• TABLE OF CONTENTS
HIDE
 Front Cover
 Inspiring students to 'be...
 Table of Contents
 News briefs
 State of the nation
 He did good
 In the public interest
 A system for attacking life
 For the people
 Partners
 Reflections on prejudice and animus...
 Faculty news
 Class notes
 Your reach: UF Law 2005-2006 annual...
 Back Matter
 Investing in the future
 Back Cover






Group Title: UF Law: University of Florida Fredric G. Levin College of Law
Title: UFlaw
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00072634/00009
 Material Information
Title: UFlaw
Alternate Title: UF law
Physical Description: v. : ill. ; 28 cm.
Language: English
Creator: Levin College of Law
Publisher: Levin College of Law Communications Office
Place of Publication: Gainesville FL
Publication Date: c2002-
Frequency: irregular
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Genre: government publication (state, provincial, terriorial, dependent)   ( marcgt )
 Notes
Statement of Responsibility: University of Florida, Levin College of Law.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 39, no. 1 (fall 2002)-
General Note: Title from cover.
General Note: Last issue consulted: v. 40, no. 1 (fall 2003).
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Bibliographic ID: UF00072634
Volume ID: VID00009
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 Related Items
Preceded by: University of Florida lawyer

Table of Contents
    Front Cover
        Front cover
    Inspiring students to 'be somebody'
        i
    Table of Contents
        Page 3
    News briefs
        Page 4
        Page 5
        Page 6
    State of the nation
        Page 7
        Page 8
        Page 9
    He did good
        Page 10
        Page 11
        Page 12
        Page 13
    In the public interest
        Page 14
        Page 15
        Page 16
        Page 17
        Page 18
        Page 19
        Page 20
        Page 21
        Page 22
        Page 23
        Page 24
        Page 25
        Page 26
    A system for attacking life
        Page 27
        Page 28
    For the people
        Page 29
        Page 30
    Partners
        Page 31
        Page 32
        Page 33
    Reflections on prejudice and animus under equal protection
        Page 34
        Page 35
    Faculty news
        Page 36
        Page 37
        Faculty scholarship
            Page 38
            Page 39
            Page 40
            Page 41
            Page 42
    Class notes
        Page 43
        Dexter Douglass
            Page 44
            Page 45
        Phyllis Harris
            Page 46
            Page 47
        William Zewadski
            Page 48
        Linnes Finney, Jr.
            Page 49
            Page 50
    Your reach: UF Law 2005-2006 annual report
        Page 51
        Your reach brings success to UF Law
            Page 52
        Financial summary
            Page 53
            Page 54
        Gator Law alumni receptions
            Page 55
        The endowed fund
            Page 56
            Page 57
        Distinguished donors
            Page 58
            Page 59
            Page 60
            Page 61
            Page 62
            Page 63
            Page 64
            Page 65
            Page 66
        Book awards
            Page 67
        JD alumni
            Page 68
            Page 69
            Page 70
            Page 71
            Page 72
            Page 73
            Page 74
            Page 75
        LLMT alumni
            Page 76
            Page 77
    Back Matter
        Page 78
    Investing in the future
        Page 79
    Back Cover
        Back cover
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FROM THE DEAN











Inspiring Students to "Be Somebody"


s plans were being made for
Supreme Court Associate
Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg's
visit to the law school, third-
year student Will Sexton (at
right) sent me an e-mail expressing his excite-
ment about her visit. He told me about a letter
he had written to Justice Ginsburg in the ninth
grade as part of an American Government
class assignment.
She sent him a personal


would not have been possible without the
support of those who understand the critical
need for private funding. We are most grateful
to our friends at Holland & Knight, and all the
other donors, who have made it possible for
Chesterfield Smith's legacy to have a perma-
nent home here.
Much more will happen in this room than
the education of students in substantive law,
which itself is a very important contribution.


response, which included
the challenge to "think of
your children and grand-
children to come, and do


"Justice Ginsburg ... wanted to assist us

in paying tribute to Chesterfield Smith,

one of our most important alumni ... "


your part to make society
as you would want it to be for them."
That experience became a turning point in
Will's life, and today he does have plans to
make society better, just like another law
student who graduated almost 60 years ago.
This is the Florida alumnus Justice Ginsburg
came to campus to honor on September 21.
She wanted to assist us in paying tribute to
Chesterfield Smith (JD 48), one of our most
important alumni, one of the legal profession's
greatest leaders, one of the nation's greatest
citizen-lawyers and one of the greatest role
models for our students to be found anywhere.
Justice Ginsburg felt strongly about being
part of the dedication of the Chesterfield Smith
Ceremonial Classroom. The classroom com-
pletes the construction and renovation project
we dedicated in ceremonies one year ago. As
was the case then, this much-needed facility


This is a room where every student will have at
least one class. It is the room where trial team
competitions, symposia and conferences will
be held. In September, the university's
Constitution Day celebration was held here and
in October the Florida Supreme Court presided
over the Final Four moot court competition.
Students also will get to know Chesterfield
Smith through the exhibit that highlights his
life's accomplishments. I have no doubt they
will be inspired. Students like Will Sexton -
who graduates in December to practice environ-
mental and land use law will have the oppor-
tunity to embrace the professionalism
Chesterfield never compromised. They will
learn values and skills that will enable them
to assume positions of leadership in our com-
munities, state and nation and, as Chesterfield
challenges all of us, learn to "do good."


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NEWS BRIEFS


Peterson


Research Spurs Congress to Pass
Legislation to Protect Military Families

A study co-authored by a UF law professor
recently helped spur the U.S. Congress to pass
legislation protecting military families
from predatory lenders who charge
interest rates that can reach well into
the triple digits.
The study, co-authored by UF
Associate Professor Christopher L.
Peterson and Steven M. Graves, an assistant
professor of geography at California State
University, surveyed more than 13,000 zip
codes and found that payday loan compa-
nies clustered in areas near military bases.
The findings were referred to in a report by the
Pentagon, and in September Peterson testified before
the U.S. Senate Committee on Banking, Housing and
Urban Affairs. As a result, Congress agreed to legisla-
tion prohibiting lenders from imposing an interest rate
of more than 36 percent on loans to members of the
armed forces or their dependents.
"It's just fantastic," Peterson said. "It's probably the
most consumer-friendly legislation Congress has
passed in a generation."


Congress may have been moved, he said, by the
irony of claiming to support the troops while at the
same time allowing them to be preyed upon by
the predatory lending practices of the payday loan
companies. Payday loans are high-interest loans intend-
ed to tide the borrower over to his next paycheck. If
the borrower doesn't have enough money in the bank
when the loan is due, he can refinance by borrowing
more money on the same terms. The annual interest rate
of such a loan can easily go to 450 percent or higher.
Peterson said he hopes the limits placed on loans to
military families can someday be made on loans to
civilians as well. "These kinds of loans are being made
to people from all walks of life," Peterson said. "If it's
good for military service members, it ought to be good
for everybody else, too. Nevertheless, I think this is a
step in the right direction and something to build upon."
Peterson has been studying predatory lending for
years and is the author of Taming the Sharks: Towards
a Cure for the High Cost Credit Market, which received
the American College of Consumer Financial Services
Attorneys' Best Book of the Year Award for 2004.
"I got into this business thinking I wanted to make
a difference, and then I realized that's completely a pipe
dream," Peterson said. "But I think we actually made a
difference on this one. We kind of helped this happen."


Law Students
Holding Court
There are about 50,000
students on the UF campus.
When some of them get into
trouble, they may end up in
the Student Honor Court,
which is comprised of 20
law students. Officers of the
court are (from left) row one,
Vice Chancellor Will Sexton
(3L) and Attorney General
Adam Mait (3L); row two,
Chief of Staff Ronny Edwards
(2L) and Chief Defense
Council Tim McCourt (3L);
row three, Charles Hart (3L)
and Chancellor Alex
Hadjilogiou (2L). As part of
Student Government's judicial
branch, the officers hear
academic dishonesty com-
plaints and serve as advisers
to students accused of DUI
and other campus violations.


UF LAW























Israel's Deputy President of
Supreme Court Visits UF Law


Eliezer Rivlin, deputy president of the Supreme
Court of Israel, arrived at the Levin College of
Law in October as a visiting lecturer in the
Comparative Litigation Foreign Enrichment
course. Rivlin is a seventh-generation Israeli,
has a master's degree in law from Tel Aviv
University, and specializes in torts, constitutional
law, economic law, and freedom of expression.





Former Peruvian Ombudsman Receives
Jon Mills Award at UF Conference

Jorge Santistevan de Noriege, the human rights
activist who became the first person to hold the posi-
tion of Human Rights Ombudsman in the government
of Peru, received the Jon Mills Award at UF Law's
Center for Governmental Responsibility's Conference
on Legal and Policy Issues in Lima, Peru, in May 2006.
Santistevan, a visiting professor at UF in January,
paved the way for other emerging democracies, many
of which have since created an ombudsman position.
The annual conference brings together attorneys,
judges, policy makers and members of the business
and academic community to discuss the rule of law
and justice reform throughout the Americas. This year,
conference participants including Peruvian Presiden
Alejandro Toledo and U.S. Ambassador to Peru J. Curt
Struble -focused on the need to reform the Peruvian
justice system.


Get Involved by Mentoring
a Minority Law Student

A11 law students find it helpful to develop rela-
tionships with lawyers and judges, but minority
law students, who are historically disadvantaged in
higher education, can benefit immeasurably by culti-
vating these relationships early on. It is a primary rea-
son alumni are stepping forward to serve as mentors
for minority students at the Levin College of Law.
Minority students and lawyers meet at events like
the Third Annual Minority Mentoring Picnic in October
in Hialeah, which brought together students from all
Florida law schools and potential mentors. To promote
diversity in the legal profession, the law firm of Ruden
McClosky sponsored a 55-passenger bus to transport
UF Law students to the event.
All minority students including, but not limited
to black, Hispanic, Caribbean, Asian, women, law
students with disabilities, and gay, lesbian, bisexual,
transgendered and questioning students were invited.
Many federal and state judges, including Supreme
Court Justice Peggy Quince, attended.
Anyone can sign up to be a mentor, and more are
still needed for the Minority Mentor Program. For
information, contact Jessie Howell Wallace, director of
the Center for Career Services, at (352) 273-0860 or
howellje@ law.ufl.edu.


It
is


Jorge Santistevan de Noriega (center), with UF
International Center Dean Dennis Jett (left) and CGR
Director Jon Mills (JD 72).


2007 EVENTS
All events at Levin College of
Law unless otherwise noted
Jan. 18: Florida Bar Mid-Year
Alumni Reception,
Miami Hyatt Regency
Jan. 23: "Privacy Law:
Perspectives of National
Security, the First
Amendment, the Media, and
the Individual" Symposium
Jan. 26: UF Latin American
Business Symposium and
Career Workshop, Emerson
Alumni Hall. Meredith
Fensom, fensom@law.ufl.edu
Feb. 2: Sixth Annual Richard
E. Nelson Symposium
LCA Board of Trustees
Meeting, Jacksonville
Feb. 10: Fifth Annual UF
Music Law Conference
March 1-3: 13th Annual Public
Interest Environmental
Conference on "Talk,
Technology and Technique:
Game Plan for Green,"
Environmental and Land Use
Law Society, www.ufpiec.org
March 23: Dunwody Lecture
with speaker Rosemary
Barkett, U.S. Eleventh Circuit
Court of Appeals Judge
March 30: Professionalism
Symposium, in partnership
with the Eighth Judicial Circuit
April 3: Center for the
Study of Race t Race
Relations Lecture
April 11-12: Eighth Annual
Conference on Legal t Policy
Issues in the Americas,
Gainesville
April 13: Spring Book
Award Ceremony
April 14: LCA Board of
Trustees and Alumni
Council Meetings
May 11: Law School
Commencement
June 27-30: Florida Bar
Alumni Reception, Orlando
World Center Marriott,
Orlando


WINTER 2007











Highlights at a Glance


The new associate dean for faculty development is
Professor Christine Klein. m Rachel E. Inman has
been named the new associate dean for students. Inman
comes to UF Law from the University of Tennessee,
where she earned her J.D. and served in sev-
eral roles. Inman's arrival allows Associate
Dean Gail Sasnett to focus on special proj-
ects and assist with the transition in the year
before her retirement. m UF continues to
rank among the top law schools in the
country for Hispanics, according to the
September issue of Hispanic Business,
which placed UF Law seventh in the maga-
zine's annual rankings. m UF's branch of
the International Law Society has been rec-
ognized as the most outstanding of the group's 200
chapters worldwide. The UF chapter also won the
group's award for Best Speaker and Best International
Event. It hosts speakers from around the world, who
address topics of historic importance. m The Graduate
Tax Program has once again been ranked second in the
nation with only New York University ranking high-
er and the Environmental and Land Use Law Program
was ranked 12th fifth among public law schools -
in U.S. News and World Report's annual rankings of the
nation's best graduate schools. UF's law school was
ranked No. 41 overall, and 18th among publics.
Thomas Hurst, Samuel T. Dell Research Scholar, was
elected Professor of the Year by law students participat-
ing in John Marshall Bar Association elections. m The
college has accepted an invitation to participate in
the Teach for America program to build a "highly
selective national corps of outstanding recent college


IRS Chief Counsel Describes
a Tax Lawyer's Dream Job


As a tax lawyer, Donald Korb says, it just doesn't
get any better than being chief counsel for the
Internal Revenue Service. Korb presented a lecture
on "Providing Tax Advice in a Changed Law
Enforcement Environment" to a packed student
audience in October as part of the Graduate Tax
Enrichment Series.

graduates -of all academic majors and career inter-
ests who commit two years to teach in urban and
rural public schools in our nation's lowest-income
communities and become lifelong leaders for expand-
ing educational opportunity." At present, 31 law
schools participate in the program, including Columbia,
Cornell, Michigan, Northwestern, Virginia, Stanford,
Penn, Texas, Cal-Berkeley, Harvard, Yale and NYU.


The Gift of Art >
The bare walls of the
renovated faculty lounge
have been enhanced
recently with striking
artwork, including (right)
Margaret Ross Tolbert's
"Springs of Justice,"
which was donated by
Nathan Collier (JD 82),
and Dr. Kenneth and
Linda McGurn (JD 78).
Well-known artist Arnold
Mesches also loaned a
piece from his famous
series of paintings. New
artwork was also hung
throughout the library.
Steven E. Martin (06)
loaned a painting by
Man Ray, as well as
several photographic
prints by UF Professor
Emeritus Jerry
Uelsmann.


UF LAW


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BY JAMES HELLEGAARD


after 35 years in the U.S. State Department,
Victor Comras (JD 66) had decided to
retire. He had been a witness to history,
experiencing his share of tremendous
satisfaction as well as terrible frustration.
The time had come, he thought, to call it a
career.
It was August 2001.
A month later, Comras was in Washington, D.C., and wit-
nessed the horrors of Sept. 11th unfold on television.
So much for retirement.
The following spring, he was called by the United Nations and
was subsequently appointed by Secretary General Kofi Annan to
serve as one of five international monitors working under Security
Council Resolution 1267 to see what countries were actually doing
to impose U.N. Security Council measures against Al-Qaeda and the
Taliban. It was just one of the post-9/11 actions put in place as part
of a new U.N. sanctions program against Al-Qaeda.
Armed with the knowledge and experience developed over
four decades of service to his country, Comras continues to try to
defeat an enemy that is ever more difficult to track.
"We are facing increasing challenges," says Comras, "and
when it comes to the issue of terrorism and terrorism financing,
we have kind of a simplistic view of that world."
Al-Qaeda as the world knew it five years ago has changed,
fracturing into a thousand different kinds of cells. It's something
more than was initially thought, he says.
"Its theology, if I can use that word, or philosophy or
approach has been taken up by so many fundamentalist Islamist


Victor Comras

has helped shape '.

national policy

on key issues

of our time
Comras
groups," says Comras, who is now "semi-retired," working as an
attorney with the Eren law firm in Washington, D.C., and as an
independent consultant.
Efforts to stop Al-Qaeda and those who help fund it are
complicated by a lack of consensus on the definition of terrorism
and who are terrorists, Comras says. For example, for most
Americans it is very clear that groups like Hamas and Hezbollah,
which have gained some prominence in the Middle East conflict,
are terrorist groups. "But that view is still not shared by a good
part of the world, including many of our European friends," he
says. "So it's hard to deal with it."
Still, a great number of steps have been taken to deal with ter-
rorism financing, money laundering, and other criminal activity
related to international financing.
"We've come a heck of a long way, but we still have a long way
to go," Comras says. "We've done a good job of putting in place
structures to deal with terrorism financing and other illegal financial
activity. But the international community still doesn't have a cred-
ible strategy to deal with terrorism financing."


WINTER 2007











Comras, meanwhile, has gone on the offensive through his
computer keyboard, banging out articles on various international
issues for The Washington Post, The Financial Times, and other
publications, as well as a chapter on Al-Qaeda financing for a
book being published this fall. He has been concentrating some of
his writing efforts on the serious problems that remain in the inter-
national arena in dealing with the terrorism financing issues and
the failure to put the major financiers out of business. In his June
2005 op-ed in The Washington Post, "Following Terrorists'
Money," Comras wrote that there was reason to question the Bush
administration's assertions that Al-Qaeda was weakened and was
forced to cut its expenditures.


"While the fight against terrorism has benefited from
increased intelligence, this effort has not been enough to cut off
Al-Qaeda's financing or to put its financial supporters out of busi-
ness," he wrote. "Turning intelligence into actionable evidence for
civil designation or criminal prosecutions has proved exceedingly
difficult. There are heavy constraints on sharing intelligence and,
even when it is shared with investigators, special efforts are
required to come up with open-source evidence that can confirm
the intelligence and stand up in court."
In June 2006, a series of articles in The New York Times, The
Wall Street Journal, and The Los Angeles Times revealed a secret
Bush administration program, initiated weeks after the Sept. 11
attacks, allowed counterterrorism officials to gain access to
financial records from a vast international database and examine
banking transactions involving thousands of Americans and
others in the United States. The articles on the Society of
Worldwide Interbank Financial Telecommunication (SWIFT)
drew harsh criticism from Republicans and conservatives,
including The Weekly Standard, which called The New York
Times "a national security threat."
"I was surprised that everybody was so surprised," says
Comras, who expressed his opinion in numerous articles, includ-
ing those he posted on The Counterterrorism Blog (http://
counterterrorismblog.org/). "I guess I was caught off guard by the
impact the story had both on the public as well as on the adminis-
tration because, for us dealing with the issue of terrorism financing
and the international efforts against it, these kinds of things were
not a surprise. It was a no-brainer to us that we would be looking


closely at SWIFT and at the other international transfer mecha-
nisms and houses that deal with terrorism financing."
Comras cut his teeth on some of the key issues of our time,
including strategic export control policies during the height of the
Cold War, and eventually oversaw the mission to open the first
U.S. Embassy in Macedonia. Perhaps the crowning achievement
of his career came in the 1990s when he helped bring down
Serbian President Slobodan Milosevic during the Kosovo War.
Milosevic, one of the key figures in the Yugoslav wars during
the 1990s and Kosovo War in 1999, was indicted in May 1999 by
the U.N.'s International Criminal Tribunal for the Former
Yugoslavia for crimes against humanity in Kosovo. In the wake of


demonstrations following the disputed presidential election of
October 2000, he conceded defeat and resigned, and less than a
year later was extradited to stand trial in The Hague.
"I was asked by Secretary of State Madeline Albright to put
together an international sanctions program," he recalls. "At this time
we didn't have a U.N. resolution working with our European allies
that could have an impact on Serbia and help to convince the Serbian
people they needed to get rid of Slobo, and at the same time take steps
that could weaken financially those key support elements that
sustained Slobo in power. We were effective and eventually Slobodan
Milosevic was overturned and was turned over to The Hague."
It stands out as one of the high points in Comras' career.
Milosevic, who suffered from chronic ailments, died in March
2006 of a heart attack before his trial had concluded.
"One never hopes for those kinds of things to happen to
anyone, but it couldn't happen to a nicer guy," Comras says
sarcastically about Milosevic's death. "I'll leave to his maker any
final judgments about his actions during his lifetime, but if any
one man could be held responsible for the tragedies that occurred
in the Balkans and particularly in the break up of Yugoslavia, I
think he would stand up as the man most responsible."
One colleague who worked with Comras during that time was
Leon Fuerth, who first met Comras in the early days of the
Clinton administration when he was asked by the White House to
take over general responsibility for enforcement of economic
sanctions against Serbia. Comras, who was directing an inter-
agency sanctions team operating out of the State Department, had
already established mechanisms for enforcement in the U.S. gov-


UF LAW










ernment and internationally, Fuerth says, but the system needed a
link to the White House to have the necessary political impact.
"Victor was a master of Washington and international maneu-
vers a tremendously fertile source of new ideas, and endlessly
energetic," recalls Fuerth, a former national security adviser to Vice
President Al Gore and now a research professor of international
affairs at the Elliot School of International Affairs at The George
Washington University. "Together, this team turned sanctions into a
force that strongly influenced Milosevic to search for ways to come
to terms with demands for an end to ethnic cleansing in Bosnia. It
took force in the end, but we know the sanctions had a tremendous
impact on his will to resist."


Out of these daily con-
tacts, the two men developed
a friendship that has survived
the end of the Clinton admin-
istration and Comras' retire-
ment from the Foreign


Hussein or his regime. I think that getting rid of Saddam was and
should have been one of our objectives. But I personally believe we
went about it in a very clumsy manner."
Those who know Comras are familiar with his degree of deter-
mination in doing things right. Stephen Powell, director of the
International Trade Law Program at the Levin College of Law, has
been friends with Comras since their days as UF Law students in the
mid-1960s. He isn't surprised at the impact Comras has had on U.S.
foreign policy in the area of economic sanctions. Powell remembers
Comras as someone who "never did anything halfway," whether it
was his law studies or playing handball at the courts that used to
stand north of Florida Field.


















.omra 1 with


"At the time I suggested we were leaving ourselves

no option but going to war, and I guess I was more

prophetic than I would have ever wished to be."


Service, Fuerth says. "Victor
was passionate about his work," Fuerth says. "His approach to it
proceeded from a deep moral determination to make sure ethnic
cleansing would not succeed. This continued during his work at
the U.N. on sanctions enforcement. He could be bureaucratically
artful, but he could always be counted upon to tell truth to power.
Personally very modest, he was impossible to intimidate when it
came to his mission."
Still, Comras' career has not been without its share of disap-
pointment. After initially making plans to retire in early 2001,
Comras put those plans on hold when the Bush administration
asked him to stay on to see what could be done to make sanctions
on Iraq more effective. He led a team that recommended steps be
taken to "put in place a more effective sanctions regime, to
modernize it, and to target it." It would become, Comras says, "a
very frustrating experience."
"I think at that time the administration simply lost interest in
what we were trying to do," says Comras, who reflected on the expe-
rience in a Washington Post editorial. "At the time I suggested we
were leaving ourselves no option but going to war, and I guess I was
more prophetic than I would have ever wished to be. And of course,
we all have seen what has transpired since. I'm no friend of Saddam


"His commitment to justice and fair dealing was always
strong," Powell says of his old law school study partner.
"Endlessly curious, he could be exasperating in his 'what if'
scenarios about Vietnam, other world issues, or the rule against
perpetuities. The conversation, whether with me or a professor in
class, couldn't end until we had come up with a rational explana-
tion or solution."
Comras says his interest in joining the Foreign Service
stretches back almost as far as he can remember. From the
Georgetown University School of Foreign Service, where he
earned his undergraduate degree in international affairs, to law
school at UF and onto a professional life that has taken him to
virtually every corner of the globe, including Africa and Europe,
his path has always been interesting.
"I have had a fascinating and varied career," he says.
"I used to tell some of my students when I taught for a while
as a diplomat-in-residence that it gave me an opportunity to
have a front row on history. I have found my career in the state
department over 35 years to be very fulfilling and can look back
and say I enjoyed it and was glad that I had that opportunity
to serve."


WINTER 2007












































Chesterfield Smith Ceremonial Classroom dedicated

by Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg, family and friends

BY KATHY FLEMING


n that particular Sunday afternoon,
Chesterfield Smith (JD 48) sat in the
windy stands of Soldier Field, watch-
ing the Chicago Bears take on
the Boston Patriots. But his mind
was 700 miles away, deep inside the
Oval Office.
What could President Richard Nixon possibly be thinking?
In the span of a few hours the day before, Nixon had fired
the Watergate special prosecutor and accepted the resignation
of the attorney general and deputy attorney general in a
desperate attempt to buck the judiciary branch on the issue of
the White House tapes. Political leaders and followers alike
were dismayed.
"Meet me down at the taxi line. We are going out to the
ABA," he said to Bill McBride (JD 75), his young prot6g6,
midway through the game.
The 56-year-old "country lawyer," as he liked to call him-
self, had been president of one of the most powerful organizations
in the country for less than six weeks. Typically, the American
Bar Association leadership would have spent weeks discussing


this kind of hornet's nest, but Smith was agitated and deter-
mined to do the right thing at the right time.
At the ABA offices, he and his staff started calling prominent
attorneys around the country. There was no consensus, but he made
up his mind quickly. Before midnight he issued a formal statement
that included one ringing declaration: "No man is above the law."
Smith's early voice of leadership on October 21, 1973, and
subsequent outspokenness in speeches, media interviews and
congressional committees calling for impeachment altered histo-
ry by becoming a catalyst in the president's ultimate resignation.
Being at the forefront with freethinking views long before
they were mainstream was central to Smith's idea of doing the
right thing, and it was a trait that served him and the nation well
over the course of half a century. Upon his death in 2003, he left
behind a legacy of historic accomplishment.
However, for the more than 300 family members, colleagues
and donors including good friend and U.S. Supreme Court
Associate Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg who came to campus
in late September to dedicate the Chesterfield Smith Ceremonial
Classroom, there was much more to this larger-than-life
UF law graduate.


UF LAW







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"do good" and "be somebody."


Smith was remembered affectionately throughout the day as
a man who had an unconditional love of the law, lawyers, his
law school and the firm he helped found and grow into one of
the largest in the country, Holland & Knight. It was a collective
effort by 400 colleagues and friends, funded through Holland &
Knight's Charitable Foundation, that made possible the
college's largest classroom, used as the primary location for
conferences, workshops and special events.
The elegant lobby and classroom feature an exhibit (see
www.law.ufl.edu/news/current/dedication.shtml) that illustrates
Smith's rise from the small Central Florida town of Arcadia to
national prominence. At various points in his career, U.S. News
and World Report listed him among the nation's 60 most influ-
ential people in a "Who Runs America" article, and a Time
magazine essay included him in a listing of 35 "non-candi-
dates" qualified for the presidency. Tom Brokow devoted a
chapter to him in his best-seller, The Greatest Generation.
Smith's bold leadership style enabled him, as Florida Bar
president in 1964, to establish much needed uniform rules of proce-
dure in Florida courts, raise money for a new building and locate
The Florida Bar Center in the seat of the state's government.
As chairman of the Constitution Revision Commission in
1965, he devoted most of his time to the unpaid task of leading
36 distinguished members to scrap Florida's antiquated 1885


charter. He vigorously stumped the state to secure passage in
1968 of a modern but controversial constitution that established
numerous visionary concepts still in force today. The segrega-
tionist doctrine was stricken, the Bill of Rights was expanded,
and cities and counties were empowered with home rule. The
one man, one vote system was implemented, along with a
periodic citizens' review of the constitution. He went on to
serve on or chair numerous commissions state and nationwide.
It was his unselfish investment in people that won him
legions of loyal admirers. In the early 1950s, he was outspoken
against racial segregation and unfair discrimination, particular-
ly against the deprived and disabled. He was among the first to
welcome and nurture minorities and women in his law firm. He
supported black judges and argued for gay and lesbian rights.
"I held in highest esteem and deepest affection the man
whose name this classroom now bears," said Ginsburg, who
called Smith a "way paver" in her remarks before the group.
When Ginsburg first met Smith in 1972 at an ABA commit-
tee meeting, she said she and her colleagues thought of their
president-elect "as somewhat of an enfant terrible. Later I came
to appreciate that Chesterfield's provocative style suited his
purpose. He was never satisfied in the status quo if there was
room for improvement. His uninhibited questions and com-
ments stirred us up to better effort."


UF LAW











She noted that many lawyers are cautious by nature and
tend to keep clients safe by avoiding things yet untried.
"Chesterfield was not of that stripe. He was instead a
most positive 'yes' person," she said. "If asked, 'can we do
this or that,' Chesterfield would invariably say, 'Yes, we can,
but with one large proviso. This or that must be the right
thing to do.'"
Smith, who was on a first name basis with several
Supreme Court justices, didn't hesitate to write letters to
President Bill Clinton and key U.S. senators in support of
Ginsburg's nomination to the bench. She appreciated his
gestures and responded with a hand-written note he kept in
files: "All my life I will try to be the person you described.
With so much appreciation, Ruth."
Martha Barnett (JD 73), as the first woman hired at
Holland & Knight and later an ABA president, said her
mentor saw things others did not and had the courage to
shape the future.
"He lived long enough to see many of his visionary ideas
become a reality ideas such as diversity, specialization,
billable hours, institutionalized pro bono and global offices
connected by technology. All are commonplace concepts
today, but in his time, they were radical and risky,"
said Barnett, chair of the Director Committee at Holland
& Knight.
Smith was remembered as an exuberant, warm man who
would call prot6g6s "his girls" and "his boys," and they were
not offended, but proud. He loved to be the center of
attention and more often than not had an eclectic group of
smart professionals from national leaders to junior
partners at his dinner table, where he would initiate a
lively discussion about a complicated issue of the day. He
passionately campaigned for lawyers throughout the nation
to provide pro bono services to those in need. He changed
people's lives and constantly challenged them to "do good"
and "be somebody."
Howell Melton Jr., managing partner of Holland &
Knight, noted Smith would have loved "his" ceremonial
classroom at the University of Florida. It is the place
where Smith, who came to law school as a returning World
War II veteran, discovered a love of the law and received
what he called "the broad and profound education in the law
necessary to become a great lawyer."
Family members and colleagues all agreed the man being
honored would have taken immense pleasure in the dedica-
tion festivities.
"One of our partners recently said that Chesterfield
Smith was the only person he had ever met who had lived up
to his reputation," Barnett said. "He was a living legend and
now thanks to all of you and to so many others who could
not be here today we are part of something bigger than
any one of us and we have this vibrant, exciting and
living place to continue his legacy and to continue to inspire
those who walk through these doors to greatness."


WINTER 2007











! erest


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* When Rick Parker (JD 72) introduces himself, he always says,

] L "I work at the Public Defender's Office." It never occurs to him
Sto say he is the Public Defender for the Eighth Circuit.


He works out of cramped
offices built in 1888 and has the
.responsibility of defending
almost 20,000 accused indigent
residents in six North Central
Florida counties. In his spare
time, he has amassed a better
coaching record than Steve
Spurrier in his six years of
coaching Pop Warner football
(51-8), and now he is the "white
hat" referee on football fields
Parker from Gainesville to the Georgia
border. He is a lecturer at the
law school and has served as president of the Florida Public
Defender Association four times.
As his wife likes to say, 31 years ago he left a lucrative
private practice law firm in Miami, where he had the potential to
own a yacht, to move to Gainesville and own a canoe. She is
tremendously proud of him.
Rick Parker is just one of hundreds, if not thousands, of
UF Law's 17,000 alumni who serve the public and their interests
... social justice, children's rights, environmental protection,
advocacy for low-income people, immigration rights, fair hous-
ing, civil liberties, the list goes on and on.
From day one, UF Law encourages students to address
the need for equal access to justice by creating opportunities
for public interest and pro bono work. For instance, after the
first week of classes, students are expected to spend the weekend
helping at a prearranged activity such as painting a Habitat
for Humanity house. Over the course of three years guest
speakers, conferences, internships and ongoing community
and pro bono services (such as the volunteer income tax
assistance and school mentoring programs) strengthen the
habit of undertaking endeavors that truly, as cliche as it may
sound, make a difference.


Once out in the working world, with huge school loans to be
repaid and families to raise, UF Law alumni provide powerful
services for those without power. They work for the government,
represent clients at legal aid societies, lobby Congress for non-
profit organizations, serve as in-house counsel for grassroots
organizations, and more. They practice virtually every kind of law
from criminal defense and prosecution, to administrative law, to
creating policy and legislation, and even civil litigation.
They are alumni like Kevin McCarty (JD 84), Florida's Insurance
Commissioner, who is responsible for the regulation and oversight of
more than 3,700 insurance entities. And Thomas Falkinburg (JD 93),
a senior general attorney with the U.S. Department of Education's
Office for Civil Rights in Atlanta, who watches over equal opportuni-
ties for students and employees of educational institutions. And Jeffrey
Neiman (JD 01), a federal prosecutor for the U.S. Department of
Justice who recently indicted a $3 billion securities fraud case in Ohio.
As Andrew M. Fussner (JD 99), vice president of estate settle-
ment for the American Heart Association, said, "I absolutely love
my job. Not only do I get to go home at the end of every day
knowing that I'm making a difference in the fight against our
nation's number one killer heart disease and stroke but I
also get to handle some of the most interesting probate cases."
Megan Wall (JD 91), managing attorney of St. Johns County
Legal Aid, said she became a lawyer only because she would gain
the tools to improve the lives of others. As someone who sees on
a daily basis the overwhelming need for assistance and as head of
the Pro Bono Program in St. Johns County, she requests that each
lawyer in her county step forward in some way, whether it's
through pro bono or community service work.
"It's up to every lawyer, not just those who work full-time in
poverty law, to help others have access to justice. Lawyers have
the keys to the courthouse, and no one can gain access without
us," she said. "Many drops fill the well."
What follows is a glimpse into the lives of just a few of the
UF Law men and women who chose public interest law as their
life's work.


UF LAW













































Is the Grass Greener in Iraq?


SAs an attorney in the U.S. Army
Judge Advocate General's Corps
(JAG), since graduating from UF Law, I
have enjoyed my time immensely, but like
everyone, I often find myself asking
whether the grass is indeed greener on
the other side of the fence.
I have wondered if I wouldn't enjoy
another sort of practice, in a stable loca-
tion, with predictability and the possibility
of greater pay. In fact, I've sometimes felt
down-right envious of friends who have
made partner in successful firms. I know
they are doing great work and are assets
to their communities, and I fear that I may
be missing out somehow.
However, when I look at what I have
experienced in the past 10 years, I have a
hard time believing that I could find
another legal job that would give me the
same truly unique opportunities. My wife
and I have had the chance to live in
Panama for two years, where we could
literally look out the window and see
ships going through the locks of the
Panama Canal; Puerto Rico for one year,
where I had a chance to surf some
famous "insider" surf spots; and Germany
for three years, where we skied and
snowboarded in the Alps and I watched
Lance Armstrong win a couple of Tours
de France as I sat in the back of my truck
in the French countryside.
Professionally, I have served as a legal
assistance attorney, administrative law


attorney, labor counselor, prosecutor and
defense counsel. I've been fortunate
enough to handle a good number of trials
for both the government and individual
clients, including defending murder cases.
While these opportunities have been
rewarding, I didn't realize what I truly
value most about being an Army attorney
until I had the opportunity to reflect upon
my recent year-long deployment to Tikrit,
Iraq, in support of Operation Iraqi
Freedom III. During that time I was the
principal legal adviser to an infantry
commander, his staff and his subordinate
commanders on issues pertaining to the
law of war, rules of engagement, detainee
operations and human rights matters.
I also had the opportunity to work with
governmental officials and judges from
the Salah Ad Din Province to promote
adherence to the rule of law and support
functioning democratic institutions at the
local and provincial levels.
Despite the fact that 14 to 16 hour
non-stop days were the norm, the varied
nature of my duties and sense of urgency,
that only service in a combat zone can
impart, caused time to simply fly by. One
minute I would find myself sitting in the
brigade's Tactical Operations Center (TOC)
intently monitoring live video footage
from an unmanned aerial reconnaissance
vehicle, and the next I would be loading
into an armored vehicle with several of
my paralegal-trained soldiers, headed for


a meeting with a Provincial Judge. Sitting
in those meetings, talking to Iraqi officials
while sipping freshly-brewed Chai tea,
I often thought, "what would Professor
Winston Nagan (from my International
Law class) think if he saw me now?"
I know that he would relish that opportu-
nity to sit in those meetings, and I like to
think he also would be proud.
Looking back on my time in Iraq, it
is clear to me that I remain an Army
attorney because I am honored to work
for our amazingly talented and dedicated
soldiers. After seeing them in action, and
seeing first-hand how they embody the
term "selfless service," I can't imagine a
more noble and worthwhile legal career.
I also realize I have come to love
being an Army officer, a "soldier who
happens to be a lawyer" and who has a
sense of purpose. The pay is sufficient,
and perks like living in Europe have been
nice, but they aren't enough to outweigh
things like missing your son's first birth-
day and being away from your family for
a year.
I've realized that it comes
down to people, pure and simple.


Dean L. Lynch (JD 96)
Major, United States Army
Litigation Attorney
Civilian Personnel Litigation Branch
U.S. Army Legal Services Agency


W INTER 2007




































"It's about the sustainable use of natural resources and ensuring

that we bequeath to our children a world we would want to inhabit."
-DAVID J. WHITE (JD 86)


As a graduate student in wildlife ecology at the University
of Florida in the early '80s, David White soon realized
that natural resources management was based more on
politics and economics than sound science and a solid
understanding of how natural systems function. His growing
awareness that changes would have to be put in place at the policy
level to protect the natural world led him back to UF to pursue a
law degree.
"I wanted to be an advocate for sustainable management of
wildlife and their habitats," White said. "It's about the sustainable
use of natural resources and ensuring that we bequeath to our
children a world we would want to inhabit."
After finishing law school and working as a public interest
environmental lawyer for 15 years, White took on his present role
as director of The Ocean Conservancy's South Atlantic office in
2000. As a director, White advocates for expanded use of marine
zoning and ecosystem-based management in Florida, the Southeast
Atlantic and the Gulf of Mexico. The conservancy's goal in the area
is sustainable management of marine wildlife populations and
conservation of important marine ecosystems such as coral reefs,
fish spawning areas, estuaries and other nearshore coastal habitats.


Despite considerable obstacles, White has helped put several
protective policies in place, including a 2001 action that created
the largest, fully protected marine ecological reserve in North
America in the Dry Tortugas, 70 miles west of Key West.
Though the conservancy is working hard to raise public
awareness and build support for policy changes that will protect
our oceans, the picture is bleak, according to White. Over-fish-
ing, global climate change and habitat destruction continue
to threaten marine resources, while pollution from sewage
discharge, nutrients from agriculture and urban storm water, and
atmospheric "greenhouse gasses" are changing the chemistry of
the oceans.
"In the last 10 years, 80 percent of the coastal reefs in the
Caribbean basin have been destroyed," White said. "And in
just the past few decades, 90 percent of large predatory ocean
fish are gone. We've also managed to impair 75 percent of
America's estuaries. Take Silver Springs it's turning green
and no longer meets state water quality standards. We've
managed to turn our ground water into a pollutant.
We need to drastically rethink the way we manage our oceans
and marine resources."
Career Highlights
* Helped establish the Tortuga Ecological Reserve in the Dry Tortugas,
the largest fully protected marine ecological reserve in North America
* Board of directors of the Florida Wildlife Federation for almost
20 years, advising them on environmental and legal issues
* Board of directors of the Everglades Law Center (a public interest
law firm at Shepard Broad Law Center, Nova Southeastern
University), advising them on legal issues


UF LAW




















H lping to secure stable, healthy living situations for children

has long been the focal point of Rutledge Hutson's legal
career. As a senior staff attorney at the Center for Law and
Social Policy (CLASP) in Washington, D.C., since 1999,
with two years at the Children's Defense Fund in between, Hutson
strives to implement government policy changes to aid at-risk children
and families.
"I do policy work in the child welfare area at the state and federal
level, especially for children who have been abused and neglected,"
Hutson said. "Children are some of the most vulnerable members of
society and they don't have a voice in our political system. I try to give
voice to their interests."
As an attorney in CLASP's child welfare division, one of Hutson's
key projects has been finding ways for child welfare agencies and
Temporary Assistance to Needy Families (TANF) to work in harmony
to assist families and ensure a comprehensive range of services that
low-income children and their parents need.
"CLASP has long focused on welfare policy and how to get adults
successfully into the workforce," she said. "I've brought along an
additional vantage point that examines the connection between adult
success in the workforce and a healthy family life, since problems
parents have at work can sometimes have a negative impact on their



JUVENILE OFFENDERS

David J. Utter (JD 89) pictured on p. 15
Director and Co-founder
Juvenile Justice Program of Louisiana
New Orleans, La.

Juvenile offenders in Louisiana are now being dealt a far better hand
by a state justice system that had long been exacerbating their problems
rather than remediating them, thanks to David Utter's efforts as director
and co-founder of the Juvenile Justice Project of Louisiana, which
opened its doors in 1997.
The passage of the Juvenile Justice Reform Act in 2003, the culmi-
nation of Utter's efforts, along with two other project co-founders,
to reform Louisiana's juvenile justice system, has been nationally recog-
nized as one of the most progressive and comprehensive pieces of
legislation of its kind to pass in any state in years. It earned Utter the Ford
Foundation and Advocacy Institute's 2005 Leadership for a Changing
World Award.
Since the reform act became law in 2003, the number of incarcerat-
ed juveniles in Louisiana has dropped from 1,900 to 500, a statistic that
makes Utter, understandably, proud.
"The Juvenile Justice Reform Act changed the face of justice in the
state as it committed the state to change its policy on justice," Utter said.
"Our work to bring about the closing of the Tallulah Correctional Center
for Youth in 2004, championed by Gov. Kathleen Blanco in her campaign,
began the general shift toward reducing the juvenile prison population in
the state," Utter said. "Fifty years of research shows the incarceration of
juveniles only hurts them."
Utter's odyssey in public service began in earnest just after law
school when he moved back to Atlanta, where he had done his under-


home life. We also need to look at
untreated mental health disorders,
substance abuse, undiagnosed
learning disabilities and domestic
violence, often the underlying
causes of parents' struggles at
home and in the workplace."
The passage of the 1996 wel-
fare law focused on getting people
to work, but without speaking to

according to Hutson.
"Say a child has been placed in
foster care and the welfare agency sends the mother to parenting classes,"
she said. 'Then a welfare plan from a different agency requires the
parent to do job searches at the same time it's a rock and a hard place.
She can't do both plans. So the question remains how do we give low
income families the tools to address their varying obligations?"
Integrating systems so that they are more seamless is the goal to
work toward, Hutson said.
"I have tried to get all the agencies to work together to make sure
that what is available is coordinated in a way that serves peoples'
needs," Hutson said.

Career Highlights
* Senior staff attorney, Center for Law and Social Policy, Washington, D.C.,
1999-2004 and February 2006-present
Deputy director, Child Welfare and Mental Health, Children's Defense
Fund, Washington D.C., March 2004-February 2006
Volunteer caseworker, Georgia Council on Child Abuse, Atlanta, Ga.,
February 1997-January 1999


graduate degree at Emory University. After a few months at ACLU of
Georgia, Utter went to work at the Southern Center for Human Rights,
under the tutelage of Stephen B. Bright, the world-renowned advocate
for the incarcerated poor.
"I had the good fortune of landing a place at his office, representing
people incarcerated in prisons and jails," Utter said. "He's my mentor, the
most important thing for a public interest lawyer."
Utter next worked for a year as a sole practitioner in New Orleans
representing the rights of incarcerated individuals before co-founding
the Louisiana Crisis Assistance Center in 1993, which specialized in sys-
temic challenges to the adequacy of funding in indigent defense work.
Utter's move to advocating full-time on behalf of incarcerated
juveniles, with the founding of the Juvenile Justice Project of
Louisiana, was spearheaded by the 1997 Human Rights Watch and
U.S. Department of Justice reports on the "unspeakable violence and
brutality" in Louisiana's juvenile prisons. It will remain his core mission
as a lawyer until the futility of incarcerating juvenile offenders is
understood and eliminated, he said.
However, these days Utter and his staff, who are based in New
Orleans, are still struggling with post-Katrina fallout.
"The day-to-day things that one takes for granted just aren't there or
are much harder," Utter said. "For example, of 15 or 16 staff at JJPL
pre-Katrina, we lost about 25 or 30 percent of those folks. They decided
it wasn't safe to come back to New Orleans. So there is as much work, if
not more, to do with fewer people."

Career Highlights
* Leadership for a Changing World Award from Ford Foundation, 2005
* Those Who Dared to Care about Kids Award from Louisiana Council
of Jewish Women, 2004
* Distinguished Attorney of the Year Award from Louisiana State Bar
Association, 2003


WINTER 2007





































"Finding my way to social justice issues was the first big piece of


discovering my true north as a lawyer."


B onnie Allen's commitment to public service has led
her on a path from the courtroom to the classroom, leav-
ing her law practice behind to instead offer counseling to
fellow practitioners in need of reflection and renewal.
As president and CEO of the International Center for Healing
and the Law in Kalamazoo, Mich., since 2004, Allen spearheads
an organization that provides educational programs to lawyers,
judges and other members of the legal community, offering them
opportunities to step back and reflect upon the deeper meaning of
their professions.
"Finding my way to social justice issues was the first big piece
of discovering my true north as a lawyer," Allen said. "But despite
this step forward, another thing was eating at me my inner self
asking, 'What does it mean to be an authentic person?' I was look-
ing for a way to integrate personal and professional authenticity."
That's what led Allen to change her focus from ministering to
needy clients as a public service lawyer for more than a decade to
addressing the needs of those providing the legal services. An
important step along the way in Allen's newly evolving path was
her completion in 1999 of a master's degree in theological
studies with a focus on ethics and society at the Garrett-
Evangelical Theological Seminary in Evanston, Ill.
Founded in 2002, the Center for Healing and the Law
promotes a legal profession dedicated to peace and healing in


-BONNIE ALLEN (JD 84)


society on three different levels: personal, institutional and com-
munity. The center's personal renewal retreats, increasingly
requested by clients around the country, presently make up the
largest segment of the center's programs.
Many law professionals are struggling with a conflict
between their personal values and the demands placed on them
in their professional roles, Allen explained.
"The personal retreats provide space for individuals in crisis
or at a professional crossroad to reexamine their directions and
explore the deeper dimensions of their vocational calling, ethics
and professionalism, as well as the deeper meanings of life,"
Allen said.
The center's institutional healing workshops strive to narrow
the gap between institutional values purporting to serve the com-
mon good and market-driven realities that frequently undermine
lawyers' integrity, according to Allen. The center's third compo-
nent community healing workshops seeks to promote law
as a vehicle for healing communities. To that end, the healing
center is developing programs that facilitate "inside-out"
community building, social justice and conflict transformation.
Last summer the center's healing workshops were
put to the test in post-Katrina Mississippi, where Allen
stayed for an extended period ministering to the needs of recov-
ering communities.

Career Highlights
* Executive director, Just Neighbors Immigrant Ministry,
Arlington, Va., 2003-2004
* Director of Outreach and Community Support, National Legal
Aid and Defender Association, Washington, D.C., 1995-2003
* Director, American Bar Association Center for Pro Bono,
Chicago, II., 1995-1998


UF LAW






















T rhan Robinson has always viewed public service as the

"noblest labor available to empower the poor, disabled,
children, sick and to protect those most vulnerable."
It was his fellowship in the Center for Governmental
Responsibility under Professor Jon Mills, however, that encour-
aged him to actually practice in the public sector. It was the
right decision.
"I have received immense satisfaction and rewards in service to the
public," he says of a career that has taken him from Tallahassee to
Thailand.
Robinson points to one particularly satisfying role in which the
secretary of the Army appointed him in July 2001 as his civilian aide
to advise and support Army leaders across the country.
"I've used this position to support the soldier and seek employ-
ment for soldiers injured in Iraq and Afghanistan and ease their transi-
tion from military service," he said of the non-compensated position.
Bosnia and Estonia benefited from his expertise when he was
named to the Governor's Partners for Peace Delegation to assist the
business and legal communities and when he served on a committee


to revise court procedures in
Bosnia-Herzegovina to prosecute
the more than 13,000 war crimi-
nals from the civil war.
He makes his living as a
senior assistant attorney general

Human Resources.
"We try to maximize the per-
sonal independence of Maryland's
citizens in economic and social
matters. I'm responsible for review Robinson
of all procurement transactions and
all contract litigation for the department," he said. In the past year, that
means he has approved 732 contracts valued at more than $564 million.
Robinson also is counsel to the Governor's Commissions on
Migratory and Seasonal Farm Labor, Asian-Pacific Affairs, Hispanic
Affairs and the Maryland Commission for Women.
His service has not gone unnoticed. His awards include the
Exceptional Service (Attorney of the Year) Award and the Public
Service Award by the Attorney General, and the Valued Hours Award
for Community Service by the Fullwood Foundation.

Career Highlights
* Retired major in the U.S. Army, 1990
* National Board of Directors, ACLU, 1996-2004
* Chief of Contracts at Martin Marietta, responsible for more than
$11 billion of missiles, weapons and electric-optic systems


Giving a Voice to the Voiceless


I I came to law school
to gain a louder voice. I
already had some success-
es under my belt cutting-
edge advocacy on behalf of
tropical rainforests, indige-
nous peoples, and South
Florida native plant commu-
nities- and I'd honed my
leadership skills by partici-
pating in a five-month
expedition to the Amazon Matzen
and by co-owning and run-
ning a South Florida environmental services
company. These experiences whetted my
appetite for more, for something I had wanted
since I was a child growing up in the great
outdoors of Colorado to be a lawyer,
working for the voiceless.
While at UF Law, I researched indigenous
peoples/Native American civil and environmen-
tal rights while working with Tom Ankersen in
the Center for Governmental Responsibility
(CGR) on his Mesoamerican Biodiversity Legal
Project, and while interning with the Florida
Department of Environmental Protection as a
CGR Public Service Law Fellow.
The impact of Hurricane Andrew (which
struck at the start of my second year, devas-


tating my hometown of Goulds) on
the Everglades migrant labor camp
inspired me to pursue a summer
clerkship at Farmworkers Legal
Services of North Carolina (FLSNC).
I found the work to be wonderfully
compelling and satisfying, offering a
work-life balance that supported my
new status as a single parent of a
young son.
After graduation, despite opportu-
nities to work in Mexico and Colombia,
I returned to North Carolina to work as
a staff attorney with FLSNC, and later with the
Immigrant's Legal Assistance Project of the N.C.
Justice Center. I engaged in policy advocacy
and handled individual cases and class action
litigation on behalf of immigrant workers and
limited English proficient students in employ-
ment, civil rights, benefits and immigration
cases. The work was stressful and at times infu-
riating, but I knew I was making the kind of dif-
ference I always wanted to make.
The expertise I gained led me to serve on
numerous boards and commissions, to advise
non-profit funders, legislators and policy-mak-
ers, and to work as a consultant for Human
Rights Watch. I also co-founded a Latino commu-
nity resource center (www.elcentrolatino.org),


which has served thousands since opening its
doors in 2000.
I returned to international work in 2002 when
I traveled to Colombia with Witness for Peace, a
human rights group working in Latin America.
Our purpose was to witness the impact of U.S.
drug policy (which is causing terrible environ-
mental and human rights tragedies); to meet and
speak with numerous governmental officials,
human and environmental rights activists, reli-
gious leaders, farmers, and indigenous represen-
tatives; and then to come home and talk about it.
Upon my return from this revelatory,
humbling and at times terrifying experience,
I gave numerous presentations and appeared
in several local newspapers to discuss what I
learned and saw.
I spent the last three and a half years as an
adjunct clinical professor, teaching, supervising
and mentoring students in the University of
North Carolina School of Law's Externship
Program.
Overall, I have had a wonderful career as a
lawyer in the public sector. It has allowed me to
do meaningful work and have a fantastic family
life with my husband and three children.

Jena Matzen (JD 94)
Self-employed, Durham, NC


WINTER 2007





































"Procedures were ... put in place for long-term legal assistance to


THOMAS K. EMSWILER (LLMT 95)


s general counsel of the Federal Retirement Thrift
Investment Board, Thomas K. Emswiler is responsible
for administering the Thrift Savings Plan, a 401(k)-
like plan of $190 billion for 3.6 million federal
employees and members of the uniformed services. This is just
one of the important public interest initiatives he has been
responsible for in his 23-year career.
The September 11 attack, however, showed him a completely
new side of public service.
For one dramatic month, Emswiler was in charge of round-the-
clock legal operations at the Department of Defense Center, which
was set up to support family members of the victims of the attack
on the Pentagon.
"The emergency nature of the mission required us to build
this center from scratch," he said. "We needed experienced
attorneys with expertise in probate, estate planning and estate
administration issues."
Due to the limited number of active duty attorneys with these
specialized skills, he staffed the office with expert Army reserve
attorneys and augmented with a team of Coast Guard attorneys.
The sheer numbers from the operation were astounding: approx-
imately 110 attorneys and paralegals in the local area worked on


a pro bono basis to address 278 individual legal issues and work
with 94 casualty assistance officers.
"The staff frequently provided legal support to other agency
staffs in the center on such issues as benefit entitlements, social
security benefits, military and civilian pensions, and retirement
benefits counseling," he said. "Procedures were also put in place
for long-term legal assistance to support the families."
Emswiler's leadership was recognized when the Department
of Defense awarded him the Joint Services Commendation
Medal and the American Bar Association (Standing Committee
on Legal Assistance for Military Personnel) awarded him the
Legal Assistance Distinguished Service Award.
At the time of the attack, Emswiler had served as an Army
judge advocate for 18 years. In his last assignment before retiring
in 2003, he served as the executive director of the Armed Forces
Tax Council and was responsible for all tax matters relating to
members of the Armed Forces.
"I drafted and staffed several legislative proposals that were
enacted by Congress that benefited service members and their
families," he said. This included the Military Family Tax Relief
Act of 2003, Public Law 104-117, and a tax exclusion initiative
that benefited military personnel in the Afghanistan combat zone.
For this work he was awarded the Defense Superior Service Medal.

Career Highlights
* Army Judge Advocate for 20 years, retiring in 2003 with the rank
of lieutenant colonel
* Legal adviser, Pentagon Family Assistance Center, Arlington,
Va., September 12, 2001-October 12, 2001
* Executive director, Armed Forces Tax Council, the Pentagon,
Washington, D.C., May 1998-December 2002


UF LAW


support the families."



















Making Public Interest Interesting


SFor the past 30 years I have served
as an assistant public defender, prosecutor
and legal adviser for the Florida Department
of Law Enforcement. The different and always
interesting issues I encountered daily in the
practice of criminal law more than made up
for the lack of financial awards. For instance:
* Two years after graduation I successfully
argued to the Florida Supreme Court
(State v. Keaton, 371 So.2d 86, Fla. 1979)
that the obscene telephone call statute
violated the right to free speech. Relying
on a lesson learned during one of the
few lucid moments I had in Professor
Robert Mann's Constitutional Law class,
I was able to convince the trial judge to
dismiss the case.
* One of my male clients was charged with
an obscure City of Orlando ordinance that
made it illegal for a man to dress like a
woman. He showed up for trial in male
attire, but I immediately sent him home to
change into his drag outfit since he really
looked much better as a female (and that
was his preferred clothing). We had no
chance of winning the case, so I thought
we might as well have some fun with the
jury. He was convicted, but the ordinance
was ruled unconstitutional on appeal.
* Even as a prosecutor I strove to maintain
my sense of humor. I charged a defendant
with resisting arrest when he struggled
with Bruno, a police dog that was
attempting to apprehend him. When
asked by a newspaper reporter, I indicated
that I might call Bruno to the witness
stand. I told the surprised reporter that
I would ask the dog how the defendant
treated him and Bruno would reply "ruff."
* Of course, many of my cases were very
serious. I obtained a first-degree murder
conviction against serial killer Gerald
Stano for the murder of a woman in
Seminole County.
* I handled the infamous case of the "Pied
Piper of Longwood," who was charged with
molesting numerous children in his neigh-
borhood. By then I considered myself to
be a tough, seasoned prosecutor. But the
testimony of one of the victims was so
distressing that I had a difficult time leading
her through it. When she finally finished
and the judge ordered a break, I barely
made it to the bathroom before I broke
down in tears. Fortunately, the defendant
was found guilty.
Because of wins like these, I not only
became a bit cocky but perhaps even com-


placent. Back then we did not have an
intake division, so I would file my own
cases. In one, I filed sexual battery charges
based solely on the word of a child victim,
which led to the arrest of the foster parent.
It wasn't until later I found out the police
failed to provide me with crucial evidence
that indicated the child had made the whole
thing up. I immediately nollee pressed" the
case, but that did very little to restore the
reputation and dignity of the man I had
charged. That was the lowest point of
my career.
In 1985 I was offered the position of
regional legal adviser for the Florida
Department of Law Enforcement. My goal at
that time and it remains the same today -
was to provide zealous legal assistance to my
agents but at the same time make sure that
constitutional standards are adhered to.
Here is a good example of that: Our
Tampa agents were investigating a murder
we believed was committed by a couple
who were dating each other. Unable to
obtain sufficient evidence to make an arrest,
the agents asked several months later if
they could get a wiretap order in an effort
to catch the couple discussing the crime.
Because of the freshness issue, a wiretap
would be unconstitutional. But we did not
give up. Instead, we came up with an ingen-
ious plan and received authorization for
the wiretap.
Once we had the wire in place, two of
our agents confronted the female at work and
told her we had reason to believe she was
involved in the murder. As soon as they left
the business, she was immediately on the
telephone to her boyfriend telling him the
cops knew about their involvement in the
murder and for him to get out of town. The
entire interception took 19 seconds and prob-
ably holds the record for the world's shortest
wiretap. They were arrested and the male,
Richard Anderson, is currently on death row.
As you can see, I've experienced suc-
cess, failure, had a few laughs and shed
some tears throughout my career. It's
been an emotional roller-coaster ride that
I wouldn't have exchanged for anything.
However, I never wavered in my belief
that I was a servant to the citizens of
the State of Florida, and I always
tried my best not to let them down.

Steve Brady (JD 77)
Regional Legal Adviser
Florida Department of Law Enforcement


WINTER 2007


Brady



"He showed up

for trial in male

attire ... I sent

him home to

change into his

drag outfit."










































"It helps so many women get safe, as it provides an economic lifeline

for them. It made me feel, 'You can do this and effect real change.'"
-PAM CRONE (JD 91)


U employment insurance law, particularly as it inter-
sects with the rights of domestic violence and
stalking victims, has been Pam Crone's mission in
one form or another since her first days as an
attorney. Crone has served as director of the state of
Washington's Unemployment Law Project, as a staff attorney for
the Northwest Women's Law Center in Seattle, and as an unem-
ployment insurance law educator at the University of
Washington Law School.
Ultimately, it was Crone's devotion to reforming unemploy-
ment insurance law and, in particular, advocating on behalf of
victims of domestic violence and stalking that eventually led her to
give up her law practice in 2002 and become a contract lobbyist.
"I loved direct service and working with people," Crone said,
referring to her law practice. "It has a huge impact on individuals'
lives. But I felt I could effect more systemic change and thereby
help many more people by working to change the law in my role
as a lobbyist."


And Crone has done just that. One of her proudest achievements
in her six years as a lobbyist was aiding in the passage of House Bill
1248 by the Washington State Legislature in 2002, which secured
unemployment benefits for victims of domestic violence and stalking.
Before House Bill 1248 passed, victims of domestic violence
and stalking were often forced to leave their jobs and homes
to protect themselves and their children. They were very
vulnerable, as they weren't eligible for unemployment compen-
sation and were thrust into poverty, Crone said.
In fact, in the four years since House Bill 1248 became law,
1,120 women in Washington state have received previously
denied unemployment benefits, Crone said.
"That bill's passage fueled my passion," Crone said.
"It helps so many women get safe, as it provides an economic
lifeline for them. It made me feel, 'You can do this and effect
real change.'"

Career Highlights
* Protection for abortion clinics and others from losing insurance
when the injured person or organization is the victim of arson
or malicious mischief. Legislation passed in 2006
* Protections for domestic violence and sexual assault victims in
rental housing. Allows leases to be legally broken in order for
women to move to safer locations. Legislation passed in 2004
* Unemployment insurance for victims of domestic violence and
stalking. Legislation passed in 2002


UF LAW

















Finding the Value in Public Interest


S"Where is this man's public defender?"
the judge barked from the bench. The
demand was made even though I stood at
the bar with my client.
"I represent Mr. Nelson, your honor,"
I said, for the third time.
The county judge eyed me suspiciously,
and then decreed, "You can't be a public
defender. Your clothes match."
This was a less than subtle introduction
to the fact that attorneys who serve in the
public's interest are often viewed at best as
fashion-challenged oddballs, and at worst
as godless infidels bent on our society's
demise.
Since graduating from UF in 1991, I
have served as an assistant public defender,
assistant dean for Student Affairs at the
UF Levin College of Law, director of the
Cumberland Public Interest Project at the
Cumberland School of Law at Samford
University, director of Legal Advocacy at the
YWCA of Central Alabama, and currently as
a special circuit judge and senior trial refer-
ee in the 10th Judicial Circuit of Alabama.
While survey after survey reports high
levels of job dissatisfaction, substance
abuse and depression amongst attorneys,
I continue to love my work and wonder
why more people don't seek to serve in the
public's interest.
Unfortunately, the answer to this ques-
tion has less to do with fashion sense and
more to do with income. As the director of
a public interest project at a small, private
law school, I cajoled future graduates to
apply for public interest positions only to
be met with the same response: "I can't
afford to work there."
Historically, private sector positions have
paid more than public service. Recently, this
salary gap has widened. In 1991, the median
starting salary for a private practice position
was $50,000. In 2001, it was $90,000 an
80 percent increase. In 1991, the median
starting salary for a federal government posi-
tion was $31,500. In 2001, it was $45,000 -
a 43 percent increase. In 1991, the median
starting salary for a public interest position
was $25,500. In 2001, it was $35,000 a
37 percent increase.
This salary differential only grows as
attorneys rise in seniority. The median
salary for a fifth-year associate in 2002 was


$115,000, while 61 percent of public interest
lawyers with five years of experience were
making less than $45,000.
The realities of debt make the persist-
ently low salaries and lack of earning poten-
tial associated with public service seem
even more bleak. According to the Access
Group, between 1993 and 2000, the median
law student educational debt increased 59
percent to $84,000. During that same eight-
year period, the median tuition at private
law schools increased 48 percent while the
median tuition at state law schools
increased 76 percent.
Why should we care that a law student
who wishes to pursue a public interest
career can't afford to?
In 2001, 32.9 million people lived below
the federal poverty level. Low-income indi-
viduals and families face legal problems
associated with their most basic needs -
food, housing, health care, personal safety
and education. Yet, attorneys trained and
able to assist them are in short supply.
The federal government's role in repre-
senting the nation in its regulation, policy
development and oversight responsibilities
demands the most skilled attorneys. A tal-
ented and committed federal workforce is
tantamount to a high-performing govern-
ment that earns and retains the confidence
of the American people.
The good news is, as educational debt
prevents more attorneys from taking and
remaining in public interest and govern-
ment jobs, more entities are creating possi-
bly the most viable solution to the problem:
loan repayment assistance programs
(LRAPs). Generally speaking, an LRAP is
when an employer or a law school directly
pays or forgives educational debt if a per-
son takes a public interest position and
commits to a term of service.
At this point, few employers (including
the federal government, which has the
authority to provide repayment incentives)
are using LRAPs to recruit, retain or impact
the quality of the workforce. As of October
2002, 56 law schools had LRAPs. However,
70 percent of the total LRAP monies were
disbursed by six schools.
What can the alumni do? We can create
a generously funded, school-based LRAP at
UF with reasonable eligibility requirements.


Horn

"I cajoled future

graduates to apply

for public interest

positions only to be

met with the same

response ... 'I can't

afford to work there.'"

Alumni who are concerned with public
interest/public service law can raise funds
for the LRAP or scholarships. We can
encourage aggressive implementation of
LRAPs in federal agencies. We can
remember that when provided with
decent salaries ... we can be very snappy
dressers.

Francoise Hartley Horn (JD 91)
Family Court
Birmingham, Ala.


WINTER 2007





















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A System for




Attacking Life


BY KATHY FLEMING


She superstar artist Prince is playing the
Super Bowl Feb. 4.
The announcement may be well-
known by now, but Patrick Cousins (JD
89) knew about it and many other
private details of Prince's life back in
mid-June when he learned the performer
was moving to South Florida for a few months to prepare for the
TV bowl appearance in Miami.
It was welcome news for Cousins, who oversees the mega-
musician's legal needs from his West Palm Beach office. It means
fewer road trips and more time with his family and with the man
Cousins now considers a very good friend.
But Cousins wouldn't complain if Prince stayed home in
Minnesota for the winter. He simply isn't a complaining man. He
is instead a good-natured professional with a dependable system
for going after what he wants an approach that seems to be
working well, as evidenced by his growing entertainment, person-
al injury and consumer law practice.

The System
Cousins credits his parents with providing most of the guide-
lines he has used to surmount the challenges in his 42-year path.
He spent much of his first four and a half years with his
grandmother after his parents immigrated from Kingston,
Jamaica, to New Jersey in search of a better life. He clearly
remembers his first day of kindergarten in his new country ...
and his first lesson.


From Prince's legal affairs to

Lemon Law case precedents,

Patrick Cousins has a plan

"The school was on this huge hill, and there were about
60 steps to walk up to go inside," he said. ly dad knelt down and
said, 'This is the beginning of a new life and you are getting
opportunities I never got.' He expected me to climb those stairs by
myself and go inside and hit every challenge head on."
Cousins was one of three children of color in a sea of 750
students. His father had a strict "no excuses" policy. He expected
his son to never tell a lie, to always make straight As, to act with
integrity, to ask hard questions, to be more prepared than others,
and to succeed despite the circumstances.
"I believe he saw I had a gift or ability to succeed,"
Cousins said.
He went on to graduate as a National Honor Society Scholar in
the top three percent of his high school class and earn a degree
in economics from the College of William and Mary, where he
captained the track team and was a Martin Luther King Jr. Scholar.
A Virgil Hawkins scholarship convinced him to attend UF's
law school, where he, twice, was the recipient of the President's
Outstanding Student Award. In his leisure time, just for fun, he ran
alongside track athletes who were in Gainesville training for the
1988 Olympics. The rest of his time was devoted to class and
study, just as his father would expect.


WINTER 2007











Outgoing and full of questions, Cousins said many of his pro-
fessors went out of their way to give him good advice advice he
acted on. For instance, Professor Fletcher Baldwin advised him, as
a new lawyer moving to West Palm Beach, to seek out the "bad-
dest, most cantankerous lawyer in town" to get the lay of the legal
landscape. Cousins' research revealed that person was probably
Bob Montgomery (JD 57).
"So I just went to his office without an appointment
and waited and waited, hoping he would see me. I knew he was in
his office, but I didn't think I was going to get in. So I finally said
in a loud voice, 'I'm a new lawyer who is looking for the key to
this city, and I understand it's in your office.'"
Montgomery saw him, and the two remain friends today.
"It's sort of like wind sprints. The last person standing gets the
prize," Montgomery said. "That's how Pat is. He makes sure he is
the last person standing. He is an excellent lawyer, and his driving
force has put him in the good graces of all the lawyers down here."


"I was trying to be cool and put him on hold," Cousins said. He
broadly points to an imaginary phone in his hand. "I tell everyone in
my office, 'You're not going to believe who is on the phone."'
"I got back on the phone," he said, his voice immediately
dropping an octave, "I tell him, 'Yeah, I can handle that.'"
The successful outcome on that project led to another, such as
the copyright infringement assignment that required the Cousins
Law Firm to stop a large national retail chain from selling
Halloween costumes with Prince's likeness.
"He had already shopped it with some huge firms, and they
told him it could not be done. That wasn't what Prince wanted to
hear. Within 48 hours, we were able to convince the retailer to pay
the maximum statutory damage award and pull the costumes from
1,300 stores in 47 states," Cousins said.
Cousins soon found himself with the general counsel title and
the majority of his time devoted to managing the musician's com-
plex legal affairs. As Prince says, Cousins "gets it done."


"It's sort of like wind sprints. The last person standing gets the prize."


Lemon Law King
Lemon law cases have earned Cousins the most limelight,
including a feature in Automobile magazine in June 2006. After
representing car manufacturers from 1991 through 1997, he
switched sides and began representing consumers. Since then
he has handled about 500 cases for his clients. And he's won
nearly all of them.
He likened a 2005 landmark jury case to David and Goliath, in
which his firm took on Allison Transmission, a division of General
Motors. Allison makes the majority of transmissions for motor
homes, fire engines, buses and large trucks around the country
Cousins clients claimed they had a lemon transmission in their
RV and won a jury verdict of $165,000, plus legal fees (now
on appeal).
"Even though we only had little rocks to throw, it's what we
had and it worked," he said. "I felt like if I outworked them, I could
win. We tried to be one step ahead."
Another happy client walked away with nearly $600,000 -
which topped the lemon law record in Florida by $210,000 and is
thought to be the largest lemon law victory in the nation from a
case involving a Porsche Cararra GT.
Courts nationally are now citing one of his victories, Fischetti
v. Isuzu, as precedent to hold manufacturers responsible. The
National Association of Consumer Advocates named it as one of
the most significant cases of the year.

Entertainment Law
Cousins calls his entertainment law business a blessing
from above. Prince first called him about three years ago
to review a contract after the two met briefly through a
mutual friend.


"Our personalities mesh, and he trusts me. Prince is a
fighter and he never backs away from a situation when he
knows he is right," said Cousins. "He is honest and has a lot of
integrity. He's just a down-to-earth, nice guy who happens to
have a tremendous God-given talent."
That side of his business has put him on a first-name basis
with major stars such as Bruce Willis and Sharon Stone and has
brought him clients such as reggae artist Wycliff Jean, soul
singer Larry Graham and Janet Jackson's producer, Jerry
DuPlessis.

Signature Style
"Hokey" is a word Cousins often uses when describing how
he feels about what he cares about most his family (includ-
ing his three children and wife, Kaydene, who manages his
office), his clients and his faith. But, that's how he really is.
There is nothing hokey, however, about his sense of style.
Cousins is seldom without his signature fedora or crisp pocket
handkerchief.
"I think a hat shows respect for a lost tradition and forces
the wearer to be a gentleman and dignified," he said. "It makes
me think of Atticus Finch in the movie To Kill a Mockingbird."
For Cousins, having a distinctive style fits right in with his
system of how to build a successful law practice and how to be
content with who he is at the end of the day.
"I really didn't know much about the law before I came to
law school except what I saw on Perry Mason. I did have the
idea I would have the power to help people. I saw a lot of injus-
tice growing up and saw people in circumstances who didn't
know how to help themselves. I thought being a lawyer was
honorable. And," he said, smiling, "really cool."


UF LAW















































Moody


BY JAMES HELLEGAARD


friends and colleagues talk about
Judge James S. Moody's (JD 72)
sense of humor and his understated
manner. Judge Moody likes his
courtroom to be a place where
everyone can be relaxed and
focused. But that's not always easy,
especially for anxious lawyers who don't know what to
expect in his courtroom.
"When lawyers come in front of a judge, they're nervous,
just as anybody would be coming into court," says Judge
Moody, who earned both his undergraduate and law degrees
from the University of Florida. "A lot of times, if you can
soften the edge with some humor or something personal, it
makes them relax and they can think more clearly and make
their arguments more comfortably."
While his sense of humor, which has been compared to that
of Bob Newhart, has served him well as a judge, he knows its
limits. When people's lives and lawyers' careers are riding on
the outcome, there can be little room for a joke, no matter how
well timed and delivered.


In or out of the headlines, Judge

James Moody makes the tough

decisions when needed

"I think it's harder to be humorous when you're in the
middle of a trial, particularly when you have a lot of lawyers,
because you have members of the public sitting in the audience
watching," explains Judge Moody, who serves on the U.S.
District Court for the Middle District of Florida. "They don't
really understand if a judge makes a joke. Sometimes they
might interpret that as the judge making fun of the lawyer or
the lawyer's case or the lawyer's argument."

National Attention
Light-hearted moments are particularly hard to come by
when you're presiding over one of the most important terror-
ism trials in the nation, as Judge Moody was in the 2005 trial
of Sami Al-Arian, a popular computer science professor at the
University of South Florida. Al-Arian, along with three co-


WINTER 2007
















defendants, was accused of helping to organize and finance the end of the 19th century when his great uncle, and later his grand-
Palestinian Islamic Jihad, which has claimed responsibility for father, arrived.
numerous suicide bombings in Israel and its occupied territories. "Wherever you went in town, whether it was to the
The trial would last for six months and garner considerable playground or to the movies or to get a hamburger, there was
media attention from around the world. In the end, Al-Arian, 48, always somebody who knew who you were," Moody recalls. "It
entered a plea deal, agreeing to admit guilt and accept a possible was like having a town full of parents. If you did something out
sentence of 46 to 57 months and eventual deportation from of line they'd tell your parents, so it was just like having your
America. Prosecutors agreed to join defense attorneys in recom- parents there."
mending a sentence at the low end of the range, but the judge chose His father, James Moody Sr., was a lawyer in town and joined
to impose the maximum sentence allowed by the plea bargain. John Trinkle to establish the law firm of Trinkle and Moody.
"You are a master manipulator," he told Al-Arian at his May Jimmy Moody can't recall when he decided to follow in his
2006 sentencing. "You looked your neighbors in the eyes and said father's footsteps and become a lawyer.
"It seems like I always knew I wanted to
Sbe a lawyer without knowing why," he says. "I
You need to always keep in mind that never really stopped to think about it. I

when the public calls, they're the ones who remember when I was a little kid and we were
playing cowboys and Indians, I always knew I
are paying us. We're working for them." wanted to be a lawyer. My friends would want
to be a fireman or a policeman. I just always
knew I wanted to be a lawyer."
you had nothing to do with Palestinian Islamic Jihad. This trial Judge Moody, who was appointed to the federal bench by
exposed that as a lie. The evidence was clear in this case that you President Bill Clinton in 2000, previously served as a Hillsborough
were a leader of the Palestinian Islamic Jihad." circuit court judge. Though his family name was well established in
Throughout the trial Judge Moody faced many tough decisions. the area at the time he ran for judge, he set out on foot in the
After much consternation, he denied defense motions to move the summer of 1994, with his family in tow, campaigning door-to-door
trial out of Tampa. He also held that prosecutors would have to in a county that covers more area than many states.
prove the defendants knew the money they raised would pay for ter- ly walking team was basically my family, so I can guaran-
rorism. Even before the trial started, Judge Moody took measures tee you my kids weren't excited about it," Judge Moody recalls of
he had not taken before, such as issuing a questionnaire to a pool of those hot summer days. "But they did it. Every Saturday morning
500 people to help weed out those who already had formed an opin- we'd pick a neighborhood and go door to door, each of us walk-
ion about the case or for some reason couldn't serve on a jury for a ing down one side of the street. The campaign was good for me in
long trial, and setting up a system to make it easier for the media to that it got me out of Plant City and around the county to meet a lot
access evidence that was being presented. of different people that I otherwise would never have had the
"A lot of it was a learning experience," he says. chance to meet."
For Judge Moody, it's all part of his responsibilities as a judge. The value of hard work, which he learned from his own
His former judicial assistant, Patty Coone, remarked to the Tampa parents, is something Judge Moody has tried to pass on to his chil-
Tribune last year that she remembers Judge Moody telling her "we dren, including daughter Ashley (JD 00), and son Jamey (JD 03),
worked for the people, the people paid our salaries ... We always both UF Law graduates, and another daughter, Patricia, a medical
needed to accommodate them if we could." student. In addition to campaigning for their dad, the children
"As a judge you often tend to forget that," Judge Moody says. were required to spend three to four hours working in the yard
"You get caught up in 'judgeitis.'And you need to always keep in every weekend, weeding flower beds, trimming bushes and
mind that when the public calls, they're the ones who are paying us. mowing the lawn.
We're working for them." "I didn't like it when I was a child. My dad made me get out
there every weekend when my friends were playing football in the
The Home Court side yard," he recalls. "We had to do our work and finish the work
From the time he was a child growing up in the small Florida before we could go join in the game. I hated it when I was a kid,
town of Plant City in eastern Hillsborough County, he was known but looking back as a lawyer I realized how that stood me in
to everyone as Jimmy. His family called the area home since the good stead."


UF LAW













PARTNERS


Klingensmith Heads Law Alumni Council

Mark W. Klingensmith (JD 85), of the West Palm
Beach office of Sonneborn Rutter Cooney &
Klingensmith, has been named president of the Levin
College of Law Alumni Council.
Klingensmith has been active on the council for
the past 14 years, helping the group increase partici-


Recent Gifts to College Support
and Strengthen Student Programs

Each gift to the Levin College of Law is prudently
employed to support and enhance programs for
students and faculty. Recent significant commit-
ments include:
* $50,000 from Robert S. (JD 26) and Mildred M.
Baynard Trust to support technology in the
Lawton Chiles Legal Information Center
* $300,000 from Robert Kerrigan for the Martin
Levin Advocacy Center expected to be com-
pleted in May 2007
* $300,000 from Robert Montgomery (JD 57) for
the Martin Levin Advocacy Center
* $100,000 bequest from Howard Garrett (JD 49)
for the W.D. Macdonald Prize, a prize awarded
to the graduating senior with the highest cumu-
lative law grades each year


pation of alumni now numbering more than 17,000
- to support law students, faculty, programs and
services. He is seen often at council meetings and law
school functions with daughter Hope, 8, who plans to
attend UF Law in 14 years.
"I don't think John (his 5-year-old son) has come
to a meeting with me yet, but he's getting to the point
where he is old enough to start coming with me to
help his daddy," Klingensmith said.
The council, along with the Law Center
Association Board of Trustees, act as the primary
support and advisory boards for the law school,
assisting with raising private funds to cover
expenses not met through state support, tuition or
endowment income.
In other council news, new members joining this
September were Brent Rainey (JD 04), with West,
Green & Associates in Orlando; Dayle M. Van Hoose
(JD 05), an associate with Bush Ross in Tampa; and
Carter Andersen (JD 98), a shareholder with Bush
Ross in Tampa, who joined the council's executive
committee.
Gary Printy (JD 82) was elected the council's sec-
retary and Rahul Patel (JD 97) assumes the president-
elect position. Tim Cerio (JD 95) will serve in the
immediate past president capacity.


* $100,000 bequest from Gene Moore III (JD 53) to
establish the Leo Wotitzky Dean's Discretionary
Fund in memory of a favorite classmate from
1953
* $185,000 from Levin College of Law
Professor Michael
Allan Wolf, the
Richard E. Nelson
Chair in Local
Government Law,
and Betty Wolf
for an endow-
ment to establish
the "Wolf Family
Lecture on the
American Law
of Real Property"


Good News from
Washington

For just a short time,
charitably-minded UF
Law alumni 70 1/2 years
of age and older can take
advantage of a new law
that will allow them to
make donations from
their IRAs while excluding
the amount from their
gross income.
"The Pension
Protection Act of 2006
is a wonderful opportuni-
ty for alumni who meet
the requirements and
who want to support
the law school," said
Kelley Frohlich, senior
director of Development.
"However, the window
of opportunity to use
this creative tool is only
available until the end
of 2007."
Gifts cannot exceed
$100,000 per taxpayer
per year, and gifts of
$100,000 may qualify for
Florida's matching gift
program. For specific
information, contact
Frohlich at (352) 273-0640
or frohlich@law.ufl.edu.


WINTER 2007















New Members
Appointed to Trustees

The Law Center
Association Board of
Trustees has several new
members who will provide
guidance and fundraising
support for the college.
They are:
* Jacqueline Allee Smith
(JD 78), former dean of
St. Thomas University
College of Law,
Coconut Grove
* Cesar Alvarez (JD 72),
Greenberg Traurig, Miami
* Mark Avera (JD 89),
Avera 8 Avera,
Gainesville
* Barry R. Davidson (JD
67), Hunton 8 Williams,
Miami
* John A. DeVault III
(JD 67), Bedell, Dittmar,
DeVault, Pillans & Coxe,
Jacksonville
* Elizabeth Hernandez
(JD 83), city attorney,
City of Coral Gables,
Coral Gables
* Judge Elizabeth A.
Jenkins (JD 76), federal
magistrate, Tampa
* Ernest Sellers (JD 62),
Sellers, Prevatt 8
Robertson, Live Oak
* Mark Somerstein (JD 82),
Ruden, McCloskey, Smith
et al., Fort Lauderdale
* Marjorie Bekaert Thomas
(JD 76), president,
Ivanhoe Broadcast News,
Orlando
* George A. Vaka (JD 83),
Vaka, Larson, & Johnson,
Tampa
* Peter W. Zinober (JD 69),
Zinober & McCrea, Tampa


Students Can Now Interview Via Teleconferencing Equipment


Interviewing potential new hires has gotten a lot easier for employers with travel conflicts, thanks to a gift from two UF
alumni. Andy (JD 74) and Lin (MS 85) Fawbush provided a new teleconferencing system, giving students greater access
to firms not able to come to campus for On-Campus Interviews. "This is going to dramatically improve our students'
ability to interview with firms anywhere in the country," said Assistant Dean for Career Services Linda Calvert Hanson.


Have Fun in the Gator Nation

ccessing the Gator Nation just got a whole lot -- ;- -
easier. UF alumni, students, and friends now .--
can upload their own photos and personal video NATION
such as personal "Go Gator" commercials -
related to their experiences at UF via
GoGatorNation.com, a new website that highlights UFWi Bi
interesting facts about the university and alumni in
an entertaining format.
"GoGatorNation.com is designed to be a social
network and to work in conjunction with the activi-
ties of the UF Alumni Association," said Joe Hice, BY um MoWuGMvMEo.
associate vice president of marketing and public
relations.
Visitors also can watch some of the Gator
Nation TV commercials, listen to new radio spots, nu*m" nlV
and chat with alumni and friends through a
message board.


UF LAW
















Devoted Gator Heads Up Alumni Affairs 1 i


K elley Frohlich is well-known to many law
alumni because she has served in various
levels in the law school's Office of Development
and Alumni Affairs for the past six years. What
many may not know, however, is that she follows
Gator sports with an intensity that rivals some of
the college's most ardent fans.
"I grew up in Ocala going to UF events my
entire life, earned my undergrad degree here, and
began my UF career at the University Athletic
Association," she said. "I was always a huge Gator
fan, but that first job here gave me the opportuni-
ty to learn about the development arm of the
university, and of all the academic units, there is
no place I would rather be than the law school."
Frohlich plans to bring that same Gator spirit
to her new role as senior director of development
and alumni affairs, where she will head a staff of
three professionals and three support staff. Donald
Hale, the previous senior director, left to direct
The Florida Bar Foundation.
"I hope to surpass the college's campaign goal
and build the endowment to benefit future genera-
tions of Gator lawyers," said Frohlich.
Frohlich understands the momentum of the law
school's success and reputation.
"The value of a UF law degree is directly
proportional to the continuing success and nation-
al reputation of the college. Private dollars are
becoming more important to us every day," she
said. "We are the flagship law school in the state
of Florida, but without the support of our alumni


n a .l


and friends, we would be just one among many
state law schools."
To contact Frohlich, call (352) 273-0640 or
e-mail Frohlich@law.ufl.edu.


Departed Friend's Memory Is Inspiring Gifts


D an Galfond (JD 01) made many friends before
his death at age 30 from leukemia, and they say
it would please him to know they are still coming
together a year after his
passing. Thus far, an
unusually large number
of alumni, friends, and
colleagues have stepped
forward to honor
Galfond's memory in the
form of an endowed
scholarship that will be
used for future students.
"Dan had a passion
for life that knew no
bounds. His enthusiasm
in all of his endeavors,
Galfond


both personal and professional, was unparalleled,
and those of us fortunate enough to know Dan
will forever be touched by him," said Russell Koonin
(JD 00).
Galfond, who also earned a bachelors degree in
building construction at UF, practiced in the area of
construction law at Siegfried, Rivera, Lerher,
DeLetora 8 Sobel in Miami.
"The response to our fundraising efforts was
astounding, but not surprising, given that Dan touched
the lives of so many people," said Lara Osofsky Leader
(01), who led the effort. "Dan was a loyal Gator, and
thanks to the generosity of the alumni, his friends,
family and colleagues, Dan's name and memory will
live on at the University of Florida forever."
For more information, contact Andrea Shirey
at (352) 273-0640.


UF Law CLE Course
Available Online

The Levin College of Law
now offers a self-study CLE
course online, and others will
be available soon. Much of
the program proceeds direct-
ly benefit the Levin College
of Law.
The initial offering is a five-
credit "Financial Calculations
for Lawyers" course for those
who want to communicate
more effectively with expert
witnesses, judges, juries and
clients. The $165 course
discusses the legal system's
use of financial terminology,
provides a basic explanation
on how to use a typical
hand-held financial calculator,
and includes a downloadable
JavaScript financial
calculator
that
solves
most of

prob-
lems

lawyers.
The course is
taught by UF Law
Professor Steven
W illis.
Courses offered in
the coming weeks include
"How To Create a Public
Charity," which will cover
charitable solicitations, pri-
vate foundations, lobbying
and other subjects. An
income tax module also
has been designed both
as a review for alumni and
tax students. It covers the
fundamentals of U.S. tax law
cases, code sections, rulings
and more.
To learn more about the
courses and program, which
is funded through a grant
from UF's Department of
Continuing Education, go
to www.ufcle.com.


WINTER 2007











FACULTY OPINION



Reflections on Prejudice and


Animus under Equal Protection


U s a law that is judicially acknowl-
edged to be motivated by preju-
dice or animus toward a particular
group per se unconstitutional
under equal protection? Given
our society's commitment to
equality, one would think the answer is clearly "yes."
Those who are under this impression will be
surprised to learn that the Supreme Court not only
has not articulated a per se rule, but it has explicitly
articulated a rule that makes it possible for a law to
be ill-motivated and still be constitutional.
The confusion seems to come from a case involv-
ing hippies. In U.S. Dept. of Agric. v. Moreno, the
Court held unconstitutional a provision of the federal
food stamp program that limited assistance to "relat-
ed" persons living in the household. One purpose of
the limitation was "to prevent so called [sic] 'hippies'
and 'hippie communes' from participating in the pro-
gram. Although not a Fourteenth Amendment case
because it involved the federal government, the Court
has applied identical equal protection requirements
through the Fifth Amendment. The Court held that:
"[I]f the constitutional conception of 'equal
protection of the laws' means .i. II;i ,. it must at the
very least mean that a bare desire to harm a political-
ly unpopular group cannot constitute a legitimate
governmental interest."
Moreno reminds us that "a desire to harm" is an
unconstitutional motive, buttressing the impression that
it triggers a per se rule. But the word "bare" is far more
important than it might seem, as the Court's subsequent
language makes clear, citing to the Moreno lower court:
"As a result, '(a) purpose to discriminate against
hippies cannot, in and of itself and without reference
to (some independent) considerations in the public
interest, justify the [law]."'
The Court acknowledged the ill-motive behind the
law and simultaneously undermined the significance of
its acknowledgment by invalidating the law for lack of
a legitimate state interest. It is understandable that some
people might have the wrong impression about whether
an ill-motivated law is per se unconstitutional.
Subsequent and radically different cases rely on
Moreno, compounding the confusion. For example, in
the famous Clebume case, the Court cited Moreno and
struck down the city's denial of a special use permit for


a home for people with "mental retardation" because
no rational reason supported the requirement. The
Court concluded, "[t]he short of it is that requiring the
permit in this case appears to us to rest on an irrational
prejudice against the mentally retarded." This is differ-
ent from saying the law lacks a legitimate state interest.
It is a judicial acknowledgment that the requirement
was ill-motivated. Still, most of the Court's opinion is
devoted to analyzing the legitimacy of the state's
asserted interests in requiring the permit.
Consider Romer v. Evans, in which the Court
struck down Amendment 2 to Colorado's constitu-
tion, which prohibited "protected status based on
homosexual, lesbian or bisexual orientation." The
Court interpreted this to mean that gays and only
gays were prohibited from seeking legislative,
judicial or executive protection from discrimina-
tion based on their status. The Court held
that Amendment 2 was "born of animosity."
"Animosity" is a harsh word and one not used
lightly, particularly by the Court. According to my
research, Romer is the only case in which the Court
used that word to strike down a law under equal
protection. It is strong evidence of the Court's con-
demnation of Amendment 2. It is no wonder that
Romer bolsters the impression that an ill-motivated
law is per se unconstitutional.
As much as the Romer Court makes clear that
animosity is an anathema to principles of equality,
however, it did not articulate a per se rule. Much of
the opinion is devoted to establishing the lack of a
legitimate state interest for Amendment 2, which
ultimately exposed the animus behind it. Thus, con-
sistent with Moreno and Cleburne, it was not the
presence of animus that invalidated Amendment 2;
it was the absence of a legitimate state interest that
did. The difference is important to highlight. It chal-
lenges the impression some people have about equal
protection methodology. More importantly, it is
inconsistent with equality principles and the spirit of
the Constitution, particularly the 14th Amendment,
to allow a legitimate (whether it be rational,
important or compelling) state interest to validate a
law that is born of animosity.
One might think that would never happen. It used
to happen. Korematsu and Plessy come to mind, but
surely it would not happen now, some might think.


UF LAW


Sharon Rush
Professor














After all, the laws in Moreno, Cleburne, and Romer
were invalidated. Three concerns advise against com-
placency. First, society has made progress toward
achieving racial equality. We understand that racial
hostility was at the center of Korematsu, and Plessy
has been superseded by Brown. This progress proba-
bly adds to the impression that racial hostility is per
se intolerable under equal protection. Surprisingly, to
the best of my knowledge, there is no per se rule in
the area of race discrimination either. Think of the
disparate impact cases where the finding of racial
hostility merely triggers strict scrutiny.
Second, Moreno and Cleburne have current
implications. They have influenced decisions under
Section Five of the 14th Amendment. For example,
the Alabama v. Garrett Court relied on Cleburne to
hold that Congress lacks the power to abrogate states'
sovereign immunity under Title I of the Americans
with Disabilities Act (ADA), which prohibits dis-
crimination against persons with disabilities in
employment. Patricia Garrett was effectively demot-
ed from the position of director of nursing at the
University of Alabama upon her return to work
following cancer treatment. Realize that good inten-
tions motivated enactment of the ADA; Congress
thought it was necessary to enforce equality principles.
Again, the Court acknowledged the widespread
prejudice against persons with disabilities but said,
"Although such biases may often accompany irrational
(and therefore unconstitutional) discrimination,
their presence alone does not a constitutional
violation make." Moreover, sometimes it is
rational to discriminate against persons with
disabilities. Because the congressional record
failed to substantiate widespread discrimination
in employment by states against persons with
disabilities, Title I exceeded Congress' power.
Obviously, abrogation raises many complex issues
that exceed the scope of this essay. Nevertheless,
Garrett illustrates that the implications of Moreno
can be quite broad. Certainly, it is disquieting to
realize that ill motives of government officials can
be judicially acknowledged and potentially make
no difference in the outcome of a particular case.
Third, it is naive, perhaps even disingenu-
ous, to suggest that discrimination against
different politically unpopular groups is qual-
itatively the same. Prejudice against hippies,
as irrational as it is, is not the same as hatred
toward gays, as irrational as that is. The point
is not to compare how long and hard each
group's journey is toward equality. The point
is that to apply the Moreno rule to all
politically unpopular groups dilutes the


significance of the qualitative differences among
them and their struggles to gain equal citizenship
status with politically popular groups. To give
lawmakers a chance to justify their ill-motives
leaves groups that are especially unpopular at
greater risk of being denied equal protection. A per
se rule obviates this problem.
Our history of race discrimination teaches us that
a group's struggle to achieve equality is an enduring
one because prejudices and hostilities are often
masked. They are deeply ingrained in the social struc-
ture and in many individuals' minds, albeit at a
subconscious level for many people. Critical to any
group's success is its ability to expose prejudice and
animosity because they often are the crux of the
problem. It takes time and effort to overcome years
of discrimination that is born of animosity. A per se
rule sends a resounding message that ill-motivated
laws are more than a theoretical anathema to equal
protection. A per se rule
evidences society's com-
mitment to equality
for everyone. This
might be why some
people think it
already exists.


Our history

of race

discrimina-

tion teaches

us that a

group's

struggle to

achieve

equality is

an enduring

one because



and

hostilities

are often

masked.


WINTER 2007












FACULTY NEWS


Wright Heads Faculty
Senate for University

Professor Danaya C. Wright
is seeing the university from a
different altitude: from the
President's Suite in Ben Hill
Griffin Stadium and in the com-
pany of the Board of Governors
for the State University System,
all in her role as chair of the UF
Faculty Senate.
As chair for one year, Wright
presides at senate meetings,
serves as a member of the
University Board of Trustees
and the Advisory Council of
Faculty Senates (a council made
up of all 11 Florida university
senate chairs), chairs the Senate
Steering Committee and meets
weekly with President Bernie
Machen and Provost Jamie
Fouke.
This past summer and fall
she is meeting with dozens of
people across campus to facili-
tate dialogue between faculty,
students and administration in
the restructuring of governance
mechanisms within their
respective units.
She wants every college,
department, center, and academ-
ic unit to put in place procedures
to ensure appropriate voices are
all heard when important deci-
sions are being made.
Shared governance doesn't
mean faculty get to dictate what
will happen. Rather, it recognizes
that faculty should have the key
voice in developing policies
around the academic mission of
the university. "It's my job as fac-
ulty representative to remind the
Board of Trustees that we should
have a say in the long-range plan
for this university."
When she's not busy telling
the president how to run the
university, she is teaching, writ-
ing, serving on student commit-
tees, and fulfilling the rest of her
law school duties. "The work-
load is phenomenal," she said.
"Fortunately, Dean Jerry was
the chair of his Faculty Senate at
the University of Kansas, so he
understands and has given me a
lighter teaching load this year."
Specializing in property law,
Wright teaches classes in
Property, Estates and Trusts,
History of Women and the Law,
and English Legal History.


Professor Calfee Earns
Top Taiwan Award

Levin College of Law Professor Dennis A.
Calfee (LLMT 75) recently was awarded one
of Taiwan's most prestigious honors, the Public
Finance Specialty Medal, for helping over the past
20 years to develop public finance in the Republic
of China and train local tax officers to deal with
international tax.
More than 650 of the country's local
and foreign finance officials have attended
Calfee's classes in the International Training
Program of the Ministry of Finance, and many
of his former students have been promoted
to key positions. The ceremony in Taiwan
was attended by numerous national tax agency
heads and tax officers who have benefited from
his lectures.
"We are truly blessed for his willingness and
enthusiasm to come to Taipei almost every year
since 1986 to provide lectures and seminars on
important and timely tax law and tax policy issues
to members of this big family, Ministry of Finance,
Republic of China," said Taiwan Minister of


Finance Dr. Ho Chih-chin. "I am also very grateful
that Professor Calfee has provided substantial
assistance in the design and improvement of the
program of the International Taxation Academy
and made great efforts in bringing many leading
tax experts around the world to participate in vari-
ous lectures at the academy."
Calfee has been teaching at the University of
Florida since 1975 in the Levin College of
Law's Graduate Tax Program, which consistently
ranks in the nation's top two in U.S. News & World
Report's annual ranking of tax specialty programs.
He has also taught as a visiting professor at Leiden
University, the Netherlands; Peking University,
Beijing, China; Academy of International Tax,
Taipei, Taiwan; and University of Montpellier,
Montpellier, France.
He has published extensively on taxation in tax
law journals, particularly on the subject of estate
and gift tax, and is a principal author of the book
Federal Estate and Gift Taxation, now in its eighth
edition, and its supplemental study problem manu-
al. He holds memberships in both the American
Bar Association and the American Institute of
Certified Public Accountants.


UF LAW


















Tritt Brings Practical Experience to
Estate and Elder Law Planning
T he new director of the Center for Estate and Elder
Law Planning has his sights set on a national rep-
utation for the program he is taking on. After spending
eight years in top-tier New York City practices,
Professor Lee-ford Tritt (J.D., LL.M., New York
University) brings a very practical perspective to
the center.
"When the director positions were offered to me,
I didn't think twice about accepting," said Tritt, who
also will direct the Estates and Trusts Practice
Certificate Program. Because of Florida's large popula-


Writing Adviser Gertrude Block
Influences Lawyers Nationally

Retired lecturer-emeritus Gertrude Block was
recently pictured on the cover of the September
issue of the New York State Bar Journal, which called
her "one of the nation's leading writing advisers."
The article, "Writers' Block," dealt with her
tenure at the University of Florida and her columns
on language that appear every month in The New
York State Bar Journal, The Pennsylvania Lawyer,
The Illinois State Bar News, and the national jour-
nal, The Federal Lawyer.
Block has written hundreds of articles on legal
and lay language, as well as several books. Her 1980
Ell, in,,. Legal Writing (Foundation Press) was
revised and published in five editions, the latest in
2000. Her Legal Writing Advice: Questions and
Answers was published in 2004 (W.S. Hein &
Company). She is a co-author of the Judicial
Opinion Writing Manual (ABA), and she is
currently writing a book she tentatively calls
Language for Fun.
Some attorneys consider Block's columns required
reading. "I read it every month .... It's interesting and


tion of retirees, UF's status as the state's flagship uni-
versity, the large group of alumni who practice in the
field and the caliber of the college's tax program, Tritt
believes the center has a great potential to become the
premiere academic research and resource institute on
estate planning issues.
"The college has a unique opportunity to create a
meaningful academic center that will enhance our col-
lege's national reputation, help prepare our students to
meet the challenges of an estates and trusts practice,
and provide community services for the area's elderly
and poor," Tritt said.
Tritt has five main goals. First, he will begin to
establish ties with alumni who practice in the field in
order to get valuable input concerning the develop-
ment of the center as well to provide learning and
networking opportunities for students. Next, Tritt
would like to establish speaking series and confer-
ences that will bring together scholars and practition-
ers to focus attention on prominent issues that affect
our daily lives.
Tritt also would like to update the certificate pro-
gram to reflect the evolving nature of an estates and
trusts practice, the American family dynamic and the
laws that govern family structures. He hopes interest-
ed students will provide community services such as
clinics for the elderly. Finally, Tritt wants the center to
play a part in shaping Florida's estates and trusts pub-
lic policy and statutes. Once these goals are achieved,
he foresees a national reputation that will reflect well
upon the entire college and university.



it's witty," Edmund
Rosenkrantz, a partner in a
New York City law firm,
told the Journal.
Block's undergradu-
ate degree was in eco-
nomics. Years later, after
her children were in high
school, she entered the
graduate English program
at the University of Block
Florida. "I no longer 'spoke' economics, but I still
spoke English," she said.
While preparing to write her dissertation in linguis-
tics, she taught at UE But when Dean Richard Julin
asked her to take a temporary position at
the law college, he added, "We'll try it out for a semes-
ter, and if we're both pleased, you may want to stay on. "
To prepare for her role, Block attended all the
basic law courses and created "The Writing Clinic"
to help "writing-challenged" law students succeed in
law courses. The course was successful and popular.
Although Block retired from the law school in
1990, she still conducts CLE seminars, and acts as a
language consultant and an expert witness.


International Tax Law
Welcomes New Faculty
Member


irauner


Yariv Brauner has joined
UF's Graduate Tax Program as
an associate professor of law.
He will teach primarily in the
International Tax Law area
with Professors Lawrence
Lokken and Paul McDaniel.
Brauner comes to UF from
Arizona State University
College of Law, where he
has taught since 2004. Prior
to that, he taught in the
Graduate Tax Program at
Northwestern, as well as
New York University, where
he spent three years teaching
a variety of courses in the
international tax program.
Originally from Israel,
Brauner went to law school
at the Hebrew University in
Jerusalem, where he earned
an LL.B. degree. After
receiving his LL.M. from
NYU, Brauner joined Ernst
r Young's international law
practice in New York. He also
holds a J.S.D. degree from
NYU School of Law. Brauner
is the author of several tax
articles and focuses his
scholarship on the merits of
international coordination of
tax policies.


WINTER 2007












FACULTY SCHOLARSHIP

Since March, 2006


Mary Jane Angelo
Assistant Professor
* Published "Embracing Uncertainty, Complexity,
and Change: An Eco-pragmatic Reinvention of a
First-Generation Environmental Law," in
33 Ecology Law Quarterly 105 (2006).
Thomas T Ankersen
Director, Conservation Clinic and Costa Rica Law
Program; Legal Skills Professor
* Published "Defending the Polygon: The
Emerging Human Right to Communal Property,"
in Oklahoma Law Review (Vol. 59:3) (Fall 2006)
(with Thomas Ruppert).

Fletcher N. Baldwin, Jr.
Chesterfield Smith Professor; Director of UF Center
for International Financial Crimes Studies
* Published "Current Developments in Monetary
and Financial Law," Ch. 18, in Money Laundering
Countermeasures with Primary Focus on Terrorism
and the USA Patriot Act of 2001, Vol. 3 (IMF
2005-06).
* Published Assessing the Constitutionality of the
National Security Agency's Warrantless
Wiretapping Program, 17 U. Fla. J. L. t Pub. Pol'y
(Fall 2006) (with R. Shaw).
* Published "Exposure of Financial Institutions to
Criminal Liability" in Journal of Financial Crime
(Vol. 13:4) (Emerald Pub'l, London 2006).
* Presented arguments and papers supporting
governmental seizure of all assets from known
terrorists, and freezing all assets of suspected ter-
rorists for ROLE [Rule of Law Enterprise] and the
Chairman of the Philippine Money Laundering
Council to return to the Philippines 2006. Prepared
Model In rm forfeiture Legislation for the Philippines
and Indonesia.
* Delivered paper, "Exposure of Financial
Intermediaries" at the 24th International
Symposium on Organized Crime and Terrorism,
Jesus College, University of Cambridge, UK,
September 2006.
* Conducted workshop, "Human Rights and the
Financial 'War' on Terrorism." Keynote address
published in London.
* Presented lecture, "Criminal Substantive and
Procedure Federal Constitutional Criminal Law
Florida Bar Certification Review," for The Florida Bar
and the Florida Association of Criminal Defense
Lawyers in Tampa, April 2006.
* Presented lecture, "Johns Committee and
McCarthyism," in Winter Park, for The Marjorie
Kinnan Rawlings Society, April 2006.
* Visiting Professor au Centre du Droit de
I'Entreprise, Montpellier University I, Montpellier,
France. Presented seminar, "Money Laundering,
Asset Forfeiture and International Financial Crimes:
United States and European Union Response to
Terrorists and Their Money Trail," May 2006.
* Awarded by French du Consulat de Septimanie,
the title of Grand Maistre Du Consulat De
Septimanie Ceremony in Narbonne, France.
* Presented a paper, "Financing of Terrorism in the
Americas," as a delegate to the Seventh Annual
Inter-American Conference: Legal & Policy Issues in
the Americas, Lima, Peru.
Dennis A. Calfee
Professor; Alumni Research Scholar
* Published Federal Estate and Gift Taxation and
accompanying instructor's manual and study prob-
lems (Warren, Gorham and Lamont, 8th Ed., 2006)


(with Richard B. Stephens, Guy B. Maxfield,
Stephen A. Lind and Robert B. Smith).
* Honored with Taiwan's Third Level Public
Finance Specialty Medal for service with the
International Training Program under the Ministry
of Finance (MOF) by Minster of Finance Ho Chih-
chin, July 2006. He is credited with helping develop
Taiwan's public finance system and training local
tax officers to deal with international tax affairs.

Jonathan R. Cohen
Professor; Associate Director, Institute for Dispute
Resolution
* Published "In God's Garden: Creation and
Cloning in Jewish Thought," in The Human
Cloning Debate (Berkeley Hills Books, 4th Ed.,
2004) (Glenn McGee and Arthur Caplan, Eds.);
and reprinted in Ethical Issues: Western
Philosophical and Religious Perspectives, 480-486
(Thomson Wadsworth, 2006).

Stuart R. Cohn
Associate Dean for International Studies; Professor;
Gerald A. Sohn Scholar; Director of International
and Comparative Law Certificate Program
* Published "Good Corporate Governance in
Developing Nations: Idealism and Realism," Best
Practice Series, United Nations Institute for Training
and Research (2006).
* Published "Potential Liability for MD and A and
8-K Disclosures and Omissions," Annual Institute
on Federal Securities.
* Presented at Baker & McKenzie and White & Case
in Warsaw, Poland, on legal issues and decisions in
the Delaware derivative action regarding compen-
sation payments to departed Michael Ovitz.
* Presented to the Montpellier, France, Legal
Society on federal-state tension resulting from
the constitutional authority to states to determine
corporate law.
* Presented sessions in June to the International
Business Law Section of the Master Professionnel
Driot du Commerce International Program at
Montpellier University.
* Directed a five-day workshop in July in
Swaziland on Pension Reform and Capital Market
Development sponsored by the U.N. Institute for
Training and Research, which was attended by
central bank and government representatives
from 10-12 African countries.
Charles W. Collier
Professor; Affiliate Professor of Philosophy
* Published "Speech and Communication in Law
and Philosophy," 12 Legal Theory 1 (2006).

Jeffrey Davis
Gerald A. Sohn Scholar, Professor
* Presented to the Jacksonville Bankruptcy Bar
Association, Orlando Bankruptcy Bar Association,
and Southern District of Florida Bankruptcy Bar
Association on "Developments in Business and
Individual Bankruptcy Law Since Enactment of the
2005 Amendments to the Bankruptcy Code."

Nancy E. Dowd
Chesterfield Smith Professor; Co-Director,
Center on Children and Families
* Published Handbook of Children, Culture and
Violence (Ed., with Dorothy Singer and Robin
Fretwell Wilson, Sage Publications, 2006) (with
chapters by Dowd and Barbara Bennett
Woodhouse).


* Published "Parentage at Birth: Birthfathers and
Social Fatherhood," William t Mary Bill of Rights
Journal, 2006.

Meredith Fensom
Director, Law t Policy in the Americas Program
* Published 2006 Latin American Business
Environment Report (with Terry McCoy).
* Awarded a $3,000 "Internationalizing the
Curriculum Grant" with Jon Mills for the Law Policy
in the Americas seminar, which will take place in
spring 2007.

Mark A. Fenster
Associate Professor
* Presented "Regulating Land Use in a
Constitutional Shadow: The Institutional Contexts of
Exactions" at the Law & Society Association Annual
Meeting in Baltimore in July.
* Presented "The 'Naked' Brand: Transparency
and the Branded IPO" at the Harvard Negotiation
Law Review Symposium: The MasterCard IPO:
Protecting the Priceless Brand, in Cambridge,
Mass., in April.
* Presented "Takings, Version 2005: The Legal
Process of Constitutional Property Rights" at Florida
State University Law School.

Alyson Craig Flournoy
Director, Environmental and Land Use Law
Program; Professor
* Received a Seed-Funding Grant from UF's
School of Natural Resources and the Environment
for proposal, "Next Generation Environmental Law:
Incorporating Experience, Science, and Technology
to Develop Sustainable Environmental Laws."

Michael W. Gordon
John H. and Mary Lou Dasburg Professor in
Corporate Law
* Published Florida Corporations Manual (Five
volumes, LexisNexis 1974, revised 2006).
* Published book review on Mexican Law by
Zamora, et al 37 Inter-American L. Rev. 611 (2006).
* Created and moderated panels on Fundamentals
of International Business for the Bankruptcy ABA
Section of International Law Spring Meeting in New
York City.
* Presented at the Joint International Conference
of the Defense Research Institute, International
Association of Defense Counsel, Association of
Defense Trial Attorneys, and Federation of Defense
and Corporate Counsel in Miami on "Civil Litigation
with Civil Law Nations Pitfalls with Jurisdiction,
Service of Process, Discovery, Forum Non
Conveniens, Proof of Foreign Law, and Enforcement
of Judgments."
* Participated in panel discussion of the NAFTA
Side Agreement on Environmental Law and
lectured on international civil litigation at the
Francisco Marroquin Law Faculty in Guatemala.
* Appointed by the Office of the United States
Trade Representative to a three-year term on the
NAFTA Chapter 20 dispute panel roster.
* Organized two, two-hour panels on International
Business Transactions and International Foreign
Investment for the ABA Section on International
Law's fall meeting in Miami. These two panels
include Professors George Dawson and Stephen
Powell. Spoke on a third panel on the use of civil
law in litigation in U.S. courts.
* Reappointed as the ABA Section on International
Law Liaison to the American Law Institute.


UF LAW












* Organized a panel, "Parlatino to Owusu:
Challenges to Forum Non Conveniens," for the
International Law Weekend annual program in
New York City in October, sponsored by the
International Law Association.

Richard H. Hiers
Affiliate Professor Emeritus, Professor of Religion
* Presented "First Amendment Academic
Freedom Rights of Universities: Judicial
Fabrication of New Clothes for the Emperor,"
as a contribution to a symposium focused on
"Individual vs. Institutional Academic Freedom"
at the annual meeting of the American Education
Research Association.

Thomas R. Hurst
Professor; Samuel T Dell Research Scholar
* Published "A Post-Enron Examination of
Corporate Governance Problems in the Investment
Company Industry" in 27 Co. Law. 41 (2006).
* Presented paper, "Hedge Funds and Money
Laundering," at The Cambridge Symposium on
Economic Crime at Cambridge University, U.K.,
in September 2006.
* Published Unincorporated Business
Associations, Cases and Materials (coauthor,
3rd. Ed., West, 2006).
Jerold H. Israel
Ed Rood Eminent Scholar in Trial Advocacy and
Procedure; Professor
* Published Criminal Procedure Constitutional
Limitations in a Nutshell (Thomson/West, 7th
edition, 2006) (with Wayne Lafave).
* Published Modern Criminal Procedure (West
Group, 11th Ed., 2006 supplement) (with Yale
Kamisar, Wayne LaFave and Nancy King).
* Published Criminal Procedure and the
Constitution (Thomson/West, 2006 Ed.) (with
Kamisar, LaFave and King).
Michelle S. Jacobs
Professor
* Published "Loyalty's Reward A Felony
Conviction: Recent Prosecutions of High-Status
Female Offenders," 33 Fordham Urban L. J. 843
(March 2006).


Robert H. Jerry
Dean; Levin Mabie and Levin Professor
* Published "Regulating the Business of Insurance:
Federalism in an Age of Difficult Risk," 41 Wake
Forest L. Rev 835 (2006) (with UF Law 06 graduate
and George Washington Law School adjunct pro-
fessor Steven Roberts).

Clifford A. Jones
Associate in Law Research/Lecturer,
Center for Governmental Responsibility
* Presented paper, "Patent Power and Market
Power: Rethinking the Relationship Between
Intellectual Property Rights and Market Power in
Antitrust Analysis," in Munich, Germany, to the
Conference on Intellectual Property and Competition
Law, sponsored by Max Planck Institute for
Intellectual Property, Competition, and Tax Law.

Elizabeth T. Lear
Professor
* Published "Congress, the Federal Courts, and
Forum Non Conveniens: Friction on the Frontier
of the Inherent Power," 91 Iowa Law Review 1147
(May 2006).

Lyrissa Barnett Lidsky
UF Research Foundation Professor, Professor
* Presented at Florida Bar Annual First
Amendment Panel Discussion, June 2006.
* Presented, "First Amendment Decisions of the
2005-2006 Supreme Court Term," Southeastern
Association of Law Schools Conference, July 2006.
* Published "Are Bloggers the New Lonely
Pamphleteers?" UF LAW magazine, 2006.
* Published 2006 Supplement to Franklin, Anderson
& Lidsky's Mass Media Law (7th ed. 2005).
Lawrence Lokken
Hugh F Culverhouse Eminent Scholar in Taxation;
Professor
* Published "Territorial Taxation: Why Some U.S.
Multinationals May Be Less Than Enthusiastic About
the Idea (and Some Ideas They Really Dislike)," in 59
SMU Law. Rev 751 (2006).
* Published Federal Taxation of Employee
Compensation (Warren Gorham and Lamont, 2006)
(with Boris I. Bittker).
* Published Fundamentals of International
Taxation (Warren Gorham and Lamont, 2006/2007
Ed.) (with Boris I. Bittker).


Paul J. Magnarella
Affiliate Professor; Professor of Criminology
and Law; Affiliate Professor of Anthropology,
African Studies, and European Studies
* Published "Turkish-American Intellectual
Exchange and Community Research in Turkey
(1930-1980)" in 27 The Turkish Studies Association
Journal 69-89 (2006).

Andrea Matwyshyn
Assistant Professor; Executive Director of Center
for Information Research (CIR)
* Published "Material Vulnerabilities: Data Privacy,
Corporate Information Security, and Securities
Regulation" in 3 Berkeley Bus. L.J. 129 (2005)
(Chapter 10 appears in West's most recent update
to their treatise on data security law, Data Security
and Privacy Law: Combating Cyberthreats).
* Published the forward for the Journal of
Technology Law t Policy (Volume 11:1).

Diane H. Mazur
Professor
* Presented "The Judge Advocate General Corps
Under 'Don't Ask, Don't Tell': Should Gays Be
Allowed to Serve in the Military, and If Not, Should
You Serve?" at the Yale Law School on Oct. 6 at a
forum. Her remarks were based on her recent article
in the Journal of National Security Law t Policy
titled "A Blueprint for Law School Engagement with
the Military."
* Spoke at the annual Lavender Law Conference's
plenary session on military recruiting at law schools
after the U.S. Supreme Court's decision in Rumsfeld
v FAIR.

Paul R. McDaniel
James J. Freeland Eminent Scholar in Taxation;
Professor
* Published Federallncome Taxation of
Partnerships and S Corporations, Fourth Ed.
(Foundation Press, 2006) (with Martin McMahon, Jr.
and Dan Simmons, UC-Davis).
* Published "The Charitable Contributions
Deduction (Revisited)," in 59 SMUL. Rev 773
(2006).
* Published Federallncome Taxation of
Corporations, Third Ed. (Foundation Press, 2006)
(with Martin McMahon and Dan Simmons,
UC-Davis).


Faculty Profile: Jeff Davis


a lawyer; he just wanted to experience a
different career first. After receiving his
bachelor's degree in physics, Davis
worked as an engineer in the defense industry for
four years in the 1960s.
While he enjoyed being an engineer, the '60s
were a turbulent time for the defense industry,
and he felt his livelihood was being defined by
the national political will.
Davis began attending law school at Loyola
University's School of Law in Los Angeles, and
by the time he graduated he knew he wanted to
teach law, not practice it.
"As a first-year law student, I thought my
Contracts professor was a wonderful teacher and
I was fascinated," Davis said. "I felt it was the
most exciting educational experience I'd ever
had. Then as a third-year law student I taught
Legal Writing and Research and Appellate
Advocacy. Although I always assumed I would


practice law, I found teaching really exciting
and I had enormous energy for it."
Since coming to UF Law in 1981, Davis has
written numerous articles for various law jour-
nals and received several noteworthy awards,
such as the Editor's Prize from the National
Conference of Bankruptcy Judges and a
Lifetime Achievement Award from the Business
Section of the Florida Bar Association.
However, despite his accomplishments,
Davis feels his greatest accomplishment is
getting law students excited about the cours-
es he teaches, which are primarily Contracts
and Bankruptcy Law.
"Most students expect Contracts to be full of
tedious detail, but it's really about people trying
to take advantage of one another which, to
their amazement, is pretty interesting. In bank-
ruptcy, it is always gratifying to see how many
students sign up for and enthusiastically partici-
pate in the Advanced Bankruptcy course."


WINTER 2007












Faculty Profile: Jim Nicholas


f you've ever had to slap down an extra
few hundred dollars to start construction
on a new house or open a business, you
may have Jim Nicholas to thank for that.
If you can hear birds outside your window,
swim at the local beach, and drive to work
without breaking your axle in a pothole, you
may have Jim Nicholas to thank for that, too.
Nicholas, the economist who played a
crucial role in sweeping reforms of Florida's
growth management policies in the 1970s,
retired from the UF law faculty in Spring 2006
after more than two decades as an affiliate
professor of law and associate director of UF's
Environmental and Land Use Law Program.
These days, Nicholas is perhaps best known
to the public as an expert on impact fees those
taxes levied on new homes and businesses to
offset the effects of new construction on traffic,
schools and the environment. From Lakeland to
London, governments around the world seek his



Published Federal Income Taxation of
Business Organizations, Fourth Ed. (Foundation
Press, 2006) (with Martin McMahon and Dan
Simmons, UC-Davis).

Martin J. McMahon, Jr.
Clarence J. Teselle Professor
Published "Cumulative Supplement" to
Federal Income Taxation of Individuals, Third
Edition (Warren, Gorham & Lamont, 2002) (July
2006) (with Boris I. Bittker & Lawrence A.
Zelenak).
Published Supplement to Federallncome
Taxation, Cases and Materials, Fifth Edition
(Foundation Press, 2006) (with Paul McDaniel,
Daniel Simmons & Alice Abreu).
Published Federal Income Taxation of
Partnerships and S Corporations, Fourth Ed.
(Foundation Press, 2006) (with Paul McDaniel
and Dan Simmons, UC-Davis).
Published Federal Income Taxation of
Corporations, Third Ed. (Foundation Press, 2006)
(with Paul McDaniel and Dan Simmons,
UC-Davis).
Published Federal Income Taxation of
Business Organizations, Fourth Ed. (Foundation
Press, 2006) (with Paul McDaniel and Dan
Simmons, UC-Davis).
Visiting lecturer at the University of Leiden
International Tax Center LL.M. Program in
International Taxation in May teaching a course
in United States Corporate Taxation.
Delivered CLE presentation, "Recent
Developments in Federal Income Taxation," at
the 41st Annual Southern Federal Tax Institute in
Atlanta, Ga. (jointly with Prof. Ira Shepard).
Jon L. Mills
Professor, Director of the Center for
Governmental Responsibility, Dean Emeritus
Presented paper, "Law Schools as Agent of
Change and Justice Reform in the Americas,"
(with Timothy McLendon), UF Levin College of
Law Seventh Annual Conference on Legal &
Policy Issues in the Americas, Lima, Peru,
May 2006.
Participated on the Oxford Round Table this
summer at the University of Oxford. The collo-


advice when considering a new regime of fees.
Still, there's more to Nicholas than just taxes.
He had just completed his Ph.D in economics at
the University of Illinois in 1971, when the state
of Florida, feeling the pressure of a booming
population, began a wide-ranging set of reforms
that affected everything from how we pay taxes
to where we get our water and served as a
model for other states trying to deal with run-
away growth. As staff economist for the Florida
Environmental Land Management Study
Committee, Nicholas played a key role in those
reforms.
These days, Floridians may sometimes
grumble about impact fees and other regulations
that emerged from that era but without
them, Nicholas said, "Florida would be a
complete mess."
"At the beginning of the 1970s, Biscayne
Bay was little more than an open sewer," he
said. "So was Tampa Bay. Eagles were almost



quium enabled governmental and business
leaders to discuss contemporary public policy
issues that affect nations and states worldwide.
Listed in Florida Trend magazine as one of
the best lawyers in Florida (Appellate Practice
section).
Awarded a $3,000 "Internationalizing the
Curriculum Grant" with Meredith Fensom for
the Law Policy in the Americas seminar, which
will take place in spring 2007.
Robert C. L. Moffat
Professor; Affiliate Professor of Philosophy
Presented "Habermas, Rawls ... and the
Future of Europe," to the Institut Fuer
Kriminalwissenshaften und Rechtsphilosophie,
Faculty of Law, Johann-Wolfgang-Goethe
University, in Frankfurt, Germany.
Presented "The Entitlements Blackhole:
The Transformation of the West," to the Max
Planck Institute for Foreign and International
Social Law, Munich, Germany.
Published "How Can Law Pave the Road
to Perpetual Peace? What Law Does and What
Law Does Well," in Kant and the Problems of the
Contemporary World (Justyna Miklaszewska ed.,
Krakow, Poland: The Jagiellonian University
Press, 2006).

Winston Nagan
Samuel T Dell Research Scholar; Director,
Institute of Human Rights and Peace
Development; Director, Summer Study Abroad
Program with Cape Town University;
Affiliate Professor of Anthropology
Published "The New Bush National Security
Doctrine and the Rule of Law," which was
published in two parts in the May 2006 and
June 2006 issues of the Russian journal Law
and Politics (with C. Hammer).
Presented "Justice in Transition Prosecution
and Amnesty in Germany and South Africa,"
at Humboldt-Universitat zu Berlin.
Accepted an appointment to the Russian
Council of Editors of the Russian journal, Law
and Politics.
Published a chapter in Justice in Transition.


completely extinct,
and alligators were
nearly gone. Since
then, we've fit 12 mil-
lion more people into
the state, and things
on the whole are bet-
ter than they were."
Nicholas came to
the law school in 1985 with a joint appointment
in law and urban planning even though his
degree is in economics. Nicholas said former
dean Frank Read, who was at the helm of the
law school at the time, understood the value of
thinking outside the box.
"He saw that environmental regulation was a
relatively new field and would require a new way
of looking at the law," said Nicholas. "Our
Environmental and Law Use Law Program is one
of the most respected in the country, so I think
this approach has been proven to work."



Lars Noah
Professor
* Published Law, Medicine, and Medical
Technology: Cases and Materials (Foundation
Press, 2nd Ed., 2006).
* Published "Treat Yourself: Is Self-Medication
the Prescription for What Ails American Health
Care?" 19 Harvard Journal of Law t Technology
359 (2006).
* Published "Managing Biotechnology's
[R]evolution: Has Guarded Enthusiasm Become
Benign Neglect?" 11 Virginia Journal of Law t
Technology 4 (2006).
* Published "A Drug by Any Other Name ...?:
Paradoxes in Dietary Supplement Risk
Regulation," 17 Stanford Law & Policy Review
165 (2006).
* Received the Simonsmeier Award ($2,500)
from the American Society for Pharmacy Law
for his previously published article "Ambivalent
Commitments to Federalism in Controlling the
Practice of Medicine."
* Spoke at a Federalist Society program on
regulatory compliance as a defense to pharma-
ceutical product liability in Ann Arbor, Mich.
* Spoke about developments in biotechnology
at the annual meeting of the Florida Bar
Association.

Kenneth B. Nunn
Professor; Associate Director, Center on
Children and Families
* Published "Foreword: New Explorations
in Culture and Crime Definitions, Theory,
Method," 17 Florida Journal of Law and Public
Policy VII (2006).
* Organized, moderated, and presented
"Problems in Paradise: Native Hawaiian
Disparities in Hawaii's Criminal Justice System,"
before the Council of the Criminal Justice
Section, American Bar Association Annual
Conference, Honolulu, Hawaii.
* Presented Keynote Address, "Race
Relations and the Law: Affirmative Action in
the United States and Brazil," II Brazil-USA Law
Seminar, Universidade Federal da Bahia,
Salvador, Brazil.


UF LAW








FACULTY NEWS


* Presented paper, "Truth and Reconciliation in
Post-Apartheid South Africa A Pan-Africanist
Perspective," "Law, Politics, and Society in
South Africa: The Politics of Inequality Then
and Now," at the 22nd Annual Gwendolen M.
Carter Conference, Center for African Studies,
University of Florida in Gainesville.
* Presented panel, "Race, Victimology
and the Response to Hurricane Katrina," at
"Dreaming of Democracy" Conference at the
University of Miami School of Law in Miami.

William H. Page
Marshall M. Criser Eminent Scholar in
Electronic Communications and
Administrative Law; Professor
* Presented "Communication and Concerted
Action" at the Loyola University Chicago con-
ference "Matsushita at 20: Proof of Conspiracy,
Summary Judgment, and the Role of the
Economist in Price Fixing Litigation."
* Published 2007 supplements to Kintner's
Federal Antitrust Law (Lexis) (with John
Lopatka and Joseph Bauer).
* Edited The Antitrust Practitioner and The
Antitrust Source, both online publications of
the ABA Antitrust Section.

Juan F. Perea
Cone Wagner Nugent Johnson Hazouri and
Roth Professor
* Published Mi Profundo Azul: Why Latinos
Have a Right to Sing the Blues, in Colored Men
and Hombres Aqui: Hernandez v Texas and the
Emergence of Mexican American Lawyering
(Michael A. Olivas, ed.), Arte Publico Press, 2006.
* Presented "Of Presidents and Precedents:
The Role of Judicial Review in Recent
Presidential Elections in Peru, Costa Rica and
the United States (2006)" at the 7th Annual
Law & Policy in the Americas Conference
Christopher L. Peterson
Associate Professor
* Provided testimony before the U.S. Senate
Banking Committee in a hearing on predatory
lending to the military.


Elizabeth A. Rowe
Assistant Professor
* Published "The Experimental Use Exception
to Patent Infringement: Do Universities Deserve
Special Treatment," in Hastings Law Journal
(May 2006).
* Spoke as a Roundtable Panelist, Current
Issues in Trade Secret Law Workshop sponsored
by The Berkeley Center for Law & Technology,
Boalt Hall School of Law.
* Presented, "Saving Trade Secret Disclosures
On the Internet Through Sequential
Preservation," University of California Berkeley,
Boalt Hall School of Law, Intellectual Property
Scholarship Seminar.
* Presented "Foreshadowing Litigation:
Emphasis on Patenting Could Mean New
Intellectual Property: Related Employment
Disputes for Universities," at Closing in On
Open Science: Trends in Intellectual Property
and Scientific Research Symposium,"
University of Maine School of Law.
* Presented "Saving Trade Secret Disclosures
on the Internet Through Sequential Preservation"
at the Intellectual Property Scholars Conference
at UC Berkeley.

Sharon E. Rush
Irving Cypen Professor; Associate Director,
Center on Children and Families
* Published HuckFinn's 'Hidden'Lessons:
Teaching and Learning Across the Color Line
(Rowman and Littlefield, 2006).

Katheryn Russell-Brown
Director, Center for the Study of Race and Race
Relations; Professor
* Published chapter, "While Visions of
Deviance Danced in Their Heads," in After the
Storm: Black Intellectuals Explore the Meaning
of Hurricane Katrina, ed. David Troutt (New
Press, 2006).
* Published Protecting Our Own: Race,
Crime, and African Americans (Rowman
and Littlefield Press, 2006).


Michael L. Seigel
Professor
* Presented, "Exhortation: The Four 'R's' of
Ethical Behavior By Which Every Lawyer and
Paralegal Should Live," Tampa Bay Paralegal
Association 2006 Education Seminar in Tampa.
* Presented "Managing Information," Plenary
Session Panel Presentation, American Bar
Association Conference for Associate Deans in
Englewood, Ca.
* Published "The Effective Use of War Stories
in Teaching Evidence," 50 St. Louis Law Journal
1191 (Summer 2006).

Christopher Slobogin
Stephen C. O'Connell Professor; Affiliate
Professor of Psychiatry; Edwin A. Heafey Jr.
Visiting Professor of Law, Stanford Law
School, 2006-07
* Published Proving the Unprovable: The
Role of Law, Science and Speculation in
Adjudicating Culpability and Dangerousness
(Oxford University Press, 2006).
* Published "Competency in the Criminal
Context: An Analysis of Robert Schopp's
Views," 24 Behavioral Sciences and the Law
529 (2006).
* Published Minding Justice: Laws That
Deprive People With Mental Disability of Life
and Liberty (Harvard University Press, 2006).
* Published "The Story of Rule 410 and
United States v. Mezzanatto: Using Plea
Statements at Trial" in Evidence Stories,
edited by Lempert (Foundation Press, 2006)
* Published "Reconceptualizing Due Process
in Juvenile Justice: Contributions from Law
and Social Science," 57 Hastings Law Journal
955 (May 2006) (with Fondacaro and Cross).
* Published "Legal and Ethical Issues in
Accessing and Utilizing Third-Party
Information," in Forensic Psychology:
Emerging Topics and Expanding Roles (Wiley
Press, 2006) (with Otto and Greenberg).
* Named a 2006-2007 Merck Visiting Scholar
at Seton Hall University School of Law.


FaCUlt\' Pro'file: Berta Hernrhdez-TruN'ol


p i. i lI_:,: nl I _, ll *-_:1I1 1 HI Ii1 ,, l li .-1 ,,,1
1P i _: ni, n1 .:|ln .i [ l il n, [H l | I,_: *D 1
Her life partner passed away after a seven-
month struggle with cancer and, as the pri-
mary caregiver, Hernandez learned more than she
ever wanted to know about the U.S. health care sys-
tem. That pain has become fuel for her new research.
Hernandez's dismay with the system culminated
when the insurance company was uncooperative
about placing her partner in a specific facility for can-
cer treatment. Through a professional network of
support, however, she was able to secure placement
for her partner. But, when they were greeted with
"you must have friends in high places," Hernandez's
incredulousness stimulated her desire for concrete,
positive action.
"When I heard that, I cried," she said. "There are
many people in the world who lack the network or
skills to obtain necessary care. Receiving proper
medical care shouldn't depend on whom one knows,
but on what the needs are."
As a scholar focusing on international rights and


,:,:,1.11 111, _: I, 1[ I ,:1 1 _f: [ 1,i l r *[ *:*I, :, ,1I3 lI -

ous human rights issue. She feels health care is not
only a "service we should have access to simply
because we are human," but also a right supported
by current international human rights law, much like
the right to free speech, religion or nondiscrimina-
tion are protected in our domestic legal system.
Her current preliminary research is delving into
the U.S. health care system, focusing on the ideas of
human dignity, health as a human right, and the
material necessities needed to attain it. She hopes to
improve the U.S. health care system by detailing
methods of delivering necessary medical care based
on need, instead of an individual's ability to pay or
who they know.
"Some countries have it figured it out,"
Hernandez said. "In America there are millions of
children and innumerable hard-working men and
women with no health care whose families are but a
moment away from economic devastation if they
suffer ill health or have an accident."


WINTER 2007
















Faculty Pprofile: W\illiam Page


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articles discussing the challenging economic and
procedural aspects of the litigation.
Now Page and co-author John Lopatka, of
Penn State's Dickinson School of Law, are putting
the finishing touches on The Microsoft Case:
Antitrust, Technology and Consumer Welfare, the
first book-length scholarly study of the litigation.
The University of Chicago Press will publish the
book in the spring of 2007.
"There have been a number of journalistic
accounts that try to take the reader 'inside' the
Microsoft case through interviews with the major
players. Our book examines the policy implications
of the case from the outside," said Page.




Helped draft and shepherd through a resolu-
tion calling for prohibition of the execution of
people with serious mental disability. It unani-
mously passed the ABA House of Delegates in
August.
Spoke on "Dangerousness" as part of a
panel on Law and Psychology at the AALS
Conference on Criminal Law and Procedure in
Vancouver, British Columbia.
Participated in conference at the University
of California Boalt School of Law on
"Governing and Living in a Time of Terror:
Law Beyond 9/11."
Issued 400-page report on the Florida
death penalty system, as chair of the Florida
Assessment Team for the ABA's Death Penalty
Moratorium Implementation Project.
Spoke on "Dangerousness and Expertise,"
at faculty workshop, Seton Hall Law School.
Gave the Merck Visiting Scholar Lecture,
"Preventive Detention as a Means of
Promoting Public Health," Seton Hall Law
School.
Spoke on "Preventive Justice," at faculty
workshop, Villanova Law School.

Christopher Vallandingham
Foreign and International Law Librarian
Published chapter, "Tracking Down Legal
Sources on Prestatehood Florida," which
appears in Michael Chiorazzi & Marguerite
Most, eds., Prestatehood Legal Materials:
A Fifty-State Research Guide, Haworth
Information Press.

Walter O. Weyrauch
Distinguished Professor; Stephen C. O'Connell
Chair; Associate Director, Center on Children
and Families
Spoke in Orange Park, Fla. to members of
the Association of Former Intelligence Officers
on "Facts and Theory of Undercover
Operations," based on his evaluation of card


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issue of whether Microsoft's inclusion of its
Internet Explorer web browser in the Windows
operating system harmed consumers by limiting
the potential of Netscape's browser and Sun
Microsystems' Java technologies to evolve into
a rival platform for applications software. Among
other problems, Page said, the government was
never required to prove that Netscape and Sun
were anything more than "nascent" rivals of
Microsoft.
"The government should have been required
to offer a credible theory and supporting evidence
that Microsoft's actions were likely to limit compe-
tition in a defined market," Page said.


files of the former Gestapo for the American
Military Government in Frankfurt and the
newly emerging German authorities in
early 1945.

Steven J. Willis
Professor; Associate Director, Center on
Children and Families
* Published Federal Tax Accounting (2006)
(with Michael B. Lang and Elliott Manning).

Michael Allan Wolf
Richard E. Nelson Chair in Local Government
Law; Professor
* Presented a talk on recent developments
in eminent domain law at the 2006
Conference of the National Association of
Appellate Court Attorneys in Richmond in
July 2006.
* Published "Supreme Guidance for Wet
Growth: Lessons from the High Court on the
Powers and Responsibilities of Local
Governments," 9 Chapman L. Rev. 233 (2006),
based on a symposium presentation at
Chapman.

Barbara Bennett Woodhouse
Director, Center on Children and Families;
Director, Family Law Certificate Program;
David H. Levin Chair In Family Law;
Co-Director, University of Florida Institute
for Child and Adolescent Research and
Evaluation
* Published chapters, "The Family
Supportive Nature of the U.N. Convention on
the Rights of the Child," and "The Changing
Status of the Child," in Jonathan Todres et al,
The U.N. Convention on the Rights of the
Child: An Analysis of Treaty Provisions and
Implications of U.S. Ratification (Transnational
Publishers, 2006).
* Published chapter "Cleaning Up Toxic
Violence: an EcoGenerist Paradigm," in Dowd


et al., Handbook of Children Culture and
Violence (2006).
* Presented a talk, "Children's Rights and
American Values," at City Graduate Center in
New York in the series "The Public Square,"
sponsored by Princeton University Press.
* Presented to the Children's Justice Act
Conference of the Children's Bureau in
Washington, D.C., on best practices in child
advocacy.
* Participated in roundtable of experts
convened by Rutgers University in New
Jersey to debate the future of childhood
studies.
* Published "Martyrs Media and the Web:
Examining a Grassroots Children's Rights
Movement Through the Lens of Social
Movement Theory" in 5 Whittier J. Child E
Fam. Advoc. 121-154 (2005).
* Co-convened a conference, "Bridges to
Excellence" (with Nancy Dowd), gathering
leaders of the major child advocacy centers
around the country to discuss multidiscipli-
nary methods.
* Presented at the Askew Institute
Conference on "Abuse and Neglect: Building
Partnerships to Meet Children's Needs."

Jennifer Zedalis
Director, Trial Practice; Senior Legal Skills
Professor; Coordinator, Gerald T Bennett
Prosecutor/Public Defender CLE Course;
Trial Team Faculty Adviser
* Presented "Defending the Case" to Florida
Bar members at the Gerald T. Bennett Trial
Training CLE Course on case analysis.
* Published Criminal Law Executive
Council ad hoc committee joint report to the
Florida Bar regarding proposed rule 4-3.8(e),
circumscribing power of prosecutors to
issue subpoenas to lawyers in cases
involving their clients, September 2006.


UF LAW












CLASS NOTES


Share Your News

Please send submissions to: fleming@law.ufl.edu (preferred)
or Editor, UF Law Magazine, Levin College of Law, University
of Florida, PO. Box 117633, Gainesville, FL 32611.

If you wish to include your e-mail address at the end of
your class note, please make the addition to your class
note or provide permission to print.


1950
James D. Causey joined Tennessee-based Settlement
Solutions as mediator specializing in products liability,
domestic relations and business litigation.





























1961
Fredric G. Levin, a Pensacola attorney, was named one of
the "Top 500 Leading Litigators in America" by Los
Angeles-based Lawdragon Magazine.

Courtroom 2A of the Marion County Judicial Center has
been named in honor of Judge William T. Swigert.

1966
Steven J. Powell joined Moore & Company.

1968
William "Bud" L. Kirk Jr., founding partner of Rumberger,
Kirk & Caldwell, was initiated into the American College of
Trial Lawyers.


1970
Mercer K. "Bud" Clarke, a shareholder with Clarke
Silverglate Campbell Williams & Montgomery in Miami,
was elected to the International Association of Defense
Counsel Board of Directors.

1972
Hal H. Kantor, a partner at Lowndes, Drosdick, Doster,
Kantor & Reed, was named chairman of the United Arts
of Central Florida, a community-based fundraising and
advocacy organization for local arts and culture.

Manuel E. Menendez Jr., chief judge of the 13th
Judicial Circuit of Florida, was sworn in as the chair of
the Florida Conference of Circuit Judges. He served as
secretary-treasurer and chair-elect of the conference for
the past two years.

John J. "Jake" Schickel, of Coker, Schickel, Sorenson &
Daniel in Jacksonville, was recently awarded the 2006
Justice Harry Lee Anstead Award for the Board-Certified
Lawyer of the Year.

1973
Martha W. Barnett, a partner in Holland & Knight's
Tallahassee office, was named one of the "100 Most
Influential Lawyers in America."

Richard F. Kane joined the Charlotte firm, Moore &
Van Allen as a partner in the area of labor and employment
law.

1974
Frank Derrickson, a volunteer lawyer for the ACLU of
Georgia specializing in both criminal defense and civil litiga-
tion, received the Volunteer Attorney Award from the ACLU.

Leslie J. Lott, a senior partner at Lott & Friedland, authored
a chapter, "Special Remedies for Counterfeit" in Trademark
Infringement Remedies, published by the American Bar
Association. She was also listed in the Legal Media Group
Guide to the World's Leading Trade Mark Law Practitioners,
2006.

Circuit Judge Robert K. Rouse, Jr. has been named the
Central Florida Jurist of the Year by the Central Florida
Chapter of the American Board of Trial Advocates.

1977
Dennis J. Wall has written the 2006 supplement to his book,
Litigation and Prevention of Insurer Bad Faith, now in its
second edition published by West Publishing Company. He
also authored "Experts, Gatekeepers, and Insurance Issues In
Federal Cases," an article published online and distributed by
the Defense Research Institute. He was included among
Florida Trend magazine's 2006 Legal Elite issue, in the
practice area of insurance.


Rouse 74


WINTER 2007


Il11LUF I/.


maide /o
















Dexter Douglass

Recipient of The Bar's Top Honor


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HuIIul .-'.'.1l bl, Im lul F l la tb l -ulc13[lj oui
for his "contribution to the improvement of
the administration of justice as a lawyer."
The Medal of Honor is the highest honor
awarded by the legal profession in Florida.
Douglass, of Tallahassee, was lauded at
The Bar's June meeting for his representa-
tion of clients in the federal and states
courts, often pro bono.
"Committed to civil and individual's
rights, he has zealously advocated for caus-
es both unpopular and controversial, true to
the ideal of equal justice under law," the
proclamation read.


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III:. Fill- 3 1: i-i .-IE. : I-- .- I -I.i.l 1,1

lii- L'lIal1[Ia1i" leca1Je liilp Ou [lie lFluIlJa
Constitution Revision Commission, which
he chaired in 1998. The group arrived at
several constitutional amendments that
were approved by the public, including
reform of structure of government,
wildlife and environmental protections,
increased equality for women, enhanced
requirement for high-quality public educa
tion, and equitable funding statewide for
the courts.
(Please see the Spring 2007 issue of
UFLaw magazine for a feature article about
Douglass.)


1978
Paul Fitzpatrick (LLMT) recently joined the Spokane office of
Preston Gates & Ellis in the tax, trusts & estates group.

James C. Percy (LLMT) was elected to partnership in the
Jones Walker firm in the business & commercial litigation
practice group. He practices in the firm's Baton Rouge office.

Judge Tonya B. Rainwater was elected to serve as chief judge
for the 18th Judicial Circuit Court of Florida. Rainwater has
been a circuit judge for the 18th Circuit in Brevard County
since 1991.

1979
Fred Flowers, a shareholder of Lewis, Longman & Walker in
Jacksonville, was listed in the 2007 edition of The Best
Lawyers in America.

Dennis L. Horton (LLMT) is returning to politics after a
25-year hiatus by running for the Florida House District 41
seat that encompasses portions of Orange, Lake and Osceola
counties.

David M. Layman, a shareholder with Greenberg Traurig,
was recently elected to a two-year term as president of the
board of directors of The Children's Place at Home Safe.

1981
Richard B. Comiter (LLMT), founding partner of Comiter,
Singer & Baseman, addressed the Florida Bar Tax Section on
"Tax and Non-Tax Considerations Involved in Entity Selection."
He also was listed in The Best Lawyers in America by Woodward
& White and in Florida Trend magazine's "Legal Elite."


Comiter 81


Doug Cooney and his partner, Christian Lebano, recently
adopted a son, Gideon Cooney Lebano, born Oct. 13, 2005.
Cooney also published a novel for young readers,
co-written with Oscar-winning actress Marlee Matlin,
called Nobody's Perfect. doug.cooney@gmail.com

Beth Harlan, a Lakeland attorney, has been appointed to the
Polk County Court by Gov. Jeb Bush.

William R. "Bill" Lane Jr. (LLMT), a partner in the Tampa
office of Holland & Knight was named a fellow by the
American College of Trust and Estate Counsel.

Phyliss Rosier was selected to fill the Eighth Judicial
Circuit Judgeship seat for the remaining two years of her
retired predecessor's six-year term.

Gerald F Stack (LLMT) joined Hiscock & Barclay in
New York as a partner and co-chair of the firm's tax
practice group.

1982
Oscar Sanchez delivered a presentation called
"Building Block Torts: Bad Faith, Tortious Interference,
Fraud in the Inducement and the Application of the
Economic Loss Rule What You Need to Know,"
to the Business Torts Litigation Section at the American
Trial Lawyers Association 2006 Annual Convention
in Seattle.

Judge Charles E. Williams, a 12th Judicial Circuit Court
judge, was honored by the Manatee County Branch of the
NAACP with the Jurisprudence Award.


UF LAW


Lalle o0









CLASS NOTES


1983
Robert Dellecker, of Dellecker, Wilson, King, McKenna &
Ruffier, was listed in the top 2 percent of lawyers practicing in
Florida in Florida Trend magazine.

James Gale, a founding partner with Feldman Gale, has been
named to the United States Lawyer Rankings 2006 list of the
nation's top 10 intellectual property lawyers. He currently
serves as a faculty adviser to the college's Intellectual Property
Certificate Program.

William D. Matthewman, a partner in the South Florida firm
of Seiden, Alder & Matthewman, published "Crawford's
Impact on Florida Criminal Law: What's In and What's Out
in the World of Hearsay" as the cover article in the April 2006
edition of The Florida Bar Journal.

Michael Prendergast has written a humorous book, Don't
Chew Jesus! A (. ;. .... fMemorable Nun Stories.

1984
Allison K. Bethel was sworn into The Florida Bar's Board of
Governors. She was also a featured speaker at HUD's Fair
Housing Policy Conference, where she spoke about "State and
Local Enforcement Initiatives in Housing," "Is a Case (Fair
Housing) Litigation Ready?" and "Mortgage Lending
Discrimination." She also received the Henry Latimer
Diversity Award from the Virgil Hawkins Florida Chapter of
the National Bar Association, the Florida Association of
Women Lawyers, and the Equal Opportunity Law Section.

John Neukamm, a shareholder with Tampa firm Mechanik
Nuccio, was elected as the real property division director for
The Florida Bar's Real Property, Probate & Trust Law Section.
jbn@floridalandlaw.com

David C. Willis, a partner with Rumberger, Kirk & Caldwell
in Orlando, was recently certified by The Florida Bar in
Construction Law, marking his second board certification.









e ad u e a d te no a 0 0 .0
If y-. are a fac0t 0ebro aeinomto bu


1985
Alan B. Cohn (LLMT), a partner with Greenspoon Marder,
was honored by the United Jewish Community of Broward
County with the Hy and Belle Schlafer Leadership Award for
his contributions to the community.

Brenna Durden, a shareholder of Lewis, Longman & Walker
in Jacksonville, was listed in the 2007 edition of The Best
Lawyers in America.

Ross M. Goodman was elected circuit judge in the First
Circuit. He will preside over the juvenile court in Escambia
County beginning January 2007.

Marilyn A. Moore, counsel in the firm Edwards Angell
Palmer & Dodge's real estate department, was installed as
president of the Executive Women of the Palm Beaches.

David M. Silberstein (LLMT), co-manager of Kirk-Pinkerton,
was elected as chair of the Florida Law Network, which is
comprised of attorneys from 12 firms throughout Florida who
meet to share information about the practice of law.

1986
Dale C. Cohen, a criminal trial lawyer with Burk &
Cohen, was appointed to the Broward Circuit Court bench.
He and his wife, Mardi Levy Cohen (1986), met at
UF while attending law school. Mardi now has her own
law firm.

Trent S. Kiziah (LLMT) was promoted to senior vice
president for U.S. Trust's Southeast region in Palm Beach.

Carol LoCicero is a founding partner in the new
Tampa-based firm, Thomas & LoCicero. clocicero@
tlolawfirm.com

Robert Merlin's family firm, Merlin & Hertz, has
received the 2006 'Put Something Back' Pro Bono
Outstanding Award for services provided to the poor
during 2005-2006.

William Ruffier, an attorney with Dellecker, Wilson,
King, McKenna & Ruffier, was named in the top 2 percent
of lawyers practicing in Florida. The results were pub-
lished in the July issue of Florida Trend magazine.

Keith Spoto, a Bartow county judge, was featured in
The Ledger (Lakeland) as he ranked second out of
seven county judges in the 2006 judicial survey, scoring
a 7.62 overall.

1987
Deborah B. Ansbro, a former litigation partner with
Gronek & Latham in Orlando, has been appointed by
Gov. Jeb Bush as a county court judge for Orange County.
DAnsbro@groneklatham.com

Robert W. Murphy was selected to be an instructor on
consumer law issues at the Army Judges Advocates College
in Charlottesville, VA., in June 2006. He maintains a practice
focusing on consumer class action finance issues.


WINTER 2007














1988
R. Scott Costantino, of the Jacksonville firm Liles,
Gavin, Costantino, & George, became board certified by
The Florida Bar in civil trial law.

Mark R. Dern, president of Boca Raton-based Dern
Capital Management Corporation, was appointed by TD
Ameritrade Institutional to its national advisor panel.

Cathryn A. Mitchell was named one of the "Best
50 Women in Business in New Jersey" by New Jersey
Business Newspaper. Mitchell is a founding shareholder
of MillerMitchell, counsel to global business in
Princeton, N.J.

1990
Tom Pennekamp Jr., a partner with Grossman, Roth,
Olin, Meadow, Cohen, Yaffa, Pennekamp & Cohen in
Miami, has been named to the board of directors of
Friends of Florida State Parks.

Scott Polodna was appointed to serve as the next
Ninth Judicial Orange-Osceola Circuit Court judge.
He previously served as assistant Osceola county attorney
since 2001.

Kevin C. Smith was made partner of Lytal, Reiter, Clark,
Fountain & Williams in West Palm Beach.
ksmith@palmbeachlaw.com


Kathy J. Tayon joined Fowler White Boggs Banker as
shareholder in the firm's newly opened Boca Raton office.
She was previously a partner with McDermott, Will &
Emery in Miami.

1991
Kevin F. O'Brien, a Jesuit of the Maryland Province, was
ordained to the priesthood at the Fordham University
Church in Bronx, N.Y.

1992
Jerry D. Hamilton and Jennifer Quildon Miller (1997)
have joined forces to start the firm of Hamilton & Miller,
an AV rated firm that specializes in all areas of admiralty
and maritime law.

Michael T. McHugh was appointed to the 20th Judicial
Circuit Court bench in Florida. He previously worked as a
managing attorney for Allstate Insurance Company.

1993
Ross L. Bilbrey was recently appointed as a county court
judge for Santa Rosa County. judgebil@co.santa-rosa.fl.us

Gwen Griggs was featured in The Business Journal of
Jacksonville as an "Up & Comer 2006," along with law
school classmates Ray Driver (1994) and Matt McAfee
(1993), with whom she merged to create the downtown
Jacksonville firm, Driver, McAfee, Griggs & Peek.


Phyllis Harris

Leading Wal-Mart's Environmental Compliance


tecting the environment through
the power of law for almost two
decades, and now she is joining
the compliance team at the nation's largest
retailer.
Harris was promoted to vice president of
environmental compliance for Wal-Mart
Stores, Inc., where she oversees environ-
mental compliance throughout all
Wal-Mart's more than 4,000 facilities and
stores nationally.
"I view my job as ensuring that we com-
ply with all environmental laws as well as to
help develop our environmental sustainabili-
ty programs," said Harris.
Harris began her career at the Fortune
500 company in January 2006 as a senior


divisional director for asset protection for
the Southeast Division. Previously, she
worked at the Environmental Protection
Agency for 19 years where, as deputy assis-
tant administrator for the Office of
Enforcement and Compliance Assurance,
she was the senior career official responsible
for managing the agency's largest staff and
helping set and execute national environ-
mental enforcement policy.
After devoting her entire legal career to
environmental law within the public sector,
Harris said this is the job she's been waiting
for. "This is a dream job because I can really
contribute to the company's environmental
compliance and make the world's greatest
company even better," she said.
-Natalie Caula


UF LAW









CLASS NOTES


Julie H. Littky-Rubin has been named partner of Lytal,
Reiter, Clark, Fountain & Williams in West Palm Beach.
jlittkyrubin@palmbeachlaw.com

Christopher P. Tessitore was promoted to general counsel of
National Retail Properties (formerly Commercial Net Lease
Realty), an equity real estate investment trust in Orlando.

Thomas P. Wert joined Roetzel & Andress's Orlando office
as partner. He also became president of the Orange County
Bar Association.

1994
Steve Diebenow, Jacksonville Mayor, John Peyton's, chief of
staff, was spotlighted in the Jacksonville Daily Record as
being the mayor's "Top Man." The article detailed his career
and family life.

Tom McAleavey joined Lowndes, Drosdick, Doster, Kantor &
Reed as a partner in the firm's corporate practice. He previously
headed the central and north Florida securities group at Holland
& Knight.

Kenneth J. McKenna, a partner with Dellecker, Wilson, King,
McKenna & Ruffier in Orlando, has been elected to the board of
directors of the Ronald McDonald House Charities of Central
Florida.

Nicholas A. Shannin, of McDonough Wieland & Shannin, has
become board certified in appellate law. He is also the 2005
recipient of the Orange County Bar Association Young Lawyer
Professionalism Award. nshannin@orllaw.com

1995
John A. Craft was appointed as an assistant U.S. attorney for
the Eastern District of Texas. He previously served as an assis-
tant state attorney for the Eighteen Judicial Circuit of Florida
and as an assistant statewide prosecutor of Florida.
John.A.Craft@usdoj.gov

Jennifer R. Junker joined the Orlando firm of
ShuffieldLowman, previously having served as in-house counsel
for Wells Fargo.

Harlan S. Louis (LLMT), a member of Bailey Cavalieri, was
named by The Journal of Law and Politics as a "Rising Star"
among Ohio attorneys.

1996
Gregory W. Meier (LLMT), a shareholder in ShuffieldLowman,
has received an AV rating, the highest available from Martindale-
Hubbell.

Ralph G. Pepe (LLMT) joined the Orlando firm of
ShuffieldLowman and will assist the firm in the area of state
sales and use tax.

Ketan S. Vakil, was elected partner in the intellectual property
group of Snell & Wilmer and named a "California Super
Lawyer Rising Stars" (top 2 percent of the lawyers in
California) and Lawdragon 500 New Stars (top 500 lawyers in
the state).


John A. Walker was elected partner for the Jones Walker firm.
He practices in the labor and employment practice group in the
firm's Miami office.

1997
Christa Calamas was recently appointed secretary of the
Florida Agency for Healthcare Administration.

Colin M. Daly was hired to fill the new position of senior corpo-
rate counsel by O'Charley's, a leading casual dining restaurant
company. He was previously assistant general counsel for
ARAMARK Corporation, a global food services, facilities
management, and uniform and career apparel provider.

David M. Delaney was made partner with the Dell Graham
in Gainesville. He continues his litigation practice in medical
malpractice, governmental liability, and civil rights defense.

Nicole Goetz became a shareholder with the marital and family
firm ofAsbell, Ho & Goetz.

Sherri L. Johnson, of Dent & Johnson, was installed as presi-
dent-elect of the Florida Association of Women Lawyers
(FAWL).

Elliott Wilcox launched a free weekly trial advocacy tips
newsletter (www.FreeTrialTips.com).
TrialTips@TrialTheater.com

1998
Jason Gonzalez, a shareholder with Ausley & McMullen in
Tallahassee, was elected chairman of the Judicial Nominating
Commission for the First District Court of Appeal for 2006-
2007. Gonzalez was appointed to the commission by Gov. Jeb
Bush and previously served as chairman of the Second Circuit
JNC in 2004. He was also listed by Florida Trend as a 2006
Up and Coming Legal Elite. jgonzalez@ausley.com

David Ogman has accepted a position in acquisitions at H.I.G.
Capital. OgmanDavid@aol.com

Harvey E. Oyer III, a shareholder and real estate attorney with
Gunster, Yoakley & Stewart in West Palm Beach, was named
one of five Palm Beach County recipients of the prestigious
"Jefferson Award," which recognizes individuals for their
outstanding achievements and contributions in public and
community service.


WINTER 2007


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1999
Adam K. Feldman was named a shareholder in Patterson,
Anderson & Feldman in Jacksonville. afeldman@
paf-lawfirm.com

Colleen M. Fitzgerald was elected to serve a two-year term
to the board of directors of the Homeless Coalition of
Hillsborough County.

Melissa Gross-Arnold, an attorney from the Jacksonville office
of Lewis, Longman & Walker, served as pro bono counsel for
the North Florida Land Trust in one of its most significant land
acquisition transactions to date. She also achieved board certifi-
cation in city, county and local government law.

William R. Shilling was featured as a "tech setter" in the
April/May 2006 issue of Law Office Computing magazine.

Ormend G. Yeilding was made partner of Lowndes, Drosdick,
Doster, Kantor & Reed. Yeilding resides in Winter Park.

2000
Amy M. Hass was named assistant general counsel in the
University of Florida's Office of the Vice President and General
Counsel.

Frances H. Merritt joined Shuffield, Lowman & Wilson in
Orlando.


2001
Douglas I. Wall has joined the Orlando office of
GrayRobinson, specializing in construction law and litigation.

2002
LaShawnda Jackson, an associate with Rumberger, Kirk &
Caldwell in Orlando, was recently appointed by Gov. Jeb Bush
to the Judicial Nominating Commission for Florida's Ninth
Circuit. She also received The Florida Bar's Diversity Award in
recognition of her efforts and allegiance to create and promote a
more diverse workplace.

2003
Darlene Corey, an attorney with the 11th Judicial Circuit
Domestic Violence Court Case Management Unit, was honored
with the 2006 Female Mentor of the Year Award by the Dade
County Bar Association's Young Lawyers Section eMentoring
Program.

Whalen Kuller, an attorney with Holt, Ney Zatcoff &
Wasserman, was made a member of the governing board of
directors for The Make-A-Wish Foundation of Georgia and
Alabama. He serves as secretary.

Matthew P. McLaughlin (LLMT), of Balch & Bingham, was
appointed to serve as chairman for the Tax Committee of the
Young Lawyer's Division of the American Bar Association.

Julie Siefkas-Marin joined Royal Caribbean Cruises as an
associate counsel. She provides in-house representation to the


William Zewadski

Collecting Photography for Your Law Firm


looks at a photograph for the
first time, he looks much
deeper than most. He is gaug-
ing the emotions he feels and whether he
wants to purchase it for his private collection
or his law firm, Trenam Kemker Attorneys in
Tampa.
Zewadski recently gave a gallery talk
at the Samuel P Harn Museum of Art
about the difference between collecting
individually and for a business. His firm
started its collection in 1987 because a
senior partner had an interest in photog-
raphy and a private collection.
Experience has proven to him the pursuit
has been a good investment all around
because not only has it enhanced the
office d6cor and staff interaction, it has
increased in value as well.


His tips on collecting for a law firm include:
* Find a theme, even if it is arbitrary.
Zewadski and his partners collected the
works of American photographers who
were alive in 1970 because that was when
their firm was founded.
* Determine the display space available and
a specific budget.
* Go to auction and/or hire a consultant.
* Get your whole firm involved. "We have
80 lawyers and everyone had to approve.
* Frame everything behind an ultraviolet fil-
tered plexiglass. Color photos look best
framed in mahogany, and black and
whites in black frames. Make all frames
consistent unless the artist framed them.
* Show your collection to clients as well as
universities and students by appointment.
* Many artists and galleries will provide a
discount if you ask and if you plan more
than one purchase.


* Consider office security. "I bought an
8x10 for $1,900 in 1987 and found out
later it was worth $20,000. Someone
could have easily put that in a briefcase
and walked out, so I sold it and bought a

dozen others. Today that photo is worth
a quarter of a million dollars," he said.
* Collect the work of photographers of dif-
ferent nationalities and races for a more
complex arrangement of imagery.
"In corporate collecting we try to be as
excellent in our photo collecting as we
think we are as lawyers practicing the
law," Zewadski said. "Almost all our pur-
chases have gone up in value. I tell my
partners it is the only thing in the office
that appreciates computers, books, and
furniture depreciate but the photos get
more valuable. They are beginning to
believe me."
-Kristen Hines


UF LAW


9,c,,n










CLASS NOTES


Linnes Finney Jr.

Heads National Bar Association

BY NATALIE CAULA

An avid civil activist and litigator, Linnes
Finney Jr. (JD 82) is now presiding over the
National Bar Association, the oldest and
largest national association consisting of
predominately African-American lawyers and judges.
Finney is a partner in the national law firm of Gary,
Williams, Parenti, Finney, Lewis, McManus, Watson Et
Sperando in Fort Pierce.
"Now it is time for me to put my plan into
action, which includes continuing to support
election protection and Hurricane Katrina relief. We
hope to fully fund our endowment and begin a new
initiative that will encourage middle school students
to stay in school and eventually pursue legal
careers," said Finney.
Finney's theme for his administration is "Carrying
the Torch Leading By Example." He said presiding
over the organization will take "commitment, determi-
nation, consensus building, a good support team and
sensitivity" to hold the position with distinction.

Q: What responsibilities come with your new title as
president and what does the job entail?

A: As president of the National Bar Association, I
serve as the organization's primary speaker and
preside over meetings of the Board of Governors,
the executive committee and the membership. The
president serves as the face and voice of the organ-
ization and is often called upon to share the
prospective of the Black attorney and community in
relation to various issues of national/international
concern.

I am also charged with the responsibility of ensur-
ing that our programs and initiatives remain viable.
These programs include our sterling seminar pro-
grams, award-winning NBA Crump Law Camp, MLK
Advocacy Competition for high school students,
judicial evaluation and review process, advocacy
for civil and political rights, and our various mem-
bership development programs.

Moreover, I view my primary role as that of an
advocate for African American lawyers, judges and
law students, as well as for the disenfranchised,
disfavored and disadvantaged.

Q: What characteristics does it take to hold such a
prestigious position?

A: Commitment, determination, consensus building, a
good support team and sensitivity.


Q: Does this job take a lot of time away
from your firm and your family?

A: Yes, but I consider myself an excellent
time manager, and I have the support
of my partners and family, which is cru-
cial.

Q: What drives you professionally and
personally?

A: Professionally, I am driven by the desire
to serve. To a great extent my religious
faith sustains and motivates me.
Accomplishments to me are by-prod-
ucts of competently representing my Finney
clients and serving my community. I see each day


"I see each day as another opportunity to

do something that has a positive effect ...


as another opportunity to do something that has a
positive effect upon those with whom I come into
contact and upon my community as a whole.

Q: Why is this organization necessary?

A: The National Bar Association was founded in 1925.
The organization's objectives are to advance the
science of jurisprudence; improve the administra-
tion of justice; preserve the independence of the
judiciary and to uphold the honor and integrity of
the legal profession; promote professional and
social intercourse among the members of the
American and the international bars; promote legis-
lation that will improve the economic condition of
all American citizens, regardless of race, sex or
creed in their efforts to secure a free and untram-
meled use of the franchise guaranteed by the
Constitution of the United States; and to protect the
civil and political rights of the citizens and residents
of the United States.

From what I can see, those objectives are still rele-
vant and end results still an aspiration.

There is still a need for organizations such as the
National Bar Association. An older and much wiser
NBA lawyer once told me, "Merely because some-
one opens the door and allows you to come into
their home is no reason for you to burn down your
own." I continue to see his point in this regard.


WINTER 2007











































Royal Caribbean and Celebrity Cruises sales and marketing
departments. jsiefkas@bellsouth.net

Andrew J. Smallman recently opened his own firm, Andrew
J. Smallman, in downtown Fort Lauderdale. The firm's main
focus is criminal defense, family law and probate.
AJSmallsLaw@hotmail.com

2004
Steven O. Anderson (LLMT) recently joined Stamper,
Rubens, Stocker & Smith.

Ashley N. Calhoun (LLMT), in the Lakeland office of
GrayRobinson, has been selected as the recipient of the 2006
Omicron Delta Kappa "Grads Made Good" award, presented
by Florida Southern College.

Cheryl Priest has joined the commercial and securities litiga-
tion practice in Holland & Knight's Tampa office and was
named one of the 2006 Tampa Bay Business Journal's "30
Under 30" award winners. She is marrying Aaron Ainsworth
in March.

Brent M. Rainey, an associate with West, Green, and
Associates in Orlando, who exclusively practices marital and
family law, co-authored the equitable distribution chapter of
the Matrimonial and Family Law Board C. ,Ur. ,,. Review
materials for the second year. He also was recently installed as
president of the Collaborative Family Law Group of Central
Florida. b.rainey@rdwestlaw.com

Thomas P. Swift Jr. (LLMT), certified financial planner, has
joined the estate settlement group as an estate administrator at
SunTrust Bank. He was previously an estate and tax attorney
with James, Bates, Pope & Spivey.

Michael B. Verille joined the Washington, D.C. office of
Thacher Proffitt & Wood as an associate with the firm's


Corporate & Financial Institutions Department.
mverille@tpw.com

2005
Kimberley A. Belcastro (LLMT) has joined Quarles & Brady
in the company's taxation practice group.

Benjamin Brown joined the Naples office of Quarles & Brady
as an associate. He was previously with the Naples office of
Bond, Schoeneck & King, a Syracuse, NY based firm.

Diane Dick, an associate at Bilzin Sumberg Baena Price &
Axelrod in Miami, is publishing "Tax and Economic Policy
Responses to the Medicaid Long-Term Care Financing Crisis:
A Behavioral Economics Approach" in the Cardozo Public
Law, Policy and Ethics Journal.

Michael J. Faehner (LLMT), of Sarasota, was appointed by
The Florida Bar to the board of directors of The Florida Bar
Foundation for a three-year term.

Christopher D. Foster (LLMT) has joined Nexsen Pruet of
Charleston as an associate in the tax group.

Marty Fulgueira has joined Rumberger, Kirk & Caldwell in
Miami as an associate practicing in several areas, including
product liability, toxic tort defense and casualty defense. She
also received one of the highest overall scores on the February
Florida Bar exam. In recognition of her accomplishment,
Fulgueira was asked to speak on behalf of newly admitted
attorneys at the Third District Court of Appeals swearing-in
ceremony.

Jarrett R. Hoffman completed his LL.M. in tax at New York
University in May. He is now a second year associate at the
Wall Street firm of Simpson Thacher & Bartlett in Manhattan.

David L. Luikart III has joined Hill, Ward & Henderson in
Tampa as an associate. dluikart@hwhlaw.com

2006
Kelly C. Lyon joined Quarles & Brady in the firm's litigation
practice group.

Meghan M. Mahaney (LLMT) joined Hiscock & Barclay in
New York as an associate.


UF LAW


In Memoriam
Tom Adams (JD 48)
Daniel Galfond (JD 01)
Hon. William "Wade" Hampton III (JD 39)
Thomas C. MacDonald Jr. (JD 53)
Knowlton "Joe" Shelnut Jr. (JD 72)
Franklin J. Slagle (LLMT 80)
Robert Ware (JD 03)
James Young Wilson Sr. (LLB 41)

















UF LAW 2005-2006 ANNUAL REPORT


U F L AW C E N TE R ASSOCIATION, I N C


PJEACI


























Your Reach brings success to UF Law.


As chair of the Law Center Association, it is my pleas-
ure to report that, with the support and involvement
of alumni and friends of the Levin College of Law, this
year has been one of the most memorable and suc-
cessful in the history of our college. Although we need
your continued support for capital improvements, our
facilities are exceptional and soon will be next to none.
I urge every alumnus to visit our "new" law school.
Walkthrough the halls of the Lawton Chiles Information
Center, visit the recently dedicated Chesterfield Smith
Ceremonial Classroom, stop and speak with our students;
feel the pride and appreciation of the role our college has
played in the destiny of this state, and the sense of its
great potential and purpose as we build upon our past.
Under Dean Jerry's leadership, we have attracted
some of the finest faculty in the nation, even though
we are frequently working at a financial disadvantage.
Looking ahead, our task is to build our annual giving
and financial support for programs and faculty so we
can take the final steps to becoming the number one
public law school in the nation.
Your participation in annual giving is essential to
the future of our college. Annual giving provides the
discretionary funds that open important doors for our
students and enrich law school life. During the last
year, what other law school has had not one, but two
United States Supreme Court justices visit and interact
with faculty, students and alumni? Student morale has
risen to the point that recent graduating classes are
themselves making substantial pledges to the college.
The Annual Fund has helped students travel to
competitions across the nation where they now place
at or near the top. It has permitted us to bring in


Gentry (right) with Tim Cerio (JD 95), who served as president
of the Law Alumni Council

nationally acclaimed guest speakers and provide semi-
nars and learning experiences that make our students
some of the most highly recruited. I urge each of you
to contribute as fully as you can to our Annual Fund.
You will receive back much more than you give, partic-
ularly if you take the opportunity to visit and involve
yourself in activities at our College.
Each of us has benefited from the opportunities
provided by the College of Law. It is our obligation
to sow seeds of generosity so we can maintain our
momentum toward excellence and inspire our graduat-
ing students to participate in the nurturing cycle of
giving and growth. Get involved and support UF Law.
Ain't it great to be a Gator?
GO GATORS!

W.C. Gentry (JD 71)
Chair, UF Law Center Association


UF LAW




























Financial Summary
2005-2006 FISCAL YEAR OJULY 1. 2005-JUNE 30. 200r.


Donor Pie Chart


7 2005 200
^^^^E-i^^^^H^^^ "TH'3


Law Alumni.
Aluimnusi s
Friend
Other Indiviilual
Pal ent
Siiudent
UF Faculty
Comin Charitabli Fund
Corpolation
Fainli, Founiation
Foundation
Other Organization


Donors
1877
22

52


4

8

78
14
7
11
2097


S Total ". of total


$4,655.319 00
$78.653 33
$288 812 63
$150 00
$13 397 32
$355 00
$11 750 00
$200.777 97
$277.158 90
$124.348 52
$25.150 00
6(35.851 74
$5,741,724.41


81 081o
1 37",
5 030"
0 000
0 23"-
0010
0 20"n
3 500
4 83"
2 17",
0 4415
1 15"'.


2 i005-20066 Represenis all gilis
to the Le;vin College .:.t La- Slale
IaiIr h 11 rie, h13s been c '11 :li ed
Fiscal Year Amount
2002 $2.305.549
2003 $2.208.023
2004 $1.929.432
2005 $3,791,324
2006 $5,741,724


m Don..rs
E Gifs


3.000


2.782
2.485 2,503 ,440

S3?,00 2,088 2.097
2 1 9I97












2002 2003 2004 2005 2006
Fiscal Year


W TI N T E F: : 21 ;7


[





















Financial Summary
CONTINUED...




Total Participation:
Total Giving Participation 12%
(all donor types)
Total Alumni Giving Participation 11%


Annual Fund Participation


9.51%


Endowment Income
Gifts to the law school's endowment are not
spent, but instead are carefully invested to
yield a dependable, stable source of income
in perpetuity. Approximately 4 percent of
earned interest from the market value of the
endowment fund balance was transferred
and spent for specific uses designated by
donors and by college administrators for
annual operating and administrative costs.
(The additional earned interest above the
4 percent is returned to the fund balance.)
The fund grew almost 13 percent in 2005-06
under the stewardship of the University of
Florida Foundation Investment Company
(UFICO), which oversees investments and
law school endowment income.


Fund Balance Interest
Transferred
1997-1998 $28,630,708 $816,589
1998-1999 $43,410,446 $1,197,483
1999-2000 $57,931,929 $2,129,167
2000-2001 $58,442,477 $2,907,585
2001-2002 $59,837,880 $2,971,718
2002-2003 $46,903,630 $2,287,087
2003-2004 $52,975,580 $1,582,204
2004-2005 $59,588,895 $1,634,109
2005-2006 $67,250,539 $2,004,200


Annual Fund Participation:

Fiscal Year Donors Participation
2002 1308 7.66%
2003 1357 7.95%
2004 1571 9.20%
2005 1595 9.34%
2006 1623 9.51%




2000




7.95%
9.20% 9.34% 9.5




1500 -
7.66%


a 1


Annual Fund Contributions
Contributions received to non-endowed, non-building funds


2002 2003 2004 2005 2006
Fiscal Year


2002 2003 2004 2005 2006
Fiscal Year


UF LAW






















Gator Law Alumni Receptions


"Beat the Bulldogs"
Gator Law Alumni Reception
October 27, 2005

Be.ell. DIllrrnar DeVatili Pill.ns a i:**.e PA
Holland 6 Knighlt
V,:.lpe Balelia Wickes Rogerson Gallo a b W achs

Herb Alien
William H An Irei s
Charles E IComman'.er
\V.C Geniry
D-:igl as Milne
Mlatrthn. F,:.sqa.,
Jarnes L. Purcell .Ir.
T:.ir Slater
E. 3ai 'J egel.vel

Taste of Gainesville
Gator Law Alumni Reception
August 12, 2005

Cliarles rf Rand PA
Dean ,lead Egertoni. bloo. l',orth C3pouanl:. boarth PA
Dellecker VvWil:.n King McKeiina t Ruiffir LLF'
GraR.:-bins:.n P, A.
Harris Harris Bauerle Sh.irm.a
King Blac:kell Dov nE h Zehtider F:a
Lo/ns:les Dr,:.sdiclk, D,:.sler Kanr :.r a Reed
Mc:D.:'n,:.uigh 'ielanlJ & SIhannin
Vose La'. Firm LLC

Dak.iI .1 Akiiis
Titfaii Fernan'.le? Miller
Laura E. Minit:.t-
rMa, nne Doavi
Sarah E Rumpt

Florida Bar Annual Mid-Year Meeting
and Heckerling Institute
UF Law Alumni Reception
January 11. 2006 and January 19. 2006

Alkernman Senierfirt
Bush Ross
FelIman Gale
GrayRobinsor Fi.
Greenberg Traurig P.A
Hughes Hubbarcd b Reed LLP
Pressly b F'ressls F'P
Richman Greer, \Veil Bruirnmauqh
rlMrahil.: 8 Chrislenren PA

Scont E. .r., 00oo.
DuBose uEle,
W Dexter D.:.ugl3ss
Jeffre, D Fel. lman
Jlries Gaile
\V.C enitr
Daild 1 i-on 'zalez
Bruce rM Harris
Gordon H Sruirip, Harris
Bill Hol.,pe
Sarmulel Lev, is


F Wallace Pope Jr
Ho.' rd R.:.EreiblaTt
'scar A Sanchez
Larr\ and: Cath, Sellers
VVW. Kell, Sirrrth
James Siepan

Dean's New Year Party
January 26. 2006

Janet Ai411slo:k. h David Hudson
Ken Dak is
Nanc, Filer
MIVandell 8 Joyce Glickshlurg
Shiar.i .l ones
Catherine Fallerson
H',:.var'l Rosenhlat b Ee A-ckerriani
L, ni Sc iac 3 :k,-

Florida Bar Annual Meeting
Gator Law Alumni Reception
June 22, 2006

Akerrman Seitlerlill
Wiltes a Kapelan
Boeis Schiller b Flexr.er LLP
Greeinberg T 3rurig
Bedell Dittmar Delaull FillanE b Coxe, P!
.Iirn Gale E Jeff Fel.Jmarnii .f Feln.lman Gale PA
Buckinghair, Do:.linle b Burroughs LLP

S:oll tr.ioo.l
DuB,:..e L.Ausle,
Vinme Barrett
V' i, Birchfield
Bill Bone
.letre, P Brock
rmelia Cani.pbell
Carl.:.E C.:. nc,.pelr.:.
Roberta Fuilt.:n F:.s
W.i. enitr,.
Bruce HarriE
Sc,. It Ha.- .Kins.
Ric hard 3Jac:.bson
Mark Klingensmitlh b Wenidc, Webrb
Leslie Lev'.E
Josepli Mellichlamp
Julie Miller
Raliul FPael
3all, P:.i..e
Mla rti'the F':.sga,
Grier Pressl,
Gar, L. Prinr,
:Clarles RaPnd
H.:. var.. PRosenhlatt
Sharon Rush
Os-car Sanchez
Jc.-hnEs-i Sasarr
Sarnrii3tha Scliosberg
Larr\ and :Cath, Sellers
Inna She3
Levis an.l Licida Shelley
,-it Srii lth
.r Kelly Smith
G- nlle 'i;:.unq
An lrea Zeihri-ar


If 0you vt-oulJd like to sponsor a law iailrmni, reception please contact .4Anrea Slrrer at (3521 273-0640 or shire\ ,'.ai; .ufl.edu.


W I N T E F: 1 21 ;7

























THE ENDOWED FUND provides a permanent foundation for the college and is indispensable
in supporting important programs and activities. Donors give to this fund for many reasons:
to provide scholarships, honor distinguished careers, memorialize loved ones, serve as an
estate-planning tool, or to simply thank and support the college. The benefits from those
gifts are immeasurable and allow the college to weather state cuts and plan for the future.
The donors recognized on these and the following pages gave in the 2005-2006 fiscal year.


Chairs E Professorships
James J. Freeland
Eminent Scholar Chair in Taxation
August 8 Kulunas
Philip B. Barr, Jr.
Harry S. Colburn, Jr.
Hugh F Culverhouse, Jr.
Harry M. Eisenberg
The Florida Bar Tax Section
Richard D. Green
J. David Pobjecky
David M. Richardson
John H. and Mary Lou Dasburg
Professorship
John H. 8 Mary Lou D. Dasburg
Richard B. Stephens
Eminent Scholar Chair in Taxation
Harry S. Colburn, Jr.
Meredyth Anne Dasburg Foundation
Edward F Koren
Peter J. Losavio, Jr.
Richard B. Stephens, Jr.
Susan Winn
Richard E. Nelson Chair in Local
Government
Jane B. Nelson
Dennis A. Calfee Eminent
Scholar Chair in Taxation
Matthew J. Ahearn
David J. Akins
William M. Black
Alan B. 8 Lauren K. Cohn
Comiter, Singer 8 Baseman
Charles H. Egerton
Robert E. Glennon, Jr.
Bradley R. Gould
James A. Hauser
Thomas J. Korge
R. Neal Manners
Robert W. Mead, Jr.
Michael D. Minton
Robert E. Panoff
Purcell, Flanagan 8 Hay
Sarah E. Rumpf
Patricia A. Willing

Scholarships
American Academy of Matrimonial
Lawyers/Shutts & Bowen
American Academy of
Matrimonial Lawyers of FL


Coker, Myers, Schickel, Cooper and
Sorensen, PA. Trial Team
Gregg E. Hutt
Anna C. Shea
Adria M. Toledo
Dewey and Lynn Burnsed
Endowment in Law
R. Dewey 8 Lynn E. Burnsed
James J. Freeland Graduate Tax/
Joseph R. Julin Scholarship Fund
John J. Collins, Jr.
Lake Lytal, Jr./
Michael A. Fogarty Memorial/
Mark A. Rentenbach
Don Allen Foundation, Inc.
Paul R. Rentenbach
Lewis "Lukie" Ansbacher
Memorial Scholarship
Barry B. Ansbacher
Frank D. Upchurch III 8
Katherine G. Upchurch
Upchurch, Bailey 8 Upchurch
Terrye Coggin Proctor Merit
Memorial Scholarship
Kim O'Connor
W. D. Macdonald Prize
Howard L. 8 Marie G. Garrett

Other Endowed Gifts
Attorneys' Insurance Fund
Instructional Endowment
Attorneys' Title Insurance Fund, Inc.
Brian M. O'Connell Estates and Trusts
Book Award Endowment
Brian M. O'Connell
Charles and Linda Wells Judicial
Process Teaching and Research
Charles T. 8 Linda Wells
Florida Constitutional Law
Book Award Endowment
in honor of Bill McBride
Robert S. Bolt
Alex Sink
Gene K. Glasser and
Elaine Glasser Fund
Gene K. 8 Elaine R. Glasser
Sandra 8 Leon G. Gulden
Private Foundation
Russell H. 8 Karen H. Kasper


Samuel 8 Rose Riemer
Private Foundation
Law Review Endowment
Jeffrey W. 8 Amanda M. Abraham
David M. Hudson 8 J. Parker Ailstock
J. Carter 8 Dana Andersen
Mary Jane Angelo
Joseph E. Ankus
Ronald P Anselmo
Kendall Coffey, Esq. 8 Joni Armstrong
Coffey, Esq.
Reubin O. Askew
F Eugene Atwood 8 Dabney D. Ware
Mark O. Bagnall
G. Thomas Ball
Todd A. Bancroft
E. John Wagner II 8
Rosetta F. Barrett-Wagner
Joshua L. Becker
David L. Bilsker
R. Mason Blake
Bruce H. Bokor
David S. Boyce
Matthew C. Brewer
Randy R. Briggs
Jeffrey P Brock
George E. Bunnell
Les W. Burke
David D. Burns
James D. Camp, Jr.
Timothy M. Cerio
Jon C. Chassen
Thomas C. Cobb
R. John Cole II
R. Scott 8 Kelly J. Collins
Community Foundation of
Tampa Bay, Inc.
Fred M. Cone, Jr.
John T. 8 Kim Conner
Nathan L. Coppernoll
Sarah Cortvriend
Evans Crary
Donald H. Crawford II
Jerry B. Crockett
Mrs. Marion M. Cromwell
Raul A. Cuervo
Duane A. 8 Teresa K. Daiker
Stephen E. Dalton
Paul W. Danahy, Jr.
C. LeAnn Davis
Terri R. Day
George R. Dekle, Sr.
Robert H. Dellecker


Benjamin F Diamond
Juan M. Diaz
Roberto J. Diaz
Phillip S. Dingle
Russell W. Divine
Andrew T. Dixon
Dunwody, White 8 Landon
Donald A. Dvornik
Linda Ebin
Charles H. Egerton
Kenneth C. Ellis
Theodore A. Erck III
Robert T Ervin
Kerry I. 8 Elizabeth K. Evander
Andrew J. Fawbush*
Patricia Combs Fawsett
Peter T Fay
Robert R. Feagin III
Dyanne E. Feinberg
Joel R. Feldman
Todd W. Fennell
Ray F Ferrero, Jr.
The Franklin 8 Carmichael Law Firm
S. Katherine Frazier
Jon T Gatto
Patrick E. Geraghty, Sr.
Alan M. Gerlach, Jr.
John M. Gillies
Mandell 8 Joyce K. Glicksberg
Allison M. Gluvna
Andrew F Gordon
Colonel Jonathan C. Gordon
Bryan S. Gowdy
Jonathan S. Gowdy
K. Lawrence 8 Maureen G. Gragg
William P Gray III
E. John 8 Yali C. Gregory
Linda S. Griffin-Keliher
Robert S. Griscti
Timothy D. 8 Patricia G. Haines
William F Hamilton
Lydia R. Hanley
Jeffrey L. 8 Sarah W. Harrison
Charles V. Hedrick
Richard H. 8 Jane G. Hiers
William T. Hodges
Holland 8 Knight Charitable
Foundation
Dan H. Honeywell
Daniel C. Irick
Jeffrey A. Jacobs
Adam M. Jarchow
Elizabeth A. Jenkins


UF LAW



























Your Reach sponsors chairs and professorships.


Robert H. Jerry II 8 Lisa N. Jerry
John A. Jones
Thomas R. Julin
Katherine J. Kaminsky
Hal H. Kantor*
John F Kasbar
Bruce E. 8 Patricia A. Kasold
George W. Kates
Bryan W. Keene
Megan A. Kelly
Susan L. Kelsey
Kimberly R. Keravouri
Bradford D. Kimbro
E. C. Deeno Kitchen
Robert D. 8 Elenore C. Klingler
David T. Knight
Sharon A. Knight
Brian H. Koch
Jacalyn N. Kolk
Russell Koonin
Paul M. 8 Judith Korchin
Edward F Koren
Ryan M. Kroll
Bruce D. 8 Elizabeth C. Landrum
The Law Firm of Robert S. Griscti
Steven D. Lear
William M. Lederer
Jordan G. Lee
Robert W. Lee
Chauncey W. Lever, Jr.
Julie M. Levitt
Robert E. Lewis
Rutledge R. Liles
Samuel R. 8 Stacie M. Linsky
Clint S. Malone
Amy R. Mashburn
Lorie A. Mason
Maureen Monaghan Matheson
James M. Matulis
Darren K. Mc Cartney
Matthew S. McAfee
Thomas M. 8
Shannon C. McAleavey
Darren K. McCartney
Lawrence S. McDowell
Mark S. Meland
Jason S. 8 Victoria O. Miller
Mrs. Tiffani F Miller
Lew I. 8 Jennifer I. Minsky
Charles S. Modell
Daniel F Molony
Robert M. Montgomery, Jr.


John H. Moore II 8 Joan K. Moore
Michael G. Moore
George R. Moraitis, Jr.
Andrew A. 8 Jessica A. Morey
M. Scotland Morris
Jon C. Moyle
Greg T. 8 Joy Sabino Mullane
Edward M. Mullins, Jr. 8
Rima Y. Mullins
Keith E. Myers
Noel H. Nation
Tracy A. Nichols
James M. Nixon II
Shelly E. Nixon
Steven A. Osher
Taylor C. Pancake
John C. Patterson, Jr.
Matthew D. Patterson
Graham C. 8 Lara H. Penn
Carl R. Pennington III
Robert J. Pile
Charles P Pillans III
Michael A. Piscitelli
S. Jay Plager
Scott D. 8 Ingrid H. Ponce
F. Wallace Pope, Jr.
James G. Pressly, Jr.
Robert H. 8 Kelly B. Pritchard
Sharon H. Proctor
John H. Rains IV
Patrick C. Rastatter
Harley E. Riedel II
James N. Robinson II
Mark E. Robinson
Richard P Rollo
Robin L. Rosenberg
Louis K. 8 Denise D. Rosenbloum
Paul S. Rothstein
Thomas K. Ruppert
Randolph J. Rush
James D. 8 Debbie S. Ruskin
Lanny Russell
Christopher J. Ryan
Christopher M. 8 Sharon C. Sacco
Albert A. Sanchez, Jr.
Edward E. Sawyer
Tura L. Schnebly
James E. Seay
Lawrence E. Sellers, Jr.*
Christian D. 8 K. Shawn Shields
James H. Shimberg Jr.
Andrew D. Zaron 8


Erica S. Shultz Zaron
Rebecca Shwayri
Paula M. Sicard
Kenneth M. Sigelman
Michael D. Simon
John S. Simons
Debbie S. Ruskin
David T. 8 Sandra G. Smith
Douglas A. Smith
Justin R. Smith
Roy J. 8 Lisa A.G. Smith
Rodney W. 8 Deidra C. Smith
W. Kelly Smith*
Stacy F Speiller
Andrew P Speranzini
Brian J. Stack
Harold B. Staggs
Kimarie R. Stratos
Timon V Sullivan
Hans G. Tanzler III 8
Deborah M. H. Tanzler
Grace W. Taylor*
Jeffrey M. 8 Lisa S. Taylor
Michelle T. Taylor
Donald R. Tescher
Gregg D. Thomas
Sara A. Tolliver
Diane A. Tomlinson
Tara V. Trevorrow
James B. 8 Mary P Twitchell
David R. Tyrrell
Justin B. Uhlemann
Vogel Law Office
Timothy W. Volpe
Bill Wagner
Waldman, Feluren,
Hildebrandt 8 Trigoboff
Glenn J. Waldman
Mark E. 8 Karen D. Walker
William A. Weber
Daniel R. Weede
John M. Welch, Jr.
Winifred L. Wentworth
Scott L. Whitaker
White 8 Case
Wilbert's
Charlotte W. Williams
Sean T. Williams
Robert H. Willis
William M. Wilson, Jr.
Allen C. Winsor
Wiseheart Foundation, Inc.


Malcolm B. Wiseheart, Jr.
Michael A. 8 Betty M. Wolf
James L. Yacavone III
Leighton D. Yates, Jr.
Gwynne A. Young*
Richard M. Zabak
Melissa S. Zinkil
Peter W. Zinober*
Benjamin F. & Marilyn Overton
Endowment
Benjamin F. Overton
Richard H. Simons
Charitable Trust
Richard H. Simons
Charitable Trust
Saliwanchik, Lloyd, and
Saliwanchik Intellectual
Property Fund
Saliwanchik, Lloyd 8
Saliwanchik
Upchurch, Watson & White
Dispute Resolution Fund
Upchurch Watson White 8 Max
Mediation Group
Wolf Family American Property
Law Lecture Endowment
Zimmerman, Kiser & Sutcliffe, PA.
Fall Moot Court Competition
Theodore S. Kypreos
Marie E. Marteli


01909 Society Member (see page 63 for description)


WINTER 2007


Endowments may be
established with a mini-
mum of $30,000. For
more information on cre-
ating an endowed fund,
contact Kelley Frohlich
at (352) 273-0640 or
frohlich@law.ufl.edu

























UI TIIN'.I IISHED DONORS are individuals, businesses and organizations contributing
tr rii.- .:.Il.:-wing levels: Founders Society, Dean's Council, 1909 Society, Trusler Society
-r.. I E r.I .: I .ment Society. (For a complete description see next page)


Founders Society gold

Gifts and pledges of
$100,000 and more
Charles W. Abbott
W. George 8 Enid Allen
Anonymous
Attorneys' Title Insurance Fund, Inc.
John Bargas
The Robert S. 8 Mildred M.
Baynard Trust
BellSouth Corp.
John C. Bierley*
E. G. Boone
Mary B. Bryant
R. Dewey 8 Lynn E. Burnsed
James D. Camp, Jr.
Walter G. Campbell, Jr.
Carlton Fields
Warren M. 8 Dorothy C. Cason
Luther W. Coggin, Jr.
Coker, Schickel, Sorenson 8 Daniel
Howard C. Coker
Marshall M. Criser
Irving Hazel A. Cypen
John H. 8 Mary Lou D. Dasburg
Dean, Mead, Egerton, Bloodworth,
Capouano 8 Bozarth
Jack C. Demetree
The Dunspaugh-Dalton Foundation
Jessie Ball duPont Fund
Ray F Ferrero, Jr.
The Florida Bar
W. C. Gentry
GrayRobinson
Andrew C. Hall
Wayne Hogan
Edith E. Holiday
Holland 8 Knight Charitable
Foundation
Holland 8 Knight
Icard, Merrill, Cullis, Timm, Furen
8 Ginsburg
Justice Story Book Exchange
Nick Kapioltas
Robert G. Kerrigan
Kerrigan, Estess, Rankin 8 McLeod
Gerald J. Klein
The Kresge Foundation
Lane, Trohn, Bertrand 8 Vreeland
Levin 8 Papantonio Family Foundation
Fredric G. 8 Marilyn K. Levin
Stephen A. Lind
Lake H. Lytal, Jr.
John D. 8 Catherine T. MacArthur
Foundation


Macfarlane, Ferguson 8 McMullen
Margaret MacLennan
Michael C. Maher
Martin Z. Margulies
John M. McNatt, Jr.
Robert G. 8 Joelen K. Merkel
Mershon, Sawyer, Johnston,
Dunwody and Cole
Montgomery Family Charitable Trust
Robert M. Montgomery, Jr.
Morgan 8 Morgan
John B. 8 Ultima Morgan
Motley Rice
James H. Nance
National Center for Automated
Info Research
Jane B. Nelson
Brian M. O'Connell
Benjamin F Overton
Whit Palmer, Jr.
Justus W. Reid, Sr.
Mikel M. Rollyson
William E. Rosenberg Foundation
Gerald A. Rosenthal
J. Quinton Rumph
Saliwanchik, Lloyd 8 Saliwanchik
John J. Schickel, Sr.
Lewis M. Schott* 8
Marcia Whitney Schott (D)
Scruggs Law Firm
Security Sales
T Terrell Sessums, Sr.*
W. Paul Shelley, Jr.
Benedict A. Silverman
Richard H. Simons Charitable Trust
W. Kelly Smith*
Gerald Sohn
Lynn D. Solomon
Steel, Hector 8 Davis
Glenn W. Sturm
Robert L. Trohn*
Upchurch Watson White 8 Max
Medical Group
Jeffrey W. 8 Susan Warren*
Michael A. 8 Betty M. Wolf
Samuel J. 8 Evelyn Wood Foundation
Frank Wotitzky
Yent Bayou Properties Partnership
C. Steven Yerrid
Zimmerman, Kiser 8 Sutcliffe

Founders Society silver

Gifts and pledges of
$50,000 $99,999
C. Wayne Alford


C. DuBose Ausley
David S. Band
Barnett, Bolt, Kirkwood, Long 8 McBride
Bedell, Dittmar, DeVault, Pillans 8 Coxe
Joseph Benzinger
Bruce H. Bokor
Carol M. Brewer
Broad 8 Cassel
Bush Ross
Community Foundation of
Tampa Bay, Inc.
Hugh F Culverhouse, Jr.
Meredyth Anne Dasburg Foundation
George H. DeCarion
Dunwody, White 8 Landon
Philip I. 8 Barbara Emmer
Robert M. Ervin
Henry A. Finkelstein Memorial
The Florida Bar Tax Section
Fonvielle, Hinkle 8 Lewis
Michael K. 8 Jacqueline Friel*
Ellen B. Gelberg
W. C. Gentry Family Foundation
Ruth Goodmark
James A. Hauser
Corinne C. Hodak
Wayne 8 Patricia Hogan Family
Foundation
David Hyman*
E. C. Deeno Kitchen
Edward F Koren
Krome Realty, Inc.
The Lewis Schott Foundation
Lawrence A. Lokken*
Kevin A. Malone
Francis T. McCoy
Gene Moore III
Jon C. Moyle
National Conference of Bar Examiners
Mark A. Nouss
Kitty Phillips
F. Wallace Pope, Jr.
James G. Pressly, Jr.
Mark J. Proctor
Reid, Ricca 8 Rigell
David M. Richardson
Richman Greer Weil Brumbaugh
Mirabito 8 Christensen
Richard M. Robinson
Rumberger, Kirk 8 Caldwell
George E. Schulz, Jr.
Searcy Denney Scarola
Banhart 8 Shipley
Shutts 8 Bowen
Richard B. Stephens, Jr.
Sidney A. Stubbs, Jr.*


The Carl S. Swisher Foundation, Inc.
Terrell, Hogan, Ellis, Yegelwel
John Thatcher
U.S. Sugar Corp.
United Way of Miami-Dade
A. Ward Wagner, Jr.
Charles T. 8 Linda Wells
Scott L. Whitaker
J. J. Wicker II
Winderweedle, Haines, Ward 8
Woodman
Susan Winn
Yegelwel Family Foundation
Evan J. Yegelwel
Yerrid Foundation

Dean's Council Barristers

Gifts and pledges of
$25,000 $49,999
S. C. Battaglia Family
Foundation, Inc.
Robert S. Bolt
Alan B. 8 Lauren K. Cohn
Comiter, Singer 8 Baseman
John N. 8 Ruth T Giordano
K. Lawrence 8 Maureen Gragg
Michael A. Hanzman
John H. Haswell
J. Bruce 8 Marion Hoffmann
Kluger, Peretz, Kaplan 8 Berlin
Chris M. Limberopoulos
Peter M. MacNamara 8
M. Therese Vento
R. Neal Manners
Pedro A. Martin
Michael J. McNerney
Cynthia F. O'Connell
S. Daniel 8 Nancy Ponce
Edward E. Sawyer
W. Crit Smith
Dale M. Swope
Hans G. Tanzler III 8
Deborah M. H. Tanzler
White 8 Case
Stephen N. Zack

Dean's Council Partners

Gifts and pledges of
$10,000 $24,999
A. P Phillips Foundation, Inc.
August 8 Kulunas
Ausley 8 McMullen
R. Vinson 8 Carlene Barrett*
Bill Bone*


UF LAW


























Your Reach provides scholarships and financial aid.


Boose, Casey, Ciklin, Lubitz,
Martens, McBane 8 O'Connell
Jeffrey P Brock*
John W. Campbell*
Timothy M. E Jayne Cerio
Clark, Campbell 8 Mawhinney
Clarke, Silverglate, Campbell,
Williams 8 Montgomery
C. Randolph 8 Cheryl Coleman*
Barry L. Davis*
Brian T. Degnan
Lauren Y. Detzel
Mayanne Downs*
James E. Eaton, Jr.
Patrick G. Emmanuel
Peter C. K. Enwall
Fassett, Anthony 8 Taylor
Andrew J. Fawbush*
Foley 8 Lardner
Roberta F Fox*
Peter J. Genz*
Patrick E. Geraghty, Sr.
Gene K. 8 Elaine R. Glasser
Robert E. Glennon, Jr.
Richard C. Grant*
Sandra 8 Leon G. Gulden
Private Foundation
Bruce M. Harris*
Barbara J. Pariente 8
Frederick A. Hazouri*
R. Lawrence Heinkel*
Hill, Ward 8 Henderson
Scott C. Ilgenfritz 8
Margaret D. Matthews
William C. Israel
R. Timothy Jansen*
Jones, Foster, Johnston 8 Stubbs
Lawrence Keefe*
D. Burke Kibler III
Peter T Kirkwood
K. Judith Lane*
Lewis, Longman 8 Walker
Paul R. Linder*
Lott 8 Friedland
Margol 8 Pennington
Phillip J. 8 Stacey L. Mays*
Robert W. Mead, Jr.
Michael C. Maher
Wilton R. Miller
Douglas J. Milne*
Milton, Leach, Whitman,
D'Andrea, Charek 8 Milton
Michael D. Minton
James F Page, Jr.*
Rahul 8 Swati Patel*
Gary Lee 8 Suzanne Printy*


Bruce S. Rogow*
Rosenthal 8 Weissman
Oscar A. Sanchez*
David C. 8 Rona G. Sasser*
Gerald D. 8 Joanne W. Schackow
Ernest A. Sellers
Scott D. Sheftall*
John A. Shipley III
Stichter, Riedel, Blain 8 Prosser
Tax Analysts, Inc.
James E. Thomison*
Rick 8 Aase B. Thompson*
George A. Vaka*
White 8 Case
Douglas A. 8 Patricia O. Wright
Gwynne A. Young*

Dean's Council Associates

Gifts and pledges of
$5,000 $9,999
Cory L. Andrews
Barry B. Ansbacher
Charles W. Arnold, Jr.*
G. Thomas Ball
Richard R. Barnett, Sr. 8
Martha W. Barnett
Suzanne C. Bass Trust
R. Mason Blake
Richard B. Bush
James D. Camp III Trust
William M. Camp Trust
Hank B. Campbell
Maria C. Carantzas
Mercer K. Clarke
Gary J. Cohen
Jean C. Coker
Richard P Cole*
Glenn L. Criser
W. Dexter Douglass
Thomas M. Ervin, Jr.
Scott J. Feder
Richard T. Garfield
James L. George
Michael W. 8 Elsbeth K. Gordon
J. Charles Gray
Greenberg Traurig
Stephen H. Grimes
Ellen C. Ham
Marie C. Hansen Trust
Scott G. Hawkins
Sylvia B. Helton
Jeffrey A. Hirsch
Richard C. Jans
Russell H. 8 Karen H. Kasper
Joseph H. Lang, Jr.


Frederick W. 8 Victoria Cook
Leonhardt
Marsha G. Madorsky
Dorothy S. McCurry Trust
Gregory A. Nelson
Darrell W. 8 Deborah J. Payne
Charles P Pillans III
J. Stephen Pullum*
Purcell, Flanagan 8 Hay
John T. Rogerson III
Stephen F Rossman
Juliet M. Roulhac
Alan J. Rubinstein*
E. Thom Rumberger
Albert A. Sanchez, Jr.
Stephen W. Sessums
Ned M. Shandloff
Sarah Helene Sharp
Andrew K. 8 Marie S. Strimaitis
Grace W. Taylor*
John J. Upchurch IV
Upchurch, Bailey 8 Upchurch
Timothy W. Volpe
Samuel G. Wells
Michael K. Wilson
R. Duke Woodson
Jerome A. Yavitz Charitable
Foundation
James E. Yonge
Peter W. Zinober*

Trusler Society

Annual gifts of
$1,000 -$4,999
Barry A. Abbott
Akerman Senterfitt
Don Allen Foundation
American Academy of
Matrimonial Lawyers of FL
Harry L. 8 Susann F. Anstead
Ralph Artigliere
Jerald D. August*
Mark O. Bagnall
Todd A. Bancroft
Philip B. Barr, Jr.
Jeffrey S. Bartel*
Anthony S. Battaglia
Robert J. Beckham
Lisa C. Berry
Roger L. Blackburn
Jeffery A. Boone*
William A. 8 Laura M. Boyles*
Les W. Burke
L. Kinder Cannon III
Ronald A. Carpenter


Distinguished Donors

FOUNDERS SOCIETY
Members receive permanent
recognition in the annual report.

GOLD: Annual Gifts and five-year
pledges of $100,000 and up.

SILVER: Annual Gifts and five-year
pledges of $50,000-$99,999.

DEAN'S COUNCIL
Members receive full President's
Council benefits and recognition,
invitations to special events, and
distinguished recognition in the
annual report.

BARRISTER: Gifts and five-year
pledges of $25,000-$49,999.
PARTNER: Gifts and five-year
pledges of $10,000-$24,999.
ASSOCIATE: Gifts and five-year
pledges of $5,000-$9,999.


1909 SOCIETY
The 1909 Society commemorates
the founding year of the law
school and honors individuals
who support the law school's
annual fund program. See page
63 for more details.

Annual fund gifts (contributions
designated to non-endowed,
non-building funds) of $2,000-
$4,999. All current members of the
1909 Society are designated in this
report by an asterisk (*).

TRUSLER SOCIETY
Annual gifts of $1,000-$4,999
Members receive special
recognition in the annual report.

ENRICHMENT SOCIETY
Annual gifts of $100-$999. Donors are
recognized in the annual report.


1909 Society Member (see page 63 for description)


WINTER 2007














DISTINGUISHED DONORS


Allan R Clark
W. Michael Clifford
Norman A. Coll
Nathan S. Collier
Anne C. Conway*
Susan E. Cook*
Janet M. Courtney
Evans Crary
Paul W. Danahy, Jr.
Terrence T. Dariotis
Ronald A. David
Barry R. Davidson
Tad Davis
George L. & Sally Dawson*
Robert H. Dellecker
John A. DeVault III
DLA Piper Rudnick Gray Cary
Sally A. Dorn
Rosanne M. Duane
Charles H. Egerton
Kenneth C. Ellis
Ladd H. Fassett*
Patricia Combs Fawsett
Peter T. Fay
Robert R. Feagin III


Kimberly R. Keravouri
Sharon A. Knight
Donald S. Kohla*
Thomas J. Korge
Lourdes F La Paz*
Ronald C. LaFace
Bruce D. & Elizabeth C. Landrum
Law Office of W. C. Gentry
Peter J. Losavio, Jr.
Michael T. Moore & Leslie J. Lott
Maher, Guiley 8 Maher, PA.
Alfred J. Malefatto &
Moria Rozenson
Christine N. Markussen*
The Matthias Foundation, Inc.
Robert C. Matthias*
Matwiczyk 8 Brown
Darren K. Mc Cartney
Harold F McCart, Jr.
Darren K. McCartney
Clifton A. McClelland, Jr.*
Kenneth R. & Linda C. McGurn
Martin J. McMahon, Jr. &
Pamela S. McMahon
F. Shields McManus


Robert L. Tankel
The Community Foundation, Inc.
Gregg D. Thomas
Robert D. Thompson*
Jonathan B. Trohn
James B. & Mary P Twitchell
Frank D. Upchurch III
Katherine G. Upchurch
Vaka, Larson 8 Johnson, PL.
George A. Vega, Jr.*
David H. Vickrey
John K. & Marie L. Vreeland*
Bill Wagner
Waldman Feluren Hildebrandt
& Trigoboff
Rob Webb
William A. Weber
Jack A. & Jordana S. Weiss
Don M. Welsh Charitable Trust
Warren E. Williams
Patricia A. Willing
Wiseheart Foundation, Inc.
Malcolm B. Wiseheart, Jr.
Marc A. Wites
Patricia M. & Council Wooten, Jr.


Cristina Alonso
Victoria J. Alvarez
Chintan K. Amin
Alberto R. & Debra D. Amirin
K. Dinos Anastasiades &
Nancy H. Jackson
Anchors, Smith 8 Grimsley
C. LeDon Anchors, Jr.
J. Carter Andersen
Brett D. Anderson
Bruce R. Anderson, Jr.
Geddes D. Anderson, Jr.
Scott P Andrew
Mary Jane Angelo
Joseph E. Ankus
Michael R. Ansay
Ronald P Anselmo
Alan M. Applegate
Alan I. Armour II
Kendall Coffey, Esq. &
Joni Armstrong Coffey, Esq.
Mr. Michael J. Gelfand & Mary C. Arpe
Frank A. Ashton
Reubin O. Askew
Sharon B. Atack


Your Reach funds travel for student competitions.


Feldman Gale
Jeffrey D. Feldman*
William H. Ferguson*
Linnes Finney, Jr.*
James C. Fleming
Florida Lawyers Legal Insurance
FPL Group Foundation
The Freedom Forum
Julia L. Frey
Melvyn B. Frumkes
George D. Gabel, Jr.
James A. Gale*
Linda R. Getzen
Mandell & Joyce K. Glicksberg
Goodlette, Coleman 8 Johnson
John A. R. Grimaldi
Caleb J. & Michele B. Grimes
Frank A. & Lauren F. Hamner*
James L. & Lenore R. Hanapel
Robert M. Harris
David W. Hedrick
Benjamin H. Hill III & Marte A. Hill
Dan H. Honeywell
Bill Hoppe*
Hopping, Green 8 Sams
Robert F. Hudson, Jr.
Mark Hulsey*
E. L. Roy Hunt*
Gary W. Huston
Michael L. Jamieson*
Adam M. Jarchow
The Jelks Family Foundation
Allen N. Jelks, Jr.
Elizabeth A. Jenkins
Robert H. Jerry II & Lisa N. Jerry
Kenneth C. Johnson*
Kenneth R. & Kimberly L. Johnson
Hal H. Kantor*


Joseph C. Mellichamp III
Barbara J. Staros*
The Merlin Law Group
Jon L. & Beth B. Mills
Daniel F Molony
James B. O'Neal
Eduardo Palmer*
Kathleen M. Paustian
S. Austin Peele*
J. Carter Perkins, Sr.*
Matthew N. Posgay
Becky A. Powhatan*
Kathleen Price*
Robert H. & Kelly B. Pritchard
Sharon H. Proctor
Charles M. Rand
Dee D. Reiter
Joseph E. Rhile
Samuel & Rose Riemer Private
Foundation
Paul G. Rogers*
Rogow Greenberg Foundation
Edward O. Savitz, Jr.
William J. Schifino, Jr.
Ronald Y. Schram
Clifford A. Schulman*
Lawrence E. Sellers, Jr.*
J. Patrick Shannon*
James H. Shimberg Jr.
Ned F. Sinder
Barry S. Sinoff
Smith, Hood, Perkins, Loucks, Stout,
Bigman, Lane 8 Brock
Henry T. Sorensen II
Law Offices of Steinberg & Brown
Mal Steinberg
William H. Stolberg
Deborah B. Story*


Leighton D. Yates, Jr.

Life members of
the Trusler Society
Herbert L. Allen
William Goza
B. Douglas Hind-Marsh
Julius F Parker, Jr.

William F Sheffield
William K. Zewadski

Enrichment Society

Annual gifts of $100-$999
Michael A. Abbott
Robert G. Abood
Jeffrey W. Abraham
Evan L. Abramowitz
Glenn A. & Stacey Y. Adams
Louie N. Adcock, Jr.
Mark A. Addington
Matthew J. Ahearn
David M. Hudson & J. Parker Ailstock
Akerman Senterfitt
David J. Akins
Alachua County Board of
County Commissioners
Cynthia A. Alcantara
Larry B. Alexander
Ben Alexander
Matthew C. Vinton & Lynn S. Alfano
Jacqueline Allee
A. Graham Allen
Frank A. Allen
Herbert L. Allen
Linda A. Alley
Alan B. Almand
James W. Almand


Steven D. Atkinson
F. Eugene Atwood & Dabney D. Ware
Scott E. Atwood
Richard C. Ausness
Bryan F. Aylstock
Daniel & Lynne F Bachrach
Alton D. Bain
Fred R. Baisden, Jr.
Peter Baker
Fletcher N. Baldwin, Jr. &
Nancy T. Baldwin
Haywood M. Ball
Michael R. Band
David C. Banker
George Barford
Thomas H. Barkdull, Jr.
Earl M. Barker, Jr.
James A. Barks
Robert J. Barna
Harris H. Barnes III
Richard L. Barrett
E. John Wagner II 8
Rosetta F. Barrett-Wagner
James V. Barrios
Bernard A. Barton, Jr.
George Baten
Joni L. Batie-McGrew
James R Beadle
Alton S. Beasley
Joseph W. & Geremy G. Beasley
Judith E. Beasley
Judith S. Beaubouef
Jill F Bechtold
Joshua L. Becker
Frank M. Bedell
Joan F Beer
Steven L. Beiley
Cathleen G. Bell


UF LAW




















Greg Bell
John E. Leighton 8 Caryn L. Bellus
Jack W. Belt
Michelle D. Beneski
Carlton F Bennett
Susan F Bennett
Morgan R. Bentley
Jeffrey B. Berg
Zelma L. Berger
Bill Berke
Steven M. Berman 8 Jill M. Gunn
Christopher D. Bernard
Mackenson 8 Shawntoyia Bernard
Debra H. Bernes
E. Sue Bernie
Paul B. Bernstein
Brian M. Bez
Brandon C. 8 Rachel E. Biederman
Jay P Cohen 8 Christine K. Bilodeau
David L. Bilsker
Marvin W. Bingham, Jr.
W. 0. Birchfield
Tina M. Bird
James O. Birr, Jr.
C. Ken Bishop
Matthew B. Bishop
E. Kelly Bittick, Jr.
Susan H. Black
William M. Black
Russell M. Blain
Timothy C. Blake
Byron B. Block
Gertrude H. Block
Darryl M. Bloodworth
Allan M. Blue
Boies, Schiller 8 Flexner
Thomas R. Bolf
Bradley J. 8 Tandy G. Bondi
John R. Bonner, Sr.
William R. Boose III
Bradley T. Borden
Daniel D. Bowen
David E. Bowers
Richard K. Bowers, Jr.
Martin L. Bowling
David S. Boyce
James A. Boyd, Jr.
Tyrie A. Boyer
Christopher W. Boyett
Robert J. Boylston
Stephen John Bozarth
Jacqueline Bozzuto
Lenore T. Brakefield
David A. Brennen
Matthew C. Brewer
K. Clayton Bricklemyer
Shana H. Bridgeman
Shelton S. Bridges IV
Thomas P Briggmann
Randy R. Briggs
Penny H. Brill
Michael Brinkley
Heather B. Brock
W. Bard Brockman
Brokers Legal Group
Theotis 8 Jeanelle G. Bronson
Richard J. Brooderson 8
JoAnn M. Guerrero
Greg Brown
Thomas R. Brown
Wendy R. Brown


Derek E. Bruce
John M. 8 Caroline P Brumbaugh
Leon H. Brush
Patrick M. Bryan
Penelope E. Bryan
Kimberly Bryars-Blanchard
Ernest T. Buchanan III
Morison Buck
Allen Buckley
Toby J. Buel, Sr.
Mark P Buell
Bruce S. Bullock
Dean B. Bunch
George E. Bunnell
Brian D. Burgoon
Faye A. Burner
David D. Burns
John B. Burns
G. Brian Butler
Patricia G. Butler
Bob Butts
James H. Buzbee
David K. Cahoone
Ashley N. Calhoun
Michael T Callahan
John F Callender, Jr.
Jessica M. Callow
Amelia M. Campbell
Monterey Campbell
David E. Cannella
R. Dean Cannon, Jr.
J. Thomas Cardwell
John K. Carey
Darrell F. Carpenter, Jr.
Robert J. 8 Kathryn A. Carr
Steven W. Carta
Charles H. Carver
Allan L. Casey
Mary E. Catchings
Casey M. Cavanaugh
E. Hugh Chappell, Jr.
Jon C. Chassen
Alison K. Chastain
Richard R. Chaves
Neil H. Chonin
David E. Chopin
Mark Citrin
Johanna W. Clark
Cobb Family Foundation, Inc.
Thomas C. Cobb
Barry M. Cohen
Bart L. Cohen
Stuart R. Cohn
Harry S. Colburn, Jr.
R. John Cole II
Jonathan S. Coleman
Lowell D. Collie, Jr.
John J. Collins, Jr.
R. Scott 8 Kelly J. Collins
Charles E. Commander
Christopher G. Commander
Wayne R. Compton
Carlos F. Concepcion
Al J. Cone
Fred M. Cone, Jr.
Cristin A. Conley
Kraig A. 8 Heather L. Conn
Dabney L. Conner
John T. 8 Kim Conner
Marc A. 8 Karen Z. Consalo
William T. Cook


Law Firms Accept the Challenge

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a e-a- -, *lkt.I 1 rI l i. .,hnli.. 101.1 i. e.-n i,.lii l'pa snll ')f
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S:am nll,'_'ill.l] : ijar,:'l [) n'li.lk- gift Io the L in C' ll-eg
of LaV a ,iil .1i.uppon a .3 a ri l, .)f X\')i1s1h il pII 1 .j.nan Li's l-i
Ij lo,'' .:ir the hil'I '- .li'i s otti i, .h]lc-a.lor i and .Olu.int-eei
-h.aiipfior,_n ot th t liiL cipa iri.l hiiIns ii't l iee ,c-atel oril ;
11'10 eier, '; .';'i l\ i ,-p \ i t an I 1'--:3 i;. rh- lt


* Anchors Smith b Grimsley
F v.ailI..lin BE-.:. Lir, K--f-
* Andrx Corporation
PIji[[.l.n _..hi.I.h B ,Ve'_inqr-.:
* Boose, Casey, Ciklin, Lubitz.
Martens. McBane O'Connell
'.- Pain.r BE:-.ac -
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* Dean Mead

Laul Ms lii:.i 1.:. i.--4
* Feldman Gale, RA.
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* Harris. Harris. Bauerle b
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* Hill. Ward b Henderson
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* J. Parker Ailstock. RA.
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* Johnson. Pope. Bokor. Ruppel b
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* Jones. Foster Johnston b
Stubbs. RA.
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* King. Blackwell b Downs RA.
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* King b Spalding. RA.
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* Kubicki Draper
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* Maney b Gordon. RA.
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* Pressly b Pressly. RA.
UV'.-, Pain. B.?'.:h -
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* Quarles b Brady LLP

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* Sutherland. Asbill b Brennan
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* White b Case LLP
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* Bush Ross RA.
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* Gray Robinson. RA.
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* Carlton Fields
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,7it-,,," in Dr, ..I,, .. l-.,-


+1909 Society Member (see page 63 for description)


WINTER 2007














DISTINGUISHED DONORS


Charles L. Cooper, Jr.
Derek S. Cooper
James E. Copeland
Nathan L. Coppernoll
Craig Corbett
Stephen L. Cordell
Sarah Cortvriend
R. Scott 8 Monico O. Costantino
Derrick E. Cox
Ernest A. Cox III 8 Maria G. Cox
Frederick C. Craig, Jr.
Donald H. Crawford II
Lloyd V. Crawford
Charles M. Cray
Gene E. Crick, Jr.
Lewis F Crippen
Robert D. Critton, Jr.
Jerry B. Crockett
Marsha J. Croland
Marion M. Cromwell
Pamela J. Crone
Michael D. Crosbie
Samuel G. Crosby
Daniel S. Livingstone 8
Mary C. Crotty


Patrick T. Deren
Christopher A. Detzel
Benjamin F. Diamond
Juan M. Diaz
Nelson D. Diaz
Roberto J. Diaz
William M. Dillon
Phillip S. Dingle
Russell W. Divine
Andrew T Dixon
David L. Dixon
Patricia A. Doherty
Jerome F 8 Linda C. Dolan
Michael P Donaldson
Samuel A. Donaldson
Charles W. Dorman
Michael S. Dorris
G. Sheppard W. Dozier
David E. Dreyer
James O. Driscoll
G. Ray Driver, Jr. 8 Lisa R. Driver
W. Ford Duane
F. Joseph DuBray
Cynthia A. Duncan
Richard J. Dungey


Scott T. 8 Sam Farrell
Paul M. Faver
Christopher M. Fear
Frank H. Fee III
Dyanne E. Feinberg
Craig D. 8 Karen P Feiser
Lawrence D. Felder
Brian E. Feldman
Joel R. Feldman
Todd W. Fennell
Meredith T Fensom
Mark A. Fenster
Luanne E. Ferguson
Marco Ferri
Franklin D. Fields, Jr.
Gregg H. Fierman
Richard J. Fildes
Jack J. 8 Cherie H. Fine
Tony M. Fineman
Andrew D. Fisher
Brian T. Fitzgerald
Paul D. Fitzpatrick
John P Flanagan, Jr.
Shawn M. Flanagan
Alyson C. Flournoy


Beth Ann Gause
Robert H. Gebaide
Alison E. Gerencser
Alan M. Gerlach, Jr.
John F. Germany, Sr.
Anne F. Gerry
Ellen R. Gershow
David M. Giard
Francis B. Gibbs
Nancy J. Gibbs
Robin Gibson
James H. Gilbert, Jr.
Suzanne E. Gilbert
Joel B. Giles
John M. Gillies
John A. Gilmore III 8
Amy B. Grass Gilmore
Jill Haberman Giordano
Gregory T. 8 Jaime R. Girgenti
Lorraine S. Glass
Glendale Nature Preserve
Jeremy E. Gluckman
Allison M. Gluvna
Don E. Goebel
John C. Goede


Your Reach purchases and maintains technology.


Christine A. Crousillat
Elizabeth M. Crowder
T Spencer Crowley
Raul A. Cuervo
Jonathan P 8 Camille A. Culver
Paul M. Cummings
Gerald B. Curington
Barry A. Currier
Martha A. Curtis
Lauren E. Cury
Mark H. Dahlmeier
Duane A. 8 Teresa K. Daiker
Stephen E. Dalton
Ricky R. Damerville
James N. Daniel III
Alys N. Daniels
Srinivas R. Dantuluri
Rick E. Dantzler
Howard S. Dargan
C. LeAnn Davis
Edward B. Davis, Jr.
Hayward H. Davis
Jeffrey Davis
Joseph H. Davis III
Kenneth S. Davis
Lawrence J. 8 Margaret E. Davis
Lynne M. Davis
Terri R. Day
H. Edward Dean
Theodore A. Deckert
George R. Dekle, Sr.
Terence J. Delahunty, Jr.
Susan F Delegal
Dellecker, Wilson, King,
McKenna 8 Ruffier
Dell Graham
Angela C. Dempsey
V. Robert Denham, Jr.


George T. Dunlap III
John R. Dunphy
William E. Dunwody III
Harolyn H. Dutt
Donald A. Dvornik
Alan P 8 Rebecca C. Dye
David W. Dyer
John H. Dyer, Jr. 8
Karen Caudill Dyer
Edward J. Dyke III
Deborah S. Eaton
Linda Ebin
Charles F Edwards
Harry R Edwards
Laura A. Eidson
Harry M. Eisenberg
Gregory W. Eisenmenger
Dennis J. Eisinger
Steven Ellison
Guy S. Emerich
John D. Emmanuel
Stephen C. Emmanuel
Lisa H. Enfield
Patricia H. Engman
Manuel Epelbaum
Theodore A. Erck III
Donna J. Ernest
Robert T. Ervin
Maria I. Escoto-Castiello
Lisa A. Esposito
Kerry I. 8 Elizabeth K. Evander
Stephen L. 8 Hallie S. Evans
William A. Evans
Gail G. Fagan
Nancy J. Faggianelli
Alyson L. Falik
Alfred M. Falk
John M. Farrell


Joseph E. Fluet III
James L. Fly
Stephen E. Fogel
Foley 8 Lardner
Sally H. Foote
P Campbell Ford
Timothy K. Ford
James W. Forsyth
W. Ray Fortner
Joseph E. Foster
Kenneth R. Fountain
Kevin D. 8 Andrea J. Fowler
Gregory A. Fox
Jed L. Frankel
Ronald S. Frankel
The Franklin 8 Carmichael Law Firm
Larry C. Frarey
Seann M. Frazier
S. Katherine Frazier
Nancy S. Freeman
Mitchell I. Fried
Keathan B. Frink
Peter J. Fryefield
Andrew M. Fussner
Eric K. Gabrielle
Charles M. Gadd, Jr.
Robert P Gaines
Louis A. Gaitanis
Betsy J. Gallagher
Joan L. Galletta
Melinda P Gamot
Stephen D. Gardner
Howard D. 8 Leslie Y. Garfield
Christopher M. Garrett
Howard L. Garrett
Latasha A. Garrison-Fullwood
Alan S. Gassman
Jon T. Gatto


Stuart E. Goldberg
Golder Associates
Robert I. Goldfarb
Paul M. Goldman
Mark E. Goldstein
David Gonzalez
Jose A. Gonzalez, Jr.
Don H. Goode
Freddie L. Goode
Andrew F Gordon
Cheryl L. Gordon
Howard W. Gordon
Jonathan C. Gordon
Robert E. Gordon
Bradley R. Gould
Bryan S. Gowdy
Jonathan S. Gowdy
Matthew L. Grabinski
Albert N. Graham
Nancy C. Graham-Lawler
Jill M. Granat
Todd B. Grandy
Peter J. 8 Amy S. Gravina
Downing L. Gray
William P Gray III
Richard D. Green
Holly J. Greer
E. John 8 Yali C. Gregory
Lee T. Griffin
Linda S. Griffin-Keliher
Courtney K. Grimm
Robert S. Griscti
The Law Firm of Robert S. Griscti
Claramargaret H. Groover
Bradley C. Grossenburg
Frank B. Gummey III
William J. Gundlach
Kimberly J. Gustafson


UF LAW



















William C. Guthrie
Jack O. Hackett II 8 Mary O. Hackett
Dianne D. Hagan
Timothy D. 8 Patricia G. Haines
Victor M. Halbach, Jr.
James T. Haley
Adam S. Hall
Allan J. Hall
Frank D. Hall
Wallace H. Hall
Stanley G. Halliday
Patti W. Halloran
John F. Nancy P Halula
Laurence C. Hames
William F Hamilton
Virginia C. Hamner
Christopher J. Hand
Linda C. Hankins
Lydia R. Hanley
David F. Hannan
Beth Harlan 8 David J. Houston
Jill K. Harmon
Daniel B. Harrell
Gregory C. Harrell
Jennifer C. Harrington
Harris, Harris, Bauerle 8 Sharma
Christy F. Harris
Stumpy 8 Dorothy L. Harris
Jeffrey L. 8 Sarah W. Harrison
J. Larry Hart
Stephen B. Hatcher
Philip B. Hathorn
Todd A. Hauss
Zelda J. Hawk
Cynthia A. Hawkins
Jonathan L. Hay
Michael P Haymans
Christopher C. Hazelip
Jeffrey M. Hazen
Maureen M. Hazen
Kenneth R Hazouri
Robert J. Head, Jr.
Lauren C. Heatwole
Amanda D. Hechenberger
Charles V. Hedrick
Robert A. Heekin, Jr. 8
Elizabeth J. Heekin
Frederick C. Heidgerd
Jeanette K. Helfrich
Reverend Dorsey F Henderson, Jr.
William L. Hendry
Mary G. Henry
Matthew M. Henry
Nancy H. Henry
Jennifer C. Hepler
Todd E. Herberghs
Eugenio 8 Elizabeth M. Hernandez
Berta Esperanza Hernandez
Laura O. Hewett
Robert S. Hewitt
Joseph G. Heyck, Jr. 8 Marilyn G. Heyck
Benjamin P Hicks
Richard H. 8 Jane G. Hiers
Robert A. Higbee
Daniel L. Hightower
Lewis H. Hill III
William T. Hodges
Jeffrey D. Hogan
John L. Holcomb
Maurice D. Holloway
Robert F. Hoogland
James C. Hoover
Heidi Horak


Matthew B. Horan
Travis L. Horn
Steve C. Horowitz
Glenn R. Hosken
John R Howard
Louis F Hubener III
Hughes, Hubbard 8 Reed
Scott E. Hunt
Thomas R. Hurst
Gregg E. Hutt
L. E. Hutton
Thomas B. Hyman, Jr.
Wilton B. Hyman
Thomas V. Infantino II
Daniel C. Irick
Jerold H. Israel
John R lurlano
Matthew M. Jackson
Paul R. Jackson
Jeffrey A. Jacobs
Richard A. Jacobson
Kevin E. Jakab
Jay T. Jambeck
Daniel L. Molloy 8 Judith L. James
Philippe C. Jeck
John F. Jewell
C. Gray Johnsey
Carl L. Johnson
Edmond D. Johnson
Kristy M. Johnson
Sherri L. Johnson
Timothy A. Johnson, Jr.
Alexander T Johnston
Harry A. Johnston II
Michael W. Johnston
James T. Joiner
Frederick W. 8 Patricia PH. Jones
Jason Z. Jones
John A. Jones
John D. Jopling
Brian B. Joslyn
Matthew P 8 Cristin H. Julian
Thomas R. Julin
Joseph T. Jurkowski, Jr.
Charles J. Kahn, Jr.
David L. 8 Maida J. Kahn
David Kamer
Mark A. 8 Wendy W. Kamilar
Michael D. Kaminer
Katherine J. Kaminsky
Randy M. Kammer
Paul B. Kanarek
Murray Kanetsky
Lewis M. Kanner
John F Kasbar
Neisen O. Kasdin
Bruce E. 8 Patricia A. Kasold
George W. Kates
Edward M. Kay
Bryan W. Keene
Brian T. Kelly
Megan A. Kelly
Susan L. Kelsey
Peter T Kennedy
Michael G. Kerman
William C. Kerns
Mark S. Kessler
Nicole C. Kibert
Jay Kim
Bradford D. Kimbro
Robert A. Kimbrough
King, Blackwell 8 Downs
Clifford M. King


1909 Society


The 1 0 ')'I S .':Iir, :onirni.inI)rar-': [hl foundiiin g ,im.?i .aiId
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,RI I 5.'*; 1 2 .-0l.'l.'-.l'


*1909 Society Member (see page 63 for description)

WINTER 2007














DISTINGUISHED


DONORS


Frances S. & William A. King
Thomas C. King
Jack A. Kirschenbaum
Marvin A. Kirsner
Gerald R. Kleedehn
Christine Ann Klein
Steven I. Klein
Mark W. Klingensmith &
Wendy H. Werb
Robert D. & Elenore C. Klingler
Stephen R. Klorfein
David T. Knight
Gerald L. Knight
Melton E. Knotts, Jr.
Angelique D. Knox
Brian H. Koch
Joshua P Koehler & Jill A. Mahler
Jacalyn N. Kolk
Alan H. Konigsburg
Chris N. Kontaridis
Russell Koonin
Katherine M. Koops
Paul M. Korchin
Michael J. Korn
Traci A. Kratish


Mark F Lewis
Robert E. Lewis
Samuel A. Lewis
Lyrissa B. Lidsky
Rutledge R. Liles
Robert R. & Cheryl K. Lindgren
William J. Lindsay, Jr.
Samuel & Stacie Linsky
Karen G. Lipsey
William J. Liss
R. Dennis Tweed & Cheryl J. Lister
Joseph W. Little
Charles H. & Lorraine E. Livingston
Robert M. Lloyd
Scott Lodin
Caren L. Loguercio
Peter D. & Heather A. Loguidice
James J. Long
Donna L. Longhouse
Lamont C. Loo
Stephen R. Looney
Bernardo Lopez
Ralph C. Losey
Frederick J. Lotterhos III
Joan H. Lowenstein


Lorie A. Mason
M. Elaina Massey
Morris C. Massey
Richard L. Massey
John J. Masternick
Maureen Monaghan Matheson
James M. Matulis
Thomas M. & Shannon C. McAleavey
Alan K. McCall
William R. McCall, Jr. &
Laura R. McCall
Kevin M. McCarty
Paul B. McCawley
Chad M. McClenathen
Patrick F McCormack
Terry R. McDavid
John A. McDermott
John M. McDonald
Eric W. Jarvis & Marybeth McDonald
McDonough, Wieland 8 Shannon
Lawrence S. McDowell
G. Carson McEachern
Michael M. McFall
William D. McFarlane, Jr.
Howard O. McGillin, Jr.


Michael J. Monchick
Stephen N. Montalto
Ashley B. Moody
James S. Moody, Jr.
John H. Moore II & Joan K. Moore
Kendall T. Moore
Marilyn Ann H. Moore
Michael G. Moore
Robyn E. Moore
W. Taylor Moore
George R. & Karen K. Moraitis
George R. Moraitis, Jr.
Ivan A. Morales
John A. Moran
Andrew A. & Jessica A. Morey
Charles R. Morgan
Jon A. Morris
M. Scotland Morris
Tracy D. Morris
Robert T. Mounts
James E. Moye
Michael E. Muchnick
Greg T. & Joy Sabino Mullane
Edward M. Mullins, Jr. &
Rima Y. Mullins


Your Reach supports journals and publications


Fred J. Krim
Ryan M. Kroll
Edward J. Kuchinski
Amanda C. Kunz
Daniel R. Kurland
Theodore S. Kypreos
Chandra L. Lagrone
Rodney N. Laham
Paula N. Lamb
Allison N. Landgraff
William R. Lane, Jr.
Joseph H. Lang, Sr.
Mark P Lang
Suzanne D. Lanier
William W. Large
Roger A. Larson
Lester B. Law
John E. Lawlor III
David M. Layman
Jason D. Lazarus
Robert A. Lazenby
Martin E. Leach
Steven D. Lear
Barbara H. Lebow
William M. Lederer
Jordan G. Lee
Robert W. Lee
Brian D. Leebrick
Thomas V. Lefevre
Richard N. Lenner
Susan S. Lerner
Ross T. Lessack
Chauncey W. Lever, Jr.
Michael A. Levey
Julie M. Levitt
Russell D. Levitt
Charles D. Lewis, Jr.
Jeffrey E. Lewis
Leslie A. Lewis


Lowndes, Drosdick, Doster, Kantor
8 Reed
John T. Wettach, Jr. &
Amy S. Lowndes
James F Lowy
Elliott H. Lucas
Lance C. Lucey
Meredith D. Lukoff
Mitchell L. Lundeen
Donald J. Lunny, Sr.
Donald A. Lykkebak
Bassel J. Maali
MacKenzie Realty
Erick S. Magno
Robert C. Maland
John D. Malkowski
Robin Paul Malloy
Henry E. Mallue, Jr. &
Marilyn M. Mallue
Clint S. Malone
Robyn L. Mandel
I. Paul Mandelkern
R. Layton Mank
Leigh C. Manning
Mark E. Manovich
Lawrence J. Marchbanks
Jillian E. Marcus
Michael J. Marees
Anthony P Mario, Jr.
Jeffrey B. Marks
Andrew J. Markus
Kathy-Ann W. Marlin
Patrick F. Sheryl R. Maroney
Samuel A. & Sarah G. Maroon
John T. Marshall
Marie E. Marteli
Richard L. Martens
Rebecca E. Martinez
Amy R. Mashburn


Carl S. McGinnes
J. Thomas McGrady III
Barbara B. McGriff
W. John McHale IlI 8
Nancy S. Freeman
Daniel F Mclntosh
Robert D. Mclntosh
John D. McKey, Jr.
W. Campbell McLean, IV
Michael W. McNatt
John R. & Jennifer H. McRae
John N. & Ruth T. Giordano
Kathleen M. McRoberts
Jameil C. McWhorter
Greg D. Medalie
Telly J. Meier
Mark S. Meland
Robert L. Mellen III
Howell W. Melton, Jr.
Clancy V. Mendoza
Robert J. Merlin
Irvin A. Meyers
Scott Michelman
Stephan P Mickle
Stephanie M. Mickle
Frank E. Miller
Jason S. & Victoria O. Miller
Jona J. Miller
Julie C. Miller
Robert L. Miller
Robert S. Miller
Tiffani F. Miller
Charlton Mills
Michael J. Minerva
Lew I. & Jennifer I. Minsky
Charles P Mitchell
Charles S. Modell
Leroy H. Moe
Mark R. Mohler


Murphy 8 Anderson
Niels R & Lynne O. Murphy
John B. T. Murray, Jr.
Robert G. Murrell
Victor J. Musleh, Jr. &
Kelly H. Musleh
Keith E. Myers
Charles I. Nash
Jonathan H. Nason
Noel H. Nation
Ginny R. Neal
Marjie C. Nealon
Jeffrey A. Neiman
Michael R. Nelson
Michael E. Neukamm
Leon G. Nichols
Tracy A. Nichols
Richard A. Nielsen
Richard B. Nirenberg
James M. Nixon II
Shelly E. Nixon
Hubert C. Normile, Jr.
Sylvia A. Norris
Thomas G. Norsworthy
Mindy C. Nowakowski
Melody A. Nundy
Sean W. & Paula P O'Brien
Kathleen M. O'Connor
Susan M. O'Connor
Lisa S. Odom
Colleen C. O'Donnell
I. J. Wesley Ogburia
Fehintola Kemi Oguntebi
Matthew R. O'Kane
Keith M. Olivia
L. Delane Olson
Leslie K. O'Neal-Coble
Michael L. O'Neill
Steven A. Osher


UF LAW




















Tanja Ostapoff Michele L. Ratzan
Neil M. O'Toole Kurt A. Raulin
Wm. A. Oughterson Louis F. Ray, Jr.
Elizabeth Outler Daniel C. Re
Murray W. Overstreet, Jr. Austin F Reed
Ernest M. Page, Jr. Frederick T. & Vicki L. Reeves
William H. 8 Judith W. Page Kevin E. Regan
Taylor C. Pancake Jacob I. Reiber
Barbara R. Pankau Garland L. Reid
Robert E. Panoff Charles A. Reinhardt, Jr.
Gary M. Pappas Joel Reinstein
William A. Parady 8 Jack R. Reiter
Salome J. Zikakis Julius B. Remmen
Ava L. Parker William C. Rencher
Thomas M. Parker Paul R. Rentenbach
Marshall R. Pasternack Steven J. Resnick
Ami R. Patel Diego L. Restrepo
Ketan D. Patel W. Joseph Reynolds
Ben Patterson Kimberly B. Rezanka
John C. Patterson, Jr. Charles B. Ricca, Jr.
Matthew D. Patterson Janice Matson Rickert
B. Darin Patton Harley E. Riedel II
Neal G. Patton Catherine A. Riley
Frank A. Pavese, Jr. Keith W. Rizzardi
Jeanne A. 8 Brian A. Pelski Kathleen H. Roberts
Graham C. 8 Lara H. Penn James N. Robinson II
Carl R. Pennington III Mark E. Robinson
Leonard Pepper David A. Roby, Jr.
Steven A. Pepper Justo Rodriguez III
Phyllis M. Perrin-Harris Steven E. Rohan
Derek A. Schroth 8 Richard P Rollo
Anna Perry-Schroth William J. Romanos III
Jerrold K. Phillips J. Michael Rooney
T C. Phillips 8 Andrea E. Zelman John F Roscow III
Francis E. Pierce III Taylor K. Rose
Robert A. Pierce Howard M. Rosenblatt
Robert J. Pile Louis K. 8 Denise D. Rosenbloum
Charles Pillitteri Jason A. 8 Ashley A. Rosenthal
William A. Pinto, Jr. Michael S. Rosenthal
Nicholas J. Pisaris Paul E. Rosenthal
Michael A. Piscitelli Jeremy P Ross
S. Jay Plager Paul S. Rothstein
Evan B. Plotka Mark E. Rousso
J. David Pobjecky Roger J. Rovell
Scott D. 8 Ingrid H. Ponce Ronald L. Rowland
Kenneth C. Pope Alan L. Rubens
Nicholas A. Pope John D. Ruffier
Robert V. Potter, Jr. Sarah E. Rumpf
Frank R. Pound, Jr. Brian R Rush
Stephen J. Powell Randolph J. Rush
Mark A. Prater Sharon E. Rush
Joanne M. Prescott James D. 8 Debbie S. Ruskin
Pressly 8 Pressly Alec D. Russell
David S. Pressly Lanny Russell
J. Grier Pressly III Christopher J. Ryan
Renee Preston Kerry A. Ryan
Colleen A. Preston Michael S. Rywant
Raymond C. Preston Jr. 8 Christopher M. Sacco
Colleen A. Preston Eliot J. Safer
M. Julian Proctor, Jr. Richard G. Salazar
David R. Punzak Robert C. 8 Elizabeth B. Sanchez
James L. Purcell, Jr. Charles T. Sands
Kevin D. Purnell Brian J. Sasadu
Quarles 8 Brady Gail E. Sasnett-Stauffer
J. Peyton Quarles Johnson S. Savary
Paul S. Quinn, Jr. Harry M. Sawyer, Jr.
Gary S. Rabin Bradley M. Saxton
John H. Rains IV Paul D. Scala
Rahul P Ranadive Edwin A. Scales III
John C. Randolph John C. Schaible
John W. Randolph, Jr. John M. Scheb
Patrick C. Rastatter David L. Schick

*1909 Society Member (see page 63 for description)

WINTER 2007


Michael J. Schmidt
David Schmudds
Tura L. Schnebly
Al L. Schneider
Alan B. Schneider
Jason R. Schneider
Jeffrey C. Schneider
Michael N. Schneider
Seth E. Schneiderman
Samantha L. Schosberg
Wayne A. 8 Lorinda S. Schreier
Peggy F Schrieber
Roger D. Schwenke
Amanda B. Scott
Paul V Scott
James E. Seay
Stephen W. Seemer
Jeffrey D. Segal
Steven M. Seibert
Jan K. Seiden
David M. Seifer
Michael L. Seigel
Susan M. Seigle
Jeremy M. Sensenig
Bruce G. 8 Pamela K. Shaffner
Anna C. Shea
L. David Shear
Robert D. Sheesley
Stephen B. Shell
Lewis E. 8 Linda L. Shelley
Christian D. 8 K. Shawn Shields
A. Edwin Shinholser
John B. Shoemaker
Andrew D. Zaron 8
Erica S. Shultz Zaron
Rebecca Shwayri
Paula M. Sicard
Ardith A. Sider
Michael R. Siebecker
Edward Siegel
Kenneth M. Sigelman
Michael P Silver
Frederick W. Silverman
Sidney S. Simmons II
Michael D. Simon
John S. Simons
Debbie S. Ruskin
Jeanne M. Singer
Thomas J. Sireci, Jr.
Michelle Sisco
Chester L. Skipper
Cynthia C. Slack
Susan Slagle
Thomas F. Slater
Donald D. Slesnick II 8
Jeannett B. Slesnick
Christopher Slobogin
A. Russell Smith
David T. 8 Sandra G. Smith
Rodney W. 8 Deidra C. Smith
Douglas A. Smith
Gilbert A. Smith
Janet Smith
Justin R. Smith
Roy J. Smith IV
Phillip S. 8 Lori W. Smith
M. Stephen Smith III
Robert B. Smith
Thomas B. Smith
Tito S. Smith
Lori A. Sochin
Richard A. Solomon


Class Gifts Reach

New Records







$ 1 : 'I.' r ..'.:. I. j: r .k i .



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DISTINGUISHED


DONORS


Gaylin G. Soponis
The South Financial Group
Stacy F Speiller
Andrew P Speranzini
Martin J. Sperry
Mitchell H. Spingarn
Alexander Spitzer
Brian J. Stack
Richard E. Stadler
Andrew M. Stanko
Norma Stanley
Peter T. Stanley
Stephen G. Stanton
Hugh E. Starnes
Mark E. Stein
Ali Steinbach
James A. Stepan
Laurie E. Stern
Robert A. Stern
James P Stevens
John D. Stewart
Larry M. Stewart
Larry S. Stewart
William J. Stewart, Jr.
Denise B. Stobbie


Jennifer M. Tipping
Michael W. Tittsworth
Charles D. Tobin
Adria M. Toledo
Sara A. Tolliver
Allen R. Tomlinson
Diane A. Tomlinson
John A. Walker &
Stephanie J. Toothaker
David T. Traub & Mary B. Weigly
Kenneth A. Treadwell
Yvette M. Trelles
Tara V. Trevorrow
Tritt 8 Franson
Victor J. Troiano
Richard B. Troutman
Christopher M. Tuccitto
John K. Tucker
M. Stephen Turner
Kenneth F. Tworoger
David R. Tyrrell
Justin B. Uhlemann
Samuel C. Ullman
S. Thomas Ullman
Scott A. F Erica A. Underwood


Ronald W. Wells
Winifred L. Wentworth
Jennifer A. West
Terry A. Wex
Ralph S. Wheatly
Matthew B. Wheeley
Denise L. Whisenant
K. Taylor White
Wilbert's
Gregory F. Susan K. Wilder
James B. Wiley
James R. Wiley
Charlotte W. Williams
Dirk A. Williams
Gerald A. Williams
J. Mason Williams III
Joseph H. Williams
Robert F Williams
Sean T. Williams
Steele T. Williams
Samuel A. & Tracy P Williamson
Robert H. Willis
Brian S. Wilson
Courtney B. Wilson
Dale S. Wilson


Melissa S. Zinkil
Wilma L. Zippel
Barry L. Zisser
Joseph W. Zitzka, Jr.

Gifts through
Estate Planning

J. Parker Ailstock
Anonymous
Michael A. Bedke
John C. Bierley
Susan H. Black
James D. Camp, Jr.
Warren M. Cason
Debra A. Doherty
Harold A. Gokey
Ransom Griffin
Robert E. Gunn
Stumpy Harris
Mark Hulsey*
Jeffery Q. Jonasen
T. Paine Kelly, Jr.
David T. Knight
Frederick W. Leonhardt


Your Reach funds travel for student competitions.


Brian D. Stokes
Keith H. & Laura S. Stolzenberg
Kimarie R. Stratos
Charles S. Stratton
Michael H. Streater
Charles K. Stuart, Jr.
Michael P Sullivan
Timon V. Sullivan
Timothy M. Sullivan
Lynn H. Sumlin
Gary L. Summers
Roland A. Sutcliffe, Jr.
Michael F Sutton
Jeffrey C. Sweet, Sr.
Robert A. & Karen D. Sweetapple
T.O.P Jewish Foundation, Inc.
James A. Taylor III
Jeffrey M. Taylor
John C. Taylor, Jr.
L. Haldane Taylor
Misty M. C. Taylor
Porcher L. Taylor III
R. Bradley Taylor
Robert L. Taylor
Sarah H. Teed
Lee P Teichner
Robert J. Telfer, Jr.
Donald R. Tescher
Lori A. Tetreault
David Tetrick, Jr.
Matthew E. Thatcher
Robert W. Thielhelm, Jr.
Bradford L. Thomas
Loretta J. Thompson
Cathy B. Thomson
Robert H. Thornburg
James B. Tilghman, Jr.
Tim 8 Terry's Music & More


Ustler II, Inc.
Jeffrey A. Utay
James F. Valenti, Jr.
Laurie W. Valentine
William A. Van Nortwick, Jr.
John G. Varney
Dale W. Vash
W. Eric Venable
Alfred Joseph Ventura
Vogel Law Office
Volpe, Bajalia, Wickes, Rogerson
& Wachs
Wallace C. Von Arx III
Sylvia H. Walbolt
Glenn J. Waldman
Mark E. 8 Karen D. Walker
Robert D. Walker, Jr.
John R. Wallace
Max N. Wallace
Douglas A. Ward
Robert A. Ware, Jr.
J. Phillip Warren
Water & Air Research, Inc.
Daniel H. Waters, Jr.
Gordon K. Watson
James A. Watson
Valerie A. Watson
Robert W. Wattwood
H. Adams Weaver
Daniel R. Weede
Gerard F. Wehle, Jr. & Joann T. Wehle
Joshua B. Weingard
Richard S. Weinstein
Vicki J. Weinstein
John A. Weiss
Christine Welch
John M. Welch, Jr.
Robert J. Wells


David Wilson III
John D. Wilson
Laurel F Wilson
Richard H. Wilson
William M. Wilson, Jr.
Scott E. Wilt
C. Douglas Wingate
Mary Ellen Jones Winkler
Gail I. Winson
Allen C. Winsor
William A. Winter
Law Offices of Wites & Kapetan
Matthew L. Wolfe
Mark J. Wolfson
Lisa M. Wolgast
Douglas A. Wood
Charles F. Woodhouse &
Barbara Bennett Woodhouse
James H. Woodroffe III
Robert B. Worman
John B. Wright, Jr.
Wilson W. Wright
Art Wroble
Elizabeth A. Wulff
Robert Q. Wyckoff, Jr.
James L. Yacavone III
David A. Yarema
Tad A. Yates
Bruce I. & Betsy F. Yegelwel
Ormend G. Yeilding
Jan A. Yelen
Joe F. Mary M. Yonek
Laura M. Young
Stuart A. Young
Richard M. Zabak
Leslie B. Zacks
Thomas A. Zehnder
Anton H. Zidansek


Harlan E. Markham
Michael J. McNerney
Mark W. Merrill
John H. Moore II
Corneal B. Myers, Jr.
Brian M. O'Connell
Benjamin F. Marilyn Overton
Robert P Rosin
J. Quinton Rumph
David C. Sasser*
Ronald Y. Schram
Neva S. Sessums
T. Terrell Sessums, Sr.*
W. Paul Shelley, Jr.
Eric B. Smith
Betty H. Stern
Robert G. Stern
Donald Q. Vining
A. Ward Wagner, Jr.
Sandra L. Warren
Frank Wotitzky
Art Wroble
Stephen N. Zack

Legacy Society

Donors who have named the Fredric
G. Levin College of Law as benefici-
ary of an insurance policy
Timothy C. Blake
Robert Eugene Glennon
James R. Holmes
Betty S. LaFace
Robert W. Morrison
Edward C. Rood
Roger Dean Schwenke
Robert Gary Stern
William K. Zewadski


UF LAW





















Book Awards



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Administrative Law
* Tir-...:.h, PJ1 a Lo. i r. 1 r.:.-I

Advanced Bankruptcy
* II.:l '9 F~.i i~. l U[I 3


Advanced Liligation
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Appellate Advocacy
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Child. Parent 8 State
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Civil Procedure
* Fi:.. 1.i.:eel DuI.,e, S.'.i -I
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* .'l- ,.ie ,. E"i..


Civil Tax Procedure
* F. I...i.i i .:.- H-ii..-I F-- 'l

Constitutional Law
* Paci ..i E F ,' laI lihr, P'A
* Kienntl. R .:,ni..nio:.n F
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Contracts
* F-.:.-, a La.i.ln-i

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Corporations
* Il r -h, ll [,.1 -..i 9 E .,'
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* Fa,..ll.il Pai l E-.i


Creditors' Remedies 8 Bankruptcy
* .1"l '- r .V .ri-in F-.'

Criminal Clinic -
Public Delender Clinic
* The H.:.n Fi-l T n..In


Criminal Law
* in lh.:in, bani.lihi Ei .I
* R T.i .,rihi .Ia- il EI


Criminal Procedure -
Adversary System
* Philll l I [J.L ,, ELi Ini H.:.l': .:. l
FPr, :.-.-_,.:.i K-nn-r h r nn

Criminal Procedure -
Police 8 Police Practices
* inn- Flhin .,, .11 F:-

Delerred Compensation
* An. 1e.. .1 Fa.c t..L h EiS ..

Eminent Domain 8 Takings
* -n.:.- Ml H.-iuu, Ei.-i
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Employment Discrimination
* .I.:.hn i -an pb-ll Ei ..i l

Estate Planning

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* E,..J...i F K.:- -n Ei
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Estates 8 Trusts

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* E ni .In 1 :.:. I ,-nn ll lE n .l.:... .ll

Evidence


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* .las-it if 1 i5

* ijiiF-...ol:..n-... PA IE ..I .:l 1l
* A n. T iirell Hi ,.Ji1i .

Family Law
* RP.:.t-n. F- F.. In ln.:i- i, .:.I
Irr. ..iq .. I h rl.I.n F.:.'.

Federal Courts
* F- talla.: P. :.[ i- i E ..I

Florida Administrative Law
* L.u. -,-.. E a .-r., [ S- ll.-

Florida Constitutional Law
* Ale-, Snil a E,L. b..ll I.I D 7 11
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Income Taxation ol
Estates 8 Trusts
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Insurance
* llP shn Lai. ., ,i,:.,u: PA


Intellectual Property
* Loi a Fi.iejlani..l P

Intellectual Property Litigation
* F-l.ir..,.n .r.1 P-

International Business
Transactions
* .-.:.hn. a Tli, bil rle, lEn.I.:,',- l

International Litigation 8
Arbitration
* Mi.:lih l .I [i.:I in.-II Et..

Jurisprudence
* .ill Ho,:::,- E -.

Land Finance
* F..,:I An.i Aas- Tl-..:. ,pS:ni

Land Use Planning b Control
* b-:.-.- _', i- illn Li iLF ,Iiz



Kaiii. ,. a F-.. PAF

Law 6 Psychiatry
* L,..ini.n- K--I

Legal Accounting
* F.-11 H-enll PK

Legal Research 8 Writing
S i.:.. i Fi-r..: K b


Mediation
* .iiiii- F Pale- -F- P.
P.q.l- i ,.i-.F A .:.:'.

Medical Technology and The Law
* .ii- E i F Th,:.n .ii ,:.In

Negotiation 8 Mediation
S .I I.:...ui.ii F-ri ..F.ia E'I

Partnership Taxation
* Pe-i i I i-.-n: E .i i.I D I
* i.:..* -n.1--. i, ,i.:i I, U l.,i-r
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Professional Responsibility
8 The Legal Prolession
* 0 .- L.l-...I Eg.-n.:.n

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-nn.l, F--l..IF.: t [iF.t.... .II
* U.:.i.., b .I..:, M ihin-
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* K .li.. lh Lain


Property

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Remedies
* Fai-r;i Aillhi:,l, a Tal .:.i P-

Sports Law
* Fr..n. ,m re.-r I-. ii
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State And Local Taxation
* Au-.il-, ,3 PJ.:PMiilln. P-

Tax Policy
* Ta. ,nailtit In.

Torts
SR: Vii.n..,n .Ba.II Ei,.
* PaulI Lin.rli E91F
* :Cl.rl-. i, P F.an.l Ei.

Trial Practice
* Bai L Da.,u Thli:. nti:.
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* b II -..r.n-. 'i
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* PAii.:.n Leai.:'. Ai' nii i.aui
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* Li.:.nri .1 T.-I Ir l,u1r.. ri. l
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* 5:.:.n D Sh-1fill

* V.:-,I. F i-m-1 1 i,,h'i.:l, F,
R:. .. it. -I a 0 Va. lit

While Collar Crime
* Inr H.:.n.:.i Ci:t C: 1" lI P Pill.an. III
i E l.: .,,. II

Workers' Compensation
8 Other Employment Rights
* Ft.,-iii.1- t tV-imi.mi PA


i i I 1 ;























ALUMNI FROM MANY GRADUATING CLASSES made financial commitments
to help the college grow stronger and expand programs and services, thereby
permitting the college to reach toward its full potential.


Class of 1936
Class Total: $100.00
No. in Class: 19
Participation: 5%
Enrichment Society
A. Edwin Shinholser

Class of 1939
Class Total: $7,108.00
No. in Class: 15
Participation: 20%
Founders Society gold
W. Paul Shelley, Jr.
Enrichment Society
Leonard Pepper

Class of 1940
Class Total: $100.00
No. in Class: 25
Participation: 4%
Enrichment Society
Louis A. Gaitanis

Class of 1942
Class Total: $1,012,400.50
No. in Class: 8
Participation: 25%
Enrichment Society
Thomas V. Lefevre

Class of 1943
Class Total: $5,000.00
No. in Class: 8
Participation: 13%
Founders Society gold
Irving Cypen

Class of 1945
Class Total: $100.00
No. in Class: 7
Participation: 14%
Enrichment Society
Harry R Edwards


Class of 1946
Class Total: $20,100.00
No. in Class: 13
Participation: 15%
Founders Society gold
Lewis M. Schott
Enrichment Society
Robert S. Hewitt


Class of 1947
Class Total: $5,952.20
No. in Class: 28
Participation: 7%
Founders Society silver
Robert M. Ervin
Trusler Society
David W. Hedrick

Class of 1948
Class Total: $24,450.00
No. in Class: 82
Participation: 10%
Founders Society gold
Gerald J. Klein
Trusler Society
Mark Hulsey*
Paul G. Rogers*
Enrichment Society
Morison Buck
Marie G. Garrett
Ernest M. Page, Jr.

Class of 1949
Class Total: $3,770.00
No. in Class: 93
Participation: 9%
Partners
D. Burke Kibler III
Enrichment Society
Thomas H. Barkdull, Jr.
Bart L. Cohen
Howard L. Garrett
John A. Jones
George W. Kates
Al L. Schneider
Richard S. Weinstein

Class of 1950
Class Total: $1,100.00
No. in Class: 86
Participation: 12%
Founders Society gold
Warren M. Cason
Enrichment Society
John R. Bonner, Sr.
Al J. Cone
John M. Farrell
John R Howard
Wm. A. Oughterson
John M. Scheb

Class of 1951
Class Total: $41,701.74
No. in Class: 95
Participation: 9%


Founders Society gold
James D. Camp, Jr.
Marshall M. Criser
Trusler Society
Mandell Glicksberg
John A. R. Grimaldi
Enrichment Society
Frank D. Hall
Fred J. Krim
Gilbert A. Smith
Winifred L. Wentworth
Robert H. Willis

Class of 1952
Class Total: $110,964.60
No. in Class: 45
Participation: 11%
Founders Society gold
Benjamin F Overton
Trusler Society
Evans Crary
Enrichment Society
Hayward H. Davis

Class of 1953
Class Total: $4,100.00
No. in Class: 48
Participation: 10%
Founders Society gold
Charles W. Abbott
Trusler Society
Anthony S. Battaglia
Melvyn B. Frumkes
Enrichment Society
Robert G. Murrell
Murray W. Overstreet, Jr.

Class of 1954
Class Total: $6,100.00
No. in Class: 46
Participation: 13%
Founders Society gold
Robert L. Trohn*
Associates
Stephen H. Grimes
Trusler Society
Ned F Sinder
Enrichment Society
Tyrie A. Boyer
Monterey Campbell
W. Joseph Reynolds

Class of 1955
Class Total: $10,165.90
No. in Class: 35
Participation: 20%


Associates
W. Dexter Douglass
Trusler Society
Robert J. Beckham
George A. Vega, Jr.*
Enrichment Society
W. Ray Fortner
Lewis H. Hill III
Edward Siegel

Class of 1956
Class Total: $2,850.00
No. in Class: 37
Participation: 22%
Trusler Society
Peter T. Fay
Enrichment Society
Louie N. Adcock, Jr.
Reubin O. Askew
Jerry B. Crockett
Marion M. Cromwell
Robert R Gaines
Johnson S. Savary

Class of 1957
Class Total: $54,400.00
No. in Class: 48
Participation: 17%
Founders Society gold
Robert M. Montgomery, Jr.
Founders Society silver
A. Ward Wagner, Jr.
Associates
James E. Yonge
Trusler Society
Paul W. Danahy, Jr.
Enrichment Society
Jack W. Belt
James O. Driscoll
Jose A. Gonzalez, Jr.
Hon. William L. Hendry

Class of 1958
Class Total: $6,450.00
No. in Class: 65
Participation: 12%
Founders Society gold
T Terrell Sessums, Sr.*
Founders Society silver
David Hyman
Enrichment Society
William T Hodges
Harry A. Johnston II
Lewis M. Kanner
Donald J. Lunny, Sr.
S. Jay Plager


UF LAW

























Your Reach brings distinguished speakers to campus.


Class of 1959
Class Total: $90,600.00
No. in Class: 63
Participation: 5%
Associates
Stephen W. Sessums
Enrichment Society
Robert J. Boylston

Class of 1960
Class Total: $3,200.00
No. in Class: 73
Participation: 10%
Founders Society gold
Ray F Ferrero, Jr.
Trusler Society
Bill Wagner
Enrichment Society
Thomas R. Brown
Edward B. Davis, Jr.
Robert A. Kimbrough
L. David Shear
Chester L. Skipper

Class of 1961
Class Total: $2,107,100.00
No. in Class: 75
Participation: 16%
Founders Society gold
Fredric G. Levin

Founders Society silver
Jon C. Moyle
Associates
E. Thom Rumberger
Enrichment Society
Robert J. Carr
Neil H. Chonin
George T Dunlap III
Paul M. Goldman
Irvin A. Meyers
John H. Moore II
Frank R. Pound, Jr.
Harry M. Sawyer, Jr.
Robert A. Ware, Jr.

Class of 1962
Class Total: $26,726.60
No. in Class: 109
Participation: 17%
Founders Society silver
C. DuBose Ausley
Partners
Wilton R. Miller
Ernest A. Sellers
Associates
J. Charles Gray


Grace W. Taylor
Enrichment Society
Byron B. Block
Leon H. Brush
Bruce S. Bullock
George E. Bunnell
Robin Gibson
James H. Gilbert, Jr.
James C. Hoover
R. Layton Mank
Michael M. McFall
Barry L. Zisser

Class of 1963
Class Total: $9,750.00
No. in Class: 94
Participation: 15%
Founders Society gold
John C. Bierley
Partners
Bruce S. Rogow
Trusler Society
Chief Justice Harry L. Anstead
Tad Davis
S. Austin Peele*
Enrichment Society
Ronald R Anselmo
W. O. Birchfield
Joseph G. Heyck, Jr.
Murray Kanetsky
Joseph H. Lang, Sr.
Leon G. Nichols
Larry S. Stewart
Sylvia H. Walbolt

Class of 1964
Class Total: $55,825.00
No. in Class: 133
Participation: 7%
Founders Society silver
Charles T Wells
Trusler Society
Robert R. Feagin III
George D. Gabel, Jr.
Michael L. Jamieson*
Enrichment Society
Haywood M. Ball
Alton S. Beasley
Stephen D. Gardner
Nicholas J. Pisaris
Hugh E. Starnes

Class of 1965
Class Total: $218,576.59
No. in Class: 135
Participation: 15%
Founders Society gold
R. Dewey Burnsed


Founders Society silver
Sidney A. Stubbs, Jr.
Partners
Gerald D. Schackow
Associates
Alan J. Rubinstein
Trusler Society
Norman A. Coil
Benjamin H. Hill III
Enrichment Society
C. LeDon Anchors, Jr.
Charles E. Commander
Victor M. Halbach, Jr.
Wallace H. Hall
Stumpy Harris
Steve C. Horowitz
Robert A. Lazenby
Michael J. Minerva
Leroy H. Moe
W. Taylor Moore
Jeremy P Ross
M. Stephen Turner
Richard H. Wilson

Class of 1966
Class Total: $27,200.00
No. in Class: 177
Participation: 12%
Founders Society gold
W. Kelly Smith
Founders Society silver
Richard M. Robinson
Associates
Charles R Pillans III
Stephen F Rossman
Trusler Society
L. Kinder Cannon III
Allan R Clark
Ronald C. LaFace
Enrichment Society
Allan M. Blue
Ernest T. Buchanan III
J. Thomas Cardwell
Howard W. Gordon
Edward M. Kay
Rutledge R. Liles
Robert S. Miller
George R. Moraitis
Robert T Mounts
James M. Nixon II
Stephen J. Powell
Louis F Ray, Jr.
John F Roscow III

Class of 1967
Class Total: $34,975.00
No. in Class: 227
Participation: 11%


Founders Society silver
C. Wayne Alford
E. C. Deeno Kitchen
Partners
Roberta F Fox*
Frederick A. Hazouri*
Trusler Society
Barry R. Davidson
John A. DeVault III
Bill Hoppe*
Barry S. Sinoff
Council Wooten, Jr.
Enrichment Society
Susan H. Black
Fred M. Cone, Jr.
Stephen E. Dalton
W. Ford Duane
Timothy K. Ford
Robert J. Head, Jr.
Dorsey F Henderson, Jr.
Roger A. Larson
Robert M. Lloyd
Terry R. McDavid
Hubert C. Normile, Jr.
Samuel C. Ullman
Ralph S. Wheatly
James H. Woodroffe III

Class of 1968
Class Total: $75,586.72
No. in Class: 188
Participation: 18%
Founders Society gold
Andrew C. Hall
Justus W. Reid, Sr.
Partners
Patrick E. Geraghty, Sr.
Douglas J. Milne*
Rick Thompson*
Associates
Charles W. Arnold, Jr.
John J. Upchurch IV
Trusler Society
Les W. Burke
Robert C. Matthias
Warren E. Williams
Enrichment Society
Herbert L. Allen
Richard C. Ausness
Fred R. Baisden, Jr.
George Barford
Earl M. Barker, Jr.
Stephen John Bozarth
Michael Brinkley
Thomas C. Cobb
Ronald S. Frankel
Jonathan C. Gordon
Allan J. Hall
John A. McDermott


WINTER 2007














JD ALUMNI


Robert D. Mclntosh
John D. McKey, Jr.
M. Julian Proctor, Jr.
Charles T Sands
Donald D. Slesnick II
Mitchell H. Spingarn
Kenneth F. Tworoger

Class of 1969
Class Total: $51,210.00
No. in Class: 185
Participation: 16%
Founders Society silver
James A. Hauser
F. Wallace Pope, Jr.
Partners
Robert W. Mead, Jr.
Associates
Peter W. Zinober*
Trusler Society
Charles H. Egerton
James C. Fleming
Dan H. Honeywell
Clifton A. McClelland, Jr.*


Charles M. Gadd, Jr.
James T Haley
David F Hannan
Christy F Harris
Donald A. Lykkebak
Stephan R Mickle
John C. Randolph
Robert A. Stern
John C. Taylor, Jr.
John K. Tucker
William A. Van Nortwick, Jr.
H. Adams Weaver

Class of 1971
Class Total: $22,353.90
No. in Class: 222
Participation: 13%
Founders Society gold
Howard C. Coker
W. C. Gentry
Barristers
Robert S. Bolt
Stephen N. Zack


Associates
G. Thomas Ball
Russell H. Kasper
Trusler Society
Hal H. Kantor*
Donald S. Kohla*
Christine N. Markussen
Jon L. Mills
Clifford A. Schulman
Enrichment Society
James W. Almand
Steven D. Atkinson
C. Ken Bishop
James H. Buzbee
Allan L. Casey
Richard J. Dungey
Christopher M. Fear
Frank B. Gummey III
Carl L. Johnson
James T Joiner
David L. Kahn
Elliott H. Lucas
G. Carson McEachern
William D. McFarlane, Jr.


F. Joseph DuBray
Luanne E. Ferguson
Stanley G. Halliday
Zelda J. Hawk
Thomas V. Infantino II
Gerald L. Knight
Alan H. Konigsburg
Andrew J. Markus
Michael J. Monchick
Richard A. Nielsen
Patrick C. Rastatter
Jan K. Seiden
Kenneth A. Treadwell
S. Thomas Ullman
Gordon K. Watson
Joseph H. Williams
Dale S. Wilson
Robert B. Worman
Art Wroble


Class of 1974
Class Total:
No. in Class:
Participation:


$151,444.34
292
15%


Your Reach makes UF Law nationally competitive.


Enrichment Society
A. Graham Allen
James O. Birr, Jr.
William R. Boose III
Patricia H. Engman
William A. Evans
Frank H. Fee III
Thomas B. Hyman, Jr.
Timothy A. Johnson, Jr.
William M. Lederer
Henry E. Mallue, Jr.
Noel H. Nation
Ben Patterson
John C. Patterson, Jr.
Roger D. Schwenke
Alexander Spitzer
William J. Stewart, Jr.
Donald R. Tescher
f. Robert F Williams

Class of 1970
Class Total: $12,260.00
No. in Class: 206
Participation: 15%
Associates
Mercer K. Clarke
Trusler Society
Ronald A. Carpenter
Joseph C. Mellichamp III*
Ronald Y. Schram
Malcolm B. Wiseheart, Jr.
Enrichment Society
Jeffrey B. Berg
John M. Brumbaugh
Steven W. Carta
E. Hugh Chappell, Jr.
Dabney L. Conner
H. Edward Dean
William E. Dunwody III
Guy S. Emerich


Trusler Society
Roger L. Blackburn
Robert F Hudson, Jr.
John K. Vreeland*
Enrichment Society
Larry B. Alexander
Timothy C. Blake
Darryl M. Bloodworth
Alan R Dye
Jeremy E. Gluckman
William J. Gundlach
Louis F Hubener III
Barbara H. Lebow
Charles H. Livingston
Joel Reinstein
Steven E. Rohan
Bruce G. Shaffner
Martin J. Sperry
Michael P Sullivan
Roland A. Sutcliffe, Jr.
R. Bradley Taylor
Robert J. Telfer, Jr.
Douglas A. Ward

Class of 1972
Class Total: $100,453.75
No. in Class: 355
Participation: 11%
Founders Society gold
John J. Schickel, Sr.
Jeffrey W. Warren*
Founders Society silver
Bruce H. Bokor
James G. Pressly, Jr.
Richard B. Stephens, Jr.
Partners
Gene K. Glasser
Richard C. Grant*
James F Page, Jr.*


James S. Moody, Jr.
J. Michael Rooney
Michael N. Schneider
L. Haldane Taylor
Robert L. Taylor
Dale W. Vash
W. Eric Venable

Class of 1973
Class Total: $16,901.00
No. in Class: 391
Participation: 12%
Founders Society gold
John H. Dasburg
Founders Society silver
George E. Schulz, Jr.
Barristers
John H. Haswell
Partners
Peter C. K. Enwall
Associates
Martha W. Barnett
Trusler Society
Kenneth C. Ellis
Mary B. Ellis
Patricia Combs Fawsett
Mal Steinberg
William H. Stolberg
Leighton D. Yates, Jr.
Enrichment Society
Sharon B. Atack
Joseph W. Beasley
Dean B. Bunch
Michael T Callahan
Wayne R. Compton
Paul M. Cummings
Lawrence J. Davis
George R. Dekle, Sr.
Susan F. Delegal
Col. Charles W. Dorman


Founders Society gold
Robert G. Merkel
Founders Society silver
Hugh F Culverhouse, Jr.
Edward F Koren
Barristers
K. Lawrence Gragg
J. Bruce Hoffmann
Partners
Andrew J. Fawbush
Robert E. Glennon, Jr.
Gwynne A. Young*
Associates
Richard R Cole
Frederick W. Leonhardt
Trusler Society
Thomas J. Korge
Leslie J. Lott
Michael T Moore
Edward O. Savitz, Jr.
Frank D. Upchurch III
Enrichment Society
James V. Barrios
Zelma L. Berger
R. John Cole II
Theodore A. Erck III
James L. Fly
Peter J. Fryefield
Nancy H. Henry
Frederick W. Jones
Joseph T Jurkowski, Jr.
David T. Knight
Judith M. Korchin
Jeffrey B. Marks
J. Thomas McGrady III
Robert L. Mellen III
Stephen N. Montalto
Harley E. Riedel II
Louis K. Rosenbloum
Eliot J. Safer


UF LAW

















James E. L. Seay
Larry M. Stewart
Jeffrey C. Sweet, Sr.
John A. Weiss
Bruce I. Yegelwel

Class of 1975
Class Total: $47,323.75
No. in Class: 366
Participation: 14%
Founders Society silver
Kitty Phillips
Barristers
Maureen G. Gragg
Partners
John W. Campbell*
John A. Shipley Ill
Associates
Jeffrey A. Hirsch
Marsha G. Madorsky
R. Duke Woodson
Trusler Society
Barry A. Abbott
Anne C. Conway*
Ronald A. David
Robert M. Harris
Enrichment Society
James A. Barks
Bernard A. Barton, Jr.
Carlton F Bennett
Marvin W. Bingham, Jr.
Daniel D. Bowen
Randy R. Briggs
Craig Corbett
Kenneth S. Davis
Theodore A. Deckert
Christopher A. Detzel
Alan M. Gerlach, Jr.
Richard D. Green
Frederick C. Heidgerd
Paul B. Kanarek
Paul M. Korchin
John E. Lawlor III
Robert C. Maland
Anthony R Mario, Jr.
Patrick F Maroney
Howell W. Melton, Jr.
Barbara R. Pankau
Jerrold K. Phillips
J. Peyton Quarles
Austin F Reed
M. Stephen Smith III
Rodney W. Smith
Tito S. Smith
Vicki J. Weinstein
John M. Welch, Jr.
Terry A. Wex
Gerald A. Williams

Class of 1976
Class Total: $25,015.00
No. in Class: 385
Participation: 15%
Founders Society silver
Scott L. Whitaker
Barristers
Hans G. Tanzler III
Partners
R. Vinson Barrett*
Scott D. Sheftall*
Associates
James L. George


Trusler Society
William A. Boyles*
W. Michael Clifford
Sally A. Dorn
William H. Ferguson*
Elizabeth A. Jenkins
Becky A. Powhatan*
Gregg D. Thomas
William A. Weber
Enrichment Society
Brett D. Anderson
Michael R. Band
Mark R Buell
Mary E. Catchings
Robert D. Critton, Jr.
Samuel G. Crosby
Gerald B. Curington
James N. Daniel III
Jack J. Fine
John R Flanagan, Jr.
Betsy J. Gallagher
Jill Haberman Giordano
Laurence C. Hames
Daniel B. Harrell
J. Larry Hart
Rodney N. Laham
Mark F Lewis
James J. Long
Richard L. Martens
Alan K. McCall
Carl S. McGinnes
Tanja Ostapoff
Nicholas A. Pope
Charles A. Reinhardt, Jr.
Paul E. Rosenthal
Tura L. Schnebly
Stephen W. Seemer
Kenneth M. Sigelman
Charles S. Stratton
Allen R. Tomlinson
Victor J. Troiano
David R. Tyrrell
John R. Wallace
David Wilson III
Scott E. Wilt
James L. Yacavone III
Stuart A. Young

Class of 1977
Class Total: $15,485.00
No. in Class: 325
Participation: 15%
Trusler Society
Ralph Artigliere
Barbara J. Staros
Mary R Twitchell
Enrichment Society
Joan F Beer
Russell M. Blain
David S. Boyce
Toby J. Buel, Sr.
Lewis F Crippen
Marsha J. Croland
Gregory W. Eisenmenger
Richard J. Fildes
Sally H. Foote
Don H. Goode
Freddie L. Goode
Patti W. Halloran
Benjamin R Hicks
Charles J. Kahn, Jr.
Jack A. Kirschenbaum
Mark R Lang


Mitchell L. Lundeen
Charles S. Modell
Leslie K. O'Neal-Coble
Jacob I. Reiber
Catherine A. Riley
Lewis E. Shelley
Linda L. Shelley
Jeanne M. Singer
Thomas J. Sireci, Jr.
Thomas B. Smith
Michael F Sutton
James F. Valenti, Jr.
Alfred Joseph Ventura
Max N. Wallace

Class of 1978
Class Total: $39,651.80
No. in Class: 376
Participation: 14%
Barristers
Pedro A. Martin
W. Crit Smith
Dale M. Swope
Partners
C. Randolph Coleman*
James E. Eaton, Jr.
Associates
Albert A. Sanchez, Jr.
Ned M. Shandloff
Trusler Society
Caleb J. Grimes
Michele B. Grimes
Linda C. McGurn
Daniel F Molony
Enrichment Society
Jacqueline Allee
Peter Baker
Debra H. Bernes
E. Sue Bernie
Jeanelle G. Bronson
Theotis Bronson
Kendall Coffey, Esq.
Barry M. Cohen
Jay P Cohen
Martha A. Curtis
Charles F Edwards
Gail G. Fagan
Mitchell I. Fried
Melinda P Gamot
Cheryl L. Gordon
Robert E. Gordon
Peter J. Gravina
Judith L. James
Patricia R H. Jones
Randy M. Kammer
Mark S. Kessler
Chauncey W. Lever, Jr.
Robert J. Merlin
Frank E. Miller
Daniel L. Molloy
Francis E. Pierce III
Colleen A. Preston
Gary S. Rabin
Charles B. Ricca, Jr.
Jeffrey D. Segal
Sandra G. Smith
Michael H. Streater
Michael W. Tittsworth
William M. Wilson, Jr.
Robert Q. Wyckoff, Jr.
Richard M. Zabak


Class of 1979
Class Total: $37,638.84
No. in Class: 327
Participation: 15%
Founders Society gold
Brian M. O'Connell
Partners
Barry L. Davis
Peter T Kirkwood
David C. Sasser*
Trusler Society
Ladd H. Fassett*
Alfred J. Malefatto
Moria Rozenson
Lawrence E. Sellers, Jr.
Enrichment Society
Joni Armstrong Coffey, Esq.
James R Beadle
Susan F Bennett
Christopher D. Bernard
Christine K. Bilodeau
Faye A. Burner
V. Robert Denham, Jr.
Joseph E. Foster
Robert S. Griscti
Jack O. Hackett II
Charles V. Hedrick
Jeanette K. Helfrich
John L. Holcomb
Glenn R. Hosken
Mark A. Kamilar
Neisen O. Kasdin
Bruce E. Kasold
Michael J. Korn
David M. Layman
Scott Lodin
Ralph C. Losey
Michael J. Marees
Steven A. Pepper
David S. Pressly
Peggy F Schrieber
A. Russell Smith
Richard E. Stadler
Timon V. Sullivan
Robert A. Sweetapple
Robert W. Wattwood
Jennifer A. West
Gail I. Winson

Class of 1980
Class Total: $33,106.00
No. in Class: 360
Participation: 13%
Founders Society gold
Mary Lou D. Dasburg
Ultima D. Morgan
Founders Society silver
Evan J. Yegelwel
Partners
Peter J. Genz*
Trusler Society
Charles M. Rand
Rob Webb
Enrichment Society
Judith S. Beaubouef
Richard K. Bowers, Jr.
Penny H. Brill
Jon C. Chassen
Russell W. Divine
Linda Ebin
Dennis J. Eisinger
Manuel Epelbaum
Kerry I. Evander


WINTER 2007














JD ALUMNI


Hallie S. Evans
Robert I. Goldfarb
Mark E. Goldstein
Cynthia A. Hawkins
Jennifer C. Hepler
Philippe C. Jeck
Michael W. Johnston
Ross T Lessack
Robin Paul Malloy
Chad M. McClenathen
Neil M. O'Toole
Marshall R. Pasternack
Michael S. Rosenthal
Paul S. Rothstein
Randolph J. Rush
Lanny Russell
Steven M. Seibert
Debbie S. Ruskin
Charles K. Stuart, Jr.
Janet M. Stuart
Richard B. Troutman
C. Douglas Wingate
Jan A. Yelen


Brian B. Joslyn
Thomas R. Julin
Marvin A. Kirsner
Stephen R. Klorfein
Jacalyn N. Kolk
Paula N. Lamb
Richard N. Lenner
Cheryl K. Lindgren
Robert R. Lindgren
Barbara B. McGriff
James E. Moye
Kathleen M. O'Connor
Neal G. Patton
Carl R. Pennington III
Howard M. Rosenblatt
Janet Smith
Gary L. Summers
Laurie W. Valentine
Wallace C. Von Arx III
Ronald W. Wells
Matthew B. Wheeley
J. Mason Williams III


Susan S. Lerner
Rebecca E. Martinez
Marybeth McDonald
Michael A. Piscitelli
Robert V Potter, Jr.
Brian R Rush
Paul D. Scala
Bradford L. Thomas
R. Dennis Tweed
Mark J. Wolfson

Class of 1983
Class Total: $30,714.92
No. in Class: 339
Participation: 13%
Barristers
Edward E. Sawyer
Partners
Scott C. Ilgenfritz
Barbara R Vaka
George A. Vaka*
Trusler Society
Janet M. Courtney


Associates
Hank B. Campbell
Trusler Society
Allen N. Jelks, Jr.
James H. Shimberg Jr.
Enrichment Society
David J. Akins
Brian M. Bez
Thomas R. Bolf
Patrick M. Bryan
Howard S. Dargan
John D. Emmanuel
Brian T. Fitzgerald
R Campbell Ford
Alison E. Gerencser
Christopher C. Hazelip
Charles D. Lewis, Jr.
Cheryl J. Lister
Tracy A. Nichols
Michael L. O'Neill
David R. Punzak
Stephen B. Shell
Brian J. Stack


Your Reach assists student organizations.


Class of 1981
Class Total: $28,240.00
No. in Class: 383
Participation: 15%
Partners
Michael D. Minton
Associates
R. Mason Blake
Trusler Society
Susan E. Cook*
Jeffrey D. Feldman
Kenneth C. Johnson
Kenneth R. Johnson
Kimberly L. Johnson
Sharon A. Knight
Robert L. Tankel
David H. Vickrey
Patricia A. Willing
Enrichment Society
Victoria J. Alvarez
Mary C. Arpe
David C. Banker
Penelope E. Bryan
James E. Copeland
Frederick C. Craig, Jr.
Deborah A. Damerville
Ricky R. Damerville
Rick E. Dantzler
Joseph H. Davis III
David W. Dyer
Lisa H. Enfield
Elizabeth K. Evander
Cherie H. Fine
Stephen E. Fogel
Lorraine S. Glass
Nancy C. Graham-Lawler
Beth Harlan
Robert A. Higbee
Nancy H. Jackson


Class of 1982
Class Total: $48,048.26
No. in Class: 401
Participation: 14%
Founders Society gold
John B. Morgan
Barristers
John N. Giordano
Partners
R. Lawrence Heinkel*
Paul R. Linder*
Margaret D. Mathews
Gary Lee Printy*
Oscar A. Sanchez*
Associates
Scott J. Feder
Gregory A. Nelson
Timothy W. Volpe
Trusler Society
Jeffery A. Boone*
Nathan S. Collier
Linnes Finney, Jr.*
Julia L. Frey
Linda R. Getzen
Enrichment Society
Kathryn A. Carr
Carlos F Concepcion
Alys N. Daniels
Terence J. Delahunty, Jr.
Patricia A. Doherty
Nancy J. Faggianelli
Alan S. Gassman
Michael J. Gelfand
Joel B. Giles
Stuart E. Goldberg
Michael P Haymans
Robert F Hoogland
Richard A. Jacobson
John D. Jopling
Brian T Kelly
Frances S. King


Robert H. Dellecker
James A. Gale
Lourdes F La Paz*
Dee D. Reiter
Enrichment Society
Richard L. Barrett
John K. Carey
Stephen C. Emmanuel
Stephen L. Evans
Dyanne E. Feinberg
Gregory A. Fox
Lee T Griffin
Linda S. Griffin-Keliher
William F Hamilton
Elizabeth M. Hernandez
Eugenio Hernandez
Richard H. Hiers
Edmond D. Johnson
William A. King
Suzanne D. Lanier
Russell D. Levitt
Karen G. Lipsey
Joan H. Lowenstein
Laura A. McCall
T Clay Phillips
Mrs. Lorinda S. Schreier
Sidney S. Simmons II
Porcher L. Taylor III
Glenn J. Waldman
Christine Welch
James R. Wiley
William A. Winter

Class of 1984
Class Total: $11,050.00
No. in Class: 324
Participation: 10%
Barristers
Alan B. Cohn
Partners
Bill Bone*


Brian D. Stokes
Kimarie R. Stratos
Andrea E. Zelman


Class of 1985
Class Total: $12,495.00
No. in Class: 364
Participation: 11%
Trusler Society
Eduardo Palmer*
William J. Schifino, Jr.
Deborah B. Story*
Enrichment Society
Alan I. Armour II
Bill Berke
Patricia G. Butler
Amelia M. Campbell
Raul A. Cuervo
Lynne M. Davis
Steven Ellison
Gregg H. Fierman
Ariadne M. Fitzgerald
H. Douglas Garfield
Leslie Y. Garfield
Timothy D. Haines
Linda C. Hankins
Michael G. Kerman
Mark W. Klingensmith
Robert W. Lee
John E. Leighton
Robert E. Lewis
Daniel F Mclntosh
Marilyn Ann H. Moore
Mrs. Marjie C. Nealon
Michael E. Neukamm
Phyllis M. Perrin-Harris
Frederick T. Reeves
Robert C. Sanchez
Cynthia C. Slack
Ali Steinbach
Lisa L. Troutman


UF LAW

















Mary B. Weigly
Salome J. Zikakis

Class of 1986
Class Total: $18,577.94
No. in Class: 392
Participation: 8%
Partners
R. Timothy Jansen*
Lawrence Keefe
James E. Thomison*
Douglas A. Wright
Enrichment Society
Robert G. Abood
J. Parker Ailstock
Alan M. Applegate
Frank A. Ashton
Frank M. Bedell
E. Kelly Bittick, Jr.
Mark Citrin
Mary C. Crotty
Phillip S. Dingle
Scott E. Hunt
Lucy W. Kerman
Steven D. Lear
Morris C. Massey
Kevin M. McCarty
William A. Parady
Frank A. Pavese, Jr.
Susan M. Seigle
Paula M. Sicard
Thomas F Slater
Richard A. Solomon
James A. Taylor III
Courtney B. Wilson
Wynnora S. Wilson

Class of 1987
Class Total: $9,165.00
No. in Class: 378
Participation: 10%
Partners
Mayanne Downs*
Trusler Society
Kathleen M. Paustian
Enrichment Society
Alan B. Almand
Mary Jane Angelo
Harolyn H. Dutt
John H. Dyer, Jr.
Karen Caudill Dyer
Joan L. Galletta
Claramargaret H. Groover
Dianne D. Hagan
John F Halula
Amy R. Mashburn
Maureen Monaghan Matheson
L. Delane Olson
Gary M. Pappas
Ava L. Parker
Paul S. Quinn, Jr.
Mark E. Robinson
Christopher J. Ryan
David L. Schick
Amanda B. Scott
Laurel F Wilson

Class of 1988
Class Total: $10,688.30
No. in Class: 365
Participation: 8%


Associates
Barry B. Ansbacher
Darrell W. Payne
Trusler Society
Beth B. Mills
Katherine G. Upchurch
Enrichment Society
Glenn A. Adams
Bruce R. Anderson, Jr.
Jacqueline Bozzuto
Charles H. Carver
Jonathan S. Coleman
Kraig A. Conn
R. Scott Costantino
Michael P Donaldson
Nancy P Halula
Susan L. Kelsey
Edward J. Kuchinski
Mark S. Meland
Michael D. Simon
Douglas A. Smith
Gerard F. Wehle, Jr.
Brian S. Wilson


Class of 1989
Class Total: $5,328.26
No. in Class: 355
Participation: 8%
Founders Society silver
Corinne C. Hodak
Associates
John T Rogerson III
Trusler Society
Bruce D. Landrum
Enrichment Society
Joseph E. Ankus
Judith E. Beasley
Cathleen G. Bell
W. Bard Brockman
Donald A. Dvornik
Brian E. Feldman
Andrew D. Fisher
Amy B. Grass-Gilmore
Jennifer C. Harrington
Katherine M. Koops
Howard O. McGillin, Jr.
Charles R Mitchell
Richard B. Nirenberg
Evan B. Plotka
John B. Shoemaker
Stephen G. Stanton
Mark E. Stein
Lee R Teichner
Charles D. Tobin
Robert D. Walker, Jr.

Class of 1990
Class Total: $8,090.00
No. in Class: 379
Participation: 7%
Associates
Glenn L. Criser
Trusler Society
Jonathan B. Trohn
Jack A. Weiss
Enrichment Society
Steven M. Berman
David L. Bilsker
Casey M. Cavanaugh
Derrick E. Cox
Ernest A. Cox III
Laura A. Eidson


Paul M. Faver
Todd W. Fennell
Jill M. Granat
Jeffrey D. Hogan
Bernardo Lopez
John D. Malkowski
John J. Masternick
Greg D. Medalie
Edward M. Mullins, Jr.
Kenneth C. Pope
Bradley M. Saxton
Robert W. Thielhelm, Jr.
John T Wettach, Jr.

Class of 1991
Class Total: $15,250.00
No. in Class: 379
Participation: 11%
Partners
Phillip J. Mays*
Trusler Society
Kelly B. Pritchard
Robert H. Pritchard
Enrichment Society
Steven L. Beiley
Christopher W. Boyett
David A. Brennen
Thomas R Briggmann
Pamela J. Crone
Terri R. Day
Maria I. Escoto-Castiello
Larry C. Frarey
John M. Gillies
Philip B. Hathorn
Michael D. Kaminer
Bradford D. Kimbro
Leslie A. Lewis
Jon A. Morris
Sylvia A. Norris
Robert J. Pile
Michele L. Ratzan
Kimberly B. Rezanka
Mark E. Rousso
Richard G. Salazar
Edwin A. Scales IIl.
Alan B. Schneider
Jeffrey C. Schneider
Michelle Sisco
Keith H. Stolzenberg
Yvette M. Trelles
Wendy H. Werb
Mrs. Tracy P Williamson
Douglas A. Wood

Class of 1992
Class Total: $4,949.98
No. in Class: 366
Participation: 8%
Enrichment Society
Morgan R. Bentley
R. Dean Cannon, Jr.
John R. Dunphy
Lisa A. Esposito
Seann M. Frazier
S. Katherine Frazier
Nancy S. Freeman
David M. Giard
Courtney K. Grimm
Laura O. Hewett
Caren L. Loguercio
Amy S. Lowndes
James F Lowy
John B. T Murray, Jr.


Paula R O'Brien
Sean W. O'Brien
Kevin D. Purnell
John W. Randolph, Jr.
Lynn H. Sumlin
Lori A. Tetreault
Diane A. Tomlinson
Mark E. Walker
Andrew D. Zaron

Class of 1993
Class Total: $12,664.92
No. in Class: 406
Participation: 8%
Partners
Bruce M. Harris*
K. Judith Lane
Trusler Society
Mark O. Bagnall
Todd A. Bancroft
Enrichment Society
Nancy Baldwin
Heather B. Brock
David E. Cannella
Angela C. Dempsey
David E. Dreyer
Jed L. Frankel
Todd B. Grandy
William R Gray III
William W. Large
Donna L. Longhouse
Jennifer H. McRae
Jona J. Miller
Ami R. Patel
Janice Matson Rickert
Kathleen H. Roberts
Phillip S. Smith
Karen D. Walker
Leslie B. Zacks

Class of 1994
Class Total: $11,077.00
No. in Class: 381
Participation: 10%
Trusler Society
Jeffrey S. Bartel
Matthew N. Posgay
Sharon H. Proctor
Marc A. Wites
Enrichment Society
Stacey Y. Adams
Kimberly Bryars-Blanchard
Jonathan P Culver
Duane A. Daiker
G. Ray Driver, Jr.
Tony M. Fineman
Kenneth R. Fountain
Anne F Gerry
William C. Guthrie
Kenneth P Hazouri
Megan A. Kelly
Martin E. Leach
Peter D. Loguidice
Thomas M. McAleavey
Paul B. McCawley
Michael W. McNatt
Mark R. Mohler
Fehintola Kemi Oguntebi
Thomas M. Parker
Ketan D. Patel
Jack R. Reiter
Keith W. Rizzardi
Jason A. Rosenthal
Lori A. Sochin


WINTER 2007














JD ALUMNI


John D. Stewart
Tad A. Yates

Class of 1995
Class Total: $212,063.81
No. in Class: 381
Participation: 10%
Founders Society gold
Lynn E. Burnsed
Partners
Timothy M. Cerio
Associates
Joseph H. Lang, Jr.
Trusler Society
Frank A. Hamner*
Kimberly R. Keravouri
Enrichment Society
Scott R Andrew
Scott E. Atwood
Bryan F. Aylstock
Caryn L. Bellus
Christopher G. Commander


Suzanne E. Gilbert
Jonathan S. Gowdy
Adam S. Hall
Matthew B. Horan
Scott Michelman
I. J. Wesley Ogburia
Joanne M. Prescott
James L. Purcell, Jr.
John D. Ruffier
Jeremy M. Sensenig
David Tetrick, Jr.
Jennifer M. Tipping
John A. Walker
Dabney D. Ware

Class of 1997
Class Total: $10,299.92
No. in Class: 372
Participation: 10%
Partners
Rahul Patel*
Associates
Maria C. Carantzas


Marco Ferri
Francis B. Gibbs
John C. Goede
Jeffrey M. Hazen
Kristy M. Johnson
Bryan W. Keene
Julie M. Levitt
Bassel J. Maali
Richard L. Massey
Ivan A. Morales
Susan M. O'Connor
Ingrid H. Ponce
Scott D. Ponce
William J. Romanos III
Taylor K. Rose
Brian J. Sasadu
Michael J. Schmidt
David M. Seifer
Matthew E. Thatcher
E. John Wagner II
Joshua B. Weingard
Mary Ellen Jones Winkler


Class of 2000
Class Total: $5,695.00
No. in Class: 393
Participation: 11%
Enrichment Society
Cristina Alonso
Paul B. Bernstein
Brandon C. Biederman
Karen Z. Consalo
Christine A. Crousillat
Mark H. Dahlmeier
Edward J. Dyke III
Deborah S. Eaton
Franklin D. Fields, Jr.
Keathan B. Frink
Beth Ann Gause
Jill K. Harmon
Russell Koonin
Clint S. Malone
Ashley B. Moody
Mindy C. Nowakowski
Graham C. Penn


Your Reach supports events for students and faculty.


Michael D. Crosbie
Eric K. Gabrielle
Samuel A. Lewis
James M. Matulis
Patrick F McCormack
Jennifer I. Minsky
Lew I. Minsky
Kendall T Moore
Niels R Murphy
Thomas G. Norsworthy
William C. Rencher
Seth E. Schneiderman
Christine R. Sensenig
Christian D. Shields
Lori W. Smith
Jeffrey M. Taylor
Lisa S. Taylor
Misty M. C. Taylor
Daniel R. Weede
Charlotte W. Williams
Steele T. Williams
Thomas A. Zehnder

Class of 1996
Class Total: $7,775.00
No. in Class: 375
Participation: 11%
Trusler Society
Henry T. Sorensen II
Enrichment Society
Carolyn S. Ansay
Michael R. Ansay
Daniel Bachrach
Lynne F Bachrach
Tina M. Bird
Greg Brown
Bob Butts
John F Callender, Jr.
Lowell D. Collie, Jr.
R. Scott Collins
Roberto J. Diaz
Andrea J. Fowler
Kevin D. Fowler


Enrichment Society
Geddes D. Anderson, Jr.
F Eugene Atwood
Brian D. Burgoon
Richard R. Chaves
Cristin A. Conley
Scott T Farrell
Robert H. Gebaide
Mrs. Shannon B. Gray
L. E. Hutton
Jeffrey A. Jacobs
Jay T. Jambeck
Sherri L. Johnson
Alexander T Johnston
Mrs. Cristin H. Julian
Matthew R Julian
Jay Kim
Jason D. Lazarus
Jillian E. Marcus
John T Marshall
W. Campbell McLean, IV
M. Scotland Morris
Kurt A. Raulin
Justo Rodriguez III
Stephanie J. Toothaker
Christopher M. Tuccitto
John D. Wilson

Class of 1998
Class Total: $9,650.00
No. in Class: 391
Participation: 12%
Associates
Ellen C. Ham
Enrichment Society
Linda A. Alley
Chintan K. Amin
J. Carter Andersen
Bradley J. Bondi
Derek E. Bruce
Michael S. Dorris
Robert T. Ervin
Craig D. Feiser


Class of 1999
Class Total: $10,398.29
No. in Class: 390
Participation: 12%
Partners
Jeffrey R Brock*
Enrichment Society
Bradley T Borden
Shelton S. Bridges IV
Wendy R. Brown
Johanna W. Clark
Marc A. Consalo
David L. Dixon
Donna J. Ernest
Joseph E. Fluet Ill
Andrew M. Fussner
Latasha A. Garrison-Fullwood
Bryan S. Gowdy
Matthew L. Grabinski
Holly J. Greer
Kimberly J. Gustafson
Gregory C. Harrell
Maureen M. Hazen
Jason Z. Jones
Chris N. Kontaridis
Brian D. Leebrick
Kathy-Ann W. Marlin
Samuel A. Maroon
Sarah G. Maroon
Michael G. Moore
Joy Sabino Mullane
Ginny R. Neal
Lara H. Penn
William A. Pinto, Jr.
J. Grier Pressly III
Richard R Rollo
Alec D. Russell
John S. Simons
James A. Stepan
Timothy M. Sullivan
Ormend G. Yeilding


Steven J. Resnick
Derek A. Schroth
Paul V. Scott
Lisa A. G. Smith
Roy J. Smith IV
Andrew R Speranzini
Andrew M. Stanko
Laurie E. Stern
Sara A. Tolliver
K. Taylor White

Class of 2001
Class Total: $5,580.00
No. in Class: 379
Participation: 9%
Enrichment Society
Cynthia A. Alcantara
Ben Alexander
Jon T. Gatto
Jaime R. Girgenti
Bradley R. Gould
Captain E. John Gregory
Lydia R. Hanley
Amanda D. Hechenberger
Matthew M. Jackson
Katherine J. Kaminsky
Samuel R. Linsky
Stacie M. Linsky
Jason S. Miller
Keith E. Myers
Jeffrey A. Neiman
Melody A. Nundy
Mrs. Ashley A. Rosenthal
Christopher M. Sacco
Jason R. Schneider
Erica S. Shultz Zaron
Frederick W. Silverman
Justin B. Uhlemann

Class of 2002
Class Total: $5,991.00
No. in Class: 403
Participation: 11%


UF LAW

















Enrichment Society
Amanda M. Abraham
Jeffrey W. Abraham
Lynn S. Alfano
Sara S. Becker
Mackenson Bernard
Matthew B. Bishop
Srinivas R. Dantuluri
C. LeAnn Davis
Cynthia A. Duncan
Brian H. Koch
Theodore S. Kypreos
Erick S. Magno
Jameil C. McWhorter
George R. Moraitis, Jr.
Mrs. Tracy D. Morris
Steven A. Osher
Matthew D. Patterson
Renee Preston
James N. Robinson II
Samantha L. Schosberg
Robert H. Thornburg
Allen C. Winsor

Class of 2003
Class Total: $9,308.33
No. in Class: 426
Participation: 15%
Enrichment Society
Mark A. Addington
Joshua L. Becker
Mrs. Shawntoyia N. Bernard
Jessica M. Callow
John T. Conner
Sarah Cortvriend
Donald H. Crawford II
Benjamin F Diamond
Juan M. Diaz
Linda C. Dolan
Meredith T Fensom
JoAnn M. Guerrero
Christopher J. Hand
Lauren C. Heatwole
Robert A. Heekin, Jr.
Todd E. Herberghs
Kevin E. Jakab
Nicole C. Kibert
Steven I. Klein
Elenore C. Klingler
Robert D. Klingler
Traci A. Kratish
Amanda C. Kunz
Chandra L. Lagrone
Robyn L. Mandel
Lawrence S. McDowell
Shelly E. Nixon
B. Darin Patton
Kevin E. Regan
Sarah E. Rumpf
Scott A. Underwood
Matthew C. Vinton
J. Phillip Warren
Lisa M. Wolgast
Melissa S. Zinkil

Class of 2004
Class Total: $9,835.00
No. in Class: 397
Participation: 17%
Trusler Society
Adam M. Jarchow
Darren K. McCartney


Enrichment Society
Evan L. Abramowitz
Joni L. Batie-McGrew
Lenore T Brakefield
Matthew C. Brewer
K. Clayton Bricklemyer
Shana H. Bridgeman
David D. Burns
Alison K. Chastain
David E. Chopin
William T. Cook
Derek S. Cooper
Nathan L. Coppernoll
Elizabeth M. Crowder
Nelson D. Diaz
Alyson L. Falik
Christopher M. Garrett
Allison M. Gluvna
David Gonzalez
Matthew M. Henry
Gregg E. Hutt
Daniel C. Irick
Ryan M. Kroll
Allison N. Landgraff
Jordan G. Lee
Lance C. Lucey
Marie E. Marteli
Lorie A. Mason
Stephanie M. Mickle
Tiffani F Miller
Colleen C. O'Donnell
Anna C. Shea
Rebecca Shwayri
Michael P Silver
Stacy F. Speiller
Loretta J. Thompson
Adria M. Toledo
Valerie A. Watson
Elizabeth A. Wulff
David A. Yarema
Laura M. Young

Class of 2005
Class Total: $4,656.00
No. in Class: 372
Participation: 9%
Enrichment Society
Jill F Bechtold
Lauren E. Cury
William M. Dillon
Andrew T Dixon
Andrew F Gordon
Travis L. Horn
Thomas C. King
Angelique D. Knox
Daniel R. Kurland
Meredith D. Lukoff
Julie C. Miller
Robyn E. Moore
Charles R. Morgan
Elizabeth Outler
Taylor C. Pancake
Robert D. Sheesley
Justin R. Smith
Denise L. Whisenant
Matthew L. Wolfe


Memorials

As a tIini.j i .ute to the rm-ien.-i of ourstaiidinlg in-ri atri
V,'ori'i.n who pla, -il an ir'ipilarit pai r iin e l i store, ot th-
Lollege of La*\' i:ointrr.i[ions. %iere re,.ei.etd fioni alumni
ti ienrl anr, famil, 1co support S.e- Ltici a las- arn I al eas of
g*jiates-t ne-il


In memory ol Dan Gallond
An.;.n, i.li uS
Ja n 1,, Ba 'n.lan
Laijreil A i,,,i
Ili-.haIl ol,.mb:n
Marana D- \,ar.-n.3
Madejrliiei Bonnli Diaz
A iirenne J Fi hIqii
Miiet.thli Frank
Paul Fe-ri-n.an
Jull.: b Sandira GIalft.n. l
rJatasha Giree
Janii- F Harr.illgi.n
EJ a Sl.ia B Hellan
.IsI H.llon
AJaini M Hirshl
L'ji:v M JaM u.J
.131 ,.n KlI^.'.e-
Dani.l Koon.ji
RujssIll K-.:nlln
LCh..falne A Kumin
M.li'ha1l Li-aiJr a
I ala Os. fsk, I aler
Sadi J Fri,.Inian Le-
P g,-J, M,:'3i.:r rn
Sean T 1J.-Gur,,,
H-rrti Ir i ian k ,
Sethi E S.:hllliiii'eiri iai
'l,.ilA V M Shainip
Marl D ShIirnan
Siigtriori Ri.,ra Lrn',?
idlatnh Sllngbhaun,1
Lauri E Strrn
.l,1an-1 -,1 ^ ,I A -h,I,


In memory of Judge
Stephen O'Connell
laniii L B:Am.:lng


In memory ol
Madison B. McClellan

An.1rea A B, i.oi,'
DUij.a IIJ ri D n.-n
C. SlihpparJ.1 W D,-z|er
Paul ~ F.orno.
S Kaili-nnm. Frazir i
Dell G'.i'ahanl
Dani-l L Highti.'.:e
R.-.t-ri b Lisa J rir,
E 8 K~?.ee,
EIhzabeh B a FII.,ri ,1
Keene, JI
Cl'arles E L,Iles
Ma.rk-nzi.e R-altl
liah-i iJiil-, i i Mahei


La.i- n.i J I.lai.:ht-anl.
F Shiellls M.:Mani,.
V..:i, J [mJuSI .Ir
Pa.- Mira.hel Fitz.q- alJ
Bllan 4 PelsIl
MiIha3-el s R ,.:nt
S;ail, D nnr S.:l ar:.la
Sluan B Srii.: lHani
Laih, B Tl'nhi'p..n
R.-l:i I 0 Thoiihi on
R..ell.?il L Ti,:.hn
U s ll-i II In.'
.I,,'ln 4 Wi\'.iss
C-uncl ',:,, n Jr


In memory ol
Michael A. Fogarty
D ,,n Allen F:.junidianijn Iiii


In memory ol
Mr. William 0. E. Henry
C Iharl-s \' ,AbhboI


In memory of
Thomas C. MacDonald
B nlni.minn H Hill III
Ma.r[ A Hill


In memory ol
W. Henry Barber
[ iar. Iel-l b
J ,.:,,, K JhI l.iL- Ii,


In memory ol
Lewis "Lukie" Ansbacher
Bair, B Anstba.:l'?i
1.i S Mrs Frank D
U p .ih u t.: h III


Donors who gave in
2005-2006 and are
now deceased:

Thra3 s B -.lar-is .Ir I.ID I-i
[Il.lreI1 M Ba,naiJ
ljlhn BII.'.k
.I.:.1 I F L-.:,-,_:r ,i: ,.
Ji.itice Ra,niii.l Ehilih IJD -
Ma.lelein- K FIIl
Juceph Glass i JD 551
Lealanii L Lu.eriinm. IJD 59I
Tlh.-.n.oas R Te-.ica..ll JD O ;


WINTER 2007























',R.-,Iu, ATES OF THE GRADUATE TAX PROGRAM ranked in the nation's top
r'...:. I.i.:.-ided significant financial support so the college could continue to
i,-er ii, .llallenge of achieving top-tier excellence in legal education.


Class of 1975
Class Total: $15,825.00
No. in Class: 39
Participation: 18%
Barristers
K. Lawrence Gragg
Partners
Robert E. Glennon, Jr.
Enrichment Society
Harry S. Colburn, Jr.
Lawrence D. Felder
David M. Hudson
William C. Kerns

Class of 1976
Class Total: $33,487.50
No. in Class: 42
Participation: 19%
Barristers
R. Neal Manners
Trusler Society
Thomas J. Korge
Peter J. Losavio, Jr.
James B. O'Neal
Enrichment Society
Bernard A. Barton, Jr.
Charlton Mills
Robert A. Pierce
Ronald L. Rowland

Class of 1977
Class Total: $1,800.00
No. in Class: 39
Participation: 15%
Barristers
Hans G. Tanzler III
Trusler Society
Philip B. Barr, Jr.
Enrichment Society
John J. Collins, Jr.
Harry M. Eisenberg
James A. Watson

Class of 1978
Class Total: $3,550.00
No. in Class: 68
Participation: 13%
Trusler Society
William A. Boyles*
Enrichment Society
Patrick T Deren
Paul D. Fitzpatrick
Don H. Goode
Richard D. Green
Bradley C. Grossenburg
J. David Pobjecky
Susan Slagle


Class of 1979
Class Total: $945.00
No. in Class: 47
Participation: 15%
Enrichment Society
Cheryl L. Gordon
Laurence C. Hames
C. Gray Johnsey
William J. Lindsay, Jr.

Class of 1980
Class Total: $11,605.00
No. in Class: 48
Participation: 21%
Founders Society gold
Brian M. O'Connell
Partners
Peter T. Kirkwood
Enrichment Society
Harris H. Barnes III, Esq.
Alfred M. Falk
Gerald R. Kleedehn
Charles I. Nash

Class of 1981
Class Total: $1,775.00
No. in Class: 67
Participation: 15%
Enrichment Society
David E. Bowers
Jennifer C. Hepler
Paul R. Jackson
William R. Lane, Jr.
Daniel C. Re
Randolph J. Rush
Anton H. Zidansek

Class of 1982
Class Total: $3,875.00
No. in Class: 62
Participation: 15%
Partners
Michael D. Minton
Trusler Society
Patricia A. Willing
Enrichment Society
Stephen B. Hatcher
Marvin A. Kirsner
I. Paul Mandelkern
Roger J. Rovell
Alan L. Rubens
John B. Wright, Jr.


Class of 1983
Class Total:
No. in Class:
Participation:


$7,515.00
60
28%


Barristers
John N. Giordano
Partners
R. Lawrence Heinkel*
Enrichment Society
Michael A. Abbott
Stephen L. Cordell
Alan S. Gassman
Ellen R. Gershow
Stuart E. Goldberg
Albert N. Graham
Michael A. Levey
Mark E. Manovich
Robert L. Miller
Vicki L. Reeves
James R Stevens
Gregory F Wilder
James B. Wiley

Class of 1984
Class Total: $7,190.00
No. in Class: 74
Participation: 12%
Barristers
Edward E. Sawyer
Trusler Society
Lisa C. Berry
Enrichment Society
Lloyd V. Crawford
Linda S. Griffin-Keliher
Jonathan L. Hay
M. Elaina Massey
R. Dennis Tweed

Class of 1985
Class Total: $4,425.00
No. in Class: 74
Participation: 12%
Barristers
Alan B. Cohn
Trusler Society
W. Michael Clifford
Enrichment Society
Victoria J. Alvarez
Christopher A. Detzel
John R lurlano
Stephen R. Looney
Peter T. Stanley

Class of 1986
Class Total: $1,160.00
No. in Class: 49
Participation: 8%
Trusler Society
J. Carter Perkins, Sr.*
Enrichment Society
David K. Cahoone


Class of 1987
Class Total: $2,860.00
No. in Class: 63
Participation: 17%
Partners
Douglas A. Wright
Enrichment Society
Shawn M. Flanagan
Scott E. Hunt
Melton E. Knotts, Jr.
Lisa S. Odom
Mark A. Prater
Robert B. Smith
Wilma L. Zippel

Class of 1988
Class Total: $900.00
No. in Class: 43
Participation: 16%
Enrichment Society
Clifford M. King
John A. Moran
Amanda B. Scott
Sarah H. Teed
Dirk A. Williams

Class of 1989
Class Total: $1,425.00
No. in Class: 63
Participation: 13%
Enrichment Society
Allen Buckley
Charles L. Cooper, Jr.
James W. Forsyth
Dianne D. Hagan
John E. Lawlor III
Michael R. Nelson
Joe F. Yonek

Class of 1990
Class Total: $525.00
No. in Class: 53
Participation: 11%
Enrichment Society
Glenn A. Adams
Don E. Goebel
Jonathan H. Nason

Class of 1991
Class Total: $1,450.00
No. in Class: 63
Participation: 11%
Enrichment Society
Michelle D. Beneski
Todd A. Hauss
Charles Pillitteri


UF LAW
























Your Reach has lasting effects.


Norma Stanley
Daniel H. Waters, Jr.

Class of 1992
Class Total: $2,500.00
No. in Class: 60
Participation: 10%
Trusler Society
Jack A. Weiss
Enrichment Society
Greg Bell
Gene E. Crick, Jr.
Todd W. Fennell
Peter T. Kennedy
Robert J. Wells

Class of 1993
Class Total: $3,605.00
No. in Class: 57
Participation: 12%
Trusler Society
Rosanne M. Duane
Enrichment Society
Wilton B. Hyman
John F. Jewell
Lester B. Law
Douglas A. Smith

Class of 1994
Class Total: $2,299.92
No. in Class: 67
Participation: 10%
Trusler Society
Gary W. Huston
Enrichment Society
David A. Brennen
Samuel A. Donaldson
David E. Dreyer
Downing L. Gray
Donna L. Longhouse
David A. Roby, Jr.

Class of 1995
Class Total: $540.00
No. in Class: 68
Participation: 12%
Enrichment Society
Nancy J. Gibbs
Maurice D. Holloway
Peter D. Loguidice
John G. Varney

Class of 1996
Class Total: $525.00
No. in Class: 69
Participation: 7%
Enrichment Society
Lamont C. Loo
Jennifer I. Minsky
Matthew R. O'Kane


Class of 1997
Class Total: $205.00
No. in Class: 54
Participation: 6%
Enrichment Society
David Kamer
Keith M. Olivia

Class of 1998
Class Total: $2,975.00
No. in Class: 69
Participation: 14%
Associates
Andrew K. Strimaitis
Enrichment Society
Matthew J. Ahearn
Robert J. Barna
R. Scott Collins
Cristin A. Conley
Mark R. Mohler

Class of 1999
Class Total: $1,150.00
No. in Class: 45
Participation: 11%
Enrichment Society
Robert T. Ervin
William J. Liss
Rahul R Ranadive
Jeffrey A. Utay
E. John Wagner II

Class of 2000
Class Total: $875.00
No. in Class: 64
Participation: 8%
Enrichment Society
Bradley T. Borden
Clancy V. Mendoza
Diego L. Restrepo

Class of 2001
Class Total: $2,575.00
No. in Class: 64
Participation: 13%
Trusler Society
Robert H. Pritchard
Enrichment Society
Alton D. Bain
Kathleen M. McRoberts
Sara A. Tolliver

Class of 2002
Class Total: $1,000.00
No. in Class: 64
Participation: 9%
Enrichment Society
Steven D. Lear
Julius B. Remmen


Kerry A. Ryan
Joseph W. Zitzka, Jr.

Class of 2003
Class Total: $2,250.00
No. in Class: 79
Participation: 11%
Trusler Society
Terrence T. Dariotis
Enrichment Society
Mackenson Bernard
Srinivas R. Dantuluri
Erick S. Magno
Telly J. Meier
Joy Sabino Mullane

Class of 2004
Class Total: $5,335.00
No. in Class: 51
Participation: 14%
Associates
J. Stephen Pullum
Enrichment Society
Ashley N. Calhoun
Traci A. Kratish

Class of 2005
Class Total: $950.00
No. in Class: 78
Participation: 9%
Enrichment Society
W. Michael Black
Allison N. Landgraff
Jordan G. Lee
John M. McDonald


Tributes
The following individuals were
recognized with a tribute gift as a
way of recognizing special occa-
sions, achievements or events

In honor of Derrick Valkenburg
Christine Grazzini
Jose E. 8 Joanne M. Quinones
T. Cobb
Thomas C. Cobb
PAC by Patricia Barksdale
CSX Corp.
In honor of Prof. Dennis Calfee
Michael A. 8 Betty M. Wolf
In honor of Prof. David
Richardson
Michael A. & Betty M. Wolf


Making a

Contribution
The Office of Development
and Alumni Affairs coordinates
alumni activities and fundrais-
ing for the College of Law,
including activities of the Law
Center Association Inc. Board
of Trustees and the Alumni
Council. To make a contribu-
tion, please make your check
payable to UF Law Center
Association to the address
below. Donations are tax
deductible as allowed
by law. For more information
on making an endowed or
estate gift, please contact:

Office of Development
& Alumni Affairs

Kelley Frohlich
Senior Director of Development
Andrea Shirey
Director of Annual Fund 8
Stewardship Programs
Fredric G. Levin College of Law
PO. Box 117623
Gainesville, FL 32611
Phone: (352) 273-0640
Fax: (352) 392-3434


WINTER 2007


Names are listed as they
appear on checks or corre-
spondence. We have made
every effort to acknowledge
each 2005-2006 donor. If
your name is missing,
please notify us so we may
correct our records. We do
apologize for any oversight
and want to assure you it
was unintended. Contact the
Office of Development and
Alumni Affairs at PO. Box
117623, Gainesville, FL
32611; (352) 273-0640; or
e-mail shirey@law.ufl.edu.














UF LAW
www.law.ufl.edu


Retirees


DAVID RICHARDSON

T wenty-two years ago Professor David Richardson
came to the University of Florida tax program on
a whim. In a telephone conversation with
Professor Jack Freeland, Richardson not only
learned of an opening for the position as director of the
Graduate Tax Program, he realized applications were due the
next day. He met the deadline and got the job. He served in
that position for the next four years and remained a profes-
sor for the next 18.
During his time at UF, Richardson has been at the fore-
front of the Graduate Tax Program, now one of the most high-
ly rated in the country. He helped found the Florida Tax Richardson
Review, a law review that publishes articles dealing with significant issues of tax law and
policy, and served as the faculty editor for two years after its inception. In 2005,
Richardson co-authored a textbook on civil tax procedure that was published in the
lexisNexis Graduate Tax Series. Richardson also serves on the board of directors of the
Graduate Tax Series and expects there will be eight books in the series published by
next August. Richardson, who is retiring in December, is fulfilled by the success of the
LL.M. students.
"The thing that gives me the most satisfaction is that our students are in demand
across the country, in private practice, as corporate counsel and in the government. Our
graduates carry the college's banner proudly and enhance the college's reputation."




MARY TWITCHELL
J urisdictional issues are fundamental to all litigation, and
recently retired UF law Professor Mary Twitchell (JD 77)
made solid scholarly contributions focusing on the appro-
priate approach to determining judicial jurisdiction in state
and federal courts.
As well as tackling complex issues during her 24 years on
UF Law's faculty, Twitchell taught a range of courses and semi-
nars including Civil Procedure, Federal Courts, Comparative
Dispute Resolution, and Complex Litigation.
"My hope is that I helped curious students perceive our
litigation system in a new light," Twitchell said. "And that I Twitchell
helped many of my students whether they liked it or not -
learn to appreciate and respect the significance of one of our most critical lawyering
tools: language."
Evidence suggests that Twitchell had a great impact on her students. Recently, she
heard from a former student Mark Dikeman (JD 86), now an expert in jurisdictional issues,
who had worked on the U.S. Supreme Court case Exxon Mobil Corp. v Allapattah
Services.
"The case involved one of the very issues I had studied years before in Professor
Twitchell's class (the extent of pendent party jurisdiction in diversity-based class
actions)," Dikeman said. "As I told Professor Twitchell, our side prevailed, and I give
her all the credit."
Twitchell retired in May 2006 and plans to split her time between Vermont and Florida.
"I've spent a lot of my life at Holland Hall and am grateful for the experience,"
Twitchell said. "The College of Law has changed in some very positive ways since I came
here: there's a greater richness in course offerings, very interesting faculty scholarship,
and students have a variety of ways to experience legal practice while still in school."


Editor
Associate Director of Communications
Kathy Fleming, APR, CPRC
fleming@law.ufl.edu, (352) 273-0650

Director of Communications
Debra Amirin, APR

Photo Editor
Kristen Hines

Design
JS Design Studio

Printing
StorterChilds Printing Co.

Correspondence and Address Changes
fleming@law.ufl.edu
University of Florida Levin College of Law
RO. Box 117633
Gainesville, FL 32611-7633

Telephone Numbers
http://www.law.ufl.edu/about/contact.shtml



UF LAW CENTER ASSOCIATION INC. 2006-2007
W.C. Gentry (JD 71) Chairman
Michael McNerney (JD 73) Immediate Past Chair
Dennis A. Calfee (JD 75) Treasurer
E.L. Roy Hunt Secretary
Active Members
Charles W. Abbott (JD 53), Cesar Alvarez (JD 72), Mark Avera (JD 89), Jean
A. Bice (JD 75), Bruce H. Bokor (JD 72), Bill Bone (JD 84), Leslie W. Burke (JD
68), J. Thomas Cardwell (JD 66), Lawton M. Chiles, III, Charles E.
Commander (JD 65), Barry R. Davidson (JD 67), John A. DeVault III (JD 67),
John H. Dyer, Jr. (JD 87), Ladd H. Fassett (JD 79), Andrew Fawbush (JD 74),
Michael L. Ferguson (JD 89), W. C. Gentry (JD 71), Linda R. Getzen (JD 82),
Gene K. Glasser (JD 72), Robert Glennon (JD 74), K. Lawrence Gragg (JD 74),
Scott G. Hawkins (JD 83), Michael Heekin (JD 78), Elizabeth Hernandez (JD 83),
Judge Elizabeth A. Jenkins (JD 76), Hal H. Kantor (JD 72), Frederick Wayne
Leonhardt (JD 74), Christine N. Markussen (JD 72), Clifton A. McClelland, Jr.
(JD 69), Michael J. McNerney (JD 73), Donald Middlebrooks (JD 72), Michael
D. Minton (JD 81), James Moody, Jr. (JD 72), Lindy Paull (JD 80), S. Austin
Peele (JD 63), F Wallace Pope, Jr. (JD 69), Becky A. Powhatan-Kelley (JD 76),
Mark Proctor (JD 75), Juliet M. Roulhac (JD 87), Oscar Sanchez (JD 82),
Everett J. Santos (JD 66), Ernest Sellers (JD 62), Lawrence E. Sellers, Jr. (JD
79), Linda L. Shelley (JD 77), Jacqueline Allee Smith (JD 78), W. Crit Smith
(JD 78), Mark Somerstein (JD 82), Marjorie Bekaert Thomas (JD 76), Frank
D. Upchurch, III (JD 74), John J. Upchurch, IV (JD 68), George A. Vaka (JD
83), William A. Weber (JD 76), Peter W. Zinober (JD 69)

Ex-Officio
J. Bernard Machen, Robert Jerry, George Dawson,
Paul A. Robell, Mark Klingensmith (JD 85), Kelley Frohlich

LAW ALUMNI COUNCIL EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE 2006-2007
MarkW Klingensmith (JD 85) President
Tim Cerio (JD 95) Immediate Past President
Rahul Patel (JD 97) President-Elect
Gary L. Printy (JD 82) Secretary

At Large Members
J. Carter Andersen (JD 98), C. Randolph Coleman (JD 78), Mayanne Downs
(JD 87), Jeffrey D. Feldman (JD 81), Roberta F Fox (JD 67), Joseph C.
Mellichamp III (JD 70), Matthew N. Posgay (JD 94), Sarah Elizabeth Rumpf
(JD 03), Misty M. C. Taylor (JD 95)
Ex-Officio
W.C. Gentry (JD 71), Robert Jerry, Andrea Shirey


UF LAW











UP AND COMING


Investing in the Future
BY SARAH LEVY

Shen asked to bring a prop for his
portrait, Andre Hammel (2L)
didn't bring a little token to
represent himself. He brought a
construction truck ... a real,
two-ton Dumpster-hauling truck.
This is typical of Hammel, whose ingenuity has helped
him succeed as an entrepreneur and accomplish plenty in
his 24 years. Not only does he own his own real estate
investment company and waste-management company, he
also is a second-year law student.
After graduating from Florida A&M University in
2003, Hammel, who was student body president at
FAMU, deferred his acceptance to UF Law and worked
for the Speaker of the Florida House of Representatives
and Gov. Jeb Bush's office for the next two years. To earn
money, he also took ajob as a hotel bellman.
"I would work 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. at the Capital, and
then from 5 p.m. to midnight, I would work as a bellman
at the Doubletree Hotel," he said. ly friends from col-
lege would ask me, 'Andre, what are you doing working
as a bellboy?'"
But Hammel, who is 6 feet 5 inches tall, had a plan. He
saved his money to start a real estate investment company,
Hammel Solomon Tyler Holdings Property. The company
invests in urban communities and troubled neighborhoods
where housing is typically in disrepair. Hammdl h-.i.i.uht
his first property in the fall of 2004, and has since .i-...| I. ...
nine other units in Tallahassee, Gainesville and A Il il .
"Most landlords don't care about these place .. i..k.
care of them," he said in a deep voice that is surpi I. ....I
soft-spoken. "We do."
According to American Bar Association si..i.......I
law students are not allowed to have jobs as first- .... 1..-
students, so Hammel hired property managers to i.. ...
of his investments when he began law school 1.. i1 i.1
With business obligations looked after, he decicle.I I.. ..I.
something for the Gainesville community. He st... i..I
the Caring and Sharing Mentoring Project, which i..
its first year paired 70 law students with elemei.-
tary school students.
Hammel's peers took notice of his dedica-
tion, as well as his humility, in his first year as
a law student and selected him as one of
three Students of the Year. Most students
are chosen in their third-year as law stu-
dents. Hammel believes anyone who had
created that type of program would have
received the award.
"It's humbling and scary," Hammel said of
his award. "Some of these students are on a supe-


rior level academically, and I'm just average. It is empow-
ering when people say they see these good things in me,
but I'm not sure if I see them in myself."
What Hammel doesn't have is a plan to slow down.
This past summer he expanded his business to include a
waste-management company, EAT Waste and Hauling,


"Most landlords don't

care about these places or

take care of them. We do."

which he started after realizing it would be more cost effi-
cient to own his own Dumpsters for use during property
renovation rather than renting them. As a second-year law
student he is allowed to work up to 20 hours per week, but
he hopes to hire a secretary using money from grants so he
can better balance school and work.
After law school, Hammel hopes to grow his business
and increase his public service using what-
ever platform is available. He believes
UF Law has helped him develop as a
person and as a student, and brought
him closer to reaching his goals.
"' 1-, "--h.-.k thl...i.ilht pI-r..cc-- 1h.-
lv v r,1v r,l, .,i, ,_ v.l .i I 'l* ,I .li i T
i .,' [I. .,II,, l ... .. 1I l .. ^ ..I
SI II', i -. I .ii I A 11 1 'i "

.. Iv .2 .l ..l..i_ ..I.. .r..= ....


WINTER 2007




r__


I I


UNIVERSITY of
IUF LORIDA
Levin College of Law
P.O. Box 117633
Gainesville, FL 32611-7633


NON-PROFIT
ORGANIZATION
U.S. POSTAGE PAID
GAINESVILLE, FL
PERMIT NO. 94


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