product liability and
insurance coverage. She currently serves as a
member of The Florida Bar's Young Lawyers
Division Board of Governors and is the
current president of the Orange County Bar
Association Young Lawyers Section, as well
as a member of that organization's board of
governors.

Jennifer Page Killen was recently named a
partner with the firm McConnaughhay, Duffy,
Coonrod, Pope & Weaver, PA. Killen has
been with the firm's Ocala office since 2003
practicing workers' compensation defense.

Kim Madison, an associate at Adams and
Reese LLP's Tampa office in the firm's
Transactions and Corporate Advisory Services
Practice Group, will serve as vice chair of
the Hillsborough County Human Relations
Board for 2011-2012. Madison has been a
member of the board since 2008. The board
reviews complaints filed under Hillsborough
County's Human Rights Ordinance,
which promotes fair treatment and equal
opportunity for all of the county's residents.


George Moraitis, of Fort Lauderdale,
has been elected as the Republican
representative in the Florida House of
Representatives for District 91 in Fort
Lauderdale.

David Scileppi, a banking and financial
services attorney in Gunster's Fort
Lauderdale office, was appointed to
shareholder.


2003
Christopher Benvenuto, an environmental
and land use law attorney in Gunster's
West Palm Beach office, was appointed to
shareholder.

Brian Crevasse, an associate with Bachara
Construction Law Group in Jacksonville,
was recently named a Florida Rising Star
by Law & Politics Publishing.

Wojciech Jackowski has joined Menaker
& Herrmann in New York City as an
associate. He was previously a senior
assistant district attorney for Kings County,
N.Y., where he served in the Money
Laundering and Revenue Crimes Bureau
and the Rackets Division.

Beverly A. Pascoe became a shareholder
in Rogers Towers, PA.'s Jacksonville office
this year. Pascoe practices in the areas of
health care law and general business law.
She has also been appointed to the board
of directors for Pine Castle, a Jacksonville
organization dedicated to enriching the
lives of adults with developmental and
acquired disabilities.

Dexter Smith is the new dean of
admissions at Campbell University's
Norman A. Wiggins School of Law in
Raleigh, N.C.


Strohmenger 00 Paine 01


Reiner 01


Killen 02 Pascoe 03


Derr 04


UF LAW












CLASS NOTES


2004
V. Nicholas Dancaescu, of GrayRobinson,
RA.'s Orlando office, has been promoted
to a senior associate. Dancaescu practices
eminent domain law and general
litigation with GrayRobinson's eminent
domain practice group.

Christine Lynne Derr, of the Law Office
of Christine L. Derr, RA. in Tampa, was
awarded the 2010 Theodore Millison
Professionalism Award given by the Tampa
Family Law Inn of Court. The award
recognizes an attorney who has distinguished
herself professionally and is the only award
given by the Tampa Family Law Inn of Court.
She was also named to the 2010 Florida
Super Lawyers Rising Stars list in the area of
marital and family law.

Nelson D. Diaz, of the Becker & Poliakoff,
RA. Coral Gables office, has been elected as
a shareholder of the firm. He is an attorney
in the firm's government law and lobbying
practice. Diaz is also a member of the Levin
College of Law Alumni Council.

Vanessa Sisti Snyder, having practiced
as an attorney for several years in South
Florida, spent a year in England as a Rotary
Foundation Ambassadorial Scholar and
earned a graduate degree at the University
of Oxford. She recently completed a term
as a law clerk to Chief U.S. District Judge
Federico A. Moreno of the Southern District
of Florida and is currently serving a term as a
law clerk to Senior Circuit Judge Peter T. Fay
(JD 56) on the 11th Circuit Court of Appeals
in Miami.

James E. Walson, of Lowndes, Drosdick,
Doster, Kantor & Reed in Orlando, became
a partner in January. Walson previously
served as senior associate at the firm. Walson
focuses his legal practice on commercial
litigation, particularly real property disputes.


Walson 04


2005
Christopher M. Chestnut, founder of the
Chestnut Law Firm, won the inaugural
2010 Nation's Best Advocate of the Year
Award: 40 Lawyers Under 40 at a special
gala at the National Bar Association's
85th annual convention in New Orleans.
Chestnut was voted the top African-
American attorney (under 40) in the nation
by his peers.

Ben Bain-Creed, an assistant United
States attorney, received the Director's
Award for Superior Performance by a
Special Assistant United States Attorney
for his outstanding contributions to the
Department of Justice's forfeiture efforts
and to ensuring that the maximum amount
of restitution is paid to victims of crimes in
a timely manner. Since August 2008, Bain-
Creed has completed cases resulting in the
forfeiture and distribution to victims of over
$25 million.


Guerrero 05


Houck-Toll 05


A. Felipe Guerrero, an associate at Dean,
Mead, Egerton, Bloodworth, Capouano &
Bozarth, RA. and a member of the firm's
litigation department, was named president-
elect of the Hispanic Bar Association of
Central Florida.

Erin Houck-Toll, an associate in Henderson,
Franklin, Starnes & Holt, RA.'s Fort Meyers
office's business and tax division, has become
board certified in tax law by The Florida Bar.

Carolyn Zegeer entered the final round of a
global competition to find a new host for the
travel show, "Paradise Hunter." There were
over a thousand initial applicants from all
over the world, and she made it to the round
of 10 finalists.


2006
Natalia Medina Burnett was sworn in Nov.
22 as an assistant United States attorney in
the District of Columbia.

Gregory Lefkowitz has joined as an
associate of Duane Morris LLP's Boca
Raton office in its intellectual property
practice group. Lefkowitz concentrates
his practice on patent, trademark and
copyright procurement and litigation, as
well as the protection of trade secrets. He
holds three patents (with another inventor)
from his time as a research scientist for


SPRING 2011












CLASS NOTES


a major consumer products company.
He received his B.S. with high honors in
chemical engineering from the University of
Florida in 1999.

William Snyder, having practiced as an
attorney for several years in South Florida
and recently completed a graduate degree
at University College London, is currently
serving as a law clerk to James Lawrence
King (JD 53), senior district judge for the
Southern District of Florida. In the fall, he
will begin serving as a law clerk to Peter
T. Fay (JD 56), senior circuit judge on the
11th Circuit Court of Appeals.

James Stowers, an attorney with Cobb Cole
in Daytona Beach, was recently elected to
the Ormond Beach City Commission. He
was also recently appointed to the Volusia/
Flagler YMCA Corporate Board and was
named to the 2010 Florida Super Lawyers
Rising Stars list for his work in land use/
zoning and environmental law.


2007
Yelizaveta "Liz" Batres Herman, of
Rosenbaum Mollengarden Janssen &
Siracusa, PLLC in West Palm Beach,
moderated a judicial luncheon, "Juror
Misconduct in the Social Networking Age,"
presented by the Palm Beach County
Bar Association. The panel consisted of
Judge Kenneth A. Marra, U.S. District
Court, Southern District of Florida, Judge


wernlcK U/


Aronovitz 10


Dorian K. Damoorgian, 4th District Court
of Appeal, and Judge Robin L. Rosenberg,
15th Judicial Circuit.

Michael A. Nardella has joined Burr &
Forman LLP's Orlando office as an associate
in the Creditors' Rights & Bankruptcy
Practice Group.

Steven J. Wernick, an associate in
Sumberg Baena Price & Axelrod LLP's Land
Use & Government Relations Group, was
elected vice president of Miami Habitat for
Humanity's Habitat Young Professionals
Group.


2008
Sam Horovitz has become an associate in
Rogers Towers, RA.'s labor and employment
department.

Samantha Alves Orender has joined the
Rogers Towers, PA. Jacksonville office as
an associate in the commercial litigation
department. Her practice will focus on
commercial litigation, torts and civil trial
practice.

Anthony M. Rodriguez, of Foley & Lardner
LLP has been named to the 2010 Tampa
Bay Business Journal Up and Comers.
Rodriguez is an associate of the firm's
real estate practice, the hospitality, resort
and golf industry team and the tax and
individual planning and tax and employee


urenaer ud


Butler 10


Cohen 10


Shin 08


Gavigan 10


benefits practices.

Tae Shin has joined the Roetzel & Andress
Orlando office as an associate attorney.
Shin focuses his practice in corporate law,
mergers and acquisitions, business taxation,
and business succession planning.

S. Carey Villeneuve has joined Fowler
White Boggs in the Fort Lauderdale office.
Villeneuve practices in the firm's Business,
Banking and Insolvency Practice Group
and will concentrate his practice in all types
of business litigation.


2009
Kimberly E. Bevis recently joined Quarles
and Brady LLP's Naples office's Trusts &
Estates Group.

David N. Torre, of The Torre Law Firm, PL.
in Winter Park, began a term as a member
of the Board of Supervisors for the Seminole
County Soil and Water Conservation
District. Members are elected countywide
and serve without party designation.


2010
Cary Aronovitz has joined the Holland &
Knight LLP Miami office as an associate.
Aronovitz is a member of the firm's
litigation department and focuses on
commercial litigation and product liability.
Dustin Butler has become an associate in


villeneuve ud


Novak 10


tievis u


Williams 10


UF LAW


HorovITz Ud











OBITUARIES


The Martin Law Firm's Cape Coral office.
His practice focuses on family law and
civil litigation.

Andrew B. Carrabis has announced his
campaign as a candidate for the Florida
House of Representatives in House
District 85, which includes part of Palm
Beach County.

Da'Morus Cohen has joined the Holland
& Knight LLP Miami office as an
associate. Cohen is a member of the
firm's business law department and
concentrates his practice in the areas
of securities, mergers and acquisitions,
corporate law and corporate governance.

James C. Gavigan has joined the Jones,
Foster, Johnston & Stubbs, P.A. West Palm
Beach office as an associate attorney.

Michael V. Leeman joined the Quarles &
Brady LLP Tampa office as an attorney in
the commercial litigation group.

Susan Novak has become an associate
in Rogers Towers, P.A.'s litigation
department. She will practice in the
areas of commercial litigation, torts and
civil trial practice.

A. Daniel Vazquez, an attorney with
Fine, Farkash & Parlapiano, P.A. in
Gainesville, was recently elected to serve
on the Suwannee-St. Johns Sierra Club
executive board of directors for a two-
year term. He also has been selected
to serve on the Levin College of Law's
Oil Spill Working Group research team
developing response and policy solutions
to issues related to the BP Deepwater
Horizon oil spill.

Frederick N. Vinson received the second
place award in the national 2010
Tannenwald Student Writing Competition
in the field of tax law.

Ashley Williams has become an
associate in Rogers Towers, P.A.'s
litigation department. Her practice will
focus on commercial litigation, asset
recovery and civil trial. .


In Memoriam


A practicing lawyer and academic who graduated in 1967
from the University of Florida College of Law, E. John
Wherry Jr. passed away on March 21, 2010.
Wherry died in Southington, Conn., at the age of 67. He served .
as a criminal defense attorney, was a law professor at Widener Uni-
versity, taught trial advocacy to students and professionals through the
National Institute of Trial Advocacy and served as the first dean of the
Orlando College of Law.
Before taking on those jobs, Wherry was a student at UF Law
where he came after graduating from Villanova in 1964. It was at UF
Law that he received a D in a class with law professor Fletcher Bald-
win. Nancy Baldwin (JD 93), Fletcher's wife and a lawyer in Gaines-
ville, remembers that Wherry had a few choice words for his law professor. Wherry told him:
"I'm going to take every course you've got till I get anA."
He did, and the Baldwins became lifelong friends with Wherry, Nancy Baldwin said. The
Baldwins have donated a gift in Wherry's memory to UF Law.
A defense lawyer who lost part of his tongue to cancer in his 40s, Wherry was told by doc-
tors that he would never speak again. Instead after surgery, extensive speech therapy, and sheer
determination he learned to speak again and used the affliction to help mesmerize juries, Nancy
Baldwin said.
Wherry was an associate professor of law from 1992 to 1995 at Widener Law School, which
has campuses in Wilmington, Del., and Harrisburg, Penn. He co-founded the Intensive Trial
Advocacy Program.
He was a collector of antique inkwells and an avid fan of the Florida Gators football team.
His wife of 38 years, Sherlene (Lang) Wherry, preceded him in death.
He is survived by three children, Dr. E. John Wherry III of Havertown, Pa., Christopher Lang
Wherry of Southington, Conn., and Patricia Convery Wherry-Harris of West Hartford, Conn.

udge John L. "Papa" Hall Jr. (LLB 58) passed away Sept. 15,
at his home in Altamonte Springs at the age of 79. He was an
accomplished Florida jurist and before that he was an accom-
plished intercollegiate athlete for the University of Florida.
At the university, he was a member of Florida Blue Key. He was p.
Cadet Colonel of the Army ROTC, which is the highest ranking stu-
dent member of Florida's ROTC. He served in the Army from 1953
to 1955 as a 1st lieutenant and entered UF Law after completing his
military service.
Hall became president of the Tallahassee Bar Association in 1967
and was elected circuit judge in 1980. He served two terms as chief
judge of the 2nd Judicial Circuit. He was chairman of the Florida Conference of Circuit Judges
and he served on many committees of the Florida Supreme Court to enhance the quality of jus-
tice. He was a teacher and lecturer to lawyers and judges at judicial conferences, law schools,
seminars and bar association meetings.
He is a member of the University of Florida Hall of Fame and the UF Letterman's Associa-
tion Hall of Fame thanks to his exploits as a punt returned and leading the Gators to their first
appearance and win in a college bowl game, the Gator Bowl. Hall's high jumping skills were
renowned and he won the 1951 and 1953 NCAA titles.
He was preceded in death by a son, Bruce Rivers Hall. He is survived by his son, William
Douglas Hall; a daughter, Sara Page Hall; and his brother, Thomas M. Hall, as well as his com-
panion, Vivian Feist Garfein. m
For a list of alumni deaths reported to the Levin College of Law since May 2010 go to
www. law. ufl. edu/uflaw/ l1spring/


SPRING 2011


























UF Lawyers in the





Gator Nation


A UF Law graduate advises the residents of a newly
independent and desperately poor region of Aji ,.u how
to set up a tax system from scratch after years of civil
war. Here is her letter from Southern Sudan.
bout a year ago, a friend in
i..!. l ._.'1j i ) a .....I I.. iw Ki

'i-i.. uI hesitating, I said, "Yes,"
I 1H cl- IJ ii.l i_ the decision to
leave my job as a t..... II. inr with
the IRS National Office and take a position with the T ST
Agency for International Development (USAID) al ii
mission in Juba, Southern Sudan. I had returned to the
United States in May 2008 after five years of working with
USAID in Kosovo, part of the former Yugoslavia, helping
it prepare for independence in February 2008. I committed
to the same job for Southern Sudan.
In January, Southern Sudan held a week-long
referendum to decide whether, after fighting with the


northern p.ll of Sudan for the better part of 50 years,
it would I., with the North or separate and become
Eii in..liri..ili country. It voted overwhelmingly for
ii..Icc I ..I~Lc and in July, it will become Africa's
newest country. With a literacy rate of 15 percent, and
its status as one of the lowest ranked countries in the
".i..l ,.n hum.iii welfare indexes, its challenges are
..__.c i ..i .1 i visited referendum polling stations,
i m.iL c!L..I ili ie resilience of these people, most of
whom walked many miles to vote some even swam
across the Nile River to vote!
Life in Southern Sudan is not easy. I live in a
-1 ii-,ig container that is converted into living quarters
I.ui I111 reminds me of a railroad car. Small mud huts
Siil conical thatched roofs are a stone's throw from
where I live. The chances of getting malaria are very
good. However, I love my job, which is to manage
one of the U.S. government's largest and most high-
profile projects in Southern Sudan. This project is
helping Southern Sudan draft legislation and establish
governing institutions, such as the Ministry of Finance,


UF LAW











GATOR NATION

PAV 0- 1


















"My law degree serves me well in helping developing countries establish modern

and transparent laws and governing institutions. It was my LL.M in tax from the

University of Florida Levin College of Law that enabled me to enter this field."
-SHARON HESTER (LLMT 91)


CLOCKWISE: A courthouse in Lakes State in Southern Sudan; Sharon Hester (LLMT 91) stands
next to a soldier at a referendum polling center; Mud huts called tukuls sit on the edge of the Nile
River. People walked many miles to vote in the referendum some even swam across the Nile; A
mother shows her ink-covered finger, signifying that she voted in the referendum.


the Central Bank, the Ministry of
Legal Affairs and the Ministry of
Cabinet Affairs among others.
As in Kosovo, I am helping
Southern Sudan to "stand up" its first-
ever tax administration. This work
also involves me in policy discussions
such as what laws are needed and how
a new constitution will be drafted,
as well as how Southern Sudan will
print and manage its own currency,
manage its large oil reserves and
provide health and education to the
people. Having been involved in this
kind of work since 1998 in several
other countries, I understand how
challenging this will be, especially in
Southern Sudan.


While I no longer work as a
lawyer, my law degree serves me
well in helping developing countries
establish modern and transparent
laws and governing institutions.
It was my LL.M in tax from the
University of Florida Levin College
of Law that enabled me to enter this
field. In 1998, I moved to Moscow as
part of a team of economists and tax
experts to help Russia develop its first
tax code. As I sat with the Russian
Parliamentary committees, providing
advice as they marked up various
draft tax codes, I felt the satisfaction
of helping a country improve its laws
and government in order to improve
the quality of life for its people. m


50


UF LAW


l'.,











GATOR NATION


BY ROBERTA 0. ROBERTS (4JM)


The Vietnam War veteran and
former missile engineer landed
in the Federated States of
Micronesia, an archipelago of
about 607 islands 500 miles east
of the Philippines, on Nov. 11, 2010.
It was the same date as Veterans Day in
the United States, but this was no military
adventure.
Renwick Nelson (JD 75) arrived in
Micronesia to oversee the development
of Peace Corps programs created to teach
English to Micronesian and Palauan primary
school students as the Peace Corps country
director in Micronesia and Palau. He will
serve for 19 months with the possibly of
serving another term.
"I came here with three goals in mind: to
positively impact those I came to serve and
serve with, to be positively impacted by the
people of Micronesia and Palau, and to make
the experience a joyful one for me and my


staff," he said. "I tell people and I believe this
to this day: this has been the most meaningful
professional experience of my life."
Nelson had already traveled to this part
of the world. He taught business and law
courses in Tonga, a Pacific island nation,
from 2000 to 2002 as a Peace Corps
volunteer.
Nelson was a successful engineer,
lawyer and businessman until 1997, when
he began to volunteer worldwide.
"When I retired, initially I rode my
bike, I played tennis, I played basketball,
I worked out at the gym," Nelson said.
"After a while, that is not as satisfying as
it may sound."
He prefers being part of something
bigger than himself.
"This year marks the 50th anniversary of
Peace Corps, which has been a significant
contributor to peace in the world in the last
50 years," Nelson said. m


In the past year,

several Gator lawyers

have made their

presence felt far

beyond our shores.

Renwick Nelson (JD

75), Nathalie Nozile

(JD 10) and Michael

Cavendish (JD 98)

show that the reach

of the Gator Nation is

everywhere.


SPRING 2011











GATOR NATION


last living in Haiti, she was shel-
tered in a children's home with
dreams of being a lawyer.
Years later, Hollywood superstar
and philanthropist Angelina Jolie helped make Nozile's
dreams of becoming a Haitian lawyer come true.
Ten years since coming to the United States, Nozile
returned Jan. 30 to her home country as the first Jolie
Legal Fellow.
Sponsored by the Jolie-Pitt Foundation, this year-
long fellowship places Nozile as a special assistant to
the Haitian government. Her job is to ensure the rights
of vulnerable Haitian children. She may also have the
option to continue in the position after she completes the
first year.
Nozile said "there was no time to be star-struck"
when she met Jolie.
"Alot of kids are lost in the system in Haiti. Children
who are in conflict with the law need representation,"
Nozile said. "They need an advocate, they need a lawyer
pushing through to make sure their voices are heard."
And Nozile is prepared to be that voice.
"I am ready to go to work," she said. m


ijalon Gomes, an English
teacher in South Korea, was
arrested when he crossed the
border into North Korea from
China and was sentenced to
eight years of hard labor and fined $700,000.
Michael Cavendish (JD 98) knew he had
to take action, even if he was more than 7,000
miles away from the scene. Cavendish began
an international letter-writing campaign urging
newspapers to publish his opinion pieces
calling for Gomes' freedom.
"What discouraged me the most is the
way the North Koreans behaved," Cavendish
said. "My conscience was shocked. (His
story) grabbed me and didn't let go."
According to Cavendish, the North


Korean government gave Gomes a sentence
that was grossly disproportionate. They
made what would have been a civil infraction
in the United States (entry without a visa) a
criminal offense.
Cavendish ended his almost five-month
campaign when Gomes was escorted
home by former President Jimmy Carter in
August. He cited the U.S. military slogan
"no one gets left behind" and said American
civilians should receive this same depth of
governmental protection as do our soldiers,
since Americans abroad are increasingly
subject to detention based on geopolitics.
Jon Mills, director of the Center for
Governmental Responsibility and UF Law
dean emeritus, said that Cavendish's efforts


"show a real
commitment to
higher principles
and values."
"Frequently,
lawyers are in
a better position
or better able
to be advocates
for individuals
and their rights,
so lawyers should take initiative and
if they see something being done wrong,
they should do something about it," Mills
said. "(Cavendish) is a perfect example of
using skills and ability to help other
people." m


UF LAW









UF LAW FACULTY IN THE NEWS


MEDIA HITS


tl


"The system
takes very seri-
ously any time
someone under
oath is swear-
ing that some-
hing is personal
knowledge.
But the law has
to be careful.
It matters who
is complicit."

-AMY MASHBURN,
Professor of Law
NOV. 24, The Palm Beach
Post, "Dormant foreclosure
cases in Florida starting to
trickle back into courts"


"This is the
kind of case that
raises the (First
Amendment)
issue very force-
fully. ... If it's
really a guide
to pedophilia,
I can't see any
community any-
where thinking
that's OK. "
-LYRISSA LIDSKY,
Stephen C. O'Connell Chair,
Professor of Law
DEC. 21, AOL News, "Arrest of
Author of Pedophile
Book Raises Legal Issues"


"They are them-
selves not prone to
want to go out and
get help because of
the consequences
to themselves, so
ift's almost circular."
-BERTA HERNANDEZ-
TRUYOL, Levin Mabie & Levin
Professor of Law
JAN. 24, WCJB-TV 20,
"Modern Slavery"

"I think the
military is much
more persuaded
by output,
is much more
persuaded
y economic
efficiency."
-DIANE MAZUR,
Professor of Law
DEC. 21, The New York Times,
"Colleges Rethink R.O.T.C. After
'Don't Ask' Repeal"
Mazur doubts the military
would reinstate ROTC at Ivy
League colleges because it is
expensive to operate there.


SPRING 2011


"Our populist birthright with the
Declaration of Independence serving
as our anti-authoritarian birth certifi-
cate demands political struggle.
It offers no guarantees that the most
rational, fact-based argument wins.
But it allows and encourages cries
from the margins that challenge
and can often renew
a dysfunctional politi-
cal system."
MARK FENSTER,
Professor of Law

APRIL 22, The New York Times,
"Our Populist Birthright"
Fenster wrote an opinion piece on the
continuing debate among Americans about
President Barack Obama's place of birth












0 FACULTY SPOTLIGHT


A new direction

Extending comparative law's global reach
BY MATT WALKER


When Veronica Musa (LLM 11)
earned her law degree and mas-
ter's degree in her native country
of Argentina, she thought she was finished
with higher education and glad of it. As
a human rights activist, she said academia
was a means to an end; it wasn't what she
was passionate about.
But after she came to the United States
and began working at
Florida Institutional Le-
gal Services advocating
on behalf of immigrant
detainees in the state of
Florida, she began to
see the benefits of hav-
ing a stronger academic
and theoretical background to be more effec-
tive in her job.
After seeing how different the U.S. legal
system is from her native country's, and be-
ing inspired by a University of Florida Levin
College of Law intern who worked with her
at legal services, Musa decided to return to
school. She completed her LL.M in Com-
parative Law in May.
"The Comparative Law Program was de-
signed to attract foreign lawyers to come to the
University of Florida to learn about the United
States and the United States' legal system,"
said UF Law Professor Pedro Malavet, who
was named associate director of the UF Law
LL.M in Comparative Law Program this year.
"I think I gained a lot of perspective,"
Musa said, "especially from the other attor-


neys from abroad. That's really the feature
that I think is most interesting."
Malavet says those international connec-
tions make a difference.
"Our students are in the same classroom
with students who already have their law de-
gree from another country," he said. "Those
are relationships that you can develop. You
can meet lawyers from all over the world here
during your law studies."
In May, after 15 years of teaching com-
parative law at UF Law, Malavet will assume
his duties as the Comparative Law Program's
new director.
Malavet said his first order of business as
director will be to expand the Comparative
Law Program and use UF Law's partners
around the world to help spread the word
about its increased size. The program was
originally intended to be small, only admit-
ting 15 to 20 students per year, but based on
its success over the years, Malavet said it is
time to let it grow. The faculty will have to of-
ficially approve the expanded program and its
details since its original approval was based
on a lower student limit. Once the proper ap-
provals are secured, Malavet will be able to
promote the program more aggressively.
The reasons students are attracted to the
program vary because the LL.M can be ap-
plied in a wide variety of ways, Malavet said.
Some students plan to take a bar exam
in the United States after graduating (some
states allow foreign lawyers with an LL.M
from an American law school to sit for the


-.,1 1 IIi ilc I I LI I ._ ., I,- I, .1 .111.11 .-. i 111

I,,.l' . iPi I. L 1l.'L.' I. i I , IL.'H 11 .'
,..,. iI .ii i i il I H.' .iI .' i.',_. I.' [, i n.' -i,

.,.. ,n 1iii .'ii_ i 'I, . i I .' L I I L L .I I L .

-L.' I i i '_ i l L. i i' .I i i .
I ! i 'l l. hi i >.L , 't 1" l i,.h -




administration of justice and she also ap-
preciates aspects of the Argentine system that
she didn't realize before. For example, her
country's incarceration rate is much lower
than the United States'.
Musa said when she returns to Argentina
her LL.M will also benefit her as she looks
for employment. "I will be more marketable,
more competitive with a foreign degree, es-
pecially from a university with a good reputa-
tion."
Malavet also points out that the students
who participate in the program aren't the only
ones who can benefit from it.
"You need an expert in foreign law some-
times and how are you going to find one?
How are you going to know that they know
what they're talking about?" Malavet asked.
"If you met them as students here, you know
that they were good enough to get into law
school, that they had the credentials. I think
that gives an opportunity for our law students
and law graduates to have connections abroad
and develop that kind of connection."
Malavet will be assuming director du-
ties from Professor David Hudson, who will
return to his full-time faculty position after
serving as the director of the Comparative
Law Program since 1999.
"David Hudson has served as director
of the program for three-fourths of its life,
providing the leadership that has delivered
a high-quality educational experience to
hundreds of students," said UF Law Dean
Robert Jerry. "The affinity of the program's
graduates for not only the college but also
Professor Hudson personally is a testament
to the tremendous personal attention and
encouragement he gives the students, his pro-
fessionalism, and his support for the gradu-
ates throughout their careers." m


UF LAW










MEDIA HITS


"If he never
had the right
to develop the
property in that
way ... then
what the city
gave him was
worthless."
-MICHAEL ALLAN WOLF,
Richard E. Nelson Chair in
Local Government Law
Feb. 25, The Miami Herald,
"Air Force sues Homestead
farmer, city"
Wolf was referring to the
case of John Alger, who was
exempted from a Homestead
ordinance prohibiting him
from building residential
homes on his property,
only to be sued by the U.S.
government, which says
his property is too close to
Homestead Air Reserve Base
to build residences.

"I would say most
wrongful termi-
nation cases are
settled or some-
how dismissed, or
given up before
they actually get to
a trial. So I would
think that actually
going through to
a trial would be
unusual but not
unheard of."
-JOSEPH LITTLE,
Emeritus Professor
JAN. 2, Naples Daily
News, "Former FGCU
provost's wrongful firing
lawsuit moves toward
trial in early 2011"


"The fact that they
are even coming
back is a good thing.
A mediator can't
impose anything on
either side."


-THOMAS HURST, Emeritus Professor, Sam T. Dell Research Scholar
FEB. 28, The St. Petersburg Times,
"For NFL, mediation is all about grinding forward"
Hurst speaking on stalled labor
negations between representatives of the NFL
and the NFL players union.


"I've never
seen a case of
a person im-
proving his
chances by
firing his law-
yer. The big
thing is he just
doesn't know
what he's do-
ing. It is not a
wise thing to
do. It is going
to be a chal-
lenge to make
sure that all
sorts of things
don't happen
that shouldn't
happen in a
courtroom."

-GEORGE "BOB" DEKLE,
Legal Skills Professor
JAN. 10, The Tampa Tribune,
"Rape defendant to represent
himself at trial"


SPRING 2011











0 FACULTY SPOTLIGHT







Defusing disputes

UF Law dispute resolution program garners national attention
BY JARED MISNER (4JM)


Robin Davis (JD 88) thrives on help-
ing others.
Now serving as the director of
the University of Florida Levin College
of Law's Institute for Dispute Resolution,
Davis' history of doing just that includes
working as a middle school English and
social studies teacher, a social worker, and
alternative dispute resolution director of
Florida's 8th Judicial Circuit.
The UF Law Dispute Resolution Pro-
gram has received a boost from U.S. News
& World Report's 2012 rankings, which
placed UF Law seventh in the field of dis-
pute resolution among public universities
and 19th overall.
UF's reputation in the field of dispute
resolution, faculty members said, is due
in large part to the institute's programs,
including arbitration training for fore-
closure mediation and collaborative law
training.


Partly supported by a $100,000 donation
from Florida-based Upchurch Watson White
and Max Mediation Group, UF's Institute for
Dispute Resolution was the first of its kind es-
tablished at a Florida law school following a
trailblazing state law granting judges the broad
authority to mandate mediation in civil cases.
While dispute resolution might still
be classified as a "specialty area," Davis is
quick to highlight its importance.
"When there's a conflict, andyou let it go,
it can actually become worse. It can become
explosive," Davis said. Me-
diation "is a healthy way to
resolve conflict because you "W hel
encourage the parties to en- a conf
gage in a dialogue."
Leonard Riskin, a Ches- yOU l
terfield Smith professor of it can
law, expanded on the grow-
ing importance of mediation become
he's seen in recent years. It can
"Mediation is now used
in virtually every case you expl
can imagine," he said.
-ROBIN D
Riskin also leads UF's UF LAw
Initiative of Mindfulness in
Law and Dispute Resolution
where he works to improve
the resolution abilities of law students and
professionals.
The program's other faculty include As-
sociate Professor and IDR Associate Direc-
tor Jonathan Cohen; Professor and Director
Emeritus Don Peters; Lecturer and Affiliate
Director Stephen Powell; and Lecturer and
Affiliate Director and Clinical Professor Iris
Burke.
The real benefit of mediation lies in cre-
ating a situation where both parties gain from
the transaction. "In mediation, we like to say
there can be a win-win situation," Davis said,
"working together is in the interest of both
parties."


Cohen, the program's associate direc-
tor, added an important distinction between
dispute resolution and other areas of law.
"We try to train lawyers to be effective
problem solvers and not just effective liti-
gators," he said.
Taking that idea of working together,
faculty members in UF's dispute resolution
program point to a new organization they
hope will bring the entire UF community
together.
The Conflict Resolution Initiative,


n there's
lict, and
et it go,
actually
e worse.
become
osive."
)AVIs (JD 88)
PROFESSOR


started in part by the IDR
student organization Ga-
tors for Alternative Dis-
pute Resolution along with
the UF Student Affairs Of-
fice, will help law students
mediate actual disputes
on the UF campus as they
train to become certified
mediators by the Florida
Supreme Court.
The 27 law stu-
dents trained to become
part of the first class
of the organization's Me-
diation Training Program
in mid-March. They now


must complete observation hours and sub-
mit applications before becoming Florida
Supreme Court Certified County Court
mediators.
With a waiting list already in place
for the organization's help, Davis said the
Conflict Resolution Initiative could help
solidify the University of Florida's promi-
nence as a national leader in dispute reso-
lution.
"We hope the CRI can help change the
landscape of the UF community to a more
peaceable community," Davis said. "Con-
flict resolution helps educate people to be
more responsible citizens." m


UF LAW









MEDIA HITS


"Should the
U.S. promote
some form of
transitional
justice seri-
ously, it would
be placing
itself on the
right side of
history."
-WINSTON R NAGAN,
FRSA Samuel T. Dell
Research Scholar
Professor of Law; Affiliate
Professor of Anthropology;
Founding Director,
Institute for Human Rights
and Peace Development
JAN. 31, The
Gainesville Sun, Op-
Ed, "Transformation to
democracy in Egypt"

"It's not going
to be possible
to use the
space there
as you would
classrooms in
a school, but
the concept
that every
judge needs
his own court-
room is just
not true. It's
indefensible."

-JENNIFER ZEDALIS,
Legal Skills Professor,
Director of Trial Practice
MARCH 5, The St.
Petersburg Times, "Survey
reveals Hernando County
courtrooms not used half
of the time"


"I think it is all part
of a package (dem-
onstrating) Georgia
is cleaning up its
own house in terms
of water efficiency."

CHRISTINE KLEIN, Professor of Law
FEB. 3, The Atlanta Journal-Constitution,
"Neighbors cautiously eye Deal's reservoir push"


"It doesn't
matter
whether the
bankruptcy
has started
yet. If you
are insolvent,
you are not
supposed
to be giving
your money
away. If
you don't
pay your
creditors, the
people who
you gave
the money
to have to
cough it up."

-JEFFREY DAVIS,
Professor of Law

NOV. 5, The Florida
Times-Union, "Troubled
horses face loss of St.
Augustine home as
Ponzi scheme impacts
nonprofits"












0 FACULTY SPOTLIGHT


An intellectual challenge

New director broadens goals of IP program
BY BRANDON BRESLOW (3LAS)


.r many companies, the trade se-
rets that make them successful are
!i.rely discussed in public. But what
happens when the United States or interna-
tional governments demand the information
to keep up with federal regulations?
This is one of many issues that Eliza-
beth Rowe helps students understand as the
new director of the Levin College of Law's
Intellectual Property Law Program.
"There is a misconception that intellec-
tual property law is for people interested in
science," said Rowe, an associate professor
at UF Law. "But the field has integral rela-
tionships with pressing issues important to
the economy, such as business, policy and
technology."
The college's program provides a wide
view of these relationships, requiring comple-
tion of courses such as introductory patent and
copyright law and offering seminars on cor-
porate espionage, sports law and franchising.
Upon completion of the program's require-
ments, students are awarded the Certificate in
Intellectual Property Law at graduation.
Since accepting an appointment to the
position in 2010, replacing former UF Law


Professor Thomas Cotter, Rowe began
building a new student-oriented website
to attract students interested in intellectual
property law and provide coverage of the
college's program.
"The website is meant to be a one-stop,
comprehensive resource not just for those
registered for the certificate," Rowe said.
"I want to be able to reach the broader au-
dience of students interested in (intellec-
tual property) who aren't in the certificate
program."
In addition to course information, the
website includes resources in finding and
applying for available jobs and internships.
Rowe established and maintains relation-
ships with government agencies such as
the United States Patent and Trademark
Office, as well as law firms and businesses
in the private sector for the job placement
of technical and nontechnical students in
the intellectual property program.
"Since taking over the program," Rowe
said, "I've taken a more proactive approach
in providing job placements for students."
Coming directly from private practice
in the area, Rowe is steeped in the practice


of intellectual property law. After receiving
her juris doctor from Harvard Law School
in 1996, she worked as an associate special-
izing in intellectual property and employ-
ment litigation at Hale & Dorr LLP in Bos-
ton, where she eventually made partner.
Since becoming an assistant professor
at UF Law in 2005, Rowe has published
several legal articles on issues facing the
field. Her most recent article, "Striking a
Balance: When Should Trade Secret Law
Shield Disclosures to the Government?"
was published in March in the Iowa Law
Review. It focuses on the gap between the
protection of trade secrets and government
regulations that could require businesses to
hand over those secrets if necessary.
The article uses the hypothetical sce-
nario of "black boxes" of information be-
ing in the more than 8 million vehicles re-
called by Toyota in 2010. Rowe addresses
whether the government could seize the
black boxes as part of an investigation
even if Toyota argued that the boxes con-
tained trade secrets.
"We need to be able to do the analy-
sis in such a way that we are only protect-
ing the information that is a trade secret,"
Rowe said. "If it is a trade secret, then we
need a better way to determine the govern-
ment's need for the information relative to
the company's need to keep it secret."
William Page, senior associate dean for
academic affairs, said Rowe was a natural
choice for the role of director considering
her experience and investment in the field.
"We've already seen that she makes a
great counselor to the students and admin-
istrator for the program," Page said.
While remaining immersed in the field
of intellectual property, Rowe's focus re-
mains on developing the college's program
into one of national prominence. Her plans
include conferences to discuss trends and
issues facing the field and creating a board
of alumni from graduates of the intellec-
tual property program.
"I've conceptualized the program
in such a way that it will be something
broader than providing the certificate,"
she said. m
-Troy Hillier (JD 11) contributed to
this story


UF LAW

















































Going the Distance
U F Law Senior Associate Dean for Academic Affairs Wil-
liam H. Page, wearing light blue shorts, runs among the
24,338 competitors in the Boston Marathon on April
18. In the background is the famed Newton firehouse
at around mile 17, the start of the Newton hills. Page finished the
26.2-mile race in 4:02:31. The 60-year-old UF Law veteran recalls
running the 1988 Boston Marathon in under three hours. Page said
23 years and a less rigorous training regimen account for his latest
result.
UF Law started its own half-mile fitness trail during the spring
semester (See back cover) marking the path with arrows on the
pavement snaking through the campus. More details about the
fitness opportunities at UF Law and at the University of Florida are
available at www.law.ufl.edu/about/fitness.shtml. m


WELCOME / FAREWELL


Librarian Rick Donnelly
retires from UF Law

of the Legal In-

A associate Director
formation Center
Rick Donnelly -
retired in February, part-
ing from a position he held
with esteem for 25 years.
Donnelly came to the
University of Florida Col-
lege of Law in 1981 as
head of media services.
In 1986 he was appointedited
associate director of the
Legal Information Center, where he assisted in administra-
tion and acted as a team leader in the multi-million dollar
renovation of the law library in 2005.
Recently, Donnelly served two terms as a faculty
senator and as the college administrator for design and con-
struction of the Martin H. Levin Legal Advocacy Center.
In March, he was awarded the 2011 University of Florida
Superior Accomplishment Award.
UF Law Dean Robert Jerry praised Donnelly as a valu-
able member of the UF Law team.
Elizabeth Outler was appointed interim director of the
library. m


Lindsay Segawa appointed
accounting coordinator
L indsay Segawa
joins the staff as
UF Law's new
accounting coor-
dinator III and financial
supervisor. Her responsi-
bilities include reconcilia-
tion and review of budgets
and fiscal transactions. Ad-
ditionally, she will work
closely with the Center for
Governmental Responsi-
bility on the management
of its grants. Segawa, who has a bachelor of arts in busi-
ness administration with a concentration in accounting,
was previously an administrative officer with the Univer-
sity of Hawaii where she worked in many areas of fiscal
management, from procurement and payables to grant
management and budgeting. m


SPRING 2011




















BOOK ROUND-UP


MON.SON


JEFFREY HARRISON
WITH ROGER BLAIR
Monopsony in Law and
Economics

Harrison, a UF Law professor
and Stephen C. O'Connell
Chair, and Blair, Walter
J. Matherly Professor of
Economics and chair of the
UF Economics Department,
delve deeply into the topic of
monopsony an economic
relationship in which there is
only one buyer of a good or
service and how the law
responds to such situations.
The notion that if a monopolist
- only one seller of a good or
service raises prices, then
a monopsonist must lower
prices, is dispelled here and the
harmful aspects of monopsony
are examined, including how
consumers can be negatively
affected by monopsonies.
(Cambridge University Press)

MARC A. WITES (JD 94)
Florida Causes of Action

This annual publication
provides a comprehensive


review of over 100 Florida
causes of action that will
assist attorneys in reviewing
cases, drafting pleadings and
motions, jury instructions
and more. For each cause
of action, the book includes
case citations and excerpts
from the most recent
decision from each Florida
District Court of Appeal
and the Florida Supreme
Court that address the
action's elements; as well as
information about defenses
and the applicable statute of
limitations. The book comes
with a CD, which contains
the full text of the book in
both Microsoft Word and in a
searchable database. (James
Publishing)


DON PETERS AND
CATHERINE ROSS
DUNHAM
Civil Procedure:
Skills and Values

This textbook co-authored by
Peters, a UF Law professor,


and Dunham, the associate
dean for academic affairs,
professor of law and director
of the Trial Practice Program
at Elon University School of
Law, is part of the LexisNexis
Skills and Values series and
allows students to learn by
working through exercises
applying civil procedure
concepts and doctrines to
solve the kinds of problems
that practicing lawyers face
frequently. It features an
extensive online teacher's
manual that contains
information for role plays;
model document drafts;
sample interactive transcripts
for interviewing, counseling
and deposition exercises;
and student self-assessment
instruments. (LexisNexis)

DIANE H. MAZUR
A More Perfect Military:
How the Constitution can
Make Our Military Stronger

A More Perfect Military
opens a national
conversation about the


all-volunteer military and
its relationship to civilian
society. Mazur, a UF Law
professor, examines how
civil-military relations have
changed since the end of
the Vietnam-era draft, in no
small part due to the United
States Supreme Court. In
a series of opinions in the
1970s and 1980s, the
court chipped away at the
military's professional bond
to law and the Constitution.
This constitutional fracture
weakened our system
for civilian control and
contributed to many of the
military's most challenging
problems today: hidden
troubles with military
recruiting, difficult transitions
to equality for women
and gay service members,
erosion of professional ethics
and a crisis of candor in
military advice. Mazur offers
recommendations to return
the military to its traditional
constitutional foundation.
(Oxford University Press)


UF LAW



























THE


NANCY DOWD
The Man Question: Male
Subordination and Privilege
Although feminism is
credited with helping our
culture acknowledge that
many factors contribute
to a woman's identity
and status, we often
forget to apply the same
considerations toward
males. Dowd, the David H.
Levin Chair in Family Law
at UF Law and director
of the Center on Children
and Families, draws from
masculinities scholarship
and feminist analysis to
examine issues of manhood
and masculinity. She
demonstrates how both
subordination and privilege
are constructed for men and
boys. She suggests how
"the man question" should
be asked and then explores
some examples of where
this leads. Her analysis
looks at boys in terms of
education and juvenile
justice; and looks at men in
terms of fatherhood and


as adult male survivors of
childhood sexual abuse.
(NYU Press)

MARGARET "PEGI" S.
PRICE (JD 86)
The Special Needs Child
and Divorce: A Practical
Guide to Evaluation and
Handling Cases
With a growing number of
divorce cases involving special
needs children, this book
examines how special needs
factor into a divorce and how
lawyers can help the children
and their families get through
the process in the best way
possible. Price also looks at
how standard child support
guidelines and divorce
procedures can be adjusted
to best meet the needs of a
special needs child. Price has
years of experience in family
law cases involving special
needs children and also has
an autistic son, who was 6
years old when Price went
through her own divorce.
(American Bar Association)


BUDDY MACKAY (JD 67)
WITH RICK EDMONDS
How Florida Happened:
The Political Education of
Buddy MacKay

MacKay tells the story
of the influential Florida
politician over the course of
his three-decade political
career in the Sunshine
State. MacKay served
as a Florida legislator, a
member of the United
States Congress, Florida's
lieutenant governor, and,
following the unexpected
death of Gov. Lawton
Chiles, as Florida's
governor for 23 days before
Jeb Bush took office.
MacKay's distinctive voice
is noticeable throughout,
with Edmonds who has
held various editing and
publishing roles at The St.
Petersburg Times and is
currently a media business
analyst for The Poynter
Institute lending editing
advice along the way. The
biography captures the


shifting political tides in
Florida and documents
a state moving into the
modern era. (University
Press of Florida)

ALAN GREER (JD 69)
Choices & Challenges:
Lessons in Faith, Hope,
and Love
In his "brief before the
highest court there is," Greer
argues for the existence of
God and how such a belief
can fit into our modern
society. Writing from a
lawyer's perspective, he
emphasizes ways in which
the belief in God can enrich
the human experience. He
also addresses the concept
that organized religion is
a human construct and
therefore capable of fallibility
- but that doesn't mean
there aren't certain morals
and beliefs that should
be upheld; and as society
changes over time, it makes
sense for certain rules and
laws to change. (Morgan
James Publishing) m


SPRING 2011


The Special
Nees Chlid'
and Divorce


k -11W
a-^^^^^^











IN MEMORIAL


Professor's legacy of scholarship

and teaching remembered


Robert C. L. Moffat, University
of Florida Levin College of Law
professor and affiliate profes-
sor of philosophy, sociology and
criminology and law, passed away Nov. 14
in Gainesville after a long illness. He was 73
years old.
Moffat joined the law school faculty in
1966 as an assistant professor and was pro-
moted to associate professor in 1968 and ten-
ured professor in 1971. During his 44-year
teaching career at UF Law, Moffat special-
ized in law and public policy, jurisprudence,
criminal law, and law and morality.
Moffat leaves behind a lasting legacy
of numerous articles, publications, speeches
and presentations on a wide variety of topics,
but his memory will also live on through the
lives he impacted as a professor.
"Professor Moffat cared deeply about his
students and took a great deal of personal sat-
isfaction in their achievements. The depth of
his love for teaching and his affection for his
students were demonstrated by his reluctance
to leave the classroom even in the last days of
a severe and painful illness," UF Law Dean
Robert Jerry said.


His devotion also was evident toward his
colleagues in the legal field and to the ongo-
ing pursuit of knowledge.
"Bob had the respect of his colleagues as
a dedicated and serious scholar. His immense


knowledge of the legal phi-
losophies of Lon Fuller and
other influential theorists
was of great benefit to those
of us who sought refresh-
ment from time to time on
jurisprudential issues," said
Stuart R. Cohn, John H. &
Mary Lou Dasburg Profes-
sor of Law and associate
dean for international stud-
ies at the Levin College of
Law. "At the same time his


Southwestern Law Journal, Moffat went to
the University of Sydney in Australia to earn
his LL.M. Moffat was a Fulbright Scholar
from 1962 to 1964 and earned First Class
Honors when he graduated in 1966.
Among the many professional associa-
tions Moffat took part in, the longest run-
ning was the American Section of the Inter-
national Association for Philosophy of Law
and Social Philosophy. He joined the orga-
nization in 1966, served as executive direc-


"Professor Moffat
cared deeply
about his students
and took a great
deal of personal
satisfaction in their
achievements."
UF LAW DEAN ROBERT JERRY


feet were firmly planted in the here and now,
and he was able to bridge chronological and
philosophical gaps for the benefit of his stu-
dents and in his scholarly articles. He was de-
voted to the law school and his students and
he will be sorely missed."
After earning his B.A., M.A. and LL.B
from Southern Methodist University in
Dallas, where he was editor-in-chief of the


tor from 1987 to 1999 and
was elected president of the
organization for the 2003-
2005 term.
Moffat consistently
published scholarly works
during his career. His most
recent article, "Searching
for Substantive Justice:
Lessons from Lon Fuller's
Natural Law," was pub-
lished in the April 2010 is-
sue of the Iowa Journal of


Gender; Race & Justice.
Moffat is survived by a son, lain, and
daughter, Kaaren.
Contributions in Robert Moffat's mem-
ory may be made to the Professor Robert
and Janette Moffat Memorial Scholarship
in Law, University of Florida Foundation,
Inc. Attn: Gift Processing, P.O. Box 14425,
Gainesville, FL 32604. m


UF LAW











UP & COMING


Student makes mark on Florida, ABA

BY MATT WALKER


3L Ryan Moseley serves
on gubernatorial transition
team. See Web-Xtras at
www.law.ufl.edu/uflaw


for the section of state and local
government law at the American
Bar Association, Margaret Rowell
Good (2L) has found her place in the huge
and sometimes overwhelming 400,000-plus
member organization. And she's glad she did.
"The section of state and local govern-
ment law is really supportive of law stu-
dents and has a lot of opportunities for law
students to get involved," Good said. "The
section has given me a number of leadership
roles."
Good said after she joined the ABA as a
IL, she received frequent e-mails from the
organization, but because of the size and
scope of the ABA, she didn't really know
where to start or how to make the most of
her membership. Then she saw a message
about student liaison positions.
"I thought, 'This seems like a great way
to find mentors and to network,"' Good
said. She knew it was important to expand
her reach beyond the law school walls and
make the most of networking opportunities.
A student liaison position seemed like a
great way to make that happen.
Through her liaison position, Good has
seen how attorneys who specialize in state
or local government can apply their knowl-
edge from lobbyists to state government
employees to county attorneys. She has also
seen how different state and local govern-
ments deal with the same types of issues,
she said.
Deciding on the state and local gov-
ernment law section was an easy choice
for Good, mostly because of her involve-
ment with the Florida Horse Park in Ocala.
Good's interest and experience in state and
local government and one of her main
motivations for going to law school be-
gan at the Horse Park, where she was direc-
tor of development for four years.
Because the nonprofit equestrian facil-
ity is on state-owned land, she interacted
with state agencies and learned how state
and local governments operate, Good said.


In a way, she had already made her mark
on Florida state government before she even
entered law school. With the help of several
dedicated volunteers, Good is largely re-


sponsible for the new
"Discover Florida's
Horses" license plates,
which benefit the Flor-
ida Agricultural Center
and Horse Park Author-
ity. Good said when she
worked at the Horse
Park, the idea of trying
to get a special license
plate made for the park
had been floating around
for a while, and she de-
cided to act on it.


the Horse Park to attend law school, but
she is happy that she was able to make an
impact and with the experience that she
gained along the way.


Good knew it
was important to
expand her reach
beyond the law
school walls and
make the most
of networking
opportunities.


Good took the idea to the board of
trustees for approval, helped secure fi-
nancing for the project, held a contest to
decide on artwork for the plate, and even
made the trip to Tallahassee to try to get
the plate legislation passed. The Legisla-
ture approved the plate after Good had left


Good has also accom-
plished a great deal during
her time as an ABA member
- not the least is being cho-
sen in a competitive appoint-
ment process as law-student
liaison to all law students in
the country.
One of Good's major
projects with the ABA has
been developing and pro-
moting a law student resume
database for her section. The


database, which can be found on the ABA
website, will help connect law students
and potential employers.
"The section leaders reasoned that if
the section could figure out a way to con-
nect members with law students, it would
help our law student members find jobs in
their area of interest," Good said. m


SPRING 2011






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UF FLORIDA

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P.O. Box 117633
Gainesville, FL 32611-7633


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