• TABLE OF CONTENTS
HIDE
 Front Cover
 Dean's message
 Table of Contents
 News briefs
 Partners
 Faculty news
 Faculty opinion
 Comfterble with language?
 Class notes
 Annual report 2003-2004
 Four students selected for public...
 What we do for a living
 Back Cover






Group Title: UF Law: University of Florida Fredric G. Levin College of Law
Title: UFlaw
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00072634/00006
 Material Information
Title: UFlaw
Alternate Title: UF law
Physical Description: v. : ill. ; 28 cm.
Language: English
Creator: Levin College of Law
Publisher: Levin College of Law Communications Office
Place of Publication: Gainesville FL
Publication Date: c2002-
Frequency: irregular
completely irregular
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Genre: government publication (state, provincial, terriorial, dependent)   ( marcgt )
 Notes
Statement of Responsibility: University of Florida, Levin College of Law.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 39, no. 1 (fall 2002)-
General Note: Title from cover.
General Note: Last issue consulted: v. 40, no. 1 (fall 2003).
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00072634
Volume ID: VID00006
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
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 Related Items
Preceded by: University of Florida lawyer

Table of Contents
    Front Cover
        Front cover
    Dean's message
        i
    Table of Contents
        Page 1
    News briefs
        Page 2
        Alumni inducted in Heritage of Leadership
            Page 3
            Page 4
        Clerking to the top
            Page 5
        Lectures spotlight hot topics
            Page 6
            Page 7
        Brining home a Super Bowl
            Page 8
            Page 9
            Page 10
    Partners
        Page 11
        Page 12
        Foundation to create new advocacy center for children
            Page 13
        Florida Blue Key: UF Law leads the leaders
            Page 14
            Page 15
            Page 16
        On the case for seven decades
            Page 17
            Page 18
            Page 19
            Page 20
    Faculty news
        Page 21
        Page 22
        UF professor names human rights advocate
            Page 23
        Recent faculty achievements
            Page 24
        Privacy vs. access
            Page 25
            Page 26
        Supreme Court justice honored
            Page 27
            Page 28
    Faculty opinion
        Page 29
        Social security: where's the fire?
            Page 29
        Saving the canary in the coal mine
            Page 30
            Page 31
            Page 32
            Page 33
        Conserve and protect: using the law for the environment
            Page 34
            Page 35
            Page 36
    Comfterble with language?
        Page 37
    Class notes
        Page 38
        Page 39
        Page 40
        Chuck Chance: taking chances from the beginning
            Page 41
            Page 42
            Page 43
            Page 44
        102 years of age, 81 years of practice
            Page 45
            Page 46
        Making a mark: a behind-the-scenes look at law
            Page 47
            Page 48
    Annual report 2003-2004
        Page 49
        Thank you
            Page 50
            Page 51
        Financial summary
            Page 52
            Page 53
        Endowment contributors
            Page 54
            Page 55
        Chairs and professorships
            Page 56
        Event sponsors
            Page 57
        Distinguished donors
            Page 58
            Page 59
            Page 60
        Book awards
            Page 61
        Annual fund
            Page 62
            Page 63
            Page 64
            Page 65
            Page 66
            Page 67
        Special funding
            Page 68
            Page 69
        JD alumni
            Page 70
            Page 71
            Page 72
            Page 73
            Page 74
            Page 75
            Page 76
            Page 77
        LLMT alumni
            Page 78
            Page 79
    Four students selected for public interest internships
        Page 80
    What we do for a living
        Page 81
    Back Cover
        Back cover
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CONTENTS


2 NEWS BRIEFS

11 PARTNERS

21 FACULTY NEWS

29 FACULTY OPINION

37 CLEARLY SPEAKING

38 CLASS NOTES

81 FINAL THOUGHTS


FEATURES


8 Bringing Home a Superbowl
Jacksonville Host Committee Scores

14 Blue Key
UF Law Leads the Leaders

30 Environmental Law
Saving the Canary in the Coal Mine

34 John Henry Hankinson
To Conserve and Protect

49 Annual Report
2003-2004 Issue




VOLUME 41, ISSUE 2 SUMMER 2005
..., Cover Photo by John Moran www.johnmoranphoto.com

















NEWS BRIEFS


LEVIN COLLEGE


Volunteers Honored at Gala
Ex-felon rights restoration, election
protection, homeless rights and language
translation for clients in dependency court
were just a few of the areas benefiting from
the volunteer work of more than 80 UF law
students this year. The students who gave
about 8,500 hours of their time to charitable
causes were honored at the college's
Volunteer Awards Gala in April.
Some of the students worked through
UF's Pro Bono and Community Service
programs, while others created ad hoc organ-
izations to provide relief for hurricane and
tsunami victims.
Professor Joseph Little and student Paul
Vicary (3L) also were honored at the gala
for winning two of the law school's highest
honors. Little was named Professor of the
Year and Vicary was named Student of the
Year by the John Marshall Bar Association.

Students Hold Top Positions
in National Organization
Christopher Chestnut (JD 05) is end-
ing his term as chair of the National Black
Law Students Association (NBLSA) as


OF LAW


The Event of the Year Award at the UF Law Volunteer Gala went to "Party with a Purpose,"
a student event that raised more than $1,000 for tsunami relief. Organizers were (from left)
Lee Harang, Parnell Auguste, Ann Puentes, Mitesh Patel, Vikram Saini and Ron Antonin.


UF's Camille Warren (1L) takes on anoth-
er powerful position in the organization.
Since taking the reins a year ago,
Chestnut the first Florida student to be
elected as chair has helped increase
membership by 33 percent and participa-
tion in trial competition by 50 percent.
He also was responsible for planning the
group's annual convention, held in Denver.
Chestnut graduated in May and is opening
a litigation practice in Gainesville.
Chestnut said the boom in membership
is due in large part to the intense travel
schedule that he and other NBLSA leaders
maintained over the last year. The organiza-
tion is dedicated to articulating and promot-
ing the needs of black law students.
Warren, who worked as a financial
analyst before coming to law school, was
elected NBLSA treasurer at the Denver
convention. She plans to restructure the
organization's finances and split NBLSA
into two entities, a 501(c)3 agency and a


for-profit group, to allow the organization
to wield more political influence.
Chestnut said the law school profits
from UF's prominent role in NBLSA.
"Everywhere I go, I tell people I'm from
the University of Florida. That can be a
real rainmaker for UF," he said.

UF Law Student
Teams Compete
Two days. Two teams. Three trophies.
After months of practice, the UF Law Trial
Team sent two teams to the Chester Bedell
Mock Trial Competition at The Florida
Bar's January meeting. Both beat out nine
other Florida law schools, only to compete
against each other and bring home first
and second place trophies. In addition,
student Chris King (JD 05) was named
the competition's Best Advocate.
In other competitions providing
students with real world experience, the
members of the Trial Team advanced to
CONTINUED ON PAGE 4


2 UF LAW















ALUMNI INDUCTED INTO


Heritage of Leadership


F our of the Levin College of Law's most
distinguished alumni two chief
justices of the Florida Supreme Court, a pres-
ident of the American Bar Association and a
member of the U.S. House of Representatives
- have been selected for induction into the
Heritage of Leadership Recognition Society.
"The society is the law school's highest
mark of distinction for preeminent graduates
who assumed leadership positions on nation-
al and international levels," said Dean Robert
Jerry. "These individuals distinguished them-
selves in remarkable ways and it is a true
privilege to honor their accomplishments."
Justice Raymond Ehrlich and the fami-
lies of the other three inductees, who accept-
ed posthumous awards, were recognized at
an April 8 banquet. The Class of 2005
inductees are:

sea rI a


Bennett


Ehrlich


Charles Bennett, a 1934 graduate, was
Florida's longest serving congressman and the
second longest-tenured member of the
House when he retired in 1993 after 44
years. He sponsored legislation that created
the House Ethics Committee and Americans
with Disabilities Act and made "In God We
Trust" the U.S. motto. Bennett became the
second-ranking Democrat on the House
Armed Services Committee and chaired the
investigative committees that oversaw the
Watergate and Abscam scandals.
Raymond Ehrlich, a 1942 graduate,
practiced law for 35 years before serving on
the Florida Supreme Court for a decade,
including as chief justice. He was appointed
special counsel to U.S. Sen. Bob Graham in


1991 and received the Florida Bar
Foundation's Medal of Honor Award in
1993 for outstanding contributions to the
administration of justice, including his work
to automate courts, assign law clerks to cir-
cuit judges, promote alternative dispute reso-
lution, and defend judicial independence.
Richard Ervin Jr., a 1928 graduate,
was elected four times as attorney general
of Florida, serving with five governors
from 1949 to 1964. He is credited with
desegregating Florida schools with a mini-
mum of friction and launching a drive to
rid the state of illegal gambling. As a
Florida Supreme Court justice from 1964
to 1975 and chief justice in 1969 and
1970, Ervin wrote countless opinions in
support of the rights of the individual,
especially the poor and disadvantaged.


Ervin


Smith


Chesterfield Smith, a 1948 graduate,
founded one of the largest law firms in
the country, Holland & Knight. As chair-
man for almost three decades, he led the
way in hiring women and minorities and
encouraging pro bono work. In 1973, he
served as president of the American Bar
Association and challenged President
Richard Nixon during the Watergate
investigations. Smith received numerous


Former Chief Justice Ben Overton (from left)
and Dean Robert Jerry greet honoree
Raymond Ehrlich.

honors, including the ABA Medal from
the Board of Governors, American Civil
Liberties Union's Nelson Poynter Award,
and the Laurie D. Zelon Pro Bono
Award, presented by Supreme Court
Justice Ruth Bader Ginsberg at the U.S.
Supreme Court.
The Heritage of Leadership Recognition
Society was officially activated in 2003 with
the induction of 12 men, who collectively
served as five chief justices, two governors, two
Florida Bar presidents, two U.S. senators, two
university presidents, two law school deans
and one U.S. district court judge.
"The UF College of Law has served
Florida and the nation for almost a century
and has a rich legacy of educating men and
women who demonstrate a lifelong dedica-
tion to education, civic, charitable and cul-
tural causes," Dean Jerry said. U


UF LAW 3


Nominations Now Being Accepted
Nominations are being accepted now for the 2006 inductees. Nominees must meet sev-
eral criteria, including being a graduate of the UF College of Law or having direct involve-
ment with the college in a very significant way. The Heritage of Leadership Committee is
currently only accepting nominations for posthumous awards. Nominations or questions
should be sent to Scott Hawkins (JD 83) at 561-626-4356 or shawkins@jones-foster.com;
or to Kelley Frohlich at 352-273-0640 or frohlich@law.ufl.edu.










CONTINUED FROM PAGE 2


regional ABA competition semi-finals,
and regional semi-finals in ATLA.
The International Commercial
Arbitration Team took first place in
the Florida Pre-Moot Competition in
February and went on to compete in
Vienna, Austria.

Dean Honored for
Dedication to Students
Robert Jerry, dean of the University of
Florida's Levin College of Law, is this year's
recipient of the Julie Sina Award, given
each year to a faculty member who shows
"outstanding commitment to students."
Student Government leaders selected
Jerry from among UF's roughly 2,800
faculty for the award, named in honor of
former UF Dean of Students Julie Sina.
Jerry was given the award in a ceremony
on the UF campus in April.
"Dean Sina was still here when I was
in my first semester, and I remember her
as someone who was very dedicated to
students," said Student Government
President Jamal Sowell, who nominated


Jerry for the honor. "I wanted this award
to go to someone who showed a similar
attitude, putting students first while
working to make the University of
Florida a stronger institution."

UF Law Climbs in Rankings
The Levin College of Law climbed
two notches to 18th among public
schools and 41st overall in the annual
U.S. News and World Report rankings of
the nation's law schools. The Graduate
Tax Program was once again rated the
second best in the nation, with only New
York University ranking higher.
The law school also ranked No. 13
for trial advocacy, the first time that
program has appeared in the rankings.
Dean Robert Jerry said the numbers
pleased him, though he added he believes
the public places too much emphasis on
the magazine's rankings. "I was particu-
larly happy to see the trial advocacy
program ranked so highly. Much of the
credit for that can be attributed to the
successes of our trial teams," he said.


Wolf

Music Night at the Dean's
House
Faculty members, staff and students
from the Levin College of Law gathered
at the home of Dean Robert Jerry in
April for "Music Night 2005," a show-
case of the law school's hidden musical
talent. The event attracted 14 acts, rang-
ing from rock classics to classical violin.
Richard E. Nelson Professor Michael
Allan Wolf (above) performed "House of
the Rising Sun." 0


W. Reece Smith on the Class of 1949 and the Future


"Tom Brokaw chose to call our generation 'The Greatest
Generation.' I don't know if this terminology is deserved or
appropriate. But I do know that most members of those
post-war law classes at UF and elsewhere were grateful
for the opportunity to become lawyers. They were proud of


Former ABA president W Reece Smith (JD 49), speaking to law
students in the first installment of the Dean's Luncheon Series, which
brings distinguished UF alumni to campus to speak to students on
the topic of professionalism. U.S. District Judge Stephan Mickle (JD
70) and Holland & Knight partner George "Buddy" Schultz (JD 73)
also visited campus. The program was sponsored by Joseph "Rusty"
Carolan III (JD 74), of Winderweedle, Haines, Ward, et al in Orlando.


their profession, and they wanted to give back to both the pro-
fession and the communities they served. They cared about
the public good.
"But I am concerned for the future of our profession.
"Today we advertise. We respond to RFPs. We cold-call. We
merge. We do TV shows. We chit-chat in chat rooms.
We pursue the 'business' of law.
"In doing so, we mirror society and follow the lead of our
clients. Some of the changes this brings about may well be
salutary. The profession is more diverse than ever, is more
accessible and better serves our communities in
various ways than it did in decades past.
"But as we become more commercialized, we must
remember that we do more than sell services. We are an inte-
gral part of the democratic form of government. We are an
essential part of our tripartite form of government and an
imperative to the rule of law.
"... In this new era of sound bites, we tend to seek buzz
words and mine are 'character,' 'competence' and 'commit-
ment.' These are the attributes that have been identified by oth-
ers in real lawyers lawyers who are not just legal technicians
who make lots of money, but lawyers who know and respect in
practice the basic values of their profession,
values that include not only service to clients but
service to the public good."


4 UF LAW


NEWS BRIEFS















FEDERAL CLERKSHIPS


Clerking to the Top
BY ALISSON CLARK


No UF law graduate has ever clerked for
the U.S. Supreme Court, a fact Linda
Calvert Hanson aims to change.
As assistant dean for Career Services,
Calvert Hanson is overseeing a new initiative
to put more alumni in federal judicial clerk-
ships, the coveted positions that give recent
grads behind-the-scenes insight into the
workings of the legal system. Calvert Hanson
says increasing representation of UF grads in
federal clerkships on the Supreme Court
as well as throughout the federal judiciary -
not only enhances students' career potential,
but also the school's stature.
"It's not uncommon for federal clerks to
go on to positions in other geographical
areas," she said. "Having well-qualified grad-
uates in key positions across the country
helps boost our national reputation."
Calvert Hanson estimates five or six
graduates a year currently receive federal
clerkships. She hopes that number will
increase with the initiative, which seeks to
recruit more applicants and help them navi-
gate the complicated application process.
"Students at the top schools aggressively
pursue clerkships," she said. "We need to be
doing more."
Part of the initiative is a streamlined
application process. Career Services now will
collect and assemble all components of stu-
dent applications and then mail them to
judges in one package, to arrive on the first
day of consideration. In the past, each
judge's staff had to assemble the components
sent in by students.
In other efforts, Career Services is easing
the interface with a pilot program just
launched by the Administrative Office of
the U.S. Courts. At least 100 federal judges
are expected to use OSCAR (Online System
for Clerkship Applications and Review),
which will allow clerkship applicants to
file application materials online with
participating judges.


Another aspect of the initia-
tive is reaching out to students
who might not have considered
applying for clerkships. Heavily
recruited students might not
immediately see the advantages of
turning down a six-digit starting
salary at a law firm for more
modest clerk's wages, but many
firms offer bonuses and other Payne (
incentives for graduates with
clerkship experience.
"I've seen firms give bonuses from
$5,000 to $25,000," she said. "Clerks get
the incredible background experience of
being inside a judge's head. They see how
judges think, and they've been able to
observe attorneys going in front of the court.
Law firms value that experience."
UF law grad Jacob Payne (JD 02) agrees.
As clerk for U.S. District Court Judge
William Terrell Hodges (LLB 58) in Ocala,
he manages the even-numbered docket,
drafting orders and reviewing motions for the
judge. He'll do another clerkship, this time
with 11th Circuit Court of Appeals Judge
Susan H. Black in Jacksonville.
"When you leave a clerkship, you have a
huge leg up over other two-year associates in
law firms," he said. "As a clerk, you learn
that it's not just about who has better legal
tricks or more creative arguments. You learn
how a judge approaches a case. You hone
your skills of critical reading, research, analy-
sis and writing."
Judge Black (JD 67) is happy to see her
alma mater joining the ranks of law schools
that deliver those well-organized application
packets to her desk.
"The law schools that have risen to the
top echelon all promote clerkships aggres-
sively," she said. "They help students submit
applications, and they advertise the clerk-
ships their students receive. That's one of the
reasons they stay in the top tier."


IV


left) and Calvert Hanson

In addition to recruiting applicants and
submitting application packages, Career
Services has several ongoing database proj-
ects, such as the mentorship database that
lists former clerks whom applicants can con-
tact with questions about specific judges and
what they look for in a clerk. Calvert
Hanson also maintains what she calls a
"Gator Friendly" list, an ever-growing data-
base of judges who are alumni or supporters
of the university. She also tracks application
and acceptance patterns, compiling figures
such as how long a judge takes to respond
after an interview.
Alumni can help. Calvert Hanson asks
alumni with clerking experience to join the
mentorship database, and she encourages
firms who hire former clerks to communi-
cate the value they place on clerkship experi-
ence. Too often, she says, promising candi-
dates fear they may lose out on a position
with a top firm by taking a clerkship.
"We'd really like to see law firms com-
municating their support of students pursu-
ing clerkships," she said. "We know that
firms value that experience, and students
need to hear that message clearly."
As for the challenge of a UF grad clerk-
ing at the highest court in the land, Calvert
Hanson is already working on it.
"I'm working with a student right
now whose goal is to be a judicial law
clerk for the U.S. Supreme Court," she
said. "We'd love to see a UF law grad
accomplish that goal." U
UF LAW 5














BLACK RAGE TO BILLBOARD LAW


Lectures Spotlight Hot Topics


The first few months of 2005 brought
numerous national leaders to the Levin
College of Law to discuss engaging topics
with faculty, students, alumni and others.
Conferences and seminars on the following
topics were sponsored primarily by UF law
school centers, faculty and student groups.

Alzheimers
Elder care advocates gathered to learn
more about Alzheimer's disease and talk
about what the state can do to prepare for a
coming boom in the number of affected
Floridians. Jack Robarts, co-director, with his
wife, Emily, of the South Florida Chapter of
the Alzheimer's Association, advocated fund-
ing for research, better patient treatment,
Spanish-language Alzheimer's education pro-
grams, screening for rural patients, and police
officer training to locate patients who wander
away from caregivers. The seminar was spon-
sored by the Estates, Trusts and Elder Law
Society and Center for Career Services.
Read more at www.law.ufl.edu/news/
flalaw/pdf/flalaw-050131.pdf.

Billboard Law
Marking the anniversary of the federal
Highway Beautification Act (HBA), outdoor
advertising industry leaders, prominent
billboard opponents and legal scholars
discussed the economic benefits and
constitutional and environmental pitfalls
of laws regulating roadside signs at the
fourth installment of the Richard E.
Nelson Symposium series. Opponents
contend the law isn't being enforced,
pointing to the 73,000 billboards nation-
wide. Florida, which has about 22 bill-
boards for every 10 miles of highway, has
recently come under scrutiny because
of billboard ads for strip clubs and
white supremacist groups. Read more
at www.law.ufl.edu/news/flalaw/
pdf/flalaw-050221.pdf.


Children and Families
The Center on Children and Families
brought together UF faculty, alumni and
others from various disciplines to focus on
a multidisciplinary approach to child advo-
cacy, with the ultimate goal of training
family lawyers to incorporate social science
perspectives into their legal advocacy. The
legal system fails to recognize non-Anglo
cultures, UF Anthropology Professor
Elizabeth Guilette said. It needs a lesson
in cultural competency. Read more at
www.law.ufl.edu/news/flalaw/pdf/
flalaw-050321.pdf.

Culture as a Criminal Defense
When can a black rage defense help a
client facing a criminal charge? Should a
defendant raised in a foreign culture be
excused for criminal acts acceptable in that
culture? These questions and more were
discussed at the Culture and Crime
Symposium sponsored by the American


Bar Association. Speakers included New
York University Law Professor Holly
Maguigan and defense attorney Edi Faal,
who successfully used a mob contagion
defense in representing a defendant charged
in the beating of Reginald Denny.

Reno on Fact-Finding
Citing a number of seemingly airtight
convictions that were later overturned due to
DNA evidence, former U.S. Attorney
General Janet Reno says the nation's lawyers
must get better at collecting facts.
"We need to ask ourselves what we can
learn to avoid getting false confessions, what
we can learn to help us work better with eye-
witnesses," she said. Reno was brought to
campus by the UF law chapter of the
American Constitution Society to speak to
students, faculty and staff.
Read more at www.law.ufl.edu/news/
flalaw/pdf/flalaw-050307.pdf.


6 UF LAW












Florida Constitution
Former Florida Supreme Court Justice
and UF Adjunct Law Professor Ben Overton
(LLB 52) spoke to UF law students on the
Florida Constitution, the separation of pow-
ers and other topics in the final installment
of the Judicial Process Lecture Series. The
five-part series was designed to help students
prepare for judicial externships by bringing
prominent members of the bench to campus
to discuss court protocols and governance,
judicial ethics, public records law and other
issues affecting courts and lawyers. Past speak-
ers in this series include retired Circuit Court
Judge Chester Chance (LLB 64) and U.S.
District Court Judge Maurice Paul (JD 60).

Gay Rights
Anita Bryant's 1977 crusade against a
Miami/Dade County gay rights ordinance
revolutionized American politics for more
than a quarter of a century, according
to the speaker at the 2005 Dunwody
Distinguished Lecture. The speaker was
Yale Law Professor William Eskridge, a
widely cited constitutional scholar and lead-
ing gay rights and law expert, who was
quoted by the U.S. Supreme Court in its
decision in Lawrence v. Texas, the 2003 case
that overturned state sodomy laws.
Eskridge said Bryant's Save Our
Children campaign was novel because it
mated the body politic of disgust and
contagion with protecting children. He
praised crusading attorneys who advocated
reform of sodomy laws years before the gay
rights movement came into the mainstream,
including UF's own Professor Jerry Israel
and Professor Emeritus Frank Allen, who
drafted proposed penal codes for commis-
sions in Michigan and Illinois that urged
repeal of state sodomy laws. Read
more at www.law.ufl.edu/news/flalaw/
pdf/flalaw-050321.pdf.

International Legal Issues
Terrorism, dispute resolution and the
rule of law were just a few of the topics
examined at the Legal and Policy Issues in
the Americas Conference, hosted in
May by the Center for Governmental
Responsibility. Lawyers, scholars and law
enforcement officials from across the


Western Hemisphere gathered in Gainesville
to discuss pressing legal and policy issues
facing the United States and its neighbors in
North and South America.
Speakers included Former Florida
Governor Kenneth "Buddy" MacKay (JD
67), special envoy of the Americas in the
Clinton Administration; Dennis Jett, dean
of UF's International Center and former
United States Ambassador to Peru; Peter
German, director general of the Financial
Crimes Division of the Royal Canadian
Mounted Police; George Henry Millard,
police chief of Sao Paolo State in Brazil; and
Alan Lambert, consultant for the British
Foreign and Commonwealth Offices Anti-
Money-Laundering Program.
Maria Luisa Beltranena de Padilla,
former president of the Guatemalan
Supreme Court, was awarded the Jon Mills
Award for Significant Contributions to
Relations Between Florida and the Americas.
Beltranena who was the first woman to
sit on the supreme court and later the first
woman to serve as that nation's Minister of
Education has coordinated cooperative
efforts between UF and Guatemalan univer-
sities since the late 1970s. (Also see page 27.)

Music Law
The problems and opportunities musicians
face in the age of the iPod especially
file-sharing and copyrights brought 300
lawyers and musicians to the annual stu-
dent-run Music Law Conference. Other
topics included the non-profit organization
Creative Commons, which helps musicians
get exposure while retaining some rights.
The conference also showcased bands and
featured a demo-listening exhibit. Carlos
Linares (JD 97), counsel for the Recording
Industry Association of America, musician
and panelist, shared an anecdote of when his
band's music ended up on Napster and he
realized there would be no compensation.
Read more at www.law.ufl.edu/news/
flalaw/pdf/flalaw-050207.pdf.

Race
Race and pedagogy, how race fits into
the law school curriculum, and the conse-
quences of teaching race in the law school
environment were discussion topics at the


Race and Law Curriculum Workshop,
sponsored by the Center for the Study of
Race and Race Relations. Speakers at the
workshop were race and law scholars from
academic institutions around the country,
including Rutgers University-Newark,
Washington University, Mississippi
College, Ohio State and the Universities
of Oregon, Alabama, North Carolina,
Virginia, California-Los Angeles,
Maryland and New Mexico. Read more
at www.law.ufl.edu/news/flalaw/pdf/
flalaw-050307.pdf.

Slavery
"Affirmative Action for the Master
Class: Understanding the Proslavery
Constitution and Its Implications for 21st
Century America" was the topic of the
Spring Lecture for the Center for the
Study of Race and Race Relations, which
typically features scholars who offer novel,
critical approaches to race in America. The
guest speaker was University of Tulsa Law
Professor Paul Finkelman, a leading
authority on the history of slavery and
other areas. (Finkelman's work on the Ten
Commandments display was cited in briefs
before the Supreme Court, and he served
as an expert witness in the lawsuit over
ownership of Barry Bonds 73rd home run
ball.) Read more at www.law.ufl.edu/
news/flalaw/pdf/flalaw-050321 .pdf.


UF LAW 7


Keep

Learning


UF law alumni are invited to attend
and participate in Friday lunch collo-
quia and workshops by notable guest
speakers and law faculty. The events,
held at the law school during the aca-
demic year, are on a space-available
basis due to limited seating. The speak-
er schedule and online registration are
available at www.law.ufl.edu/faculty/
enrichment.shtml. To find out about
other events visit www.law.ufl.edu.

















BRINGING HOME a


BY GAYLE GALLAGHER


SUPER BOWL


T heir problem was: Where will we put
everybody?
Jacksonville had 840 square miles of land
... but only 43,000 hotel rooms. That wasn't
a problem until the city set out to bring
home the most famous bowl of all an
event that would showcase it in front of
1 billion television viewers worldwide.
It began in 1999 when Jacksonville
Jaguars owner Wayne Weaver returned from
an NFL franchise meeting in New York with
"approval of the possibility" for Jacksonville
to apply as a Super Bowl Host City. To move
from possibly applying to actually applying,
the city had to prove it could accommodate
an additional 100,000 people.
Fortunately, Michael B. Weinstein (JD
91) president and CEO of the


Jacksonville Super Bowl Host Committee
- was able to apply his law school train-
ing to the lodging issue that stood
between Jacksonville and a Super Bowl.
"The first thing law school does," said
Weinstein, "is erase your learning habits
and train you in a new way to solve prob-
lems. When we learned what the require-
ments were to host the Super Bowl,
the lack of hotel rooms was a glaring
obstacle."
A solution to this problem, however,
would be moot until there was a reason to
search for it.
"A city can't just decide it wants to be a
Super Bowl host city," said Weinstein. "The
NFL has to invite you to apply."
To determine whether Jacksonville


(From left) Tom Petway, Mike Weinstein and
Peter Rummell get the news the big bowl is
coming to Jacksonville.
would get an invitation, the NFL sent staff to
interview the committee and tour the area.
Weinstein and other committee executives
showed them highlights by car and by
helicopter that included the World Golf
Village, Tournaments Players Club, Amelia
Island and Alltel Stadium.
The NFL representatives were impressed.

Water, Water Everywhere
The next step was an initial presentation
to NFL decision-makers. But before this
could happen, Weinstein had to answer that
big lodging question. The solution turned
out to be a first for the NFL and a first for
the industry that agreed to Weinstein's offer.


8 UF LAW
















"We contracted with Holland America
and Carnival Cruise Lines, which designated
ships for the event," said Weinstein.
"Without these ships, we could not have
pulled this off."
With this issue resolved, the committee
went to New York to win the confidence of
the NFL ... for an invitation to apply.
With a 4-by-10-foot map of
Jacksonville's riverfront and cruise ships
made to scale, Weinstein and co-committee
members stood before NFL Commissioner
Paul Tagliabue and NFL President Robert
Godell, among others, and made the case
for Jacksonville's suitability to host the
world's greatest annual sporting event.
"They were picking up the cruise ships


graduate, Mayor John Delaney (JD 81).
The approval for Jacksonville to apply
was given in mid-1999. By the end of the
same year, this very controlled process was
over and Weinstein and company made
one more trip to New York.

Closing Argument and Verdict
"We could take only five people into the
presentation room," said Weinstein, "and
only three of us could speak. Tagliabue told
us the NFL owners could ask questions after
we presented, but that no one ever had.
Well, we were the first group to field
questions, and we took it as a good sign."
They had renewed doubt, however, as
they passed Don Shula and Dan Marino


ing cheers." Victory was especially sweet
because the buzz in the media room pre-
dicted Miami would take the bowl.
However, the work wasn't over.
"Now we had to learn from upcoming Super
Bowls," said Weinstein. "We went to Tampa
in 2001, New
Or 1 means
in 2002, San
Diego in 2003
and Houston in
2004 to observe
and study the
thousands of
details involved
in hosting a
Super Bowl."


"THE ANNOUNCEMENT WOULD EVEN GO OVER THE PUBLIC ADDRESS

SYSTEM THROUGHOUT JACKSONVILLE SCHOOLS. EVERYONE WAS WAITING."


and moving them around like game
pieces," said Weinstein. "I think this
exercise helped them make their decision.
Tagliabue said this would be the
first Super Bowl on a river. They liked
the idea."
They liked it so much, they asked the
committee to apply for the 2005 Super
Bowl instead of the 2007 and 2008 games
as originally planned.
Then the long application journey
began, a journey that would take six
months and culminate in a 15-minute
final presentation to the NFL.
"The application is just 50 pages,"
said Weinstein, "but there's an addendum
that includes a memo of understanding, a
host of contracts and a letter of intent
from all the businesses, local government
agencies, cruise lines and other assets the
bowl would need for success. That part
turned out to be 700 pages."
The entire application was put togeth-
er by the Jacksonville Economic
Development Commission, which
Weinstein directed under another UF law


going into the presentation room as they
were heading out. Shula and Marino were
there to represent Miami, which along
with Oakland and Atlanta were com-
peting against Jacksonville.
Weinstein waited with co-presenters
Tom Petway, chairman of the board for
Zurich Insurance Services, and Peter
Rummell, chairman and CEO of The St.
Joe Company, in a large press conference
room along with the other cities com-
peting for three different bowls. Television
networks, broadcasting live, had cameras
poised on the group. There also were
cameras rolling in the office of Mayor
Delaney. The announcement would even
go over the public address system
throughout Jacksonville schools. Everyone
was waiting.
"We didn't have a clue what would
happen," said Weinstein. "After several
hours, the commissioner came into the
room and announced the winners."
The jubilation that followed the
announcement was incredible, said
Weinstein. "The room erupted with roar-


A Life Prepared
Weinstein didn't turn into a Super
Bowl Host City application guru
overnight.
Born and raised in New Jersey,
Weinstein received a bachelor's degree in
political science from Hartwick College in
Oneonta, N.Y, and a master's in criminal
justice administration from California
State University. Prior to earning his law
degree at UF, he completed two years of
doctoral studies in criminology at Florida
State University.
Weinstein chose the UF law school for
two reasons: it was near his beloved
Jacksonville where he and wife Sara
had made a happy home and raised three
children and it had turned out many
successful attorneys well known to
Weinstein.
When Weinstein moved to
Jacksonville in 1977, he worked as execu-
tive director for State Attorney Ed Austin
(JD 59). He eventually became responsi-
ble for a $129 million budget and 586
full-time employees as director of the


UF LAW 9















Administration and Finance Department
for both the Austin and Delaney mayoral
administrations.
Later, as executive director of
the Jacksonville Economic Development
Commission under Mayor Delaney,
Weinstein's negotiations with private
companies brought the city more
than $2 billion in private capital
investment and 20,500 jobs. He also was
a partner in a private law firm, where
he specialized in government and envi-
ronmental issues.
"My law degree has served me well,"


said Weinstein. "I believed it would open
many career doors, and it did."
It also helped open the door to the
Super Bowl.

A Notable Return on Investment
"The Super Bowl in Jacksonville was
like no other Super Bowl before it," said
Weinstein. "We had to manage with far
less capacity in many critical areas."
The event had a final economic
impact on the region of between
$250 and $350 million. This is based on
economic factoring that assesses the


From coaches' luncheons and beach bashes to youth
regattas and prayer breakfasts, leading the Orange
Bowl Committee is a year-round responsibility a
responsibility readily accepted by two UF law graduates.
Christopher E. Knight (JD 86), of Fowler, White,
Burnett in Miami, just completed his tenure as president
of the Orange Bowl Committee, a 310-member, all-volun-
teer organization that sponsors more than 100 events
and activities during the Orange Bowl festival and leads
to the annual FedEx Orange Bowl.
Danny Ponce (JD 73) was recently elected vice
president of the committee for 2005-06, which puts him in
line to serve as president of the committee
when the Orange Bowl hosts the
national college football champi-
onship in 2008.
The organization was created in
1935 to bring tourism to South Florida
and attracts more than $200 million in
economic impact and 150,000 visitors to
the Miami area.


residual effect of dollars left behind after
such an event. But even without this fac-
toring, Weinstein said the region realized
$100 million in real dollars.
How much did it cost to make that
$100 million?
"We probably spent $11 million
to get the Super Bowl here,"
said Weinstein. "We got most of that by
selling sponsorships to local businesses.
These included tickets, signage and com-
mercial exposure."
But the real impact wasn't the money.
"Jacksonville has to come up with
15,000-20,000 new jobs each year to han-
dle the influx of those who move here
annually. The Super Bowl exposed the city
to companies seeking to expand. Our new
visibility makes us a stronger contender
for companies that might relocate here,
bringing new jobs."

Miles to Go
Before Weinstein entered the world of
government and law, he was a public
school teacher and university professor.
The position he holds today is another
natural fit. Weinstein is president of Take
Stock in Children, a national model for
helping children at risk complete their
education, maintain good grades and
remain drug- and crime-free in order to
receive a four-year tuition scholarship to
college or vocational school.
"Education and the ability to find eco-
nomic opportunity are tied together," said
Weinstein. "Everybody wants the same
thing: the ability to care for themselves
and their families."
Weinstein is happy channeling the
passion he summoned to win Jacksonville
the Super Bowl into helping Florida's stu-
dents have better opportunities.
"You never know," he said. "Some of
them might become lawyers or mayors."
One might even be on a Super Bowl Host
City Committee, looking for a creative solu-
tion to a stubborn problem standing between
his city and one super ball game. 0


10 UF LAW



















PARTNERS
LEVIN COLLEGE OF LAW FRIENDS


Alumni Give $1.5 Million
for Professorship

John (JD 73) and Mary Lou (JD 80)
Dasburg are giving the university $1.5
million to endow a professorship in corporate
law the largest sum ever given for an
endowed professorship at the law school.
"We both enjoyed and profited
immensely from our classes in corporate law
at UF," said John Dasburg, CEO ofASTAR
Air Cargo Inc. in Miami and vice-chair of
the Florida Board of Governors. "We wanted
to make sure that future law students are able
to have the same opportunity."
John Dasburg believes law school is one
of the best places to start a career in business
- and he would know. Before acquiring
ASTAR, Dasburg served as president of
Marriott Lodging Group, CEO of
Northwest Airlines and president, chairman
and CEO of Burger King Corp. He says his
law school education helped him every step
of the way.
"There's no question the academic
exercise of the case method really sharpens
your intellect," Dasburg said. "It teaches
you the significance of the difference
between inductive and deductive reasoning,
which is invaluable in the business world.
Most of the decisions you make in business
involve inductive reasoning, and it's impor-
tant to remember that inductive reasoning
has a significant margin of error."
The Dasburgs' gift will create
the John H. and Mary Lou Dasburg
Professorship Fund, which will support a
faculty member in corporate law, including
national and international law relating to
business transactions.


Mary Lou and John Dasburg
"This professorship will help us recruit
and retain the very best faculty, both of
which are vitally important to our future
quality," said Dean Robert Jerry.
The gift comes as UF begins its
Faculty Challenge, a university-wide cam-
paign to raise $150 million to give faculty
the tools they need to enhance classroom
instruction and conduct world-class
research. The donation will be matched
with $250,000 from a special fund set up
by the university for the Faculty Challenge.


Ice Cream in the Courtyard


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:-I.. 1,n -O n.l I.. I _1 2 .1 ih..n : 1:.1n 11 lO i n..I.1
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A -II


It also is eligible for matching funds from
the State of Florida Major Gifts Trust Fund.
"We both felt it was time to give
something back to the law school, and we
thought a professorship would be the best
way to make an impact," Dasburg said.
"In the end, a university is its faculty and
its students."

1909 Society Underway

For almost 100 years, the University
of Florida Levin College of Law has pro-
vided a sound legal education to thousands
of young men and women. Today a group
of supporters the 1909 Society -
wants to continue the quality, innovation
and advancement of the college by inviting
alumni and friends to give to the school
and receive invaluable gifts in return.
The 1909 Society is seeking annual
fund gifts of $2,000 to $4,999. In return,
donors will impact students, teaching and
research by enhancing academic programs,
services and outreach efforts. Donors also
will earn the benefits of membership in the
UF President's Council, recognition in the
Law Center Association Annual Report,
invitations to the dean's special events and
CONTINUED ON PAGE 12
IMI


UF LAW 11















Real Property Scholarship Established


Lewis "Lukie" Ansbacher (JD 51)
was known for his special relation-
ships with clients, many of whom
often became friends. Such was the
case with Phil and Barbara Emmer of


A luncheon to honor Lukie Ansbacher included
(from left) Phil Emmer, Ansbacher's sons, Barry
and Lawrence, and Ansbacher's wife, Sybil.

CONTINUED FROM PAGE 13 >

receptions, access to Reitz Union recre-
ational facilities, borrower privileges at
UF Smathers Libraries, and more.
To donate online, please visit
www.ufgiving.uff.ufl.edu. For more
information or to receive a donation
form, contact the Office of Development
& Alumni Affairs at 352-273-0640.

Cuban-American Bar
Endows Scholarship
The Cuban-American Bar Foundation
presented Dean Robert Jerry with a
$30,000 check to endow a Cuban-
American Bar Merit Scholarship. The
check was presented during the law
school's alumni reception at the Florida
Bar Mid-Year Meeting.
This scholarship will be awarded to a
law student who has shown outstanding
academic achievement, which can be
demonstrated through significant scholar-
ship on the subjects of human rights and
rule of law in Cuba.
The Cuban-American Bar
Foundation was formed by members of
the Cuban-American Bar Association
as a continuation of their commitment to


Gainesville, who were clients and
family friends for more than 30 years
before Ansbacher died in 2004 at the
age of 75.
To honor that friendship and
Ansbacher's love of real property
law and the legal profession, the
Emmers and Ansbacher's family and
friends have established a $100,000
endowed scholarship for qualified
law students with an interest in real
property law. The Emmers, founders
of Emmer Group, a Gainesville-
based land development company,
committed to matching all gifts
made to the scholarship fund up to
$50,000.Ansbacher is survived by his
wife, Sybil; sons, Richard (JD 83),
Barry (JD 88) and Lawrence; brothers,
Jordan and Robert; and several
grandchildren.



providing scholarships to meritorious
students in Florida.

Book Awards Honor
Top Students in Class
Supportive sponsors who remember
the long hours and hard work of law
school returned to campus in April to
honor the top student in each class. More
than 100 students were recognized with
Summer and Fall Semester Book Awards,
which are sponsored by gifts from alumni
and law firms. Read more at www.law.ufl.
edu/alumni/ba_sponsorship.shtml.


On hand to help Dean Robert Jerry (center) pres-
ent the Eminent Domain & Takings Book Award
to Cary Davis (2L, left) was Stumpy Harris (JD
65). Harris and his son, Bruce M. Harris (JD 93),
are long-time Book Award sponsors.


Spring 2005 Class Sets
New Giving Record
Once again, graduating students
have demonstrated their commitment to
their law school and hit a new record
for class giving. The Spring 2005 class
donated $55,475 in gifts and pledges,
up 24 percent from the previous record
set by the Spring 2004 class.


Z





Co-chair Julie Miller
The class gift was presented to Dean
Robert Jerry at May commencement,
which featured speaker Paul Rogers (JD
48) a former U.S. congressman
known as "Mr. Health" for his role in
crafting major legislation related to the
environment and medical research.
Spearheading the Senior Class Gift
Committee were Julie Miller, Bonnie Bolz
and Angelique Knox. Graduates from
Florida Law Review also played a leader-
ship role in documenting their pledges to
the college.

Students Hold Up
Endowment Wall
Despite massive renovations and
accompanying dust and noise at the law
school recently, one area of the Florida Law
Review' Holland Hall office has remained
strictly off-limits: the endowment wall.
It was for good reason. Created
about four years ago, the endowment wall
symbolizes the fruits of the journal's fund-
raising efforts, undertaken to establish an
independent endowment for the Review.
With a goal set at $2 million, the journal is
already halfway there, with most funds
coming from student donations. Read
more at www.law.ufl.edu/news/flalaw/pdf/
flalaw-050124.pdf. 0


12 UF LAW


PARTNERS















FOUNDATION TO CREATE


New Advocacy


Center for Children


A foundation created by a Hollywood
insider is working to establish a
multidisciplinary center at the Levin
College of Law to train those who deal
with the legal system's most vulnerable
clients: abused and neglected children.
Washington, D.C.-based First Star, a
foundation created by film producer Peter
Samuelson, intends to raise an initial $2
million for each of the three planned cen-
ters, which will be located at Columbia
University, the University of San Diego
and UF. UF's center will be administered
through the Center on Children and
Families, one of the fastest-growing
programs at the law school.


"Children in the foster
care and child protective
services systems meet and
interact with a sea of faces,
all working to bring about
SBarbara Bennett Woodhouse (left), director of the Center on Children
a happy ending," said First and Families, trains law students like Whitney Untiedt (center) and
Star founder Samuelson. Corrine Stashuk (right) to work with children in the court system.


"But without understand-
ing the multidisciplinary nature of abuse
cases, these professionals are often at odds,
engaging in senseless turf battles. The First
Star MCE curriculum is designed to level
the playing field so that the ultimate victor
is truly the child."
The Center on Children and Families
offers the Certificate in Family Law, which


allows students to work with children's
issues through the law school's Child Welfare
Clinic, the Gator TeamChild juvenile law
clinic, family law externships, and fellow-
ships that enable students to work on
Friend of the Court briefs. Read more
at www.law.ufl.edu/news/flalaw/pdf/
flalaw-050131.pdf.


MAJOR GIFT

Real Estate Law Gets a Boost


A major gift from Attorneys Title
Insurance Fund Inc. will help develop
knowledgeable lawyers at the UF law
school to serve Florida's sizzling real
estate market. After it is matched by
the state, the gift from the nation's
first Bar-related title insurance under-
writer will provide $300,000 for
teaching and faculty research in the
area of real estate law.
"The demand continues to esca-
late for well-educated legal profession-
als versed in the complexities of real
estate law. This endowment will pro-
vide much needed teaching and facul-
ty research support in this key area,"
said Dean Robert Jerry. "The gift also
works hand-in-hand with UF President
Bernie Machen's initiative to make UF
one of the nation's premier research


universities by attracting and retaining
high quality faculty and giving them
the tools they need to excel."
This endowment is one of five -
totaling $1 million the company is
establishing at Florida-based law
schools. Over the last four decades,
The Fund has provided preeminent
law schools with an annual endow-
ment to promote real property educa-
tion. In addition to the $242,800 in cur-
riculum grants the company has pro-
vided to the UF law school over the
past 40 years (including this most
recent gift), The Fund conducts an
annual law student award competition
open to law students across the state
- providing a monetary grant to the
student submitting the best legal
paper on the topic of real estate law.


"UF's law
school has a
distinguished
national
reputation and
a tradition of
academic Kovaleski
excellence. With this instructional
endowment, we are carrying out
The Fund's mission to preserve
and facilitate the practice of real
estate law," said Charles J.
Kovaleski, president. "Real estate
drives Florida's economy. This
gift represents The Fund's reinvest-
ment in the legal foundation on
which that critical piece of Florida's
economy stands."
Read more at www.law.ufl.
edu/news/flalaw/pdf/flalaw-050221.pdf.


UF LAW 13




















FLORIDA

BLUE KEY
UF LAW LEADS THE LEADERS
BY ALISSON CLARK
They are governors, university presidents and trustees. They are partners in leading law firms and com-
munity leaders. Their numbers include Florida Supreme Court justices and a UF National Alumni
Association president. They are all former presidents of the prestigious Florida Blue Key, the University
of Florida's leadership honorary, but they have something else in common: they also are UF law alumni.


14 UF LAW


















"Blue Key is linked to law. We stand for the same things.


Leaders of the 80-year-old organization can come from any
field of study, graduate or undergraduate, yet more than 85 per-
cent of the 125 past presidents are law grads. Why the domi-
nance of law students?
There is a personality profile that fits both law students and
Blue Key members, says Kelley Geraghty Price (JD 90), Blue
Key's first female leader.
"Those who gravitate to law tend to be extroverted, over-
achieving and organized. Those kinds of people are naturally
driven to Blue Key," she said.
Part of the reason also may be their long tenure on campus.
"Law students have longevity," said Price. "You get a historical
perspective on the organization, and that helps to achieve a lead-
ership status."
Blue Key presidents are in a unique position. Because mem-
bers are tapped from the leadership of organizations all over cam-
pus, the president "leads the leaders."
Past president Ashley Moody (JD 00) says leading leaders can
be tricky, as most are used to being in the driver's seat themselves.
But the combined resources of such a dynamic group can be a
powerful tool.
"When these people come together," Moody said, "you get
things done."
Florida Blue Key is best known for organizing Gator Growl,
the largest student-run pep rally in the world. In planning the
event, FBK members work with nationally known comedians
and bands to produce an event attended by thousands of stu-
dents, alumni and others.
Many presidents have appreciated the opportunity to tap into
the Blue Key network.
When Michael Silver (JD 04) graduated, he joined two other
UF law alumni who were FBK presidents T. Paine Kelly Jr.
(JD 36) and W Penn Dawson III (JD 87) at MacFarlane
Ferguson & McMullen in Tampa.
"I don't think being in Blue Key got me the job, but I think
it caused them to take a second look," Silver said.
Kelly, 92, is one of the eight UF law graduates profiled here
who have served as FBK president. While an FBK presidency
lasts only a semester, each of these former presidents says the les-
sons learned through their leadership were a defining part of their
university and professional experiences.
Gov. LeRoy Collins (page 14, from left), UF President J. Wayne Reitz,
and FBK President John Baker in the 1956 Homecoming Parade
organized by Blue Key.


I T. Paine Kelly Jr. (JD 36)
FBK President Fall 1934
Retired, MacFarlane Ferguson E
McMullen

It took nearly 70 years of practicing law
before T. Paine Kelly Jr., decided to
retire from MacFarlane Ferguson &
McMullen in Tampa, where he was a
shareholder and former firm chairman.
"Everyone was surprised I practiced as long as I did, but they
put up with me," he said. "This is where I wanted to be. I didn't
want to play golf."
Kelly's presidency in Fall 1934 came at a pivotal time, the year
the group split with the other Blue Key chapters nationwide to
become its own entity. The national Blue Key leadership honorary
was founded at UF in 1923 by Bert Riley, dean of UF's General
Extension Division. Riley had assembled 25 student leaders to
address the growing needs of Dad's Day, the predecessor of today's
Homecoming. Impressed with what the group accomplished, Riley
and his student leaders formalized the organization, forming a lead-
ership honorary that quickly spawned chapters at other universities.
Soon there were philosophical differences between chapters, and a
national convention was called to determine the future of Blue Key.
Kelly and two other Blue Key members drove to the 1934
convention in Chicago in Kelly's family car.
"We tried to impress upon the other chapters the necessity of
getting into something for the benefit of their universities," Kelly
said. "We were met with a deaf ear. At the end of the conference,
we all made speeches saying our chapter was abandoning the
national organization and becoming Florida Blue Key."
The decision didn't sit well with Riley, Kelly said, but the stu-
dents stood their ground. Although the topic remained a controver-
sial one into the next decade, an independent Florida Blue Key had
been born. (To this day, Florida Blue Key remains unaffiliated with
the organization it left. That group, now called Blue Key Honor
Society, has chapters at more than 70 colleges across the nation.)
Kelly has remained involved with FBK and was recognized as
a 50-year member at the 2002 Homecoming Banquet. To him,
Blue Key and the law go hand in hand.
"Blue Key is linked to law," he said. "We stand for the same things."


UF LAW 15












Marshall M. Criser (JD 51)
FBK President Spring 1951
Eighth President of UF; Board Member,
Scripps Florida Funding Corporation

Former University of Florida President
Marshall Criser's involvement in Blue Key
was an introduction to leadership, and
clearly it left an impression. In addition to
his UF presidency, Criser has served on and led the state Board of Regents
and UF's Board of Trustees. In November 2003 Criser was tapped by
Gov. Jeb Bush to head the Scripps Florida Funding Corporation Board,
which will oversee the state's investment in the $310 million Scripps
Florida Research Institute in Palm Beach County.
"Blue Key was really the first concentrated leadership activity I'd ever
taken part in," Criser said. "Frankly, I was a little overwhelmed. I was just
out of high school, and at that time, there were some people like myself,
but the majority had spent two or three years in World War II."
Criser was the second UF alumnus to become the university's presi-
dent, following in the footsteps of fellow FBK president Stephen C.
O'Connell (JD 40), who served in the spring of 1940.
While the organization has been through difficult times, Criser said,
he's pleased with its overall progress in recent years.
"The state and UF have changed, but there is still a credible role for
Blue Key to do what it does. They can never be complacent and must
remain credible," he said.
The 2003 election of an all-female leadership roster law students
Karen Persis and Alexis Lambert were FBK president and vice president
- is evidence of the organization's evolution, Criser said. "Coeducation
(commencing 1947) has greatly improved Florida's only AAU university.
I was very pleased to see all of the elected officers were female. I think that
is a fine thing."
Criser said the opportunity afforded to Blue Key members to gain
real world leadership experience is unparalleled.

S. Daniel Ponce (JD 73)
FBK President Spring 1973
Legon Ponce E Fodiman; Chairman of the
Board, Imperial Industries Inc.

Although Danny Ponce left Gainesville
after law school, part of him always felt
Gainesville was home.
"When a lot of people say they love the
University of Florida, they're talking about
football. For me, it goes beyond that," he said.
As a past president of UF's National Alumni Association and a cur-
rent board member of the University of Florida Foundation, he has plen-
ty of occasions to visit his alma mater. In 2000, however, he made
Gainesville home once more. He commutes more than 300 miles to his
firm, Legon, Ponce & Fodiman in Miami, and other business interests
based in south Florida.


More than 25 current law students are members of FBK this year. Last fall,
Brian Roof was the seventh of the last eight FBK presidents to also be a
UF law student. "FBK executive officers are often graduate students,
mainly because they have more experience within the organization and
they are more mature leaders," said Roof.

Now that he's back in Gainesville, Ponce, a 20-year member of Blue
Key's advisory board, can be even more hands on in his work with FBK
He continues to secure speakers for the annual banquet and has hosted
active members at his home on several occasions. During Ponce's tenure as
FBK president, the hot-button issue was the admission of female students.
"There were those who said there were already female leadership
organizations on campus, but the premier leadership organization was
not open to women, and that wasn't right," Ponce said. "In the end, the
more enlightened view turned out to be the right one."
Ponce said he continues to benefit from the lessons he learned in FBK.
"The skills it took to be elected president of Florida Blue Key -
negotiating and building consensus serve me to this day," he said.
He also has continued his commitment to service, completing a
seven-month term in Washington, D.C., as special counsel to U.S.
Sen. Bob Graham before Graham's retirement.
"It paid $2,000 a month, and my apartment in Washington cost
$3,000 a month," Ponce laughed. "I didn't do it for the money. I felt a
duty to do public service."

James C. Cunningham Jr. (JD 78)
FBK President Fall 1978
Berger Singerman

As the first African-American president
of Florida Blue Key, James Cunningham
faced down those who wished to end his
campaign before it started.
"There was an effort to get alumni riled
up that an African American was running for
president," he said. "The response came back that we were going to put
whoever was most qualified in the leadership position."
Cunningham, now with Berger Singerman in Miami, used his pres-
idency to further an ongoing initiative to open FBK to students from the
full spectrum of graduate and undergraduate schools.
CONTINUED ON PAGE 18


16 UF LAW






















THE CASE FOR


SSEVEN DECADES


red this past February after
ars as a Tampa Bay attorney.
ill active supporter of the
is an emeritus member of the
e following is reprinted with per-
fr aTribune article published in 2003.

'', l~byi y i T Paiii Kelly Ji 'il.rsil

l it[ Ill [ ile 1 IJ-l Itltl_

ld,, it w0 ll YOu Ll, I 111:11 1,1,ll,:0

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Kel ly'i.-. 01 0 .l. :il t.1 l l.'.: i 1 6., Hb Ap 'h l in- .r l Io.t ..io
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11,'ve M (,nIpuAl'' l I IJu16, ._' I ht:vbni't .e[. 1 ul l. th [In l t[6- IllII:, ll


T. Paine Kelly (JD 36. center) served as president ol FBK in 1934 dur-
ing a historic period ol the honorary organization and has continued
to serve the law school through the years as an emeritus member ol
the Law Center Association and generous donor. He recently retired
after working nearly 70 years at MacFarlane Ferguson b McMullen in
Tanipa. where two other former FBK presidents practice. W. Penn
Dawson (JD 87. right) was president in 1987 and Michael Silver
(JD 04) was president in Spring 2004.

( 'i.:iI 111,P S "
Kelly , ld I 'l not t:,. inl. 1. 1t [l'i-l [I nhl ftem ,rd ,r:llrij.i nl ii 1.:.11lll ldi '"t-
nilh 1i .t':_ in tie;iJd ,:1 lyliln [hllri A ndil i. '". i t' l.n ,[ t l-A I. i tr'. \i
.i lvbiiis' Ie O l i levtvii_,ii,:i
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he i. l I
KbIly I,. o'n l ut ih, IiJ'i ,al'ilivb iil1b iel .A [iht FI l'riiJa B.al
A 'n ociati,:,,] on:'n,, a ,,,iil l.Za r, l ni li,:,t ifl'^, 'iii ,,:.,:1sI He's rn:,[ thi,5 ,:,ldlei~t
, i, l ,: a i, iiv:l liv e r,',l'n;, W ,:,. I',, ,l 1 i 2, 1i 0 lii E lji,:,l. -^.i : ,r,:in ,':.,:l|Il I _.'ee
i.,,l.e J ,W)
Kelly -till i bpi b;.iliN ;i l.14-ybir-IolJ chil r i i i :'Poll. Ci:'uriiy
Al5t l 41) yV a .- ;,t l5,_l,: _- v wIIe. "I ,ol hliImled t oi 1:b h i, ,IU11 III
t/ih,' i hi'i 111es." he iI ,iLI
"AIbr tll .. I pji' l;lihly will I bll ." i b "ll'l "I l 'l:pe I'll Null lb h lb
to 1- 1. ,- .H..11;.
P 1 ri.. I.-- 1.t


UF LAW 17














"Blue Key hones the skills to negotiate, to work with

people to achieve things for your community."


C. NTIINIJED FR, 'M PAGE 16
"I was what you might call a reformer president," he said. "We
wanted to open up Blue Key to the student body as a whole, to elect
students from nontraditional schools such as agriculture. Our efforts
were very successful and we had a large tapping class of people who
would not otherwise have gotten into Florida Blue Key."
Cunningham said FBK membership opened doors for him after
law school, but the lasting effect was the real-life training in service and
leadership.
"Blue Key hones the skills to negotiate, to work with people to
achieve things for your community," he said. He has used those skills
as chair of the executive board of New World School of the Arts in
Miami, as well as a board member of the Coconut Grove Arts Festival.
Law students are drawn to Blue Key, he said, because of their commit-
ment to improving the world around them.
"Members of Blue Key have been very involved in student life at
the university. That sense of being involved carries over to being con-
cerned about the society in which you live, and that correlates to an
interest in the law. That's what we as lawyers do every day: we try to
impact the social fabric of our communities."

John Delaney (JD 81)
FBK President Fall 1980
President, University of North Florida

The political experience that
University of North Florida President
John Delaney gained in Florida Blue Key
has served him well ... Delaney said it
contributed to him winning two terms as
Jacksonville's mayor.
"I understood the basics of lining up votes, the typical political
horse trading that goes on," he said. "I didn't have to learn it all anew."
In 1980 Delaney balanced a busy fall FBK presidency with law
school and also got married six weeks before homecoming. Delaney
had his tensest moment when then-U.S. Vice President Walter
Mondale, scheduled to speak at the Homecoming Banquet, was
nowhere to be found when it was time for his speech.
"Everyone was saying, 'You may be married eight weeks by the
time the speaker shows up,"' Delaney recalled. "I think they had to hel-
icopter him to the Reitz Union."
Delaney said he is enjoying being back on a university campus, and
despite the prominence of his position, he describes it as a refreshing
break from the spotlight.
"We're so much smaller than the University of Florida," he said.
"You don't get the level of public scrutiny here that you do at the
Jacksonville City Hall."


Delaney's transition was made easier by his time in Blue Key:
Karen Stone (JD 82), who worked with Delaney during his Blue
Key presidency, is UNF's general counsel.
Reflecting on the dominance of law students in Blue Key lead-
ership, Delaney said law and politics are both fields that have far
reaching impact on society.
"When you look at Congress and the large number of attorneys
there, you see people who want to change society very often gravi-
tate to law as a tool to do that," he said.

Mark Merrill (JD 84)
FBK President Fall 1983
Founder and President, Family First

One of the lasting impacts of Mark
Merrill's Blue Key involvement was his
lifelong friendship with the late Stephen
C. O'Connell (LLB 40). Before
O'Connell's days as UF president and
Florida Supreme Court justice, he was a
Blue Key president as well. O'Connell gave Merrill some words of
advice that guide him to this day.
"I'll never forget one thing he told me: 'The most important
thing you can do in life is to show an interest in other people,"'
Merrill said. "Judge O'Connell had a great influence on my life."
Merrill went on to practice law alongside O'Connell, but in
1990 left the legal profession to become head of Family First, a
Tampa-based, international nonprofit organization dedicated to
strengthening the family. He hosts a radio program, "The Family
Minute," that reaches 5 million listeners each week around the
world. Each daily, one-minute broadcast explores a different aspect
of family life and parenting, giving listeners tools to better interact
with their loved ones.
"It's amazing to see the heart-tugging responses we get back
from parents, saying how it has impacted them and how it has
helped them in their parenting and in their lives," Merrill said.
Merrill has no regrets about leaving the legal field: "It was
very clear this was what God wanted me to be doing in my life," he
said. But lawyers, he said, are given a unique opportunity to make
a difference.
"We're often taught in our culture to be takers, not
givers," he said. "Every lawyer has a great opportunity to
give by being the best they can be in serving their clients
or by using their education to volunteer in their communities.
Being a lawyer can give an individual a wonderful platform to
help the community."


18 UF LAW
















KEY PRESIDENTS

it' :, .I 11111 1 F l '' il, I .: B lle .e",' F'| i:lltIl l .

1950
S 4' I I ,,,,- I I Ii
l l i' I I, II .1

1951
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l ,I


1938
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1939


1940
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1941
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1942
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1943
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1946
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1947
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1948
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1949
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1953
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1954
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1955
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1956
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1959
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1960



1961
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1962
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1963
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1964
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1965



1966

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1967

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1968
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1969
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1970
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1972
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1973




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1975


1976
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1977
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1978
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1980
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1981
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1982
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1983
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1984
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1985

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1986

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1987
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1988
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1990
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1991

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1992
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1993
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1994


1996
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1997
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1998

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1999
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2000

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2004

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E, ,, Z :


UF LAW 19
































BLUE KEY WOMEN
._The elt mn ol President Karen
it) and Vice President
ibert in 2003 was the
n the 80-year history of
Idest and most prestigious
honorary that the top two
ices were held by women.
Sis (JD 04) is a legislative
.le S. Rep. Carolyn Maloney's
IY), where she recently was
in tal in drafting a bill now
igress that requires phar-
lill and order valid prescrip-
out delay. The bill is a
o the growing number of
ts who have an objection
Sirth control prescriptions.
JD 04) is about to take the
bar exam.




Kelley Geraghty Price (JD 90)
FBK President Fall 1990
Cohen Et Grigsby

As a fall semester president, Kelley
Geraghty Price dealt with the stress of
pulling Homecoming off without a
hitch. In her case, however, there was
some additional pressure. Price was the
first female president in FBK's history.
She also was a third-year law student involved in Moot Court
and interning with the Public Defender's office.
"It was crazy," she said. "I felt like I was in a fishbowl. There
had never been a female at the helm, and people were wondering,
'how is she going to handle it?' But I believe we showed them a
woman could do as well as a man."
Price's administration focused on strengthening relations with


Blue Key alumni. When she encounters Blue Key alumni through-
out the state, they often mention her historic term as the first
female president.
"More than anything, it taught me how to handle myself
under pressure," she said. "People were incredibly supportive, both
those at the university and the alumni."
Price, now a director with Cohen & Grigsby in Naples, is pres-
ident of the Collier County Bar Association and said the time she
spends on community service today keeps her balanced.
"It's important for those in leadership positions to continue in
leadership roles after they exit the University of Florida. By doing
so you avoid 100 percent tunnel vision on your profession," she
said. "A lot of us are blessed with so many things, and it's impor-
tant for us to give back."

Ashley Moody (JD 00)
FBK President Fall 1999
Assistant United States Attorney
Middle District of Florida

Ashley Moody's Blue Key leader-
ship came at a time when the organiza-
tion was under siege. Two defamation
lawsuits had rocked Blue Key, and
Moody, now an assistant United States attorney, stepped in to
repair the damage.
"We were trying to rebuild a reputation that we felt was unfair-
ly damaged," she said. "We were struggling to ensure the organiza-
tion remained as highly respected as it had always been."
Despite the controversy, Moody said leading the group through
that difficult time was a unique opportunity for an aspiring lawyer.
"It was a trying time, but I can't imagine a better learning expe-
rience for a law student than to be the leader of an organization
trying to defend itself and its reputation," she said. "It definitely
shaped my leadership skills."
Blue Key is a family affair for Moody, whose father, U.S.
District Judge James Moody (JD 72), also participated in the
organization. Growing up, she says, her family emphasized the
importance of community service.
"It was instilled in me at a young age and magnified through
my experience in college that each of us has a duty to serve at
whichever level we can," she said. While at UF, Moody also was a
student member of the Board of Regents. Her commitment to
service continues in her profession: She recently was named to the
Tampa Bay Review's "40 Under 40," which recognizes young attor-
neys for their professional and civic contributions. Among her
many volunteer activities, Moody uses her legal expertise to help
domestic violence victims with injunctions against their batterers
as a volunteer with Bay Area Legal Services.
"The judicial system can be intimidating," she said. "Lawyers
are in a unique position to help. We are privileged to be lawyers,
and it is our obligation to help people who need our services." E


20 UF LAW



















FACULTY NEWS


LEVIN COLLEGE OF


LAW FACULTY


Professor Slobogin Cited
by U.S. Supreme Court

The work of Stephen C. O'Connell
Professor Christopher Slobogin was cited
in the U.S. Supreme Court's arguments
in Roper v. Simmons, in which the Court
ruled 5-4 to ban the death penalty for
defendants who were
juveniles at the time
of their offense.
Justice Antonin
Scalia cited
Slobogin's casebook,
Criminal Procedure:
Regulation of Police
Investigation, in his Slobogin
dissenting opinion.
Scalia disputed the majority's argument
that American law should conform to the
laws of other countries, arguing that
some aspects of U.S. law are distinctly
American. He cited Slobogin's casebook
to show that British courts rarely reject
evidence collected in illegal searches,
despite the exclusionary rule observed by
American courts.

Law School Welcomes
Talented New Faculty

The Levin College of Law will wel-
come four new faculty members in the fall.
Andrea Matwyshyn comes to UF
from Northwestern University School of
Law, where her research focuses on the
legal and social implications of technolo-
gy regulation and data security. She is an
affiliate of the Centre for Economics and
Policy at the University of Cambridge.
Matwyshyn also regularly speaks to aca-
demic and industry groups on issues of


enterprise risk
management,
information
technology and
the security
of proprietary
information.
Matwyshyn Rowe
At UF,
Matwyshyn will focus her research and
teaching on legal technology.
Elizabeth Rowe, a Harvard Law School
graduate (with a bachelors and masters
degree from UF), was a partner in the litiga-
tion department at Boston-based Wilmer
Cuttier Pickering Hale & Dorr and served
as a special assistant district attorney for
Boston. She is currently teaching at Florida
Coastal School of Law and has previously
taught at Boston University and Harvard
University. Her research focuses on intellec-
tual property and business issues, including
areas such as theft of trade secrets in the
workplace. At UF, she will teach trademarks
and patents.
Michael Siebecker, a graduate of Yale
University and Columbia Law School,
spent four years at the New York firm of
Cravath, Swain & Moore before becom-
ing a professor at Hofstra University


School of Law. At Hofstra, Siebecker
conducted research on the intersection
of law and political theory, particularly
as they relate to securities regulation,
business organizations and the Internet.
He also represented a group of socially
responsible investment firms as amicus
curiae in Nike v. Kasky, a commercial
speech case decided by the U.S. Supreme
Court. At UF, Siebecker will teach
corporate law.
As an estates and trusts associate at
the New York City firms Davis Polk &
Wardwell and Milbank, Tweed, Hadley
& McCoy, Lee-ford Tritt worked on
sophisticated estate, tax and property
matters. He currently is teaching at Pace
University School of Law. At UF this fall,
he will teach estates and trusts. Tritt also
will serve as assistant director of the
Center for Estates and Elder Planning.


Faculty Experts Guide Online
SA Faculty Experts Guide is now online that makes
Sit easy for alumni and others to identify faculty with
- i expertise in specific areas and seek expert witness-
es. The site lists UF law school faculty names, titles
and areas of expertise. Users also can click on the
S -- faculty name to link to a picture, full resume and
other information. This guide is online at
S- www.law.ufl.edu/faculty/expertsguide.shtml.


UF LAW 21














Mediation Expert Wins Award
When Alison
Gerencser (JD 84)
was a freshly minted
attorney practicing
family law in the
Jacksonville area, she
often wondered if
there wasn't a better
way to settle family
.d Gerencser
disputes.
"I began to feel that bringing lawyers
into a divorce only made a bad situation
worse," said Gerencser, a legal skills pro-
fessor and associate director of the
Institute for Dispute Resolution at the
Levin College of Law. "There has to be a
better way to settle these issues than to
fight it out in court."
In the early 1990s, Gerencser's expe-
rience led her to take charge of the 8th
Judicial Circuit's first mediation program
when it was literally headquartered in a
judge's office closet. Originally the pro-
gram offered mediation only in family
law cases. Since then, it has expanded to


Assistant Professor Christopher
L. Peterson won the 2005 Best
Book Award from the American
College of Financial Services
Lawyers for his book Taming the
Sharks: Toward a Cure for the
High-Cost Credit Market. The
book, which examines the growth
in payday loans and other high-
interest lending, also was selected
by Academia Magazine as a rec-
ommended title for Winter 2005.
Peterson also has made
headlines for a recent study that
shows that payday lending stores
are clustered around military
bases. Peterson and co-author
Steven Graves, a geography pro-
fessor at California State
University, say their study shows
that payday lenders are targeting
military families.


include civil law in county and circuit
courts, as well as some criminal cases.
Her involvement in the program led
Santa Fe Community College to honor
her with its Woman of Distinction
Award.
Mediation has drastically reduced the
caseload in the 8th Circuit Court. For
instance, 80 percent of family law cases in
the 8th Circuit are now settled through
mediation.
"Let's face it: litigation is costly, and
people would usually prefer to avoid it for
that reason alone," she said. "Another rea-
son mediation works, particularly in family
law, is that there's no transcript, so you
don't face the prospect of very personal
information becoming public record."
Gerencser teaches the UF law
mediation clinic, which trains law stu-
dents in mediation techniques and gives
them hands-on experience. Gerencser
and her students also work at the Pace
Center for Girls and other schools for at-
risk youth, teaching alternative dispute
resolution techniques to children.


"Payday loan
companies vocif-
erously deny that
they are targeting
military personnel,
but the numbers
show that they
do," Peterson said.
"It's sad enough to Peterson
see someone get into financial trou-
ble because someone lent him
money at more than 400 percent
interest. It's even worse when that
borrower is a person who is fighting
to protect our freedom someone
whose career can be ruined by a
loan of this sort."
Peterson's study has been the
subject of stories in Stars and
Stripes, Army Times, Navy Times,
The Kansas City Star, The L.A. Daily
News, and other newspapers.


Novel Fulfills
Lifelong Dream
If you were to invent the perfect mys-
tery writer, his resume would probably
look a lot like Mike
Seigel's. As a Harvard
Law School graduate,
Seigel knows a thing or
two about putting words
together. As a former
federal prosecutor, he
has an insider's view of
the courtroom drama.
And as a law professor Seigel
who teaches an evidence class at UF,
Seigel has a knowledge of investigative
techniques that most mystery writers
would, well, kill for.
"Now Seigel has put his
m "ABIE mystery-writing credentials
!hEiVtN i to the test with Improbable
,i i Events: Murder at Ellenton
Hall (iUniverse), a mys-
Stery novel released in
March. Seigel wrote the
Micbhel Seige1 book, his first work of
fiction, during a semester
sabbatical.
"To write a novel was always a dream
of mine," Seigel said. "Sometimes you
look at some of the books that get pub-
lished and think 'how hard can it be?'
Sometimes you come across a really great
book and wonder, 'could I write something
like that?'
"A couple of years ago I got tired of
wondering," he continued. "I decided to
sit down and just do it."
Improbable Events follows the adven-
tures of Mark Bolton, an associate dean at
the fictitious Tampa Bay University School
of Law. Bolton stumbles across a mystery
when a student is found murdered in one
ofTBU's classrooms. Against his better
judgment, the former prosecutor can't
resist the temptation to get involved in the
investigation even wrangling an
appointment as a sheriff's deputy to
improve his access to evidence. The novel
is available through Amazon.com and in
Gainesville at Wilbert's and Goerings. 0


22 UF LAW


PAYDAY LENDERS

Peterson Honored for Research


FACULTY NEWS






RECOGNITION


UF PROFESSOR NAMED


Human Rights Advocate


The American Bar Association's Human
Rights magazine has named Professor
Barbara Bennett Woodhouse a "Human
Rights Hero." She was one of four lawyers
from across the nation
profiled in the Winter 2005 issue of the
magazine, which described Woodhouse as
"an international leader in the field of chil-
dren's rights."
Woodhouse is director of the law
school's Center on Children and Families,
which works with court officials, law
enforcement agencies and others to pro-
mote better service for children in the
court system. Woodhouse and the
Children's Fellows law students who
have obtained fellowships through the
center train advocates for children, do
scholarly research on children's issues,
educate children about their rights and
responsibilities, and promote a more
child-centered approach to policies that
affect children.
In pursuit of that mission, Woodhouse
and her colleagues have filed amicus briefs in


Barbara Woodhouse (center), with UF Center on Children and Families Fellows Loreal Belfon
(from left), Corrine Stashuck, Najah Gibson, Cathy Ambersley and Whitney Untiedt.


a number of high-profile cases related to
children's welfare, including recent court
cases involving the juvenile death penalty
and the adoption of children by gay couples.
"I never imagined myself as a hero,"


Woodhouse said. "The real heroes are
the children, and it is their courage and
resilience that inspires gifted young
lawyers like our Children's Fellows to
dedicate their careers to this work." U


Jackson Receives Bar's Pro Bono Award


For years, Legal Skills Professor
Joseph Jackson (JD 82) has been a
friend to Gainesville's homeless,
both in and out of court. Now he has
been honored with the Florida Bar
President's Pro Bono Award for the
8th Judicial Circuit, awarded each
year to an outstanding attorney.
Jackson stays in close contact
with the homeless community
through his work with a mobile
homeless outreach effort that makes
twice-weekly deliveries of food,
blankets and other supplies. That
involvement led him to take on a


number of cases involving individu-
als and community advocate
groups, from settling probate
issues to defending people on
misdemeanor charges to fighting
a local library's decision to ban a
homeless person from its premises.
Read more at www.law.ufl.
edu/news/flalaw/pdf/flalaw-
050314.pdf.
Legal Skills Professor Joe Jackson
and his wife, Lecturer Emeritus
Elizabeth McCulloch, load donated
items into their car for distribution to
the homeless.


UF LAW 23













RECENT FACULTY ACHIEVEMENTS


m Conservation Clinic Director and Legal
Skills Professor Thomas T. Ankersen
published "Inside the Polygon: Emerging
Community Tenure Systems and Forest
Extraction," with Grenville Barnes, in
Working Forests in the Neotropics:
Conservation Through Sustainable
Management? (Columbia U.P, ed. D.
Zarin et al. 2004); and "Applying Clinical
Legal Education to Community Smart
Growth: The University of Florida
Conservation Clinic," with Nicole C. Kibert,
in Partnershipsfor Smart Growth: University-
Community Collaboration for Better Public
Places 64-80 (Wim Wiewel & Gerrit-Jan
Knaap eds., M.E. Sharpe Inc. 2005).

* Chesterfield Smith Professor and
Director of the UF Center for
International Financial Crimes Studies
Fletcher N. Baldwin published in the
Money Laundering Control Review, Institute
of Advanced Legal Studies, University of
London. His articles were "The Rule of
Law, Human Rights and Proportionality
as Components of the War Against
Terrorism: Is the U.S. Judiciary in Self-
Imposed Exile?," 7 J Money Laundering
Control 218 (2004), and "The Financing
of Terror in the Age of the Internet:
Willful Blindness, Greed or a Political
Statement?," 8J. Money Laundering
Control 127 (2004).

* Professor Stuart R. Cohn, Gerald A.
Sohn Research Scholar and associate dean
for international studies, returned last fall
from Namibia, where he was director of a
nine-nation workshop among sub-Saharan
countries. The workshop was co-sponsored
by the United Nations Institute for Research
and Development and West African Agency
for Financial Development. Cohn also pub-
lished the 2004-05 edition of his treatise,
Securities Counseling for New and Developing
Companies (Westgroup), and is currently
working on an Association for Law and
Business project with several UF law students
on behalf of The Florida Bar Business Law
Section to reform Florida's Not-for-Profit


Statute. Cohn has written "A New Direction
for African Capital Markets: Facilitating
Capital-Raising Opportunities for Small and
Medium-Sized Enterprises," United Nations
Institute for Training and Research Doc. #20
(2004); and "Potential Liability for MD&A
and 8-K Disclosures and Omissions,"
Annual Institute on Federal Securities.

* An article co-authored by Thomas
Cotter, former professor and IP program
director, was cited in the U.S. Court of
Appeals for the 9th Circuit. In its decision
in Silvers v. Sony Pictures Entertainment,
handed down March 25, the court cited
an article by Cotter and co-author
Roger D. Blair that addressed the
hardships copyright holders faced
before they were able to separately
sell the various rights arising from a
copyright. He also published "Market
Fundamentalism and the TRIPs agree-
ment," 22 Cardozo Arts & Entertainment
Law Journal (2004) and "An Economic
Analysis of Enhanced Damages and
Attorney's Fees for Willful Patent
Infringement," 14 Fed. Cir. B. J. 291-331
(2004). In addition, Cotter presented
a paper, "The Law and Economics of
Intermediaries: Developing a General
Analytical Framework," at an April 9
conference at Michigan State University
College of Law.

m Professor Jeffrey Davis moderated a
panel discussion between Middle District of
Florida bankruptcy judges, Middle District
Chapter Thirteen trustees and representa-
tives of the office of the United States
Trustee on methods for harmonizing
Chapter Thirteen procedures throughout
the district. Davis recently wrote "Ending
the Nonsense: The In Pari Delicto Doctrine
Has Nothing To Do With What is Section
541 Property of the Bankruptcy Estate,"
Emory Journal of Bankruptcy Developments.

* Chesterfield Smith Professor of Law
Nancy Dowd was one of four invited
featured speakers at the 2005 Thrower


Symposium on family law at Emory
University School of Law. Her topic was
"Fathers and the Supreme Court: Founding
Fathers and Nurturing Fathers." A forth-
coming University of Cincinnati Law Review
article, "Bringing the Margin to the Center:

Comprehensive Strategies for Work/Family
Policies," was presented at the Women's
Work is Never Done Symposium organized
by the law school.

* Associate Professor Mark Fenster spoke
on "The Opacity of Transparency" at
Stetson School of Law.

* Alison Gerencser, legal skills professor and
associate director of the Institute for Dispute
Resolution, along with her mediation clinic
students, spoke to mediators from the 8th
Judicial Circuit on "The Quality of Mercy:
Apology and the South African TRC." (Also
see page 22.)

m Chesterfield Smith Professor Michael W.
Gordon was appointed vice chair of the
Programs Committee and the Publications
Board of the American Bar Association
Section of International Law. For the fourth
consecutive year, he developed, moderated
and was a panelist on the two Fundamentals
of International Business Law programs,
held in Washington, D.C., on "International
Letters of Credit" and "Processing an
International Trade Dispute." International
Trade Law Programs Director Stephen
Powell joined the panel. Gordon also was
invited to the second Latin American work-
shop, held in May at Washington University
Law School in St. Louis. Gordon also con-
sulted on two cases before the U.S. Supreme
Court last term.
Gordon published the 7th edition of his
co-authored International Business
Transactions Nutshell by the West Group. He
sat as a panelist with two Canadians and two
other Americans in Washington, D.C., on
the NAFTA Chapter 19 wheat dispute
between Canada and the United States. The
panel met shortly thereafter in Ottawa to
draft their decision.


24 UF LAW






IMPACT


* Levin, Mabie & Levin Professor Berta
Esperanza Hemandez-Truyol published
"Asking the Family Question" in Florida Law
Quarterly and presented her work with Jane
Larson on "Prostitution -Voluntary Bondage?
On Work, Slavery and Human Rights," at the
Global Impact of Feminist Legal Theory
Conference in San Diego. Hernandez-Truyol
published "Querying Lawrence" in 65 Ohio
State Law Journal as part of a symposium on
"Equality, Privacy and Lesbian and Gay Rights
after Lawrence v. Texas." Other articles include
"Traveling the Boundaries of Statelessness:
Global Passports and Citizenship" in the
Cleveland State Law Review; "Cuba and Good
Governance," Journal of Transnational Law and
Contemporary Problems; and "Globalized
Citizenship: Sovereignty, Security and Soul,"
Villanova Law Review.

* Affiliate Professor of Law Emeritus
Richard Hiers (JD 83) delivered an address
tied "Academic Freedom Under the First
Amendment in Public Colleges and
Universities: Faculty Rights and Court-Created
Hurdles Including the Peculiar Idea of
Institutional Academic Freedom or Autonomy"
at a retired UF faculty meeting. He also pub-
lished "Institutional Academic Freedom -A
Constitutional Misconception: Did Grutter v.
Bl'.g~, Perpetuate the Confusion?" in Journal
of College of University Law 531 (2004).

m Professor Thomas Hurst presented a paper,
"The Unfinished Business of Mutual Fund
Reform," April 1 at the Investors' Rights
Conference sponsored by Pace University
School of Law in New York City.

* Ed Rood Eminent Scholar in Trial Advocacy
& Procedure Jerold Israel published "Seven
Habits of a Highly Effective Scholar," 102
Michigan Law Review 1701 (2004); and the
2005 Pocket Parts to Volumes 1-5 and
Replacement Volume 6 for CriminalProcedure
Treatise, 2nd edition, with co-authors Wayne
LaFave and Nancy King.

* Dean Robert Jerry published "A Brief
Exploration of Space: Some Observations on


SETTING POLICY


Privacy vs. Access


n the age of the Internet, how do
you resolve the tension between the
state constitutional right of privacy
and the constitutional right to access
court information?
That quandary has belonged to
Dean Emeritus Jon Mills for the last
year and a half as he has chaired the
15-member Committee on Privacy
and Court Records, which was
charged with developing a uniform,
statewide policy to ensure private
information is filtered out of court
records before being placed in media
such as the Internet and bulk electron-
ic access systems.
Mills (JD 72), director of the
Center for Government Responsibility
at the Levin College of Law, leads the
diverse group of lawyers, judges, court
clerks, courts administrators and First
Amendment Foundation representa-
tives appointed by then Florida
Supreme Court Chief Justice Harry
Lee Anstead (JD 63). The group
includes UF alumni Judge Edward
Fine (JD 71) of the 15th Judicial
Circuit, Judge Jacqueline Griffin (JD
75) of the 5th District Court of
Appeals, Jonathan Kaney Jr. (JD 79)
with Cobb & Cole, and Larry Turner
(JD 70), a former 8th Judicial Circuit
judge now in private practice in
Gainesville. Also on the panel is Andrew
Adkins, director of the Legal Technology
Institute at the UF law school.
The group has tackled several dif-
ficult issues, including whether court
records should be disseminated on the
Internet, who is responsible for taking
confidential information out of the
court records before dissemination,
when the information should be post-
ed, what happens to the information
submitted by unrepresented parties,
and sanctions for rule violations. The
result of their efforts is a 73-page draft


Mills
report now going through a public
review process before being finalized
this summer.
As Mills told The Florida Bar
News, it has been a balancing act.
"We have sought to establish a
balanced approach with safeguards and
oversight as critical prior to publicizing
information. We are seeking to keep
junk information out of the records
entirely and seeking a reliable process to
protect information that is legally
private and confidential," he said.
The committee's draft report
(available at www.flcourts.org) notes
that Florida is in a position to lead
the nation with this proposed innova-
tive policy.
"The whole issue is the quintessen-
tial clash between the two major demo-
cratic values of openness and privacy,"
Mills said. "It is made much more
difficult by modern technology." E


CONTINUED ON PAGE 26 >


UF LAW 25











RECENT FACULTY ACHIEVEMENTS


Law School Architecture," 36 U. Toledo. L.
Rev. 85 (2004). He also spoke at a plenary
session of the AALS Section on
Institutional Advancement on the topic of
"The Role of the Dean in the Fund
Raising Process." Jerry also was the
keynote speaker at the Florida Blue Key
Spring Banquet. (Also see page 4.)

* Visiting Professor Clifford A. Jones of the
Center for Governmental Responsibility pre-
sented his paper, "Foundations of
Competition Policy in the EU and USA:
Conflict, Convergence, and Beyond," at the
First Academic Society for Competition
Law Workshop on "Comparative
Competition Law: The Evolution of
European Competition Law Whose
Regulation, Which Competition?" in Villa
Schifanoia, Florence. The European
University Institute and LUISS University
of Rome sponsored the conference. Jones
was a visiting professor at King's College at
the University of London and offered two
seminars on U.S. anti-trust law.

* Associate Professor Cally Jordan was elect-
ed a member of the American Law Institute.
She also received an honorary appointment
as a senior fellow at the Faculty of Law at the
University of Melbourne, Australia. Jordan
also was the speaker at a workshop in Hanoi,
Vietnam, hosted by the World Bank, the
International Finance Corporation and
CIEM (a Vietnamese think tank engaged in
legislative drafting). Jordan made a presenta-
tion on "Corporate Groups and Corporate
Governance" at the 2005 annual symposium
of the University of Wisconsin International
Law Journal, Economic Globalization and
Corporate Governance, in Madison, Wis.
She also participated in a session about
International Corporate Governance in the
5th annual Law and Business Conference at
Vanderbilt University Law School.

* Professor Christine Klein is the lead
author on a new natural resources law
casebook, Natural Resources Law: A Place-
Based Book ofProblems and Cases (Aspen
Publishers, Aspen 2005, with Fred Cheever
and Bret Birdsong). She has also written a

26 UF LAW


Klein
chapter on Florida water law for a multi-
volume treatise, Survey ofFlorida Water
Law, in Waters and Water Rights (Robert E.
Beck, ed., Matthew Bender & Co.,
Inc., rev. vol. 6, spring 2005). Another
of her articles, "On Integrity: Some
Considerations for Water Law," appears
in 56 Alabama Law Review, 2005. She also
presented a paper titled "Overview of
Florida Water Law" at a water conference
sponsored by the Askew Institute and the
Public Utility Research Center.

* Affiliate Professor Paul Magnarella
presented a paper, "Reconciling the U.S.
with a Fugitive Black Panther in Africa?"
at the annual meeting of the Association
of Third World Studies at Mercer
University, Ga. The Black Panther is Pete
O'Neal, a fugitive living in Africa, who
Magnarella has represented in federal
court since 1997. Magnarella also
authored "Internationally Protected
Human Rights: Fact or Fiction?" Human
Rights and Human Welfare v. 4, pp. 69
(2004); "Diasporas and Human Rights"
in Encyclopedia of Diasporas: Immigrant
and Refugee Cultures Around the World,


Vol. 1, pp. 415-422 (2004); and
"Communist Chinese and 'Asian Values'
Critiques of Universal Human Rights," in
The Journal of Third World Studies, v. 21,
n. 2, pp. 179-192 (2004).

* UF Research Foundation Professor Diane
Mazur published "Is 'Don't Ask, Don't Tell'
Unconstitutional after Lawrence? What It
Will Take to Overturn the Policy," 15 U. Fla.
J L. Public Policy 423 (2004). Mazur
spoke at a session of the AALS Section on
Sexual Orientation and Gender Identity
Issues on "The Theory and Politics of Suits
Against the Department of Defense for its
Enforcement of the Solomon Amendment.
She also wrote "The Bullying of America: A
Cautionary Tale About Military Voting and
Civil-Military Relations," published in
Election Law Journal.

* Clarence J. TeSelle Professor Martin J.
McMahon Jr. was a visiting law faculty
member at Cambridge University, where he
researched comparative tax policy issues. He
also made CLE presentations on "Recent
Federal Income Tax Developments" at the
University of Montana School of Law's 52nd
annual Tax Institute in Missoula and at the
University of Texas School of Law's 51st
annual Taxation Conference in Houston on
"Recent Federal Income Tax Developments,"
with University of Houston Law Professor
Ira Shepard; and with Ira Shepard at the
American Bar Association Tax Section
Midyear Meeting. He gave a presentation on
"Tax Rules for American and Cross-Border
Mergers and Acquisitions" at Westfilische
Wilhelms-Universitit in Miinster, Germany,
and published "The Matthew Effect and
Federal Taxation" in 45 Boston College Review
993-1128 (2005).

* Samuel T. Dell Research Scholar/
Professor and Director of the Institute for
Human Rights and Peace Development
Winston Nagan, along with Craig
Hammer, published "The Changing
Character of Sovereignty in International
Law and International Relations," in 43
Columbia Journal of Transnational Law
142-187 (2004). Nagan also published













"The New Bush National Security Doctrine
and the Rule of Law," Berkeley Journal of
International Law, Vol. 22, No. 3 (2004);
"Patriotism, Nationalism, and the War On
Terror: A Mild Plea in Avoidance," Florida
Law Review, Vol. 56, No. 5 (December
2004) with Senior Research Fellow Craig
Hammer, with a reprint in the American
Journal of Immigration and Naturalization
Law; "The Changing Character of
Sovereignty in International Law and
International Relations," Columbia Journal
of Transnational Law, Vol 43, No. 1 (2004);
and "Implementing the African Renaissance:
Making Human Rights Comprehensive for
the New Millenium," The University of
Georgia Series on Globalization and Global
Understanding (2004). Nagan also presented
his paper "Transitional Justice: The Moral
Foundations of Trials and Commissions in
Social and Political Transformation" at a
symposium at Humboldt Universitat zu
Berlin. He wrote the "law" entry in 3 New
Dictionary of the History of deas 1243-1250
(Charles Scribner's Sons 2005) and pub-
lished "Truth, Reconciliation, and the
Fragility of Heroic Activism," Global urist
Advances: Vol. 5: No. 1, Article 2 (2005).

* Associate Director of the Center on
Children and Families/Professor Kenneth
Nunn participated in a forum entitled
"Black (Inter) Nationalism, Civil Rights,
and the Illusion of Equality," an event host-
ed by the Black Graduate Student
Organization as part of UF's celebration of
Black History Month.

* Marshall M. Criser Eminent Scholar
William Page published "Economic
Authority and the Limits of Expertise in
Antitrust Cases," 90 Cornell Law Review
617-703 (2005), co-authored with John
Lopatka. He gave a presentation on "Class
Certification in the Microsoft Indirect
Purchaser Litigation" at a "Litigating
Conspiracy" conference sponsored by the
University of Western Ontario School of
Law in London, Ontario.


BREAKING BARRIERS IN GUATEMALA


Supreme Court Justice Honored


The first woman to serve as head of
Guatemala's Ministry of Education
and president of that nation's Supreme
Court was honored by the Levin College
of Law in May.
Maria Luisa Beltranena de Padilla
received the Jon Mills Award, given each
year to a person who has made significant
contributions to relations between Florida
and the Americas. The award was presented
at the Conference on Legal and Policy
Issues in the Americas, an annual event
organized by the law school's Center for
Governmental Responsibility.
The conference brought lawyers, schol-
ars and law enforcement officials from
around the Western Hemisphere to UF to
discuss the rule of law, alternate dispute reso-
lution, and techniques for fighting terrorism.
"This conference allows legal scholars
and policy makers to compare and contrast
the approaches different nations take toward
problems that affect the entire hemisphere,"
said UF law Dean Robert Jerry. "It is fitting
that this year's Jon Mills Award recipient
would be someone who has contributed so
much to the public life of her country and
to the international exchange of ideas."
Throughout her career, Beltranena has
broken gender barriers in Guatemalan law
and politics.
When she entered law school herself,
Beltranena was one of only two women in
her class. She quickly rose through the ranks
of academia, becoming dean of the law
school at Rafael Landivar University in
Guatemala City the first female law
school dean in the country.
In 1982 she became the first woman to
sit on Guatemala's Supreme Court.
She later accepted the position of the
nation's minister of education, during which
time Guatemala reformed rural education,
giving small communities more control over
their schools and requiring rural school-
teachers to give instruction in native


Dean Robert Jerry, award winner Maria Luisa
Beltranena.
languages as well as Spanish. Both reforms
were intended to increase educational
participation in rural areas, where girls often
get little or no formal schooling.
In 1993 Beltranena left the Ministry of
Education to serve a brief term as president
of the Supreme Court.
"She is an extraordinary person," said
Levin College of Law Professor Michael
Gordon, who nominated Beltranena for the
Jon Mills Award. I -_nr, ,.- ago
Guatemala looked like one of the last places
you would expect a woman to rise to such a
prominent position in government.
Beltranena has been working with UF
on collaborative projects since 1979, when
she established an exchange program to
bring UF students to Guatemala. That pro-
gram was suspended after less than a year
when revolution broke out in Nicaragua,
but Beltranena continues to participate in
conferences and other scholarly events at UF
The award is named for Dean Emeritus
Jon Mills, director of the Center for
Governmental Responsibility. Previous recipi-
ents of the award include Kenneth "Buddy"
MacKay (JD 67), former governor of Florida
and special presidential envoy; Alejandro
Ogarrio, president of the Mexican Bar
Association; Miami attorney RaulValdes-
Fauli and Brazilian environmental lawyer
Paolo Roberto Pereira de Souza. 0
TIM LOCKETTE


CONTINUED ON PAGE 28 >


UF LAW 27











RECENT FACULTY ACHIEVEMENTS


* Professor Juan Francisco Perea spoke
at a conference, "The Legacy of 50 Years
of School Desegregation through a
Multicultural Lens," at FIU College of
Law in Miami. Perea also was a panelist
and author at a conference commemorat-
ing the 50th anniversary of the Supreme
Court's decision in Hernandez v. Texas.

* Professor Don Peters presented a
one-week mediation skills workshop to
17 judges, lawyers and court administra-
tors in Accra, Ghana. The workshop was
co-sponsored by the Judicial Institute of
Ghana and International Law Institute in
Washington, D.C. Also, Peters published
"Do Moving Lips Indicate that Lawyers
are Lying when Negotiating and
Mediating," in 9 Conflict Management 22
(Winter 2005). He also served on the
ABA site visit team in Dallas, Texas.

m Assistant Professor Christopher Peterson
gave a speech titled "Securitization and
Predatory Lending: Understanding
Contemporary Home Mortgage Securities
Conduits" at a conference hosted by Florida
Legal Services Inc. in Tampa.

* Irving Cypen Professor Sharon E. Rush
spoke on race relations in education at a
WUFT conference on "A Question of Race"
at the UF College of Journalism and
Communications. Rush also gave the
keynote speech at the 3rd Annual Worldwide
Forum on Education in Rome, Italy, on
"Beyond the Multicultural Curriculum: The
Importance of Multicultural Relationships."

* Professor Michael Seigel has assumed
new administrative duties as interim direc-
tor of clinical and simulation-based skills
programs. Seigel recently published "On
Collegiality," 54. LegalEd. 406 (2004).
(Also see page 22.)

* Stephen C. O'Connell Professor
Christopher Slobogin participated in a
criminal procedure forum at Brandeis Law
School, where an essay he wrote with
Professor Michael Seigel, "Prosecuting


Professor Lyrissa Lidsky was appointed
associate dean for faculty development.
She replaces Professor Thomas Cotter, who
has accepted a position at Washington and
Lee University.
Martha: Federal Prosecutorial Power and
the Need for a Law of Counts," was dis-
cussed. (The essay has since been pub-
lished in Penn State Law Review.) He
also spoke on "Mental Disorder as an
Exemption from the Death Penalty" at a
symposium at Catholic Law School;
"Transaction Surveillance by the
Government" at Hastings College of Law;
"Excuse Defenses to Juvenile Crime:
The Implications of the New Brain
Research" at a Ohio State Law School
conference; "Informants: A Comparative
Perspective" at Illinois Law School;
"Transaction Surveillance by the
Government" at the Mississippi College of
Law's Conference on Computers and the
Fourth Amendment; "Preventive
Detention" at the University of North
Carolina School of Law; and "The Ethics
of Prison Research" at a conference spon-
sored by the National Institutes of Health
in Washington, D.C. He published "The
Civilization of the Criminal Law" in
Vanderbilt Law Review and "Subpoenas
and Privacy" in a symposium issue of
Depaul Law Review. (Also see page 21.)


* Professor Walter O. Weyrauch spoke at
Cornell Law School on "The Study of Law
in Frankfurt, Germany, During the Second
World War: A Personal Reminiscence."

m Richard E. Nelson Chair Michael Allan
Wolf published, "Yes, Thankfully, Euclid
Lives," 73 Fordham Law Review. Wolf spoke
at an Albany Law School conference on
urban sprawl issues.

* Barbara Bennett Woodhouse, David H.
Levin Chair in Family Law, director of the
Center on Children and Families, and
co-director of the Institute for Child and
Adolescent Research and Evaluation, present-
ed a paper on foster care and adoption policy
at an interdisciplinary symposium on "The
State Construction of the Family" hosted by
the University of Virginia's Center on
Children, Families and the Law. She also
delivered the keynote speech at Whittier Law
School's symposium on Child Health Policy.
Woodhouse traveled to The Hague, Neth-
erlands, to attend the annual meeting of the
Executive Council of the International
Society of Family Law. She delivered the
26th John E. Sullivan Lecture at Capitol
University Law School, in connection with
the National Center for Adoption Law and
Policy's Wells Conference on Adoption Law.
Her topic was "Waiting for Loving: A Child's
Right to be Adopted." (Also see page 23.)

* Gator TeamChild Director Claudia
Wright published "Re-Thinking Juvenile
Justice: Using the IEP Concept to Create a
New Juvenile Justice Paradigm," Juvenile
Justice Update, Dec/Jan 2005, Vol. 10, No. 6.
Wright was elected to chair the 8th Judicial
Circuit Court Family Law Advisory Group.
Wright and TeamChild Social Worker Karen
Keroac provided in-service training on chil-
dren's rights to the nurses of the Florida
Department of Health's Children's Medical
Services in Gainesville.

* Professor Danaya Wright published "The
Logic and Experience of Law: Lawrence v.
Texas and the Politics of Privacy," 15 U. Fla.
J L. & Public Policy 403 (2004). .


28 UF LAW






FACULTY OPINION


SOCIAL SECURITY:


Where's the Fire?

BY PATRICIA DILLEY


T he debate over the current state of
Social Security continues to take
center stage nationally as President Bush
presses the case for his private accounts
and "progressive indexing" proposals. So
far, the president has made little headway
in selling his plan to the American public
or to Congress.
Just over 20 years ago, Social Security
faced a true crisis, to which a Republican
president, a Congress with a Republican-
controlled Senate and a Democratic-
controlled House responded. In just
three months in early 1983, Congress
drafted, debated and passed a plan that
put the Social Security system on a sound
footing for the next 75 years. What might
be different now that is preventing a simi-
lar bi-partisan approach to resolving the
system's long-term problems?
First, there is in fact no immediate
crisis of the type that faced the system in
1983. Then, the trust funds were projected
as insufficient to pay complete benefits
beginning in 1984. There was simply no
way around passing a bill in early 1983 if
the system was to continue to be financed
through the payroll tax. Necessity is the
mother of a swift legislative process.
In contrast, right now the Social
Security system is still running surpluses
and will be able to pay yearly benefits from
payroll tax revenues, without drawing on
trust fund reserves, until around 2018. At
that point, we probably will have to draw
on the reserves in the trust funds but
what does that really mean in government
finance terms? Clearly, the rest of the
budget will be under greater pressure as
trust fund bonds have to be "cashed in,"
requiring general revenues to, in effect,
"pay back" the trust funds but at that
point the crisis will be in the general rev-


enue budget, not Social Security.
Second, there is no general agreement
on the size or the timing of the Social
Security financing problem itself. The
administration has attempted to frame the
debate as an immediate problem, based on
the notion that the trust fund reserves are
"imaginary," backed up by "mere IOUs,"
which could be defaulted on at a moment's
notice. If one ignores the reserve, Social
Security would seem to be poised to run
out of money beginning in 2017.
The trust fund reserve certainly didn't
seem "imaginary" in 1983, when
Republicans and Democrats agreed to cut
Social Security benefits and increase rev-
enues by pouring surplus revenues into
the trust funds. It was clear at the time
that beginning in the late 1980s through
about 2010, the system would bring in
much more revenue than would be neces-
sary to pay benefits, resulting in a huge
buildup in the trust funds. Congress saw
the surplus as one way the Baby Boom
generation could pay for its large retire-
ment costs, in addition to the increase in
the retirement age from 65 to 67 -
which was part of the 1983 legislation
and is currently being phased in -
becoming fully effective in 2022.
Moreover, the trust fund bonds are
legal and financial obligations of the U.S.
government, which must pay Social
Security benefits as long as sufficient
funds remain in the trust fund. For a real
problem to emerge in 2017, the law
would have to be changed to prevent
payment of benefits and allow default on
those bonds. This seems to be an unlikely
eventuality.
The nation's retirement system does
indeed face very serious problems but
I would suggest that both Medicare and


the private pension system face more seri-
ous and immediate crises than Social
Security. Looming over all these policy
issues is the federal budget deficit, which
will create enormous obstacles to any
solutions we might want to pursue for
any of these programs, and which should
therefore be tackled first to make other
policy choices clear and legislative com-
promises possible. 0

Professor Dilley teaches tax, employee
benefits and elder law at the Levin College
of Law. She was a member of the profession-
al of the House Ways and Means
Subcommittee on Social Security from 1981
through 1987, and was one oftheprincipal
drafters of the 1983 Social Security
Amendments. Her most recent article, "Hope
We Die Before We Get Old: The Attack on
Retirement," appeared in the Elder Law
Journal this spring. She has published and
spoken extensively in the areas of Social
Security, and retirement policy and employee
benefits, and recently appeared at a town
hall meeting on Social Security with U.S.
Rep. Susan Davis (D-Calif) in San Diego.


UF LAW 29






FACULTY OPINION


SOCIAL SECURITY:


Where's the Fire?

BY PATRICIA DILLEY


T he debate over the current state of
Social Security continues to take
center stage nationally as President Bush
presses the case for his private accounts
and "progressive indexing" proposals. So
far, the president has made little headway
in selling his plan to the American public
or to Congress.
Just over 20 years ago, Social Security
faced a true crisis, to which a Republican
president, a Congress with a Republican-
controlled Senate and a Democratic-
controlled House responded. In just
three months in early 1983, Congress
drafted, debated and passed a plan that
put the Social Security system on a sound
footing for the next 75 years. What might
be different now that is preventing a simi-
lar bi-partisan approach to resolving the
system's long-term problems?
First, there is in fact no immediate
crisis of the type that faced the system in
1983. Then, the trust funds were projected
as insufficient to pay complete benefits
beginning in 1984. There was simply no
way around passing a bill in early 1983 if
the system was to continue to be financed
through the payroll tax. Necessity is the
mother of a swift legislative process.
In contrast, right now the Social
Security system is still running surpluses
and will be able to pay yearly benefits from
payroll tax revenues, without drawing on
trust fund reserves, until around 2018. At
that point, we probably will have to draw
on the reserves in the trust funds but
what does that really mean in government
finance terms? Clearly, the rest of the
budget will be under greater pressure as
trust fund bonds have to be "cashed in,"
requiring general revenues to, in effect,
"pay back" the trust funds but at that
point the crisis will be in the general rev-


enue budget, not Social Security.
Second, there is no general agreement
on the size or the timing of the Social
Security financing problem itself. The
administration has attempted to frame the
debate as an immediate problem, based on
the notion that the trust fund reserves are
"imaginary," backed up by "mere IOUs,"
which could be defaulted on at a moment's
notice. If one ignores the reserve, Social
Security would seem to be poised to run
out of money beginning in 2017.
The trust fund reserve certainly didn't
seem "imaginary" in 1983, when
Republicans and Democrats agreed to cut
Social Security benefits and increase rev-
enues by pouring surplus revenues into
the trust funds. It was clear at the time
that beginning in the late 1980s through
about 2010, the system would bring in
much more revenue than would be neces-
sary to pay benefits, resulting in a huge
buildup in the trust funds. Congress saw
the surplus as one way the Baby Boom
generation could pay for its large retire-
ment costs, in addition to the increase in
the retirement age from 65 to 67 -
which was part of the 1983 legislation
and is currently being phased in -
becoming fully effective in 2022.
Moreover, the trust fund bonds are
legal and financial obligations of the U.S.
government, which must pay Social
Security benefits as long as sufficient
funds remain in the trust fund. For a real
problem to emerge in 2017, the law
would have to be changed to prevent
payment of benefits and allow default on
those bonds. This seems to be an unlikely
eventuality.
The nation's retirement system does
indeed face very serious problems but
I would suggest that both Medicare and


the private pension system face more seri-
ous and immediate crises than Social
Security. Looming over all these policy
issues is the federal budget deficit, which
will create enormous obstacles to any
solutions we might want to pursue for
any of these programs, and which should
therefore be tackled first to make other
policy choices clear and legislative com-
promises possible. 0

Professor Dilley teaches tax, employee
benefits and elder law at the Levin College
of Law. She was a member of the profession-
al of the House Ways and Means
Subcommittee on Social Security from 1981
through 1987, and was one oftheprincipal
drafters of the 1983 Social Security
Amendments. Her most recent article, "Hope
We Die Before We Get Old: The Attack on
Retirement," appeared in the Elder Law
Journal this spring. She has published and
spoken extensively in the areas of Social
Security, and retirement policy and employee
benefits, and recently appeared at a town
hall meeting on Social Security with U.S.
Rep. Susan Davis (D-Calif) in San Diego.


UF LAW 29






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' II'


















I


At least 1,000 miles away from her client and surrounded by stacks of scientific
research in her cluttered Gainesville apartment, second-year UF law student
Erika Zimmerman couldn't help but wonder how her quiet efforts could possi-
bly protect the coral barrier reefs strung along the turquoise waters of Belize.


All she had was a computer, telephone, law faculty
adviser and client with a monumental mission: The Belize
Institute for Environmental Law and Policy, a group of
public interest lawyers and conservation advocates who
wanted the Belize Barrier Reef Reserve System added to
the formal "World Heritage Danger List."
The assignment part of her work requirement in
the law school's Conservation Clinic was more than
daunting. It was downright overwhelming given that she
needed to collaborate with the world's leading reef scien-
tists and lawyers via phone and e-mail and compile and
comprehend reams of research data and legal documents.
Her client hoped she might draw up a document to
prove the largest barrier reef in the Northern Hemisphere
- an ecosystem accommodating a stunning diversity of
marine life, including three species of endangered sea tur-
tles was "threatened by serious and specific danger"
from climate changes and needed exceptional protection.
So that is what she did ... patiently, thoroughly,
completely.
Many more hours and months later, Zimmerman's
efforts resulted in a petition to list the Belize barrier reefs
as an endangered site. It was presented in Paris last
November to the United Nations Scientific and Cultural
Organization, which oversees the World Heritage
Convention.
"The petition is particularly noteworthy because it
served as the model for two other simultaneously-filed
petitions involving Mount Everest and a World Heritage
site in Peru," said Alyson Flournoy, director of the law
school's Environmental and Land Use Law Program. The
program is home base for the Conservation Clinic, where
students can gain practical experience by focusing on real
world environmental issues in Florida and beyond.
"There was no preconceived format for these peti-
tions. Although Tom Ankersen (Conservation Clinic


z.mmerman
director and legal skills professor) provided editorial
support, and it was further edited by the client prior to
submission, the work remains largely Erika's," Flournoy
said. The fact that Zimmerman's format was adopted by
the other petitioners is a testament to her advocacy skill.
The Belize reef system is already one of about 730
World Heritage Convention sites which include the
great Pyramids, Vatican treasures and lions of the
Serengeti plains protected by a 175-nation treaty.
Convincing the World Heritage Committee to place the
Belize reefs on the exclusive endangered list, now num-
bering only 33 sites, will provide emergency funding and
additional protection.
"These reefs are a hub of scientific activity and are con-
sidered to be the 'canary in the coalmine' to tell us what is
happening to the health of the planet overall," said
Zimmerman, soft-spoken but resolute. "They are declining


UF LAW 31













very rapidly due to global climate changes
and other factors and we just can't wait 30
or 40 years because they will be gone."

From Shining Sea to Classroom Clinic
Zimmerman was first attracted to the
rich waters of marine ecology when she start-
ed scuba diving at age 13 on numerous
Caribbean family vacations. After earning a
bachelor's degree in biology from Wake
Forest, she considered a master's in marine
ecology.
"I just realized I could have more of an
impact as a lawyer. There is a lot of great sci-
ence already available that needs to be used
as soon as possible to make policies that will
work hand-in-hand with development,"
Zimmerman said.
The opportunity to mesh her science
background with environmental protection


Conservation Clinic Director Tom
Ankersen said he observes this kind of
apprentice passion often and can name
scores of environmental causes UF law stu-
dents have advanced.
"There is so much law and policy work
that does not involve litigation, and that's
what we practice," he said. "The university
has the mission of service, education and
research, and we have taken on the mandate
- the obligation to be of service to the
university and community."
Each semester about eight to 10 law
students work alongside graduate students
- from areas such as landscape architecture,
urban and regional planning, ecology and
economics to earn credit on projects for
local and state government agencies, not-
for-profit groups or even individuals pursu-
ing conservation objectives.


smart growth initiatives to add value to stu-
dent's environmental legal education,"
Ankersen said. The projects give students
hands-on experience in areas such as client
expectations, billing practices, interdiscipli-
nary collaboration, politics, public presen-
tations, regulatory negotiation and rapid
applied research.
Legal protection of the natural world
has a long tradition at the UF law school.
Former Dean Frank Maloney, considered
the father of Florida's water laws, took
groups of students on tubing trips down
the chilly Ichetucknee River during the
1960s and helped shape the setting for the
Environmental and Land Use Law
Program, ranked last year in the top 10
programs among public law schools
nationally and in the top 20 of both
public and private.


"The end result is that our clinical environmental education moves beyond

the courtroom to serve in ways that are quite extensive."


goals so soon into her law training came as
a surprise.
"I'm very passionate about marine con-
servation and would have done it on my own
time if I hadn't had the opportunity through
the clinic. This is exactly the type of work I
want to do as a lawyer and it has given me
wonderful experience," she said.
As it turned out, her work on the
petition far exceeded the 140-hour
clinic requirement.


Housed in the Center for
Governmental Responsibility with sub-
stantive support from UF law school
colleagues such as Richard Hamann and
Tim McLendon, the Conservation Clinic
was started with $10,000 seed money
from alumnus Kevin Malone (JD 73) in
1999 and is now funded through grants,
contracts and miscellaneous donations.
"Since its inception, the clinic has taken
advantage of Florida's legal environment for


"While there may be many different
views on what we need to accomplish,
there is little disagreement that environ-
mental and land use laws are critical to
Florida's future," said Flournoy, who has
directed the program since it was formal-
ized in 1999.

Real World Accomplishments
Despite a shortage of office space,
Conservation Clinic students have worked
in teams to pull off legal achievements
requiring clearly written goals, objectives
and policies backed up by data and analy-
sis. These achievements include:

* Drafted a model historic preservation
ordinance for Crystal River to create a
historic district in the city and enable
some buildings to qualify for state and
federal funding. The model is likely to
be used by other municipalities.
* Established tax increment financing
districts for small towns that ensure
funding for community revitalization
initiatives such as parks, sidewalks,


32 UF LAW














underground utilities and the
facade of downtown build-
ings. Cedar Key, Flagler
Beach and Marineland have
created districts with the
clinic's assistance.
* Wrote a new (and controver-
sial) wetlands protection
policy and implementation
ordinance for Gainesville's
City Commission that divid-
ed the city into four basins.
The policy requires the city
to address wetland impact on
a basin-by-basin basis.
* Drafted a model ordinance to
increase native plant land-
scaping in Florida.
* Teamed with an Alachua
County community group
and the Florida Department
of Transportation to provide
"Scenic Highway" status for a
designated stretch of road
along U.S. 441 in southern
Alachua County. The citizens
wanted to maintain the "old
Florida" look of the area and
increase tourism. Clinic stu-
dents analyzed zoning laws in
four jurisdictions and con-
ducted public meetings.
* Provided policy recommen-
dations for protecting wildlife
against feral cat colonies on
state lands that helped change
State of Florida Fish
and Wildlife Conservation
Commission policy.
* Assisted the town of
Marineland, Florida's oldest
tourist attraction, with the
preparation of a comprehen-
sive plan that helps market
the town as a new science,
education and heritage
tourism model.
* Wrote the initial draft of two
bills under consideration by


the Florida Legislature. The
first would require home sell-
ers and realtors of oceanfront
properties to notify potential
buyers if the property is criti-
cally eroding. The second
provides for a comprehensive
approach to Florida Springs
protection.


"The Conservation Clinic is
how we put students into
action," Ankersen said. "We are
somewhat unique, particularly in
our international scope, but the
end result is that our clinical
environmental education moves
beyond the courtroom to serve in
ways that are quite extensive."
For students like Zimmerman,
the guidance of professors like
Ankersen is the foundation for
her success on the Belize project
and ultimately her success as
lawyer. She thinks his call to the
U.S. Department of Justice
Environment and Natural
Resources Division helped her
cement the opportunity to work
there as a staff attorney after
graduating in May.
"He is so supportive of stu-
dents and teaches us to be inde-
pendent and think creatively,"
Zimmerman said.
Right now the success of the
Belize project has not been decided,
but the media exposure by The New
York Times and the BBC as the peti-
tion is debated in Paris before the
United Nations is "causing a stir."
"I've thought about this,
worked on this, and knew it was
extremely important and should
be hard to ignore. The fact that it
is getting this kind of attention
and that I even had the chance to
be involved in such an important
issue is ...," her voice trailed off,
"... well, amazing." 0


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UF LAW 33

































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CONSERVE&


PROTECT

Using the law for the environment


ohn Henry Hankinson (JD 79) was 5 years old
when his parents bought a rustic cabin in the
Ocala National Forest. Each summer, the forest would
become his theme park ... thousands of acres of tow-
ering sand pines, huge oaks draped with Spanish moss,
natural springs and endless critters.
Most afternoons, as the sun entered its last phase
of the day, Hankinson would climb the big shady oak
by the road and wait for his father to return from
teaching summer school.
"I would hide in that tree and wait for him to drive
directly under it," he said. "When he was close


enough, I'd drop to the ground."
Like most people who grow up in the woods,
Hankinson learned the joys of wandering, of
ambling along without a purpose and seeing what
there is to see. And like many Baby Boomers, he
meandered through his early adulthood like a boy
chasing fireflies until he realized the world's
forests might vanish without a few disciplined advo-
cates to protect them. Hankinson's years at UF
transformed a young man in love with the wilderness
into a powerful voice for environmental protection.
His early tendency to love and protect the environ-


Above: Hankinson stays close to nature at home on Summerhaven Island, near St. Augustine, where he lives with wife Gail
(JD 79) and son Sam, a high school junior. His other son, John, is studying physics and math at Harvey Mudd College in
Claremont, Calif.


34 UF LAW


BY GAYLE GALLAGHER
















ment was a family undertaking nurtured by his
parents, both of whom were teachers and early
conservationists.
"When my mom's biology students put a
snake in her desk to scare her, she deflated then
delighted them by calmly pulling it out and giv-
ing them a science lesson on garter snakes," he
said. "My sister also wrote a wonderful book on
protecting Florida's environment."
In the late '60s, Hankinson's dad was one of
the early few in Ocala to oppose the Cross
Florida Barge Canal, a coast-to-coast waterway
across Florida that began with construction of
the Rodman Dam and Reservoir.
But the son was too restless for town meet-
ings and letters to the editor. After graduating
from Florida Presbyterian College (now Eckerd
College), Hankinson journeyed through a variety
of jobs, from construction worker to substitute
teacher to parole officer.
"I was an independent breed and not ready
for the end of the '60s," Hankinson said.
Law school never entered his mind.
But that was before the influence of a UF
grad who would later become governor of
Florida, Kenneth "Buddy" MacKay (JD 67).
"I could see John was very talented," said
MacKay, who knew Hankinson from church and
as a paralegal in his Ocala law firm. "But he was
having trouble sorting out what to do with his
life. He cared about environmentalism, but it
was in its infancy and lawyers didn't have a clear
role in it. I suggested to John that if he got a law
degree, he could become a trained advocate for
the environment."
On MacKay's advice, Hankinson enrolled in
UF's law school, where he was able to study envi-
ronmental law. He credits MacKay with pointing
him toward his life's work.
"Buddy was my mentor," said Hankinson.
"He encouraged me to become a lawyer and find
my role in public service."
Upon graduation, Hankinson took his law
degree to the Florida House of Representatives
Regulatory Reform Committee, where he learned
to work within the political system and authored
the Florida Energy Efficiency Conservation Act,
which required the Florida Public Service
Commission to adopt conservation goals for the


state's major electric utilities. From there, his
accomplishments accumulated quickly.
"Marjorie Carr hired me to run Florida
Defenders of the Environment's Environmental
Service Center," he said. "Her vision was to
include scientific minds from universities and
other sources to bring a different level of expert-
ise to the governmental policy arena."
Carr zealous conservationist and wife of
internationally known biologist, environmental-
ist and UF professor Archie Carr was the force
responsible for Congress de-authorizing the
Cross Florida Barge Canal project in 1990. But
not before it essentially destroyed 9,000 acres of
productive river and floodplain forest along the
Ocklawaha River.
Together, Hankinson and Carr fulfilled the
vision of the Florida Defenders of the
Environment and changed the way Florida envi-
ronmental policy was written. Through the
Environmental Service Center and its experts,
they led efforts to establish stringent groundwa-
ter protection rules, create Florida's Non-Game
Wildlife Program, and successfully halt construc-
tion of a coal-fired power plant on the
Apalachicola River.
"The utility company wanted to build on a
very sensitive area of the river," said Hankinson.
"Fortunately, my work on solar energy at the
Center for Governmental Responsibility under
Jon Mills (the center's director and former dean;
JD 72) and Duke Woodson (JD 75) prepared me
for marshalling facts into effective policy. We
used good science to convince the utility
not to build."
Of all his endeavors, Hankinson
considers his work for the St. Johns
River Management District "the
best job in the world." As
director of planning and
acquisition, Hankinson
bought 200,000 acres
of environmentally sensi-
tive lands.
"My kids told people, 'our daddy buys
homes for animals.'"
His work was noticed. When President Bill
Clinton appointed Carol Browner (JD 79) head of
the Environmental Protection Agency, Browner


As the harp player and vocalist for "The
Nonessentials," Hankinson said the group
might have a gig in Atlanta soon. Or they
might not. As Hankinson explained, "We're
the Nonessentials and we truly are."

OF ALL HIS ENDEAVORS,

HANKINSON CONSID-

ERS HIS WORK FOR

THE ST. JOHNS RIVER

MANAGEMENT

DISTRICT "THE BEST

JOB IN THE WORLD...

MY KIDS TOLD PEOPLE,

'OUR DADDY BUYS

HOMES FOR ANIMALS.'"


\


Lw















immediately thought of Hankinson to run the Since leaving the EPA in 2001,
EPAs Southeast office. Hankinson, as a consultant, is continuing
Florida is a different place today his fight for the environment based on the
because of Hankinson's vision and commit- philosophy that innovative companies will


ment, Browner observed.
"Environmental protection is in John's
heart," said Browner. "It is part and parcel
of who he is. He's protected special places
in Northeast Florida all the way to
the Everglades."
While at the EPA, Hankinson also pro-
tected another precious resource: employee
morale.


profit by applying market principles to
reduce environmental impact, reuse "natu-
ral capital" and reduce energy costs.
"There's a great book called Natural
Capitalism: Creating the Next Industrial
Revolution (by Paul Hawken, Amory
Lovins, and L. Hunter Lovins) that address-
es a new business model for responding to
resource scarcity," said Hankinson. "The


"Dean Maloney was the architect of a
big change in Florida law, which gives five
water districts the authority to protect and
manage their own water resources," said
Hankinson. "These districts are divided
along hydrological versus political bound-
aries. No other place in the country has this
system.
This innovative water management
structure is a breakthrough approach,
Hankinson said, but society has a long way
to go in its attitude toward earth's limited
land and water.


WE DON'T HAVE THE MONEY OR TECHNOLOGY TO EVER DUPLICATE WHAT NATURE

DOES FOR US AT NO COST. IT'S A LIVING MACHINE. AND WE HAVE TO TAKE CARE OF IT."


"Remember when the government was authors describe a society that uses
shut down for four days in 1995?" he asked, resources much more efficiently, creates job


"All non-essential employees were told,
'Your job's not important, so stay home.'
Who likes to hear this? So I rounded up a
few EPA musicians and we formed a blues


opportunities for a growing population, and
restores natural systems."
As a frequent guest lecturer at the UF
law school, Hankinson is quick to discuss


band. It was fun and lifted spirits." the concept as well as the law school's lega-
The Nonessentials went on to produce a cy of effective accomplishments. Former
CD, on which Hankinson sings and plays the Dean Frank Maloney produced one of his
blues harp, and perform for occasional events, favorite examples.


"If we could put a monetary value on
the job nature does to clean itself and keep
the earth viable for everything on it,"
concluded Hankinson, "that number
would equal or exceed the gross domestic
product of the entire world. We don't have
the money or the technology to ever
duplicate what nature does for us at no
cost. It's a living machine and we have to
take care of it." 0


Public Interest Environmental Conference


A small-town teacher who secured a $5 million
community development fund as well as relocation funds
for the entire neighborhood from Shell Chemicals was
the keynote speaker at the student-run Public Interest
Environmental Conference.
Margie Eugene Richard, winner of the 2004 Goldman
Prize for Environmental Justice, joined about 250 envi-
ronmental activists, lawyers and scientists from around
the world to discuss Florida's most pressing envi-
ronmental problems and the legal issues they create.
Costa Rican presidential candidate and economist
Ott6n Solis delivered an address on international free
trade agreements and their effect. Other conference top-
ics included citrus canker, mercury in fish, water quality
trading, Florida's vanishing farmland and the collapse of
ocean ecosystems.
This successful collaboration between the UF
Environmental and Land Use Law Society and The


Environmental
and Land Use
Law Section
provided continu-
ing legal educa-
tion in a unique
format, offering
four separate
concurrent tracks
building on kick-
off plenaries. The 19 panel discussions were developed
by students who worked closely with members of the
Section's Public Interest Committee to identify timely
topics of broad appeal and knowledgeable panelists.
"A pervasive theme this year was the social justice
aspects of environmental issues," said UF law student
Adam Regar, a conference organizer.


36 UF LAW









CLEARLY SPEAKING


Comfterble with Language?


P resident Eisenhower was known for his
failure to finish sentences. President
Bush is known for his mispronunciations, but
even people who don't usually notice such
things groan when he says "nucular." In his
second State of the Union speech, he used
that word three times. (As I type it, my spell-
check sternly tells me in red print there is no
such word.)
But President Bush is not the first
politician to mispronounce nuclear. I first
noticed it during President Carter's
administration when his Secretary of
Defense, Les Aspin, pronounced the word
nucular several times in one speech. Today,
although most journalists retain the cor-
rect pronunciation, a few copy the presi-
dent's usage.
Critics blame the mispronunciation on
the "see and say" method of teaching read-
ing during a time when the phonetic
method was neglected, or just on "sloppy
speech." But the culprit is really epenthesis
- a Greek noun stressed on the second syl-
lable that means "putting in." Epenthesis is
a process by which a speaker inserts a vowel,
usually a schwa ("uh") sound, within a word
between two consonants. That insertion of
the vowel sound changes the pronunciation
of many common words, some of which
you may mispronounce yourself.
For example, realtor. Many people,
including realtors, add a vowel and call it
relitor. In the speech of many, athletes
become athletes; poison ivy becomes poi-
son ivory; and arthritis is changed to
authorities. Nucular is a variant of epenthe-
sis, because when the second vowel (u) is
added between the consonants c and 1, the
following vowel (e) is deleted. The tongue,
as always, finds the easiest movement.


There's a physical reason for these mis-
pronunciations. In speech, our tongues,
unless severely disciplined, take the easiest
route in moving from one sound to the next.
Adding a vowel (usually the schwa sound
"uh") between two consonants can ease the
transition of the tongue from one part of the
mouth to another. For example, to pro-
nounce athlete correctly, you have to move
your tongue from the th position directly
behind your front teeth to the I sound far
back on the roof of your mouth. Try saying
both athlete and athlete and you'll agree the
second pronunciation is more comfortable.
A related linguistic occurrence is called
metaphasis (another Greek noun, pronounced
with stress on the second syllable), which
refers to the transposition of letters, syllables
or sounds. Take the word comfortable. Do you
pronounce the second syllable? It wasn't until
I studied linguistics that I realized I do not.
The pronunciation I use is comfterble. That
pronunciation seems to be dialectical. Many
Southerners do pronounce the word correct-
ly, giving all of the syllables their proper
sound, a pronunciation which seems to me to
be "uncomfterble." Try the two pronuncia-
tions for yourself. Isn't the mispronunciation
easier on your tongue?
Another example of metaphesis is the
pronunciation aksed. To get from the s sound
to the k sound in the word ask requires a dif-
ficult transition for the tongue to move from
the front s sound to the back k sound. The
mispronunciations aks and aksed are much
easier on the tongue and account for the ver-
nacular pronunciation of, "He aksed me a
question."
To make speech easier for our tongues,
we also employ syncope, deleting a syllable
when it serves our purpose. Syncope occurs


widely in the
mispronuncia-
tion of veterinar-
ian as vetinarian, BY GERTRUDE BLOCK
terrorism as ter- Lecturer Emeritus
rism, and some of the -aly adverbs
(accidently and incidently for accidentally and

Although these and other such mispro-
nunciations irritate people at first, they
become respectable if they are used by a
majority of persons over a period of time,
eventually appearing in dictionaries with their
spellings changed to accommodate the mis-
pronunciation. For example, the word devil-
try probably started out as devilry, a spelling
now lost. The word glimpse (from Middle
English glimsen) is related to the current word
glimmer. Glimpse had no p, but our tongues
added one for comfort before the s sound,
and the spelling change followed. For the
same reason, an n was added to the noun
denoting the message-carrier, and the result-
ing noun is spelled messenger, not message.
Future lexicographers may list the current
mispronunciation of prostrate gland instead of
the standard pronunciation, prostate gland.
And the spellings grievious and mischievious
may replace grievous and mischievous because
those words are so often mispronunced due
to epenthesis.
With mispronunciation and mis-
spelling rampant on television and in
print, changes in usage have become accel-
erated. It may not be long before President
Bush's pronunciation, nucular, becomes
standard English. 0
Emeritus Lecturer Gertrude Block, who writes month-
ly columns for a number of barjournals, is the author
of several books, most recently, Legal Writing Advice:
Questions & Answers (December 2004), published
by William S. Hein e6 Company.


UF LAW 37




















CLASS NOTES


LEVIN COLLEGE OF LAW


Share Your News
Your classmates want to hear from you, so
don't forget to send information about
your accomplishments. Please note you
also can now list your e-mail address with
your news, but we ask that you include a
note that gives us permission to print it
(for example, "ok to print e-mail address").
We have added this feature at the request
of alumni who want to hear from class-
mates. Send information to: Editor, UF Law
Magazine, Levin College of Law, University
ofFlorida, PO. Box 117633, Gainesville,
FL 32611 or,

1953
Anthony Battaglia, of Battaglia, Ross, Dicus
& Wein, received the Jack Edmonds Award for
Civility and Professionalism in the practice of
criminal law from Goldberg Inns of Court.

1956
Louie N. Adcock Jr., along with three
others, was honored by the St Petersburg Bar
Foundation at the "Heroes Among Us" dinner
based on their substantial contributions
through community service activities.
ladcock@fishersauls.com (e-mail addresses
now listed with prior approval).

1962
Charlie Gray, of GrayRobinson in Orlando, was
ranked No. 19 in the "50 Most Powerful People"
survey published in Orlando Magazine.


Don Slesnick (JD 68) has been honored by
the UF College of Design, Construction and
Planning for his demonstrated dedication
to historic preservation in Florida. Slesnick,
managing partner of Slesnick 8 Casey
and mayor of Coral Gables, was awarded
the college's annual Beinecke-Reeves
Distinguished Achievement Award. Slesnick
is active in numerous civic and business
organizations, including serving on the


ALUMNI


1963
Robert R. Hendry, of Hendry Stoner,
DeLancett & Brown in Orlando, was re-elected to
the National Steering Committee of the District
Export Councils.

1967
Eric Smith is the town attorney for Baldwin.

1970
Mercer K. "Bud" Clarke is serving a one-year
term as chair of the Drug, Device and Biotech
Committee of the International Association of
Defense Counsel. He is founding principal and pres-
ident of Clarke, -I *. ,I & Campbell in Miami.
Ronald Y. Schram, principal of the F&R
Group and Flagler Bank in South Florida, wel-
comed his third child, Jonathan Richard, in
February. Jonathan joins Harrison Spencer (3 1/2)
and Lauren Alyssa (10 months).

1972
G. Carson McEachern, parter in the Naples
office of Roetzel & Andress, attended the "Annual
Meeting of the Fund 25" where only 25 agents
from the top 25 insurance firms are invited each
year. McEachern is Florida Bar certified in real
estate law and wills, trusts, and estates law.
Jake Schickel, parmer at Coker, Meyer,
Schickel, Sorenson & Green in Jacksonville, was
elected to The Florida Bar's Board of Governers for
the 4th Circuit. Schickel is a board-certified trial
lawyer who represents personal injury and workers'
compensation cases. jschickel@cokerlaw.com


board of directors of the newly established
Great Florida Bank and the Greater Miami
Chamber of Commerce Board of Governors
(where he was founding chair of the award-
winning Ethics in Business and Government
program). He also has served as president of
the Florida Trust for Historic Preservation,
president of the Dade Heritage Trust, and
chair of the Miami-Dade County Cultural
Affairs Council.


38 UF LAW


George Allen named to
FAMU Board of Trustees
Gov. Jeb Bush has named
W. George Allen (JD 62) to chair
Florida A&M University's top
governing board, the Board of
Trustees.
A 1958 FAMU graduate and the
first African-American to receive a
law degree from the University of
Florida, Allen is respected
statewide for his long-term
commitment and contributions
to education. Allen was a major
participant in the desegregation of
Broward county schools in the '60s
and '70s and said he is interested
in FAMU's progress during this
critical time in the school's history.
Allen who has his own law
practice in Fort Lauderdale and
serves as special counsel for the
Florida Department of Transportation
- continues to support the Levin
College of Law as well. He is a
member of the UF Law Center
Association Board of Trustees, and
students of the Black Law Students
Association have added his name
to the title of their chapter.
















1973
The Florida Bar's Family Law Section honored
Circuit Judge Raymond T. McNeal of Ocala
with the Chair's Visionary Award for his years of
work in family law, including developing the
statewide model family court structure.
Arthur J. Smith is chair of the real estate
section of the Allegheny Bar Association in
Pennsylvania.

1974
Gov. Jeb Bush reappointed Fred Leonhardt,
of GrayRobinson in Orlando, to the Board of
Governors for Enterprise Florida Inc.
Leslie J. Lott, founding parter ofLott &
Friedland in Coral Gables, presented at the Law
Education Institute's National CLE Conference, in
Aspen, Colo., on the latest developments in trade-
mark and trade dress law and recent federal district
and circuit court decisions. She and David K.
Freidland (JD 88) also announced the opening of
an office in Fort Lauderdale of their Coral Gables,
intellectual property-based firm Lott & Freidland.

1975
Carlton F. Bennett, a parter with Bennett and
Zydron in Virginia Beach, is board-certified in civil
practice by the National Board of Trial Advocacy
and was recognized by the American Trial Lawyers
Association for pro bono representation of Sept.
11th victims.
R. Terry Rigsby joined the Tallahassee office of
Carlton Fields as a shareholder in the Government
Law and Consulting Program.

1976
Mark P. Buell is chair-elect of the Trial Lawyers
Section of The Florida Bar and will become chair in
June 2005.

1977
Nathaniel Doliner, a shareholder in Carlton
Fields in Tampa, moderated a corporate governance
program in Paris, France, entitled "The Impact of
Converging Business Legal Issues in the World's
Two Largest Markets: Greater Europe and the
United States."


Up the

Ladder

An "eminently
qualified successor"
is how George
Reardon (JD 75)
was described when
he was recently
appointed senior
vice president and
general counsel of
Adecco Group
North America, a
Forbes 500 company.
Reardon previously was senior vice president and general counsel of Kelly
Services and former chairman of the American Staffing Association's legal and
legislative committee.
In his new role at Adecco the largest staffing company in the world -
Reardon is responsible for advising senior management on a broad range of
legal issues and participating in setting the company's direction.


Kim O'Connor was elected supervisor of
Ochlocknee River Soil and Water Conservation
District 3 in Tallahassee.

1978
Dennis M. Campbell was recognized as one
of Florida's top business and business litigation
lawyers. He concentrates his practice on the
representation of financial institutions and other
sophisticated business enterprises on creditors'
rights, bankruptcy and litigation matters.

Robert E. Gordon, a member of Gordon &
Doner, has been appointed to the board of directors
for the Brain Injury Association of America after
serving on the board of the Florida Brain Injury
Association for the past six years.
John D. Owsen has joined the Dallas office of
Glast, Phillips & Murray, where he practices in the
ERISA & Employee Benefits Section, Taxation
Section and Estate Planning Section.

1979
Cheryl L. Gordon was elected to a two-year
term as managing shareholder in Abel Band


Lott 74
Lott 74


Russell Collier Pitchford & Gordon Chartered
in Sarasota.

BTI Consulting Firm honored Linda Y.
Kelso, a partner in the Jacksonville firm Foley
& Lardner, for client service skills.

1980
Philippe Jeck will be participating in the
King's Trial Triathlon in Maui, Hawaii, a fund
raiser for the Leukemia and Lymphoma Society.
His participation will be in honor of his father,
Lester Jeck, who died of leukemia.
Sharon Strayer Learch, formerly a partner
at Holland & Knight in Jacksonville, opened a
private practice in May 2003 and specializes in
residential real estate matters.
Douglas Molloy recently returned from
Brazil, where he was part of a commission
studying global slavery and related crimes.
Molloy interviewed and taught Brazilian federal
police, law enforcement officers and judges
about U.S. and Brazilian efforts to stop sex
slavery, indentured servitude and domestic
servitude. He traveled to Sao Paulo, Belo
Horizonte and Rio de Janeiro.

1981
Luis A. Abreu was chosen as one of
Virginia's "Legal Elite" and has received this
honor for three consecutive years, recognizing
him as one of Virginia's top attorneys in the
area of family and domestic relations.
labreu@ccbk.com
CONTINUED ON PAGE 40


UF LAW 39






CLAS SN OTS


The Second I

Time Around
W hen Steven (JD 82) and
Natalia (JD 86) Kalishman
got married the first time,
the ceremony took place in a bare-
bones government office in Natalia's
hometown of Novorossiisk, Russia.
Only two other people looked on.
When they wanted to renew
their wedding vows 25 year later, they
decided to return to Novorossiik for
the special wedding of Natalia's
dreams. They were surprised when
they came out of the "matrimonial
palace" to find dancing children, a
choir's serenade and fireworks. They
were even more astonished to learn
the local television station's footage of
their wedding festivities was being
broadcast throughout Russia and had
become a national news event.
Steven was introduced to local cus-
toms such as laying a wreath of flowers
at a memorial to Russian war dead and
"teaming" with Natalia, in which the two



David C. Banker has joined Bush Ross Gardner
Warren & Rudy in Tampa as a shareholder and
focuses on product liability, medical malpractice and
employment discrimination.

Wilbur Brewton, partner in charge of the
Tallahassee office ofRoetzel & Andress, was elected
president of the Governor's Club for 2005 for a one-
year term. Brewton's practice focuses on administra-
tive law, appellate law, corporate and business servic-
es, public and finance, and government relations.
Richard B. Comiter, founding partner of
Comiter & Singer in Palm Beach and Palm Beach
Gardens, recently addressed the Florida Institute of
Certified Public Accountants on "Effectively Using
Limited Liability for Tax and Asset Protection
Planning."
Jonathan Marcus is a partner with Holland &
Knight in Fort Lauderdale and practices real estate
law, 1 *. *. I. ....'-... residential developers.


ceremonially cut through a log with a
cross-cut saw to "learn to pull together
as a team."
Natalia demonstrated the
American custom of pulling off her
garter and tossing it to the bachelors
in the crowd, which caused "their eyes
to start popping because they don't
have that custom."
Both attorneys practice together in
their Gainesville law firm, Steven
Kalishman, PA. (www.FlaLitiGators.com),
and were instrumental in establishing
Novorossiisk as Gainesville's sister city
(www.gnvsistercities.org) in 1982.
sjklaw@bellsouth.net



Gov. Jeb Bush appointed Joyce Henderson
Williams an Escambia County Court judge after
she served as an assistant city attorney for more than
10 years.

1982
Terence Delahunty Jr., of Foley & Lardner in
Orlando, was named to the Board of Governors of
the Orlando Regional Chamber of Commerce.

Susan Maulucci was selected by the chief judge
to serve as a general magistrate in the 12th Judicial
Circuit. susan.maulucci@co.manatee.fl.us

Richard A. Jacobson, shareholder in Fowler
White Boggs Banker in Tampa, has been elected to
the International Programs advisory board at the
Levin College of Law.
William Merlin Jr., ofThe Merlin Law Group
in Tampa, co-chaired the Sixth Annual Windstorm


Brewton 81 Comiter 81 Jacobson 82 Marraffino 84


40 UF LAW


Insurance Conference. Merlin presented a workshop
titled "Unlicensed Practice of Law and Unlicensed
Public Adjusting," which dealt with how adjusters,
public adjusters, contractors and others involved
with a claim sometimes unknowingly engage in the
unauthorized practice of law. Merlin also served on
an expert panel discussion titled "What We Learned
from the 2004 Hurricanes."

Judge Charles E. Williams was honored by the
United Negro College Fund for his achievements
and community involvement in the Sarasota-
Manatee campaign.

1983
Paul Steven Singerman and Thomas O.
Wells (JD 92), of BergerSingerman in Miami.
were featured speakers at the Northern Trust Annual
Bankers' Sales Conference on "Asset Planning for
Physicians and the Defensive Rabbi Trust Loan."

1984
John Attaway was promoted to senior vice
president and general counsel of Publix, where he
has worked since 1997.
Lawrence Marraffino is in private practice in
C ..... P. .. .. i, in personal injury, bankrupt-
cy, and commercial litigation. He is an adjunct fac-
ulty member at the Levin College of Law, where he
teaches law office management and practical skills.
Brian D. Stokes, a partner atThe Unger Law
Group in Orlando, obtained board certification by
The Florida Bar in the field of civil trial law.
David C. Willis, partner at Rumberger, Kirk &
Caldwell, was appointed to The Florida Bar
Business Committee, which oversees all applications
for Business Law Certification and prepares the cer-
tification exam.

1985
P. Campbell Ford currently lives in Atlantic
Beach, N.C., with his family, and is practicing com-
mercial and construction litigation at Ford, Miller
& Wainer law firm in Jacksonville, N.C.
Taso Milonas is a board certified tax lawyer in
Sarasota and advises individuals and businesses on
estate planning and related matters.
Edward Tancer, of Florida Power and Light
Group, was appointed vice president and general
counsel after 17 years at various legal posts within
the company.

1986
R Richard Game, formerly of Bondurant
Mixson & Elmore in Atlanta, has left the active
practice of law to pursue ordination as a priest in
the Episcopal Church. He is currently enrolled in
the Master of Divinity program at The Candler
School of Theology at Emory University
CONTINUED ON PAGE 42






ALUMNI PROFILE


CHUCK CHANCE


Taking Chances from the Beginning

BY DEBORAH CUPPLES (JD 05)


The theme was "License to Chill." The
band played Jimmy Buffet and guests
downed margaritas, cheeseburgers in paradise
and key lime pie. It was as if Key West had
come to Gainesville, and instead of a robe,
8th Circuit Judge Chuck Chance (JD 64)
donned a straw hat for the occasion.
After 31 years on the bench, Chance was
celebrating his January 2005 retirement. The
room was packed and the stories flowed,
including some from the judge.
"It was the late '60s, and I was driving
home from a meeting one night," Chance
smiled. "All of a sudden this bottle crashed
through my window."
Why? Because Chance was campaigning
for a black city commission candidate.
Despite threats, Chance continued to
campaign, and that candidate became
Gainesville's first black city commissioner.
Opposition didn't frighten Chance. In
1965, he joined the Public Defender's office
when the program was still new ... and far
from accepted.
"Back then, it was hard for law enforce-
ment to grasp that everyone charged with a
crime would get a lawyer," Chance explained.
"If they had a lot of evidence against some-
one, they'd tell him he didn't need a lawyer,
unless it was a capital case. There I was, pos-
ing challenges on my clients' behalf. Let me
just say that some people were pretty resistant
to change."
A double Gator, Chance majored in busi-
ness administration and studied political sci-
ence. Before taking the bench, he had a tight
schedule of civic activities, including helping
groups such as Florida Defenders of the
Environment.
"I'm a boater and a fisherman," Chance
said. "So the environment has always been of
great concern to me.
He also chaired Alachua County's


Judge Chance,


Democratic Party and worked on several
federal campaigns, but his political activity
ceased once he took the bench.
"Judges can't express political opinions
and must limit their associations. It can be
isolating," said Chance. "That's the hard
part about being on the bench."
As a judge, Chance found other ways to
contribute, such as spearheading one of the
nation's first Guardian Ad Litem programs
and first juvenile court programs.
He also broke ground on court system
computerization, chaired the ABAs section
on specialty courts, the Florida County Court
Judges Conference and the Florida Circuit
Judges Conference. In addition, he co-wrote
a criminal procedure book with the late UF
Law Professor Gerald Bennett for the ABA.
"Chuck is the only person I know who
can think in circles," said 8th Circuit Chief
Judge Stan Morris (JD 71). "Most people
sit around getting frustrated, but he sees
possibilities where others don't. He can look
at a situation and say, 'Hey, we can do this
better.'"
Spending years as an adjunct professor
of UF's trial practice class, Chance exposed


hundreds of students to his unique thinking
and emerged as a favorite professor. In Fall
2004, after a mock trial at the courthouse,
students Ben Brown (3L) and Jennifer
Mauro (3L) asked Chance to marry them in
his courtroom, with other students witness-
ing from the jury box.
"After only 12 weeks, it seemed like we'd
known him our whole lives," Ben said. "The
man just effused warmth, so it was only nat-
ural that he should bind us in matrimony."
He also believes, just as he did in the
'70s, that getting through the court system is
too time consuming and expensive for the
average person.
"Call me Pollyanna, but I still have
hope that one day the court system will pro-
vide results more quickly and with lower
costs to people," Chance said. "I plan to
devote some of my time to helping things
along."
But he also is considering political
activities and plans to travel with his wife,
Ramona (JD 82, LLM 83), who practices
law in Gainesville.
Most of all, he plans to enjoy his
"license to chill." U


UF LAW 41


a student favorite, marries F law students Jennifer Mauro and Ben Brown
a student favorite, marries UF law students Jennifer Mauro and Ben Brown






CLAS SN OTS


Chess Champ

Supports Kids

A ndrew Scherman
(JD 83) was 11
years old when he
set the world record for
the youngest player to
participate in the World
Chess Olympiad. In 2003
he won the title of
National "Game-in-10"
Chess Champion, which
required him to check-
mate competitors within
the 10 minutes on the game clock.
Today he holds the title of Life
Master given by the U.S. Chess
Federation, but it is his title of chess
coach for a group of adolescents at a
St. Petersburg school that provides his
greatest sense of accomplishment. His
students are rated among the top
chess players in the country.
As president of the St. Petersburg
Chess Club, Scherman believes chess


William E. Ruffier, a board-certified civil trial
lawyer with Dellecker Wilson & King, received
recertification by The Florida Bar for a five-year
period extending through 2009 and is now a part-
ner with the firm practicing in personal injury,
wrongful death, medical negligence, nursing home
litigation and civil rights.
Fred Werdine, of Fowler White Boggs Banker,
was selected to participate in the 2005 Class of
Leadership in Tampa Bay.

1987
David Bowen has joined Mayer, Brown, Rowe
& Maw as partner in the transfer pricing practice.
He also is an adjunct professor at George
Washington University, where he teaches interna-
tional litigation and dispute resolution in the
L.L.M. program.
Joanne Fanizza received The Florida Bar
President's Pro Bono Service Award for the 17th
Judicial Circuit in a ceremony hosted by the Florida
Supreme Court. jfannizza@bellsouth.net
David B. Honig, of Hall, Render, Killian, Heath
& Lyman in Indianapolis, Ind., was co-author of
"Prolific Plaintiffs or Rabid Relators? Recent
Developments in False Claims Act Litigation." The
article appears in Indiana Health Law Review.
Joe Kern, associate general counsel with Darden
Restaurants, was elected chair of the state board of
directors of Easter Seals Florida.


I


should be a part of every school sys-
tem.
"Chess is the only activity, that
we've been able to discover, that
improves standardized test scores by
as much as 20 percent. That 20 per-
cent can make the difference between
attending college and getting a
scholarship to attend college," said
Scherman. A lifelong chess player,
Scherman scored in the top 1 percent
in the nation on his LSAT.



Jack Miller was appointed the Weldon Schimke
Distinguished Professor of Law at the University of
Idaho College of Law.

1988
Richard M. Benrubi, ofLiggo, Benrubi &
Williams, was elected treasurer of the 2005 Palm
Beach County Trial Lawyers Association.
David R Browne, partner with Bond, Schoeneck
& King in Bonita Springs, was recently elected
chairman of the Bonita Springs Community
Foundation and is one of only 350 Florida Bar
board-certified wills, trusts and estates lawyers.
Charles Carver, shareholder in Ward Rovell,
was elected to a second term as vice president
of public affairs for the Florida Chapter of the
National Association of Industrial and Office
Properties, and was elected first vice president
of NAIOP's Tampa Bay chapter.
ccarver@wardrovell.com
Teri Donaldson has joined Tew Cardenas and
will serve as the managing partner of the firm's
environment, energy and resources practice
group. Before joining Tew Cardenas, Donaldson
served for five years in Gov. Jeb Bush's adminis-
tration as general counsel for the Florida
Department of Environmental Protection.
David K. Freidland and Leslie J. Lott
(JD 74) announced the opening of an office in


Fort Lauderdale of their Coral Gables, intellectual
property-based firm Lott & Freidland.
Christopher Hanna served as visiting pro-
fessor at the Levin College of Law during
Spring 2005 semester. Hanna, whose expertise
is in tax accounting, international tax, corpo-
rate tax and individual taxation, holds a
University Distinguished Teaching
Professorship at Southern Methodist University.
He is the founder and director of SMU's
Center for Pacific Rim Legal Studies and has
served since 1995 as director of the Academy of
International Taxation in Taipei, Taiwan.
Cathryn A. Mitchell, of MillerMitchell, was
recently appointed president and secretary to the
Princeton Bar Association's Board of Trustees.

Russell Silverglate has become the director
of community life and small group pastor at
Spanish River Church in Boca Raton since
receiving his M.Div. from the Reformed
Theological Seminary in 2004.: .1 I *
spanishriver.com
Spencer H. Silverglate was recognized as
one of Florida's top civil trial lawyers and is the
managing shareholder of Clarke, I -. I *, &
Campbell. He concentrates his practice on repre-
senting corporations in complex commercial and
employment litigation matters.

1989
Andrew Fisher and his wife, Serena, welcomed
their son, Michael Dignan Fisher, in December 2004.

Linda Gemind has joined the Cleveland, Ohio,
law firm of Schottenstein Zox & Dunn and prac-
tices commercial litigation regarding immigration
law and counsels businesses on strategies for
employing foreign nationals.
John T. Leadbeater became a shareholder in
Ausley & McMullen PA. in Tallahassee, where he
practices business law, state and federal taxation.
Sheree Martin received her Ph.D. in mass com-
munications in December 2004 from the University
of Alabama and is currently assistant professor at
Oklahoma State University.
Dana J. McElroy, of Gordon Hargrove &
James in Fort Lauderdale, has been appointed to the
Board of Trustees of the First Amendment
Foundation, a non-profit organization dedicated to
preserving and advancing freedom of speech and of
the press. dmceroy@ghj.com
Michael Shapiro, vice president of Smith
Barney in Boca Raton, works with clients in the
areas of wealth management and estate planning
strategies.
Mark Stein, partner in the firm Lott &
Friedland, and fellow parters Leslie Lott (JD


42 UF LAW















74) and David Friedland (JD 88), were named
as three of the four best intellectual property lawyers
in South Florida in the 2005-06 edition of The Best
Lawyers in America.

Charles D. Tobin, a partner with Holland &
Knight in Washington, D.C., practices litigation
and media law on behalf of the nation's largest
broadcasters and publishers. He also serves as editor-
in-chief of the ABA magazine Litigation, is a govern-
ing committee member of the ABA Forum on
Communications Law, and chairs the D.C. Bar
Media Law Committee. He, his wife, Nancy, and
their two boys live in northern Virginia.
charles.tobin@hklaw.com

1990
Tracy Duda Chapman was appointed corpo-
rate vice president and general counsel to A. Duda
and Sons in Oviedo.

A. Brian Phillips, ofRuden McCloskyin
Orlando, made a presentation at the annual
Louisiana State Bar Association Retreat tied
"The Rigors of Interdisciplinary Practice."

Janice Matson Rickert, of Fowler White
Boggs Banker, was selected to participate in the
2005 Class of Leadership Tampa Bay.

Cynthia Crofoot Rignanese andJ. Lenora
Bressler of J. Kelly Kennedy in Winter Haven
presented a live, call-in radio show on "Laws You
Need to Know Following the Hurricanes" on
Florida Talks AM 1570.

1991
The 2005 South Florida Legal Guide named
Kenneth Spiegelman, a new member with
Dimond Kaplan & Rubenstein, to the "Top Up
and Comers" list.

John V. Tucker, ofAnderson & Tucker in St
Petersburg, presented a seminar entitled "Social
Security, Long Term Disability Insurance and Other
Disability Benefit Issues," sponsored by the National
Multiple Sclerosis Society, Mid-Florida Chapter.

1992
Thomas Bishop, of Holland & Knight, was
elected president of the Jacksonville chapter of The
Florida Bar Association.


The Board of Governors, the power-
ful group that oversees Florida's universi-
ty system, is comprised of 17 members.
Three of them are UF Levin College of
Law graduates.
The board was created in 2003
by the passage of constitutional
Amendment 11 to manage higher
education as well as strengthen the
role of the 11 individual university
Boards of Trustees.
John Dasburg (JD 73) is chairman,
president, CEO and co-owner of ASTAR
Air Cargo. Previously he was president
and CEO of Burger King and Northwest
Airlines and president of Marriott's
Lodging Group. Dasburg is the recipient
of numerous awards, including the 2001
Horatio Alger Award for Distinguished
Americans, and is active in civic affairs


D. Bruce Hoffman is vice chair of the firm-wide
antitrust practice with Hunton & Williams in
Miami, where he was formerly deputy director of
the FTC's Bureau of Competition.
bhoffman@hunton.com

Frank M. Petosa, of Petosa & Associates in
Boca Raton, was a featured speaker at the 2004 Fall
Advanced Trial Skills Seminar sponsored by the
Academy of Florida Trial Lawyers. Petosas topic was
tied "Beware of the Arbitration Clause."
Jack A. Weiss, of Fowler White Boggs and
Banker in St. Petersburg, was elected to the Board
of Directors of The Suncoast Tiger Bay Club.

1993
Cecilia Redding Boyd and her husband, James,
celebrated the births of their daughter, Fisher Evelyn
Boyd, in 2003, and son, James Alton Boyd, in 2004.
Bruce M. Harris, founding partner of Harris,
Harris Bauerle & Sharma in Orlando, has been
admitted to the Million Dollar Advocates Forum
for achieving a verdict in the amount of $1 million
or more.
Christopher P. Tessitore, former partner of
Lowndes, Drosdick, Doster, Kantor & Reed,
has joined Commercial Net Lease Reality Inc.,
as senior vice president and assistant general
counsel.


and on the board of several for-profit
and not-for-profit enterprises.
Lynn Pappas (JD 76) is a shareholder
in Pappas Metcalf Jenks E Miller in
Jacksonville, specializing in commercial
real property practice, environmental law,
real estate finance and general business
practice. She served as chair of the
Jacksonville Regional Chamber of
Commerce in 2002 and is active in numer-
ous civic and professional organizations.
Ava Parker (JD 87) is a partner for
Lawrence, Parker 8 Neighbors in
Jacksonville. Her activities include
serving as general counsel at Edward
Waters College from 1995 through
1997, as president of the Florida
Chapter National Bar Association and
as a member of the University of
Central Florida Board of Trustees.


Tri Thornhill received Florida Board certification
in civil trial law.

1994
Lisa Bisagni opened her own office in Fort
Lauderdale, which specializes in real estate closings,
real estate legal services, tide insurance and civil liti-
gation.
Steven Diebenow has been appointed chief of
staff for Mayor John Peyton in Jacksonville.
Lawrence B. Lambert was named partner
with Lash & Goldberg in Miami and practices
commercial litigation, health care, franchise litiga-
tion and contract and employee disputes.
Kenneth J. McKenna became a partner at
Dellecker, Wilson & King in Orlando and practices
in medical malpractice and insurance bad faith.
Lance D. Reich became a partner in the newly
formed Atlanta office of Carlton Fields.
Robert W. Vale was recently elected partner at
Shutts & Bowen and handles commercial and resi-
dential real estate transactions for a variety of clients.

1995
The Class of 1995 is leading the way on binding
ties with law school classmates by hosting a website
and planning a weekend reunion during UF


suffer 86 Carver 88 R. Silverglate 88 Leadbeater89 McEroy89 Spiegelman 91 Harris 93 McKenna 94
Ruffier 86 Carver 88 R. Silverglate 88 Leadbeater 89 McElroy 89 Spiegelman 91 Harris 93 McKenna 94


Three Alums on Top Education Board


Vale 94


UF LAW 43







CLAS SN OTS


Homecoming festivities in October. The reunion
includes a tour of the law school's new facilities
(where lunch will be served), and a lunch, brunch
and party For more information go to
www.PaulSRooy.com/UFReunion.aspx
or call Raul Rooy at 386-258-5008.

Tim Cerio has been selected by Gov. Jeb Bush to
serve as general counsel for Florida's Department of
Health to oversee all legal issues. Cerio is taking a
leave of absence from GrayRobinson in Tampa,
where he focused on governmental law.
Alison Danaceau became a parter in the
Atlanta office of Carlton Fields.

J. Andrew Meyer, a former partner at
Carlton Fields, has joined James, Hoyer, Newcomer
& Smiljanich, and works on class actions and civil
litigation.
Niels P. Murphy co-founded a new firm,
Murphy & Anderson, in Jacksonville. The firm's
practice will emphasize litigation in complex com-
mercial and construction litigation, product and
professional liabilities, securities litigation and arbi-
tration, intellectual property and personal injury.
nmurphy@nmurphyandandersonlaw.com
U.S. Secretary of the Interior Gale A. Norton
appointed Daniel T. O'Keefe to a four-year
term on the Wekiva River System Advisory
Management Committee. He also is a member of
the board of the East Central Florida Regional
Planning Council, appointed by Gov. Jeb Bush.
dokeefe@schutts-law.com
Richard "Chip" E. Thompson II was select-
ed as one of the "Top 20 Attorneys Under Age 40
in the City of Atlanta" by the Fulton County Daily
Report, the Georgia division of American Lawyer
Media. Thompson also heads the international prac-
tice group for the Atlanta-based law firm Troutman
Sanders, which has seven domestic offices as well as
offices in London and Hong Kong. richard.thomp-
son@troutmansanders.com

1996

Tina Bird has become a member at FagelHaber in
Chicago and will continue to represent contractors,
designers and builders in contract drafting and
negotiation, payment disputes, delay damage claims,
defective work claims and other construction dis-
putes.
Juan Carlos Ferrucho has joined Berkowitz
Dick Pollack & Brant Certified Public Accountants


Pro Bono Deeds Spotlighted

Eula Robinson-Clarke (JD 96)
spends most of her time in private
practice focusing on family law, juve-
nile dependency, and probate and
guardianship matters for low-income
clients and victims of domestic
violence. A good deal of her time,
however, is also spent providing
pro bono services in her community,
a deed that caused her to be featured
recently in the Martin County Bar
Association's publication.
Clarke's outstanding pro bono
work include donating time to repre-
sent clients who could potentially lose
their parental rights, elderly clients with
their wills and trusts, and a mother with
divorce and child related issues. She
also is a pro bono advisor for the
Father-Child Services Center, where she
devotes time monthly to advising
fathers on child support, paternity and
other legal issues.

& Consultants in Miami as a manager in the inter-
national tax services department
jferrucho@bdpb.com

Brian J. Gausie has joined the Fort Lauderdale
office of Greenberg Taurig as a shareholder, and
practices in the corporate and securities section.

Jason K. Greene was named counsel with
Powell Goldstein in Atlanta, and practices in busi-
ness transactions and tax.

Richard A. Hujber, former immigration attor-
ney-advisor to the U.S. Department of Justice,
Miami Immigration Court, and the Board of
Immigration Appeals, opened his new immigration
law office in Boca Raton. He represents clients in all
types of immigration matters. Hujber also is the
chairman of the Immigration Committee for the
South Palm Beach County Bar Association. richard-
hujber@yahoo.com

James F Johnston, of the Orlando office of
GrayRobinson, focuses his practice on land use,
state and local government law and utilities in the
firm's public law department.

Jennifer D. Odom was named parter with
Powell Goldstein in Atlanta, where she practices


securities and corporate litigation and is a member of
the firm's Special Matters and Investigations Team.

Jeremy M. Sensenig, former lead attorney of
the Legal Aid Society of Palm Beach, opened
Sensenig Law Firm in Sarasota.

David Tetrick Jr. was elected parter at the
Atlanta office of King & Spaulding and focuses his
practice on representing management in ERISA and
employment matters.

Kathryn Williams, parmer with Holland &
Knight, was selected to participate in the Rising
Stars Class of 2005, a year long leadership and
intensive economic program developed by the firm
for women attorneys.

1997

Geddes D. Anderson Jr. co-founded a new
firm, Murphy & Anderson, in Jacksonville. The
firm's practice will emphasize litigation in complex
commercial and construction litigation, product and
professional liabilities, securities litigation and arbi-
tration, intellectual property and personal injury.
ganderson@murphyandandersonlaw.com

C. Todd Burbank, of Helms Mulliss & Wicker
in Charlotte, N.C., was promoted to member and
specializes in commercial real estate and finance.

Joaquin Ferrao has become senior advisor to
U.S. Assistant Secretary of State Roger Noriega and
resides in Virginia with his wife and two daughters.

Michael J. Ivan Jr. and John P Cole announce
the formation of Ivan & Cole in Jacksonville. The
firm focuses on estate and trust litigation, fiduciary
risk management and counseling, estate planning,
business succession planning and tax planning.

Scott R. Lilly, of the Tampa office of
GrayRobinson, concentrates his practice in the areas
of real property litigation, commercial litigation,
creditors' rights and bankruptcy litigation.

James W. Pimentel, formerly an assistant state
attorney in the 4th Judicial Circuit, has become
office legal advisor for the Clay County Sheriff's
O office. ...... .... i. .. .. T .

J. Cater Randolph II, parter with the Palm
Beach law firm Mettler, Shelton, Randolph &
Marek, has been selected as a member of the Board
of Directors of the Palm Beach Chamber of
Commerce.


Bird 96 Ferrucho 96 Williams 96


Anderson 97 Burbank 97


CONTINUED ON PAGE 46 >


Murphy 95


44 UF LAW






IN MEMORIAL


102YEARS OF AGE


BY SHARON COLE 81 YEARS OF PRACTICE


H having tenaciously dedicated 81 years of
his life to law, Clarence A. Boswell
(LLM 24), at the honorable age of 102, dis-
tinguished himself as the senior-most practic-
ing member of The Florida Bar.
Even as he neared his 100th birthday two
years ago, he continued to make his way into
his Bartow office of Boswell & Dunlap to
handle business.
"He enjoyed his work and was very good
at it. He had clients who relied on him -
from grandparents, parents, and families to
businesses and he felt an obligation to rep-
resent them," said partner Don Wilson (JD
76). "Even though he stopped coming to the
office over the past two years, he still tended
to some of his clients."
Boswell, who was born Dec, 6, 1902,
died peacefully at home Feb. 22, 2005.
Affectionately called "Mr. B," Boswell
was often referred to as a gentleman's gentle-
man and a lawyer's lawyer, and was admired
by colleagues as an ethical and vigorous litiga-
tor, a dedicated family man and a person of
great faith.
"He was acknowledged as a lawyer with
an impeccable reputation who had the won-
derful demeanor of a Southern gentleman
and the looks to go with it," said Wilson.
A full head of striking white hair was one
of Boswell's most marked features.
"He was famous for that hair, which he
acquired early in life," recalled Wilson.
"There is a funny story about it. He was liti-
gating a case in which a man was injured in a
train wreck and suing the railroad. The man
claimed a result of the accident was that his
hair turned white, to which Clarence asked
curiously, 'So how exactly have you suffered
from that?'"
Boswell made a name for himself by
serving as defense counsel for the Atlantic
Coastline Railroad and by representing the
local school board from 1939 through the


late '70s, including through desegregation.
He also garnered much attention as the
lawyer who pulled off the largest land sale in
Florida in the early '70s. The single transac-
tion between a Bartow family and a phos-


phate company totaled a whopping $101
million undoubtedly a remarkable figure
for that time period.
"Lawyers were fairly diverse back then,"
said Wilson. "They didn't specialize like they
do today. In fact, Florida law students weren't
required to take a bar exam in his day."
Boswell began his law career in 1924,
joining the firm Wilson & Boswell, which
was established in 1900 by his father, Judge
Clarence Boswell, and partner Solon G.
Wilson grandfather of Don Wilson. The
legacy of the firm continues as Boswell &
Dunlap, which now celebrates 105 years of
service and is recognized as the oldest firm in
Polk County and among the oldest in
Florida.
While sifting through dated files recently,
Wilson came across a few of Boswell's receipts
from the time he served as state attorney dur-


ing the Depression. Sent out of town by the
governor to investigate failing banks, Boswell
was required to stay in hotels for a week or so
at a time.
"His meals and hotel costs for one trip


were just $25.67 for the week," Wilson said.
Compensation also was quite different
then. Boswell's pay as the part-time state
attorney during the late 20s and early 30s:
$300 per month.
Lake Wales lawyer Robin Gibson (JD
62), who frequently found himself opposite
Boswell in the courtroom, held high regard
for his fellow Gator.
"He was the kind of adversary you secretly
admired the whole time," he said. "He would
preside over the jury with his white hair and
enormous presence while talking through
clenched teeth. He just had a way about him.
"No one will be able to do it quite the
way he did again," said Gibson. "You can't
help but say he was someone you would
model your life after.
"We are fortunate we had him for 102
years." U
UF LAW 45






CLAS SN OTS


CONTINUED FROM PAGE 44
Tammie Rattray has been named a parter
with the national labor and employment law firm
Ford & Harrison in Tampa and practices in all areas
of employment litigation.

Todd B. Reinstein joined the Washington law
firm of Pepper Hamilton as an associate in its tax
department.

1998
Andrew Chapman, ofLowndes Drosdick
Doster Kantor & Reed, was promoted to senior
associate.

Cristin A. Conley, of Carlton Fields in Tampa,
co-wrote the second chapter in the first edition of
Limited Liability Companies in Florida, titled,
"Comparative Analysis: When and Why L.L.C.'s are
a Better Alternative."

Rick Ellsley, a civil trial attorney with the Fort
Lauderdale firm of Krupnick Campbell Malone
Buser Slama Hancock Liberman & McKee, is a fre-
quent lecturer and has published articles on trial
techniques in personal injury and wrongful death
cases.

Fabienne Leconte Fahnestock and her hus-
band, Kyle, celebrated the birth of their first child,
Isabella Grace.

Jason Gonzalez, ofAusley & McMullen in
Tallahssee, was appointed by Gov. Jeb Bush to a
four-year term on the First District Court of Appeal
Judicial Nominating Commission.

Maria M. Hinds is the general magistrate for the
9th Judicial Circuit Court of Florida.

M. Scott Noble has become a shareholder at
Head, Moss, Fulton & Noble PA., with offices in
Orange Park and Ponte Vedra Beach.

Lorraine O'Hanlon Rogers, attorney with
Schwarzberg & Associates in West Palm Beach, was
appointed head of the firm's employment law prac-
tice group.

Bill Ramanos III published a chapter on
e-commerce in the Florida Small Business Practice
Manual 2004.

1999

Derek Acree, a member of The Florida Bar,
joined Nason, Yeager, Gerson, White & Lioce as an
associate and practices real estate law.


R. Bradley Adams joined the law firm of
Littler Mendelson in Atlanta and practices labor and
employment law.
Ryan E. Davis, of Winderweedle, Haines, Ward
& Woodman, was elected to the Board of Directors
of the Central Florida Bankruptcy Law Association.
Jeffry T. Donner joined Gunster, Yoakley &
Steward in Miami as an associate and concentrates
in the areas of environmental and land use law and
administrative law.
Aubrey Ducker Jr. was selected for Strathsmore's
Whose Who 2004-2005.

Q. Scott Kaye was recently elected parter at
McDermont Will & Emery and is a member of the
firm's corporate department in Los Angeles.
qskaye@mwe.com

Antony Kolenc was promoted to the rank of
major and is teaching undergraduate law classes as
an assistant professor at the U.S. Air Force Academy
in Colorado Springs, Colo.

Brian Leebrick has become a shareholder in the
Panama City firm Barron, Redding, Hughes, Fite,
Fensom, Sanborn & Kiehn and practices in the areas
of real estate transactions, development and finance,
real estate litigation and general commercial law.

Rahul Ranadive recently joined the Robert
Alien Law Firm in Miami and practices internation-
al law. rrandive@robertallen.com

William R. Schilling has opened his own law
firm as a general practitioner in Carolina Beach,
N.C., a small island just south of Wilmington.
Brian R Trauman, a domestic and international
tax controversy associate with the Washington,
D.C., and New York offices of Mayer, Brown, Rowe
& Maw, has been appointed chair of the ABATax
Section's Pro Bono Committee. He also serves as the
ABA Young Lawyers Division's Liaison to the ABA
Tax Section. BPTrauman@mayerbrownroew.com
Jeannine Smith Williams, of the St.
Petersburg Legal Department, was elected president
of the Fred G. Minnis Sr. Bar Association.
jnine96@yahoo.com

2000
Julie Imanuel Brown is the assistant city
attorney for the city of Tampa and is acquiring
several UPS stores in the Tampa Bay area with
her husband, Hank.


Hornsby 00 Fender 01


Richard Hornsby has opened his own practice,
Richard E. Hornsby, in Orlando and concentrates
primarily on trial practice, limiting his work to crimi-
nal defense and personal injury representation.
Brian Mulligan was married to fellow classmate
Elizabeth Lynch (JD 01) in September 2004.
Lisa Smith, of Lowndes Drosdick Doster Kantor
& Reed, was promoted to senior associate.

2001
Peter Boyd founded PaperStreet Web Design, a
company that creates web sites for lawyers.
peteboyd@paperstreet.com

Rocky Cabagnot was honored at the first
Fellow and Leadership Conference and is an Equal
Justice Works Fellow with Three Rivers Legal
Services in Gainesville, where he works with parter
organizations to provide legal services to four of the
poorest rural counties in North Central Florida.
Christine Donoghue, of GrayRobinson in
Tampa, was elected to serve on the Florida Defense
Lawyers Association Board of Directors for 2004-
2005.
Loren Fender recently joined Rumberger, Kirk,
& Caldwell as an associate in the Miami office,
practicing in the areas of insurance defense matters
and products liability.
Lydia R. Hanley was appointed associate direc-
tor of career services for the Ralph R. Papitto School
of Law at Roger Williams University, a newly creat-
ed position in which she will manage publications
and technology in the office, counsel students and
develop programs.
Laura Giuffrida Herzog, formerly an associate
for Holland & Knight in Jacksonville, is now direc-
tor of career services at Florida Coastal School of
Law in Jacksonville. lgiuffrida@fcsl.edu
Jay R Lechner published an article, "The New
FLSA White Collar Regulations: Analysis of
Changes," in the February 2005 Florida BarJournal.
He practices labor and employment law represent-
ing management in the Tampa firm of Zinober &
McCrea.

2002
Erin Ackor joined the Miami law firm of Moore
and Co. and will specialize in all aspects of marine
and aviation law.
Amanda Arnold completed a clerkship with
U.S. District Court Judge Susan C. Buckles and
will begin a clerkship with U.S. Circuit Court of
Appeals Judge Charles Wilson, 11th Circuit.
Shelbi Day was honored at the first Fellow and
Leadership Conference and is an Equal Justice
Works fellow with Southern Legal Counsel in
Gainesville, where she works to address civil rights
abuses that result from the criminalization of home-
lessness in Florida.
CONTINUED ON PAGE 48


46 UF LAW






ALUMNI BRIEFS


MAKING A MARK


A Behind-the-Scenes Look at Law


Paul Rogers (JD 48) has changed the face of American
health care in his five decades of service (private practice
and 24 in the U.S. Congress), which is the theme of the just-
published book, '" Portrait in Leadership, A Fighter for Health:
The Honorable Paul Rogers."
Studded with personal anecdotes
and re-creations of political jousting,
the book depicts the law-making
process in the nation's capital and
provides insight into the qualities of a
winning leader. While in office, for
example, Rogers managed to preserve
the National Institutes of Health by
Rogers, Spring com- turning a predicted House vote of at
mencement speaker
at the law school least 270 in favor ofa separate cancer-
research institute to a vote of 350 to
5 against removing the institute from NIH.
Rogers' legislative legacy touches virtually every aspect of
the nation's health status, including radiation-emissions,
ozone-damaging CFCs, drug and medical-device approval,
migrant workers, rural health care, consumer prescription
package inserts and the health workforce. He gave us the
Clean Air Act, established the National Institute on Aging,
and fast-forwarded the war on cancer.
Today, Rogers works with several groups, including the
National Coalition for Health Care, which has been lobbying
for universal health care coverage; and the Campaign for Public


Health, which seeks increased funding for the Centers for
Disease Control and Prevention. He also is an advocate for
bringing American health programs to the developing world, in
part as a way to build relations with those nations.
The book is written by Dr. Roger Bulger, president of the
Association of Academic Health Centers, Washington, D.C,
and Shirley Sirota Rosenberg (Carden-Jennings Publishing
Co. Ltd.).
TIM LOCKETTE


Sports Management on
During his illustrious career, UF law
school Trustee Mike Ferguson (JD 89) has
been able to combine two of his favorite
subjects ... the law and sports.
Ferguson not only assisted in forming the
original Arena Football 2 partnership, he served
as a player contract advisor for the National
Football League Players Association from
1995-2003. His client list included football
greats Emmitt Smith and DannyWuerffel as
well as numerous professional sports teams.
Today, he uses his knowledge of sports
and the law to speak on sports manage-
ment at various meetings, including at UF,
the University of West Florida (where he is


the Move
an adjunct professor) and the recent 13th
Annual Georgia Southern Sports Conference
in Savannah, Ga.
He also works with the military. Ferguson
is a civilian aide to the Secretary of the
Army, making him the secretary's personal
representative for Florida, and has the rank
of three-star general for protocol purposes.
He is a retired Airborne, Ranger, Combat
Infantryman with more than 30 awards,
decorations and medals.
Ferguson is of counsel with McDonald,
Fleming, Moorhead, Ferguson, et al. in
Pensacola, where he resides with his wife
and three children.


UF LAW 47


Danny Wuerffel (from left) with
Mike Ferguson and Emmitt Smith


-~; ~Y







C L S SN 0TES


In Memoriam
J. Emory "Red" Cross (JD
45) former Alachua County
state legislator, Alachua County
and circuit court judge, and
father of Florida's landmark
Government-in-the Sunshine
law passed away at the age
of 91 on March 23.
Famous in the Legislature
for his white suit, bright red hair
and Stetson hat, Cross worked
with former Florida Supreme
Court Justice James C. Adkins
Jr. (JD 38) to champion the
Sunshine law, which passed in
1967 after a decade of persist-
ence. The law was the nation's
first open-government law pro-
viding strong civil and criminal
penalties for violations. In 1993,
UF's College of Journalism and
Communications honored him
with its first Freedom of
Information Medallion.
Cross also sponsored legis-
lation that supported UF's
medical school and Santa Fe
Community College.
After graduation from the
College of Law in 1945, he
served as Florida's assistant
attorney general, practiced law
in Gainesville and later served
as Alachua County's prosecut-
ing attorney from 1948 to 1952.
In 1952 Cross began his political
career in the Florida House and
later the Florida Senate.

William O.E. Henry (JD 52)
- former president of The
Florida Bar and Florida Bar
Foundation, retired senior part-
ner at Holland 8 Knight, and law
school trustee died March 11
in Orlando. He was 77 years old.
Henry was one of the six
original associates of the firm
that became Holland 8 Knight.
He retired January 2005 after 51
years of a distinguished career
as a tax lawyer.
As Bar president in 1983-84,
he convinced large law firms to
handle at least one pro bono
case representing a death row
inmate. As president of The
Florida Bar Foundation in 1988,
Henry lobbied for mandatory
funding to provide legal services


for the poor, and he succeeded
the following year when the
Florida Supreme Court made
mandatory the IOTA program
requiring lawyers to donate
interest from client trust
accounts to indigent legal
services.
His honors were numerous
and included The Florida Bar
Foundation Medal of Honor
and University of Florida
Distinguished Alumnus Award.

UF Law Alumni Council
member Christopher "Chris"
Tompkins (JD 92), 34, of
Brandon, died April 30 after bat-
tling leukemia.
In 1988, at age 18, Tompkins
became Hillsborough County's
youngest elected official,
serving for 16 years on the
Hillsborough Soil and Water
Conservation District Board.
He went on to serve in
numerous leadership roles
while earning his BA and JD
degrees at the University of
Florida, including president of
Student Government, president
and treasurer of Student
Government Senate, and chair
of the Florida Student
Association representing all
state universities.
After obtaining his law
degree, Tompkins served on
the staff of Representative Faye
Culp and authored Florida's
Y2K Plan. He then practiced
agricultural, environment, fami-
ly and small business law with
Tompkins 8 Tracy and was
active in numerous civic and
business organizations.

In Memoriam
* George F. Baughman (JD 67)
* William Baxter (JD 78)
* Clarence Alexander
Boswell Sr. (JD 24)
Lester E. Gilbert (LLB 54)
William O.E. Henry (JD 52)
Christopher Herrick (JD 86)
Clifton M. Kelly (JD 47)
Richard T. "Rick"
Leavengood (JD 78)
Truett Ott (JD 48)
Richard S. Sparrow (JD 53)
Donald McGetrick (JD 88)


Robert J. Robbins joined Learch
Coughlin Stoia Geller Rudman &
Robbins in Boca Raton as an associate
focusing on securities and consumer
fraud litigation. rrobbins@lerachlaw.com

Glory Ross joined Ackerman Link
& Sartory in West Palm Beach and
practices in the areas of business and
commercial litigation. Previously she
clerked for Judge Fred Hazouri of the
4th District Court of Appeals.
gross@alslaw.com

2003

Tamra Carsten has joined James,
Hoyer, Newcomer & Smiljanich and
works on civil appeals, class actions and
general ,I I- 11. .

Arturo J. Fernandez joined
the Miami office of Hunton &
Williams and will focus on labor
and employment
afernandez@hunton.com

S. Allister Fisher joined Lowndes,
Drosdick, Doster, Kantor & Reed as an
associate practicing in developments of
regional impact, land use & zoning, real
estate transactions, and development &
finance.

Steven Gold completed his clerk-
ship with Florida Supreme Court
Justice Charles Wells and has
accepted a position as a deputy
solicitor general.

Kristen Lentz was honored at the
first Fellows Reunion and Leadership
Conference. She is an Equal Justice
Works fellow at Florida Institutional
Legal Services in Gainesville, where
she addresses the legal needs of men
involuntarily detained and committed
under Florida's sex offender civil com-
mitment statute.

Carlo A. Rodriguez joined the law
firm of Hunton & Williams' Miami
office and will concentrate on civil
litigation with a focus on the petroleum
and real estate industry.
crodriguez@hunton.com


S. David Selznick joined Bridger
Commercial Funding as vice president
of the Midwest and will head its
Midwest relationship management
efforts.

Dexter Smith was hired by the
National Association of Intercollegiate
Athletics (NAIA) as director of legisla-
tive services. He oversees all legislative
actions to ensure they are handled
systematically and is liaison to various
NAIA councils.

Anthony F Sos has joined the
Orlando firm of Dellecker Wilson &
King as an associate after clerking with
the firm in 2000 and 2002.

Tim Stevens was honored at the first
Fellows Reunion and Leadership
Conference. He is an Equal Justice
Works fellow at the Legal Aid Society of
Palm Beach County Inc. in West Palm
Beach, where he works to address the
multiple needs of both grandparent
caregivers andtli. .... I. l..1. .. 1 they
are raising.

J. Samantha Vacciana was hon-
ored at the first Fellows Reunion and
Leadership Conference. She is an
Equal Justice Works fellow with the
Legal Aid Society of Palm Beach
County, Inc. in West Palm Beach,
where she works in the Immigration
Unit on behalf of domestic violence
survivors who are not U.S. citizens.

2004

Ashley N. Calhoun has joined the
law firm GrayRobinson in Lakeland and
focuses her practice in the areas of taxa-
tion, corporate, wealth transfer, estate
planning, and trusts and estate adminis-
tration.

Michael Kurth has joined Neil,
Griffin, Tierney, Neill & Marquis in
Fort Lauderdale as an associate attorney.

Nicholas Palmer joined the law
firm ofFoley & Lardner in Orlando as
an associate in the Business Law
Department and is a member of the
Real Estate Practice Group. U


48 UF LAW


nu-b uz


OU& UO








































Iannual repor
LAW CE TE ASS CA I N ANC













ror












~ I ~Vinson Barrett (JD 76) with wife Carlene
a1 a~~1~1 ~~1iL



* 1 g a~~ aL ~L tL11












2003-2004 thank you


Last summer my 12-year-old
daughter told me she figured out
that if I would practice law for a cer-
tain number of additional years, she
would have enough time to finish
law school and move into my office.
That way, we would not have to
change the name of the law firm!
Beyond the mixed feelings of
fatherly pride, the conversation made me think again
about how the things we do to support the College of
Law are really for our children and the lawyers who
will come after us.
One of the things the Board of Trustees has worked
toward in the last two years is putting more alumni in
touch with the college. The response has been terrific.
Thanks to donations that supplement the cost of attend-
ing law school, the campus is more diverse then ever.
Ask any student and you'll be bombarded with appreci-
ation for alumni who come speak about their practice
area or who let students shadow their work.
In fact, student participation in mock interviews con-
ducted by alumni in Fall 2004 was so overwhelming,
Career Services had to schedule an extra day. Take one
look at events listed in the college's weekly newsletter
and you will see the quality of student activities your
donations support.
There are many ways alumni can give back to our
law school. One of the easiest is to make a donation to
the college's Annual Fund, which supports faculty and
student activities and academic programs and services.
What's my point? Your contribution of time, talent or
treasure always gives you a benefit far beyond the
amount of the gift.
Gator lawyers have a long tradition of contributions
to our school, our state, and, in fact, our country. Think
about it. Contributing to the college is an opportunity
that I hope you will not miss.

Michael J. McNerney
Chairman, Law Center Association, 2003-2004
Brinkley McNerney Morgan Solomon Et Tatum
Fort Lauderdale


But why give back to the law
school?
Because the University of
Florida Levin College of Law is the
greatest law school in the state,
bar none.
Because it is destined to be one
of the greatest law schools in the
country it is already in the top 18
public law schools and in the top 50 of all law schools,
public or private.
Because our children, and the children of all
Floridians, should not have to go out of state or go into
devastating debt to attend a "great" law school.
Because the law school allowed many of us to
achieve and surpass the American Dream and become
members of the world's noblest profession.
Because it puts us all in a long line of UF lawyers -
a list which includes some of the most successful trial
lawyers in America, governors, U.S. senators, members
of Congress, Florida Bar presidents, ABA presidents,
leaders of national law firms, great philanthropists, state
legislators, federal and state trial and appellate judges,
Florida Supreme Court justices, law professors and
scholars, prosecutors, public defenders, selfless public-
interest lawyers who serve the poor and disadvantaged,
large and small in-house lawyers at corporations, and
just plain hardworking members of the Bar -who do
their part, day-in and day-out, to protect the rights of
ordinary Americans.
Because, as practicing lawyers, we have a duty to
make sure that new lawyers entering the profession are
well equipped to practice law skillfully and ethically, and
the University of Florida is the training ground for the
best lawyers in America.
In short, we have a great law school. But your
generous support is essential. Imagine your own list of
reasons to give back and join other Gator lawyers par-
ticipating in taking it to the next level of excellence.

Oscar Sanchez
President of Law Alumni Council, 2003-2004
Akerman Senterfitt
Miami


50 UF LAW




















To the individuals and firms listed on the folic ag
pages, we say simply and sincerely, thank you.


Thank you for shaping the future of the Fredric G. Levin College of
Law and, most importantly, the future of our students ... students
who become well-educated lawyers who, in turn, shape the future
of families, clients, law firms, communities, businesses, the legal
system, government agencies and, in some cases, the world.

Plainly put, the continuing heritage of excellence in legal
education at the University of Florida and its far-reaching impact
would not be possible without the generosity of our donors.
Your gifts enhance every area of the law school, including:


> Scholarships, stipends and loan assistance
> Moot Court and Trial Team training, travel expenses
and materials
> John Marshall Bar Association and many other
student organizations
> Professorships
> Faculty research and enrichment
> Book Awards
> Legal Information Center support
> Conferences, symposia and lectures
> Student and faculty recruitment
> Public interest fellowships for students











2003-2004 financial summary







This report is for fiscal year July 1, 2003 June 30, 2004.
The 2004-2005 annual report will be released in our next magazine.


CONTRIBUTIONS


Annual Fund, unrestricted
Annual Fund restricted
Building Fund
Endowed Fund, transferred
TOTAL PRIVATE SUPPORT


$407,128
$124,120
$927,323
$1,582,204
$3,040,775


DONORS

Total Donors
Total Gifts


2,131
2,912




























Annual Fund Results

Donations to the Annual Fund are vital and foster better, stronger programs at the Levin College
of Law. These generous gifts which increased almost 19 percent from fiscal year 2002-2003 to
fiscal year 2003-2004 touch every area of the law school educational experience and are the
school's lifeblood year-in and year-out.The following reflects contributions received through the Law
Center Association and UF Foundation. The restricted total included gifts to the Graduate Tax
Program, extracurricular student organizations, and other non-endowed funds.

Unrestricted $407,128
Restricted $124,120
Total $531,248

Alumni Participation

A key measurement for top public law schools is the percentage of alumni who regularly contribute
and support funding needs. Historically, about 10 percent of the UF law school's 16,000 living alum-
ni support their school, but small gains continue to be made each year. Alumni participation in 2003-
04 continued this trend, with approximately 12 percent of all Gator law alumni participating in the
Annual Fund, Endowment Fund and Building Fund.

Total Donors 2,131
Alumni Donors 2,015
Total Gifts 2,912


Endowment Income

Gifts to the law school's endowment are not spent, but instead are carefully invested to yield a
dependable, stable source of income in perpetuity. Approximately 3.67 percent of earned interest
from the market value of the endowment fund balance was transferred and spent for specific uses
designated by donors and by college administrators for annual operating and administrative costs.
(The additional earned interest above the 3.67 percent is returned to the fund balance.) The fund
grew almost 13 percent in 2003-04 under the stewardship of the University of Florida Foundation,
which oversees investments and law school endowment income.

FUND BALANCE INTEREST
TRANSFERRED
1997-1998 $28,630,708 $816,589
1998-1999 $43,410,446 $1,197,483
1999-2000 $57,931,929 $2,129,167
2000-2001 $58,442,477 $2,907,585
2001-2002 $59,837,880 $2,971,718
2002-2003 $46,903,630 $2,287,087
2003-2004 $52,975,580 $1,582,204














2003-2004 thank you


* Endowment Contributors


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solege an 'se





-tie eoor giv -to









-memo.ia-ie -oed


.-es. sevseen

esaepann StSo*l.




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Chairs E Professorships

James J. Freeland Eminent
Scholar Chair
Matthew J. Ahearn
Austin, Bovay & Gillman
Bernard A. Barton Jr.
S. C. Battaglia Family Foundation, Inc.
Bruce H. Bokor
David E. Bowers
Jane D. Callahan
Mr. & Mrs. David W Clark
Harry S. Colburn Jr.
Frederick M. Dahlmeier
Mark H. Dahlmeier
Alan H. Daniels
Lauren Y. Detzel
Nathaniel L. Doliner
The Florida Bar Tax Section
Robert E. Glennon Jr
Prof Mandell & Joyce Glicksberg
Cheryl L. Gordon
Andrew C. Hall
Robert F Hudson Jr.
H. Wynne James
Peter T Kirkwood
Lester B. Law
Steven C. Lee
Stanley B. Levin
Jack A. Levine
Stephen B. Lewallen
R. Dennis Tweed &
Cheryl J. Lister
Robert W Mead Jr.
Michael D. Minton
Robert E. Panoff
Mr. & Mrs. James D. Pobjecky
E Wallace Pope Jr.
Charles B. Reber
Judith 0. Rosenkranz
Stanley W Rosenkranz (D)


Names are listed as they
appear on checks or corre-
spondance. We have made
every effort to acknowledge
each 2003-2004 donor. If your
name is missing, please notify
us so we may correct our
records.

We do apologize for any
oversight and want to assure
you it was unintended. Contact
the Office of Development and
Alumni Affairs at RO. Box
117623, Gainesville, FL 32611;
352-273-0640; or e-mail
shirey@law.ufl.edu.


Roger J. Rovell
Russell T Sanders
Edward E. Sawyer
John J. Scroggin
Mike Segal
William R. Swindle
Ralph E. Tallant Jr.
Hans G. Tanzler III
Tescher, Gutter, Chaves, et al.
W Eugene Tillman Jr.
B. Cary Tolley III
United Way of Miami-Dade
Howard L. Zoller

Richard B. Stephens
Eminent Scholar Chair
Prof David M. Hudson &
J. Parker Ailstock
S. C. Battaglia Family
Foundation, Inc.
Thomas G. Christmann
Jean C. Coker
Community Foundation of
Tampa Bay, Inc.
Cristin A. Conley
Lauren Y. Detzel
Samuel A. Donaldson
Peter A. Schoemann &
Christine M. Eckstein
Charles H. Egerton
John M. Farris
Robert R. Feagin III
Todd W Fennell
Frank J. Hammond III
William O. E. Henry
Holland & Knight
Charitable Foundation, Inc.
Holland & Knight LLP
Robert F Hudson Jr.
H. Wynne James
Michael L. Jamieson
Edward F Koren
Lester B. Law
James F Loebl
Stephen R. Looney
Mr. & Mrs. Robert L. Miller
Michael D. Minton
Brian M. & Joan O'Connell
Alan L. Rubens
Charles D. Rubin
Mark O. Scioscia
Donald R. Tescher
Mr. & Mrs. David P Webb
Patricia A. Willing
Jane B. Nelson
Marion J. Radson

Stephen C. O'Connell
Chair in the College of Law
Whit Palmer Jr.


Other Endowed Gifts

Campbell Thornal Moot Court
Barbara D. Farb
Scott R. & Jill A. Sausser
Center for Race and Race Relations
Lecture Series Fund
W George Allen, Esq. &
Enid Allen
Bernardo Lopez
Fredric G. and Marilyn Kapner
Levin Fund
A. Brian Phillips
Law Review Endowment
Barry A. Abbott
Jeffrey W Abraham &
Amanda M. Gruzas
Prof David M. Hudson &
J. Parker Ailstock
Joseph E. Ankus
Reubin O. Askew
Stephen F Aton
F Eugene Atwood &
Dabney D. Ware
G. Thomas Ball
Todd A. Bancroft
Richard R. Sr. &
Martha Barnett
E. John Wagner II &
Rosetta F Barrett-Wagner
Dewey L. & Martha Barton
Joshua L. Becker &
Sara S. Davis
David L. Bilsker
R. Mason Blake
Dr. H. S. Udaykumar &
Christina Bohannan
Bruce H. Bokor
Stacy J. Borisov
John C. Bovay
David S. Boyce
Jeffrey P Brock
George E. Bunnell
Les W Burke
Rocky M. Cabagnot, Esq.
Dennis A. Calfee
L. Kinder Cannon III
J. Thomas Cardwell
Joseph P Carolan III
Douglas W & Dorothy C. Cason
Jon C. Chassen
Karen M. Chastain
Thomas C. Cobb
Kendall Coffey, Esq. &
Joni A. Coffey
R. John Cole II
R. Scott & Kelly J. Collins
Community Foundation
of Greater Lakeland
Fred M. Cone Jr.
Dena L. Copulsky




























Donald H. Crawford II
Jerry B. Crockett
Raul A. Cuervo
Duane A. & Teresa K. Daiker
Terri R. Day
George R. Dekle Sr.
John T. & Jamie L. Dekle
Lauren Y Detzel
Josias N. Dewey
Benjamin F Diamond
Roberto J. Diaz
Phillip S. Dingle
Russell W Divine
Dunwody, White & Landon
Linda Ebin
Kenneth C. & Mary B. Ellis
Theodore A. Erck III
Robert T Ervin
Christy S. Etheredge
The Hon. Kerry I. Evander
& Elizabeth K. Evander
Patricia Combs Fawsett
Peter T Fay
Robert R. Feagin III
Frank H. Fee III
Todd W Fennell
Melissa Fernandez
Ray F Ferrero Jr.
Fidelity Inv. Charitable Gift Fund
Sally H. Foote
James E. Frye Jr.
Betsy J. Gallagher
Laura Ann Gardner
Jon T Gatto
Geraghty, Dougherty, Edwards
Dr. George A. Gerencser
& Allison Gerencser
Alan M. Gerlach Jr.
John M. Gillies
John N. & Ruth T Giordano
Prof Mandell & Joyce Glicksberg
Bryan S. Gowdy
Jonathan S. Gowdy
K. Lawrence and Maureen Gragg
Mr. & Mrs. William P Gray III
The Law Firm of Robert S. Griscti
Leenetta B. Grizzard
Mr. & Mrs. Timothy D. Haines
Dr. Jeffrey L. & Sarah W Harrison
Mr. & Mrs. Charles V Hedrick
Richard H. Hiers
Holland & Knight Charitable Foundation, Inc.
Osmond C. Howe Jr.
Scott C. Ilgenfritz &
Margaret D. Mathews
Edward M. Jackson
Jeffrey A. Jacobs
Nailah A. Jaffree
Talibah A. Jaffree
Michael L. lamieson


John A. Jones
Thomas R. Julin
Hal H. Kantor
John F Kasbar
George W Kates
Megan A. Kelly
Bradford D. Kimbro
E. C. Deeno Kitchen
Karl N. Klein
David T Knight
Brian H. Koch
Russell Koonin
Paul M. & Judith M. Korchin
Philip R. Lammens
Mr. & Mrs. Robert L. Lancaster
Mr. & Mrs. Steven D. Lear
William M. Lederer
Mr. & Mrs. Matthew B. Lerner
Martin H. Levin
Julie M. Levitt
Robert E. Lewis
Alton L. & Kathleen R. Lightsey
Samuel R. & Stacie M. Linsky
Don R. Livingstone
Robert J. Luck
Thomas C. MacDonald Jr.
Kristin D. Mallatt
Clint S. Malone
Lee Marcus
Marilee A. Mark
Amy R. Mashburn
Maureen Monaghan Matheson
James M. Matulis
Matthew S. McAfee
Thomas M. McAleavey
William H. McBride Jr.
Kevin J. McGrath &
Robin G. McGrath
Jason S. & Victoria O. Miller
Charles S. Modell
Robert M. Montgomery Jr.
Edgar M. Moore Sr.
John H. Moore II
Michael G. Moore
George R. Moraitis Jr.
M. Scotland Morris
Greg T & Joy S. Mullane
Edward M. Jr. & Rima Y Mullins
Keith E. Myers
Noel H. Nation
Tracy A. Nichols
Norris, Koberlein & Johnson
Dr. Mary R. Norway &
Robert M. Norway
Mark A. & Debra G. Nouss
Lisa O. O'Neill
Steven A. Osher
John C. Patterson Jr.
Matthew D. Patterson
Crl R Penninoon ITT


Robert J. Pile
Michael A. Piscitelli
S. Jay Plager
Scott D. Ponce &
Ingrid H. Ponce
S. Daniel Ponce
E Wallace Pope Jr.
Allen L. Poucher Jr.
Elizabeth K. Poucher
James G. Pressly Jr.
Patrick C. Rastatter
Harley E. Riedel II
Mark E. Robinson
Richard P Rollo
Robin L. Rosenberg
Matthew L. Rosin
Bradley P Rothman
Randolph J. Rush
Christopher M. & Sharon C. Sacco
Thomas G. Schultz
David C. Scileppi
Mr. & Mrs. James E. Seay
Lawrence E. Jr. & Cathy M. Sellers
Christian D. Shields
John S. Simons
Debbie S. Ruskin
Prof David T & Sandra G. Smith
Douglas A. Smith
W Kelly Smith
Andrew P Speranzini
Brian J. Stack
Stewart, Tilghman, Fox & Bianchi
Edward T Stockbridge
Samuel M. Streit
Timon V Sullivan
Hans G. Tanzler III
Jeffrey M. and Lisa S. Taylor
Tescher, Gutter, Chaves, et al.
Gregg D. Thomas
Mr. & Mrs. Jeffrey A. Tochner
Sara A. Tolliver
David R. Tyrrell
Justin B. Uhlemann
James E Valenti Jr.
Vanguard Charitable Endowment Program
Corise P Varn
John K & Marie L. Vreeland
Bill Wagner
Mark E. & Karen M. Walker
William P Weatherford Jr.
Daniel R. Weede
John M. Welch Jr.
Winifred L. Wentworth
White & Case
Robert G. Whittel
Everett H. Wilcox Jr.
Charlotte W Williams
William M. Wilson Jr.
Mr. & Mrs. Allen C. Winsor


James L. Yacavone III
Leighton D. Yates Jr.
Gwynne A. Young
Richard M. Zabak
Peter W Zinober
Saliwanchik, Lloyd, & Saliwanchik
Intellectual Property Fund
Fregly Foundation, Inc.
Saliwanchik, Lloyd & Saliwanchik
The Honorable W Fred Turner Book Award
Upchurch, Watson & White
Dispute Resolution Fund
Upchurch Watson White &
Max Medical Group


Scholarships

American Academy of Matrimonial
Lawyers/Shutts & Bowen
American Academy of Matrimonial
Lawyers of Florida

Darrey A. Davis Memorial
Scholarship Fund
Ernest J. Hewett (D)*

Gertrude Brick Law Review
Apprentice Prize Fund
Albert Brick (D)
Holland & Knight LLP
Scholarship
Shane A. Hart

James J. Freeland Graduate
Tax/Joseph R. Julin Scholarship
Dorothy M. Julin (D)
Lake Lytal Jr./Michael A. Fogarty
Memorial/Mark A. Rentenbach
Memorial Scholarship
Raymond F Fogarty
Paul R. Rentenbach

Martin Luther King Jr. Scholarship
Mary E. Wright

Robert S. Baynard
Scholarship Fund
The Robert S. & Mildred M. Baynard Trust
Robert S. Baynard (D)
Mildred M. Baynard (D)
Ronnie H. Walker
Scholarship Fund
Brent F Bradley
Mrs. Midori A. Lowry
Lisa M. Porter

Sherwood L. Stokes-General
Practioner Scholarship
Sherwood L. Stokes (D)

Sherwood L. Stokes-Professor
Clarence J. TeSelle Scholarships
Sherwood L. Stokes (D)
Sherwood L. Stokes-Professor
James W. Day Scholarship
Sherwood L. Stokes (D)
*(D): Deceased

UF LAW 55













2003-2004 thank you


* Chairs Er Professorships

The faculty is the essential core
of the Levin College of Law.
Endowment gifts for chairs
and professorships enable
the college to recruit and retain
premier scholars and teachers
who reinforce that core and
provide salary supplements
and teaching and research
support fields.




~ Fletcher N.
Baldwin
Chesterfield Smith
Professor


Stuart R. Cohn
Gerald Sohn
Scholar







Jeffrey Davis
Gerald Sohn
Scholar


Michael W. Gordon
Chesterfield Smith
Professor







Jeffrey L. Harrison
Stephen C. O'Connell
Professor







Thomas R. Hurst
Sam T. Dell
Research Scholar


Jarold H. Israel
Ed Rood Eminent
Scholar in Trial
Advocacy and
Procedure





Robert Jerry
Levin, Mabie
and Levin
Professor


Paul
McDaniel
James J. Freeland
Eminent Scholar in
Taxation





Martin J.
McMahon Jr.
Clarence TeSelle
Professor






Winston Nagan
Sam T. Dell
Research Scholar


William H. Page
Marshall M. Criser
Eminent Scholar
in Electronic
Communications and
Administrative Law




Juan F. Perea
Cone, Wagner
Nugent, Hazouri
& Roth Professor


Sharon E. Rush
Irving Cypen
Professor







Christopher Slobogin
Stephen C. O'Connell
Professor







Berta Esperanza
Hernandez-Truyol
Levin, Mabie and Levin
Professor


Walter O. Weyrauch
Stephen C. O'Connell
Professor







Michael Allan Wolf
Richard E. Nelson
Chair in Local
Government


Nancy E. Dowd
Chesterfield Smith
Professor


Lawrence Lokken
Hugh F Culverhouse
Eminent Scholar
in Taxation


M. Kathleen Price
Clarence J. TeSelle
Professor


56 UF LAW


Barbara
Bennett
Woodhouse
David H. Levin
Chair in Family
Law




















m Event Sponsors

Alumni receptions and other events around the nation
are made possible by Annual Fund contributions from
firms and individual practitioners who understand the
long-term value of close ties to the law school, alumni
and legal profession.


Miami Gator Law Alumni
Reception July 15, 2003
FIRM SPONSORS
Clarke, -.1 I .- Campbell,
Williams & Montgomery
Concepcion Rojas & Santos LLP
Gunster, Yoakley & Stewart
White & Case, LLP
INDIVIDUAL SPONSORS
Henry Bolz & Bonnie Bolz
Oscar Sanchez

Fort Lauderdale
Gator Law Alumni
Reception July 16, 2003
RECEPTION HOST AND SPONSOR
Northern Trust Bank

Palm Beach Gator Law Alumni
Reception July 17, 2003
HOSTS
Bill & Melanie Bone
FIRM SPONSORS
Greenberg Traurig
Jones, Foster, Johnston & Stubbs
INDIVIDUAL SPONSORS
Bill & Melanie Bone
Theodore Deckert, Esq.
Mark Klingensmith & Wendy Werb
Doyle Rogers
Gerald Williams
Art Wroble

Jacksonville Gator Law
Alumni Reception July 30, 2003
FIRM SPONSORS
Bedell, Dittmar, DeVault,
Pillans & Coxe
Holland & Knight, LLP
Volpe, Bajalia, Wickes &
Rogerson
INDIVIDUAL SPONSORS
Herbert Allen
Charles Commander
Robert Harris
Bruce Johnson
Matthew Posgay
Barry Sinoff


Evan Yegelwel
Tallahassee Gator Law Alumni
Reception July 31, 2003
INDIVIDUAL SPONSORS
R. Vinson Barrett
Robert M. Ervin
W Lance Gerlin
E.C. Deeno Kitchen
Joseph Mellichamp
Gary Printy
Larry & Cathy Sellers

Ocala Gator Law Alumni
Reception August 13, 2003
HOSTS
Wayne & Beth McCall
INDIVIDUAL SPONSORS
Wayne & Beth McCall

Gainesville Gator Law Alumni
Reception Aug. 21, 2003
HOSTS
Danny & Nancy Ponce
FIRM SPONSORS
Saliwanchik, Lloyd &
Saliwanchik
INDIVIDUAL SPONSORS
Janet P Ailstock
Nathan Collier
Bill Hoppe

Atlanta Gator Law Alumni
Reception Aug. 27, 2003
HOST
King & Spalding, LLP
INDIVIDUAL SPONSORS
A. McArthur Irvin
Randolph Marks, Esq.
John J. Scroggin

Workers Compensation
Conference Reception
Sept. 23, 2003
HOST
King & Spalding, LLP


FIRM SPONSOR
Foley & Lardner
INDIVIDUAL SPONSOR
Jeff Sullivan

Alachua County Law Alumni
Holiday Party Dec. 9,2003
HOSTS
Dean Robert and Lisa Jerry
FIRM SPONSORS
Saliwanchik, Lloyd &
Saliwanchik
INDIVIDUAL SPONSORS
Janet Ailstock & David Hudson
Nathan S. Collier
Michael Gordon
Richard Knellinger
Jon & Beth Mills
Sharon Rush

2004 Florida Bar Midyear
Gator Law Alumni
Reception Jan. 15, 2004
FIRM SPONSORS
Akerman, Senterfitt & Eidson
Feldman, Gale & Weber
Pressly & Pressly
Upchurch Watson White & Max
INDIVIDUAL SPONSORS
Bill Bone
Mark Buell
C. Randolph Coleman
Diane Tolbert Covan
W Dexter Douglass
James A. Edwards
Kara Evans
Mark W Klingensmith &
Wendy H. Werb
Thomas J. Korge
Peter MacNamara & Terry Vento
Joseph Mellichamp
Oscar Sanchez
Larry & Cathy Sellers
Thomas E Slater
Kelly Smith

Fort Pierce Gator Law Alumni
Reception May 25, 2004
FIRM SPONSORS
Dean, Mead, Minton & Zwemer
Frank H. Fee III Esq. &
R.N. Koblegard III Esq.
Gould, Cooksey, Fennell, O'Neill,
Marine, Carter & Hafner
Hatch & Doty


Fox, Wackeen, Dungey, Sweet,
Beard, Sobel & McCluskey, LLP
Murphy & Walker
INDIVIDUAL SPONSORS
Edward W Becht
Mark W Klingensmith &
Wendy H. Werb

Lakeland Gator Law Alumni
Reception May 26, 2004
FIRM SPONSOR
GrayRobinson
INDIVIDUAL SPONSORS
Samuel G. Crosby
James R. "Rusty" Franklin
Robin Gibson
Henry M. Kittleson
J. Michael McCarthy

2004 Florida Bar Annual
Meeting Gator Law Alumni
Reception June 23, 2004
FIRM SPONSORS
Akerman Senterfitt
FeldmanGale
Greenberg Traurig
Harris Harris Bauerle &
Sharma
INDIVIDUAL SPONSORS
DuBose Ausley
Bill Bone
C. Randolph Coleman
Carlos Concepcion
W Dexter Douglass
Mayanne Downs &
Barry Rigby
Joanne Fanizza
Jeffrey D. Feldman
James A. Gale
Amy Galloway
WC. Gentry
Richard A. Jacobson
Henry Kittleson
Mark W Klingensmith &
Wendy H. Werb
Samuel A. Lewis
Grier Pressly
Charles Rand
Oscar Sanchez
Larry & Cathy Sellers
Thomas E Slater


UF LAW 57















2003-2004 thank you


Ditngihe 6onr


* Distinguished Donors


Founders Society Gold

Recognized in perpetuity for contributing
or pledging $100,000 or more

Charles W Abbott
W George Allen, Esq. & Enid Allen
SamuelY. Allgood Jr (D)
Anonymous
Ralph R. Bailey (D)
John Bargas
The Robert S. & Mildred M. Baynard Trust
Robert S. Baynard (D)
Mildred M. Baynard (D)
BellSouth Corp.
John C. Bierley
E. G. Boone
Guy W Botts (D)
James D. Bruton Jr (D)
Mary B. Bryant
James D. Camp Jr.
Carlton Fields
Warren M. Cason
Alvin Cassel (D)
Luther W Jr. & Blanche Coggin
Coker, Myers, Schickel, et al.
Mr. & Mrs. Marshall M. Criser
Hugh F Culverhouse Sr. (D)
The Hon. & Mrs. Irving Cypen
Dean, Mead, Egerton, Bloodworth, et al.
Samuel T Dell Jr. (D)
Jack C. Demetree
Jeanne R. Donahoo (D)
Donald K Dorini (D)
The Dunspaugh-Dalton Foundation, Inc.
Jessie Ball duPont Fund
Chester H. Ferguson (D)
Ray F Ferrero Jr
The Florida Bar
W C. Gentry
GrayRobinson
Andrew C. Hall
Evelyn F Hartman (D)
Wayne & Patricia P Hogan
Edith E. Holiday
Holland & Knight LLP
Huber C. Hurst (D)
Icard, Merrill, Cullis, Timm, et al.
Justice Story Book Exchange
Nick Kapioltas (Trustee)
Robert G. Kerrigan
Gerald J. Klein
Lane, Trohn, Bertrand & Vreeland
Levin & Papantonio Family Foundation
David H. Levin (D)
Fredric G. Levin
Stephen A. Lind
Lake H. Lytal Jr
Lefferts L. Mabie Jr (D)
John D. & Catherine T MacArthur
Foundation
*(D): Deceased


MacFarlane, Ferguson & McMullen
Margaret MacLennan
Michael Maher
Robert B. Mautz (D)
John M. McNatt Jr.
Robert G. & Joelen Merkel
Mershon, Sawyer, Johnston, et al.
Montgomery Family Trust
John B. & Ultima D. Morgan
Nat'1 Center for Automated Info Research
Jane B. Nelson
Richard E. Nelson (D)
Ness, Motley, Loadholt, et al.
John C. Pinkerton (D)
Frank S. Reed (D)
Justus W Reid
Mikel M. Rollyson
Edward B. Rood Sr. (D)
Gerald A & Ingrid M. Rosenthal
J. Quinton Rumph
Saliwanchik, Lloyd & Saliwanchik
Lewis M. Schott &
Marcia Whitney Schott (D)
Scruggs Legal
Security Sales
T Terrell Sessums Sr.
W Paul Shelley Jr
Benedict A. Silverman
W Kelly Smith
Gerald Sohn
Lynn D. Solomon
Steel, Hector & Davis LLP
John H. Stembler (D)
Sherwood L. Stokes (D)
Glenn W Sturm
The Kresge Foundation
Robert L. Trohn
Ronnie H. Walker (D)
Josephine Wolf (D)
Samuel J. & Evelyn Wood Foundation, Inc.
Hervey Yancey (D)
Yent Bayou Properties Partnership
C. Steven Yerrid
Zimmerman, Kiser & Sutcliffe


Founders Society Silver

Recognized in perpetuity for contributing
or pledging $50,000 $99,999

C. Wayne Alford
Bank of America v. Felisa Lallana
Carol M. Brewer
Albert Brick (D)
Bush, Ross, Gardner, Warren & Rudy
Walter G. Campbell Jr.
Fonvielle, Hinkle & Lewis
Peter M. MacNamara
& M. Therese Vento
Morgan, Colling & Gilbert


James H. Nance
Kitty Phillips
Upchurch Watson White &
Max Medical Group
J. J. Wicker II
Winderweedle, Haines, Ward, et al.

Dean's Council Barristers

Contributing or pledging
$25,000 $44,999

C. DuBose Ausley
David S. Band
Dewey L. & Martha Barton
Bruce H. Bokor
Brown, Terrell, Hogan, et al.
Howard C. Coker
Law Office ofW C. Gentry
Michael A. Hanzman
John H. & Leslie S. Haswell
James A. Hauser
Corinne C. Hodak
J. Bruce & Marion Hoffmann
E. C. Deeno Kitchen
Kluger, Peretz, Kaplan & Berlin
Kevin A Malone
Pedro A Martin
Michael J. McNerney
The Hon. Jon C. Moyle &
Jean M. Moyle
Cynthia F O'Connell
Whit Palmer Jr.
E Wallace Pope Jr
William E. Rosenberg Foundation
John J. Schickel Sr
Jerome G. Schrader
George E. Schulz Jr.
W Crit Smith
Dale M. Swope
Stephen N. Zack

Partners

Contributing or pledging
$10,000- $24,999

Thomas J. Ali
Cesar L. Alvarez
G. Thomas Ball
S. C. Battaglia Family Foundation, Inc.
Anthony S. Battaglia
Bedell, Dittmar, DeVault, et al.
John W Campbell
Clark, Campbell & Mawhinney
Clarke, Silverglate, Campbell, et al.
C. Randolph Coleman
Community Foundation ofTampa Bay, Inc.
John A. DeVault III
James E. Eaton Jr
Patrick G. Emmanuel
Peter C. K Enwall
Robert M. Ervin Sr.






















Fassett, Anthony & Taylor
Jeffrey D. Feldman
Feldman Gale
Linnes Finney Jr.
J. Joaquin Fraxedas
James A. Gale
Peter J. Genz
Patrick E. Geraghty Sr.
Richard C. Grant
Gunn Merlin
Bruce M. Harris
The Hon. Frederick A. Hazouri &
The Hon. Barbara J. Pariente
R. Lawrence Heinkel
Hill, Ward & Henderson
Jeffrey A. Hirsch
Holland & Knight Charitable Foundation
Bill Hoppe
Robert F Hudson Jr
Scott C. Ilgenfritz &
Margaret D. Mathews
William C. Israel
Michael L. Jamieson
R. Timothy Jansen
Kenneth R. & Kimberly Leach Johnson
Jones, Foster, Johnston & Stubbs
D. Burke Kibler III
Ronald C. LaFace
The Lewis Schott Foundation
Lewis, Longman & Walker
Paul R. Linder
Lawrence A. Lokken
Lott & Friedland
Michael T Moore & Leslie J. Lott
Margol & Pennington
Phillip J. & Stacey L. Mays
Robert W Mead Jr
Wilton R. Miller
Douglas J. Milne
Milton, Leach, Whitman, et al.
Mark A. & Debra G. Nouss
Brian M. & Joan B. O'Connell
James F Page Jr.
Rahul Patel
Charles P Pillans III
S. Daniel Ponce
Gary Lee Printy
Gary S. Rabin
Bruce S. Rogow
Louis K Rosenbloum
Stephen F Rossman
Oscar A Sanchez
Mr. & Mrs. Gerald D. Schackow
Lawrence E. Jr. & Cathy M. Sellers
Ernest A. Sellers
John A. Shipley III
Stichter, Riedel, Blain & Prosser
Janet R. Studley
Tax Analysts, Inc.
James E. Thomison
United Way of Miami-Dade
Vaka, Larson & Johnson
Mr. & Mrs. George A. Vaka
Ward Rovell
Jeffrey W Warren


Mr. & Mrs. Douglas A. Wright
Peter W Zinober

Associates

Contributing or pledging $5,000 $9,999

Timothy G. Anderson
Barry B. Ansbacher
George Barford
Richard R. Sr. & Martha W Barnett
Suzanne C. Bass Trust
Robert J. Beckham
Roger L. Blackburn
R. Mason Blake
William A. Boyles
Les W Burke
Richard B. Bush
James D. Camp III Trust
William M. Camp Trust
Hank B. Campbell
L. Kinder Cannon III
Maria C. Carantzas
Joseph P Carolan III
Ronald A. Carpenter
Mercer K Clarke
W Michael Clifford
Jean C. Coker
Nathan S. Collier
John F Cosgrove
Glenn L. Criser
Ronald A. David
Tad Davis
Lauren Y Detzel
W Dexter Douglass
Thomas M. Ervin Jr
Peter T Fay
Robert R. Feagin III
Scott J. Feder
Phillip R. Finch
The Florida Bar Tax Section
Fregly Foundation, Inc.
Steven H. Friedman
George D. GabelJr.
Richard T Garfield
James L. George
Robert E. Glennon Jr.
Prof Mandell & Joyce K Glicksberg
Goodlette, Coleman & Johnson
Dr. Michael W & Elsbeth K Gordon
J. Charles Gray
Greater Miami Jewish Federation
Ellen C. Ham
Marie C. Hansen Trust
Stumpy & Dorothy L. Harris
Scott G. Hawkins
William O. E. Henry
Hicks & Kneale
Mark Hicks
J. Fraser Himes
Holland & Knight Charitable Foundation, Inc.
Richard C. Jans
Hal H. Kantor
Edward F Koren
Joseph H. Lang Jr.


Frederick W Leonhardt
Peter J. Losavio Jr.
Marsha G. Madorsky
Alfred J. Malefatto & Moria Rozenson
Thomas H. Maren Foundation
Dorothy S. McCurry Trust
Linda C. McGurn
Prof Martin J. McMahon Jr. &
Dr. Pamela S. McMahon
Dean Emeritus Jon L. & Beth R. Mills
Daniel E Molony
Gregory A Nelson
The Hon. & Mrs. Benjamin F Overton
Mr. & Mrs. Darrell W Payne
Pamela O. Price
Charles M. Rand
Richard M. Robinson
Richard C. Rollins
Rumberger, Kirk & Caldwell
E. Thom Rumberger
Rush & Glassman
Edward E. Sawyer
William J. Schifino Jr
Ronald Y Schram
Mr. & Mrs. Stephen W Sessums
Ned M. Shandloff
Sarah Helene Sharp
Law Offices of Steinberg & Brown
Mal Steinberg
William H. Stolberg
Sidney A. Stubbs Jr
Tampa Bay Chapter of Federal Bar Association
Grace W Taylor
Thomas R. Tedcastle
Gregg D. Thomas
Jonathan B. Trohn
John J. Upchurch IV
John K & Marie L. Vreeland
Rob Webb
Jack A Weiss
Samuel G. Wells
Michael K. Wilson
R. Duke Woodson
Yegelwel Family Foundation
Evan J. Yegelwel
James E. Yonge
Gwynne A. Young

Trusler Society

Contributing $2,000 $4,999

Barry A. Abbott
Robert L. Anderson
Stephen F Aton
Law Firm of Lansing Roy
W O. Birchfield
Bill Bone
Frances A Borland
Greg Brown
Mr. & Mrs. David W Clark
Richard P Cole
Charles E. Commander
Community Foundation of Greater Lakeland


Class Gift

It says a great deal about a
law school when newly gradu-
ated law students pledge and
give back to their law school
even before they enter the
work world. Both classes in
the academic year of 2003 -
2004 made contributions that
will be used for programs such
as Florida Law Review, Moot
Court, Trial Team, Florida
Journal ofInternational Law,
and the Black Law Students
Association.
The Fall 2003 graduating
class had 23 percent class
participation and contributed
$19,025 to the college.
Working with Class Gift
Chair Sarah E. Rumpfwere
committee members Jonathan
T Brand, James L. Davidson,
Troy Finnegan, JoAnn Marie
Guerrero, Brian McPherson
and Scott Smylie.
The Spring 2004
graduating class raised the
standard by presenting
$42,375 through 37 percent
class participation. Class Gift
Chair Elizabeth Schule
worked with committee
members Joel Feldman,
Tiffani Fernandez, David L.
Gay, Vanessa Gordon, Erin
Gray, Robert Luck, Anna Shea
and Michael P. Silver.
A reading room in the
new Lawton Chiles UF Legal
Information Center will
honor both classes for their
generous gifts.


UF LAW 59















2003-2004 thank you


* Distinguished Donors cont.

The Conese Foundation, Inc.
Anne C. Conway
MarkJ. Criser
Landis V Curry III
Dunwody, White & Landon
Andrew J. Fawbush
Brig. Gen. & Mrs. Michael L. Ferguson
Fidelity Inv. Charitable Gift Fund
Florida Lawyers Legal Insurance Corp.
Timothy C. Ford
S. Katherine Frazier
Dr. Michael K. Friel &
Mrs. Jacqueline Friel
S. William Fuller Jr.
John N. & Ruth T Giordano
Gene K. Glasser
Robert B. Gough III
Frank D. Hall
Benjamin H. Hill III
Tyler Hill
John L. Holcomb
Hopping, Green & Sams
Mr. & Mrs. Eugene J. Howard
Osmond C. Howe Jr.
David Hyman
The Jelks Family Foundation, Inc.
Allen N. Jelks Jr.
Dorothy M. Julin (D)
David T Knight
Donald S. Kohla
Martin H. Levin
Stanley B. Levin
Alton L. & Kathleen R. Lightsey
Virginia A. Lipton
Thomas C. MacDonald Jr.
Derrill L. & Megan F McAteer
Francis T McCoy
James F McKenzie
The Hon. Barbara J. Staros &
Joseph C. Staros
Joseph P Milton
Marc Mobley
Gene Moore III
A. Brian Phillips
Allen L. Poucher Jr.
Elizabeth K Poucher
Harley E. Riedel II
Judith O. Rosenkranz
Stanley W Rosenkranz (D)
Russell T Sanders
Edward O. Savitz Jr.
John J. Scroggin
Robert A. Shimberg
Barry L. Silber
The Carl S. Swisher Foundation, Inc.
Tescher, Gutter, Chaves, et al.
The Mailman Foundation, Inc.
Wesley D. & Lara J. Tibbals
David R. Tyrrell
Wachovia
Justice Charles T Wells
Steven A Williams


Trusler Society

Contributing $1,000 $1,999

Akerman, Senterfitt & Eidson
American Academy of Matrimonial
Lawyers of Florida
Reubin O. Askew
Attorneys' Title Insurance Fund, Inc.
Jerald David August
Austin, Bovay & Gillman
James B. Barnes
R. Vinson Barrett
Bernard A. Barton Jr.
Charles H. Baumberger
Frank M. Bedell
Greg Bell
Lisa C. Berry
Edward M. Booth
J. Thomas Cardwell
Edwin C. Cluster
Norman A. Coll
The Community Foundation, Inc.
Charles L Cranford
Pres. Talbot D'Alemberte
Terrence T Dariotis
Prof George L. & Sally K Dawson
Nathaniel L Doliner
Sally A. Dorn
Nola S. Dyal
Robert S. Edwards
Kenneth C. & Mary B. Ellis
W William Ellsworth Jr.
William H. Ferguson
Raymond E Fogarty
Foley & Lardner
M. Lanning Fox
The Freedom Forum
Melvyn B. Frumkes
J. Stephen Gardner
K Lawrence & Maureen G. Gragg
Stephen H. Grimes
Frank A. Hamner
Robert M. Harris
E. L. Roy Hunt
H. Wynne James
Robert H. Jerry II
John A Jones
Peter T Kirkwood
Henry M. Kittleson
Karl N. Klein
Robert M. Kramer
Herbert A Langston Jr.
Richard A. Lenon
Don R. Livingstone
Scott Lodin
Robert A Mandell
Marilee A. Mark
Christine N. Markussen
Mr. & Mrs. Harold F McCart Jr
Michael D. Minton
Robert M. Montgomery Jr.
George R. & Karen K Moraitis
Robert G. Murrell


A. Guy NeffJr.
Northern Trust Corp.
Dr. Mary R. Norway & Mr. Robert M. Norway
Robert E. Panoff
Ray & Clare A Peacock
J. Carter Perkins Sr.
Becky A Powhatan
Barbara A. Puestow
Johnson S. Savary
Mike Segal
Janice Burton Sharpstein
Gary C. Simons
Patrick W Skelton
Richard S. Sparrow
TO.P Jewish Foundation, Inc.
Hans G. Tanzler III
Vanguard Charitable Endowment Program
David H. Vickrey
Bill Wagner
Warren E. Williams
Patricia A. Willing
Leo Wotitzky

Gifts through Estate Planning

Anonymous
George J. Baya (D)
Michael A. Bedke
E. Dixie Beggs Jr (D)
John C. Bierley
Susan H. Black
Albert Brick (D)
James D. Camp Jr.
Warren M. Cason
Robert B. Cole (D)
Debra A. Doherty
Justice Raymond Ehrlich
Stumpy Harris
Rebecca B. Hawkins (D)
Mark Hulsey
Jeffery Q. Jonasen
T Paine Kelly Jr.
David T Knight
Frederick W Leonhardt
Michael J. McNerney
Corneal B. Myers Jr.
Richard E. Nelson (D)
William M. O'Bryan (D)
Brian M. O'Connell
Stephen C. O'Connell (D)
Frank S. Reed (D)
J. Quinton Rumph
David C. Sasser
Ronald Y. Schram
T Terrell Sessums Sr.
W Paul Shelley Jr.
Eric B. Smith
Robert G. Stern
Sherwood L Stokes (D)
A. Ward Wagner Jr.
Frank Wotitzky
Art G. Wroble
Hervey Yancey (D)
Stephen N. Zack




















m Book Awards


Book Awards honor and encourage academic excellence by recognizing the top
student in each course. In the 2003-2004 year, awards were sponsored for a five-year
period with a $2,000 annual contribution, a $7,500 one-time gift, or an endowed gift,
pledge or bequest of $40,000. (The criteria changed for 2004-2005). Sponsors and
recipients receive a plaque and other recognition.


Advanced Bankruptcy
* Stichter, Riedel, Blain &
Prosser

Advanced Litigation
* Lowndes, Drosdick, Doster,
Kantor & Reed

Appellate Advocacy
* Hicks & Kneale
* Gary Lee Printy, Esq.
* Bruce I i z Greenberg
Foundation
* Louis K. Rosenbloum, Esq.

Child, Parent & State
* The Hon. Barbara Pariente
& The Hon. Fred Hazouri

Civil Procedure
* McKenzie, Taylor & Zarzaur
* Fox, Wackeen, Dungey, Sweet,
Beard, Sobel & McCluskey, LLP

Civil Tax Procedure
* R. Lawrence Heinkel, Esq.

Constitutional Law
* Patrick E. Geraghty
* Kenneth R. Johnson &
Kimberly Leach Johnson
* Oscar A. Sanchez, Esq.

Contracts
* Foley & Lardner
* Richard C. Grant
(Class of 1972) in honor of
Professor Ernest Jones

Corporations
* Marshall M. Criser, Esq.
& Glenn L. Criser, Esq.
* Rahul Patel, Esq.

Creditors' Remedies &
Bankruptcy
* Jeffrey W Warren, Esq.

Criminal Clinic Public
Defender Clinic
* The Hon. W. Fred Turner
Memorial (endowed)


Criminal Law
* Anthony S. Battaglia, Esq.
* R. Timothy Jansen, Esq.

Criminal Procedure:
Adversary System
* Phillip J. Mays, Esq.,
in honor of Professor
Kenneth B. Nunn

Criminal Procedure -
Police & Police Practices
* Linnes Finney Jr., Esq.

Eminent Domain & Takings
* Bruce M. Harris, Esq. &
Stumpy Harris, Esq.

Employment Discrimination
* John W Campbell, Esq.

Estate Planning
* C. Randolph & Cheryl R.
Coleman
* Edward E Koren, Esq.
(endowed)

Estates & Trusts
* Jones, Foster, Johnston & Stubbs

Evidence
* Clarke, ,l I-.. Campbell,
Williams & Montgomery
* Class of 1955
(Reunion Class Gift)
* Roy B. "Skip" Dalton Jr., Esq.
* GrayRobinson (endowed)
* Wm. Terrell Hodges

Federal Courts
* E Wallace Pope Jr., Esq.

Federal Practice
* Stephen B. Gillman, Esq.

Florida Administrative Law
* Lawrence E. & Cathy M. Sellers

Health Law
* Michael J. McNerney, Esq.


Income Taxation of
Estates & Trusts
* Emmanuel, Sheppard &
Condon

Insurance
* Gunn Merlin,
established by
William E Merlin Jr. &
Lee D. Gunn IV

Intellectual Property
* Lott & Friedland

Intellectual Property
Litigation
* Feldman Gale

International Business
Transactions
* John C. & Tifi Bierley
(endowed)

Jurisprudence
* Bill Hoppe, Esq.

Land Use Planning & Control
* Lowndes, Drosdick Doster
Kantor & Reed
* Goodlette, Coleman &
Johnson

Legal Accounting
* Brett Hendee

Mediation
* James E Page Jr./Page Mediation

Medical Technology
and the Law
* James E. Thomison, Esq.

Negotiation & Mediation
* J. Joaquin Fraxedas, Esq.

Partnership Taxation
* Peter J. Genz, Esq. (JD)
* Lowndes, Drosdick, Doster,
Kantor & Reed (LLM)


Professional Responsibility
& The Legal Profession
* Dean, Mead, Egerton,
Bloodworth, Capouano &
Bozarth in memory
of Andy Fredricks (endowed)
* Doug & Jack Milne
* Bedell, Dittmar, DeVault, Pillans
& Coxe

Property
* Professor Emeritus Mandell
Glicksberg, established by
Andrew C. Hall, Esq. & James
A. Hauser, Esq. (endowed)

Remedies
* Fassett, Anthony & Taylor

Sports Law
* Frances Greer Israel, established
by William C. Israel

Tax Policy
* Tax Analysts, Inc.

Trial Advocacy
* Bill Bone, Esq.

Torts
* Paul Linder, Esq.
* Charles M. Rand, Esq.

Trial Practice
* Shook, Hardy & Bacon
* Monte J. Tillis Jr. Memorial
(endowed)
* Vaka, Larson & Johnson
* Rossman, Baumberger,
Reboso & Spier
* Milton, Leach & D'Andrea
* Nolan Carter
* Professor Emeritus
Hayford O. Enwall Memorial
(1906-1993) Established by
Peter C. K. Enwall

Workers' Compensation
& Other Employment Rights
* Rosenthal & Weissman


UF LAW 61

























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* Annual Fund
Contributing less than $1,000

Non-Endowed Gifts

Law Unrestricted Funds
Barry A. Abbott
Charles W Abbott
Robert G. Abood
Luis A. Abreu
Lisa M. Acharekar
R. Bradley Adams
MarciaJ. S. Adler
Jack J. Aiello
Prof David M. Hudson & J. Parker
Ailstock
Akerman, Senterfitt & Eidson
Dain C. & Sherrille D. Akin
Marve Ann M. Alaimo
John T Alderson Jr.
R. Gene Aldridge
Larry B. Alexander
Richard R. Alexander
Frank A. Allen
Linda A. Alley
Alan B. Almand
James W Almand
Cristina Alonso
David Alschuler
Alejandro Alvarez
Benjamin R. Alvarez
Kathryn M. Anbinder
Cecil L. Anchors Jr.
Michelle Anchors
J. Carter Andersen
Brett D. Anderson
Hal B. Anderson
Robert L. Anderson
Patrick M. Andreotti
Scott P Andrew
Mary Jane Angelo
Michael N. Annis
Robert W Anthony Jr.
Alan M. Applegate
Amanda W Arnold
Trevor B. Arnold
Michael R. Aronson
Michael J. Gelfand &
Mary C. Arpe
Jermy J. Ashby
Reubin O. Askew
C. DuBose Ausley
Richard C. Ausness
Fred R. Baisden Jr.
MosesJ. Baker Jr.
Susan T Balsley
Gregory S. Band
Michael R. Band
Bankruptcy Law Firm of
Lansing Roy
Robert M. Barfield
Thomas H. Barkdull Jr.
James A. Barks
Robert J. Barna
James B. Barnes
Richard R. Sr. & MarthaW Barnett
R. Vinson Barrett
Allan Bartholomew-Cook
Anthony D. Bartirome
Charles J. Bartlett
Tomasz M. Bartosz
Douglas D. Batchelor Jr.
George Z. Bateh


Anthony S. Battaglia
Robert B. Battista
Charles H. Baumberger
Dale A. Beardsley
Gregory V Beauchamp
Edward W Becht
Robert J. Beckham
David C. Beers
Steven L. Beiley
Brannon B. Belcastro
Thomas W Bell
Caryn L. Bellus
JackW Belt
Maj. Michael J. Benjamin
Walter G. Benjamin
Barry W Bennett
Carlton F Bennett
James P Bennett (D)
Zelma L. Berger
Berke & Lubell
Steven M. Berman
Debra H. Bernes
E. Sue Bernie
Paul B. Bernstein
Neal L. Betancourt
Elizabeth L. Bevington
Brian M. Bez
Brandon C. Biederman
John C. Bierley
James G. Biggart II &
Teri L. Donaldson
Ross L. Bilbrey
The Hon. Jay P Cohen &
Ms. Christine K Bilodeau
W O. Birchfield
James O. Birr Jr.
Lisa Bisagni
Ronae K. Bitter
Michael B. Bittner
Dennis L. Blackburn
Lester M. Blain
Timothy C. Blake
Byron B. Block
Gertrude H. Block
Darryl M. Bloodworth
Raymond O. Bodiford
Robert L. Bogen
Rhonda B. Boggess
Henry H. Bolz III
Bill Bone
Kenneth J. Bonenberger Jr.
Douglas A. Booher
Jeffery A. Boone
Stephen K Boone
Frances A. Borland
J. Craig Bourne
W Roderick Bowdoin
Tyrie A. Boyer
Robert J. Boylston
Stephen John Bozarth
Jonathan T Brand
Steven L. Brannock
Wendy C. Breinig
John T Brennan
Mr. & Mrs. David A. Brennen
Thomas P Briggmann
Howard W Brill
Penny H. Brill
Brinkley, McNerney, Morgan, et al.
Mark A. Brionez
Kenneth C. Bronchick


Edward Mcgowan Brooks
JaneJ. Brooks
Rabian M. Brooks III
Greg Brown
Johnny R. Brown
Wendy R. Brown
Michael J. Brudny
Leon H. Brush
John L. Bryan Jr.
Col. Leroy C. Bryant III
Mary B. Bryant
Michael L. Bryant
Kimberly Bryars-Blanchard
Morison Buck
Martin T Buckley
Michael S. Budwick
Mark P Buell
Julianna K Burke
Faye A. Burner
Danielle R. Burns
Brenda E. Byrne
Christa E. Calamas
Roy W Caldwell
Jessica M. Callow
Stephen B. Calvert
John A. Camp
Amelia M. Campbell
John W Campbell
Monterey Campbell
Ruth N. Campbell
Campus USA Credit Union
Humberto I. Cancio Jr.
Craig J. Cannon
Maria C. Carantzas
Ryan M. Cardoso
Hugh A. Carithers Jr.
Darrell F Carpenter Sr.
Elizabeth A. Carrie
Hunter W Carroll
Steven W Carta
Robert Casassa
Warren M. Cason
WilliamJ. Castagna
Thomas H. Catalano
Casey M. Cavanaugh
Arthur E. Chalker
Catherine J. Chamblee
John T Chandler
Andrew L. Chapin
Marc D. & Tracy D. Chapman
Angela M. Chesser
Neil H. Chonin
Elias N. Chotas
Cynthia K Christen
Scott R. Christiansen
John E. Christopher Jr.
Russell P Chubb
Scott W Cichon
Clarke, Silverglate, Campbell, et al.
Edwin C. Cluster
Matthew R. Cogburn
Mr. & Mrs. Luther W Coggin Jr.
Barry M. Cohen
Bart L. Cohen
Jon A May &
Carol A Cohen
Gerald M. Cohen
Susan Z. Cohen
Edward B. Cole &
Jewel White-Cole
Richard P Cole


Steven R. Cole
C. Randolph Coleman
Kevin G. Coleman
Kaye Collie
Nathan S. Collier
James E. Collins
Christopher G. Commander
Community Foundation of
Greater Lakeland
Community Foundation of
Tampa Bay, Inc.
Carlos F Concepcion
Tenesia C. Connelly
Dabney L. Conner
Valerie A Conzo
Susan E. Cook
Joseph S. Coppola
Sarah E. Corbett
William H. Corbley
Denise M. Cordes
Alfred E. Corey III
Dennis G. Corrick
Robert E. & Catherine C. Cosby
Clinton H. Coulter Jr.
Paul W A. Courtnell Jr.
Diane T Covan
Ana M. Craig
Frederick C. Craig Jr.
Lloyd V Crawford
Glenn L. Criser
MarkJ. Criser
Mr. & Mrs. Marshall M. Criser
Sharon E. Cromar
Pamela J. Crone
Kent B. Cronquist
Samuel G. & Carolyn A. Crosby
Robert S. Cross
Mary C. Crotty
Lon W Crow IV
T Spencer Crowley III
CSX Corp.
Susan S. Culmo
J. Bruce Culpepper
Kathleen S. Cumming
Paul M. Cummings
Mr. & Mrs. Barry A. Currier
Landis V Curry III
Carol A. Daly
Christine C. Daly
Christopher R. D'Amico
William P Daniel
Alys N. Daniels
Karen C. Danser
Rick E. Dantzler
Lawrence A. Dany III
Herbert F Darby
Barry R. Davidson
James L. Davidson
Clay S. Davis Jr.
Joseph H. Davis III
Lawrence J. Davis
R. Walton Davis III
Scott C. Davis
Prof George L. & Sally K Dawson
Paul E. De Hart III
Dean, Mead, Egerton,
Bloodworth, et al.
Theodore A. Deckert
Daniel L. DeCubellis
Regina L. Deiulio
John G. Delancett















ANNUAL REPORT


Law Firm Gators Give 100 Percent


Stephen J. Delaney
Ralph C. Dell
Preston W DeMilly
Angela C. Dempsey
V Robert DenhamJr.
Eric A. Dentel
Thomas G. DePeter
Adam J. Deutsch
John H. Dewell
DianaJ. Dilling
Jonathan W Dingus
Mr. & Mrs. David L. Dixon
Teri L. Donaldson
A. J. Donelson
Christine M. Donoghue
James M. Donohoe Jr.
Col. Charles W Dorman
Sally A. Dorn
Michael S. Dorris
Thomas E. Dougherty
W Dexter Douglass
Brian C. Dowling
Barry W Rigby & Mayanne Downs
James O. Driscoll
Elizabeth J. du Fresne
E Joseph DuBray
Richard J. Dungey
Kurt H. Dunkle
Michael G. Dupee &
Zana E. Holley
Stephen M. & Brenna M. Durden
Judge William L. Durden
Ronald G. Duryea
Robert V Duss
Harolyn H. Dutt
Nola S. Dyal
Alan P Dye
Tricia A Dytkowski
Dwaine E. Eastham II
Alistair D. Edwards
Charles F Edwards
Harry P Edwards
James A. Edwards
M. Chris Edwards
Kevin J. Egan
Charles H. Egerton
Laura A Eidson
John E. M. Ellis
Steven Ellison
Eric M. Ellsley
Thomas J. Ellwanger
Aimee K Elson
Guy S. Emerich
John D. Emmanuel
Patrick G. Emmanuel
Stephen C. Emmanuel
Lisa H. Enfield
Peter C. K Enwall
Donna J. Ernest
Robert M. Ervin Sr.
Maria I. Escoto-Castiello
Lisa A. Esposito
Kara L. Evans
Maggie B. Evans
William A. Evans
Gail G. Fagan
Ronald D. Fairchild
Joanne Fanizza
Barbara D. Farb
Musa K Farmand


John M. Farrell
Fassett, Anthony & Taylor
Ladd H. Fassett
Patrick J. Faucheux
Robert R. Feagin III
Larry C. Fedro
Fee & Koblegard
Craig D. Feiser
Jeffrey D. Feldman
Rabbi Marla J. Feldman
Feldman Gale
Loren W Fender
Kenneth G. Ferguson III
Luanne E. Ferguson
William H. Ferguson
Beatriz Bru Fernandez
Luis Fernandez
Marta N. Fernandez
Erin L. Fernandez-Ely
Fidelity Inv. Charitable Gift Fund
Franklin D. Fields Jr
Thomas M. Findley
Edward H. Fine
Justin C. Fineberg
Troy W Finnegan
Brian T & Ariadne M. Fitzgerald
Lawrence M. Flaster
Jay Fleisher
Angelica G. Fleites
DeHaven W Fleming
Fred Herbert Flowers
Wayne E. Flowers
Foley & Lardner
Jane B. Forbes
Timothy C. Ford
Patrick J. & Martha N. Formella
Warren W Lindsey &
Eileen C. Forrester
Mr. & Mrs. Joseph E. Foster
Kenneth R. Fountain
Fowler, White, Burnett
David M. Fowler
Fox, Wackeen, Dungey, Sweet, et al.
Gregory A. Fox
M. Planning Fox
Roberta F Fox
Ronald S. Frankel
James R. Franklin Sr.
Elizabeth M. Franks
J. Joaquin Fraxedas
S. Katherine Frazier
Col. Wilson Freeman
James A. Freese
Mitchell I. Fried
Steven H. Friedman
Robin K. Froug
Peter J. Fryefield
Kent Fulton
Andrew M. Fussner
Charles M. Gadd Jr
Robert P Gaines
James A. Gale
Daniel P Galfond
Betsy J. Gallagher
Vincent P Gallagher
Glenda H. Gallagher-Ekasala
Amy J. Galloway
Dana M. Gallup
Paul R. Game
James S. Garbett


Practitioners in firms across Florida and other key areas worked
hard to achieve 100 percent participation of UF law grads in
the Law Firm Giving Program. What follows are the offices
with 100 percent alumni participation and the volunteer
campaign coordinators who made that participation possible.


* Anchors, Foster, McInnis & Keefe
Fort Walton Beach, 3 alumni;
Larry Keefe

* Andrx Corporation
Weston, 4 alumni;
Joshua Weingard

* Carlton Fields
Tallahassee, 4 alumni;
Joseph C. Mellichamp III

* Darby, Peele, Bowdoin & Payne
Lake City, 3 alumni; Austin Peele

* Dean Mead
Fort Pierce, 3 alumni; Melbourne,
3 alumni; Orlando, 19 alumni;
Michael Minton and Sarah
Rumpf

* Fassett, Anthony & Taylor
Orlando, 3 alumni; Ladd Fassett

* Feldman Gale
Miami, 5 alumni; Jim Gale
and Jeff Feldman

* Fowler White Boggs & Banker
Fort Myers, 3 alumni;
St. Petersburg, 3 alumni; Tampa,
31 alumni; Heather Brock and
Richard Jacobson

* Goodlette, Coleman & Johnson
Naples, 5 alumni; Ken Johnson

* GrayRobinson
Lakeland, 10 alumni; Tim Cerio

* Gunster Yoakley
Miami, 5 alumni; Spencer
Crowley


* Hill, Ward & Henderson
Tampa, 21 alumni; Mark Criser

* King & Spalding LLP
Atlanta, 16 alumni; Rahul Patel

* Kubicki Draper
Jacksonville, 2 alumni;
Matthew Posgay

* Lowndes, Drosdick, Doster,
Kantor & Reed
Orlando, 30 alumni; Hal Kantor

* McDonough, Weiland, Shannin
& Gumula
Orlando, 4 alumni; Nick Shannin

* Miller, Crosby & Miller
Lakeland, 2 alumni; Samuel
Crosby

* Murphy & Walker
Vero Beach, 2 alumni; Lewis
W. Murphy

* Pressly & Pressly
West Palm Beach, 4 alumni;
Grier Pressly

* Quarles & Brady
Naples, 4 alumni;
Kimberly Leach Johnson

* Rossman, Baumberger,
Reboso & Spier
Miami, 2 alumni; Charles
Baumberger & Stephen Rossman

* Sonneborn, Rutter, Cooney
& Klingensmith
West Palm Beach, 3 alumni;
Mark Klingensmith


* Harris Harris Bauerle Sharma
Orlando, 5 alumni; Bruce Harris


To participate, contact Andrea Shirey in Alumni Affairs:
shirey@law.ufl.edu, 352-273-0640.


UF LAW 63















2003-2004 thank you


* Annual Fund cont.

Richard R. Garland
Howard L. & Marie G. Garrett
Austin H. Maslanik &
Howardene G. Garrett
Beth A. Gause
Brian J. Gavsie
Lisa Z. Geiger
Robert T Geis
Robert M. Geller
Christian J. Gendreau
W C. Gentry
Peter J. Genz
Christine C. Geraghty
Karen G. Getelman
Rev. Robert C. Gibbons
Charles L. Gibbs
Donald L. Gibson
Paul C. Gibson
Robin Gibson
James H. Gilbert Jr
Karen M. Gilliam
Amy B. Grass Gilmore
Jaime R. Girgenti
Gene K Glasser
Don E. Goebel
John C. Goede
Steven T Gold
I. Patrick Golden
Robert I. Goldfarb
Barry S. Goldsmith
Judge Harvey L. Goldstein
Mark E. Goldstein
Marcelo R. Gomez
Freddie L. Goode
Goodlette, Coleman &
Johnson
Representative John Dudley
Goodlette
Austin J. Goodrich
Catharine M. Goodwin
Dr. & Mrs. Michael W Gordon
Colonel Jonathan C. Gordon
Robert E. Gordon
Robert B. Gough III
Gould, Cooksey, Fennell, et al
Bradley R. Gould
Joey Gould
Matthew L. Grabinski
K Lawrence & Maureen G. Gragg
Todd B. Grandy
Roy E. Granoff
Osvaldo L. Gratacos
Stanley A. Gravenmier
Peter J. Gravina
Shawn C. Gray
GrayRobinson
Sheri L. Green
Steven M. Greenberg
Greenberg Traurig LLP
Mark C. & Paula W Greene
Holly J. Greer
Stephen H. Grimes
Courtney K Grimm
Robert D. Grode II
Richard S. Gross
Bradley C. Grossenburg
Gary D. Grunder
Gunn Merlin
KimberlyJ. Gustafson
Sara D. Habhab
Melody A. Hadley
Richard B. Hadlow
Victor M. Halbach Jr.
James T Haley


Donald J. Hall
Eric J. Hall
Frank D. Hall
Stanley G. Halliday
Patti W Halloran
Jay A Halpern
William A Hamilton III
Marlene Hammock
Susan L. Hanlon
Arthur S. Hardy
Bradley G. Harper
Daniel B. Harrell
Gregory C. Harrell
Jennifer C. Harrington
Bruce M. Harris
John F & Jane R. Harris
Robert M. Harris
Julian E. Harrison
Kenneth A Harrison
Jeremy J. Hart
Kim Patrick Hart
Andrea S. Hartley
Patricia L. Hartley
John H. & Leslie S. Haswell
Ira C. & Marjorie P Hatch Jr.
Philip B. Hathorn
Winslow D. Hawkes III
Cynthia A Hawkins
Holly L. Haworth
Calvin E. Hayden Jr.
Michael P Haymans
Jeffrey M. Hazen
Maureen M. Hazen
The Hon. Frederick A Hazouri
& The Hon. Barbara J. Pariente
Robert J. Head Jr.
Kimberly D. Healy
Paul J. Healy
Thomas C. Heath
David W Hedrick
Robert A Heekin
Frederick C. Heidgerd
Jeanette K Helfrich
Joshua R. Heller
Edward B. Helvenston
Rebecca L. Henderson
Robin L. Henderson
Samuel J. Henderson III
Hon. William L. Hendry
Robert D. Henry
Charles B. Hernicz
Robert S. Hewitt
Hicks & Kneale
Mark Hicks
Robert A Higbee
Hill, Ward & Henderson
Benjamin H. Hill III
Tyler Hill
J. Fraser Himes
Herbert H. Hinson
Thomas D. Hippelheuser
Corinne C. Hodak
John L. Holcomb
Jonathan Hollingshead
Richard D. Holt
Robert F Hoogland
James C. Hoover
Lucy W Hoover
Stuart N. Hopen
Bill Hoppe
Colonel Edwin F Hornbrook
Steve C. Horowitz
Mr. & Mrs. Eugene J. Howard
John P Howard


Mark S. Howard
Thomas L. Howard
Louis F Hubener III
Kim E. Howard
E. L. Roy Hunt
Steven Hurwitz
L. E. Hutton
David Hyman
Sherry L. Hyman
Jacinta M. lezzi
Glen J. Ioffredo
A. McArthur Irvin
Robert F Jr. & Hope A. Iseley
Marilyn R. Israel
Nancy H. Jackson
James R. Lussier &
Nancy C. Jacobson
Richard A. Jacobson
Jodi J. Jaffe
Jay T Jambeck
Grant C. Jaquith
Elizabeth A. Jenkins
Robert H. Jerry II
Michael D. Joblove
Bruce D. Johnson
Edmond D. Johnson
Kenneth R. &
Kimberly Leach Johnson
Lee S. Johnson Jr.
Leonard H. Johnson
Timothy A Johnson Jr
Christina M. Johnson-Boyce
Barbara C. Johnston
James F Johnston
Michael W Johnston
Jones, Foster, Johnston &
Stubbs
Bret Jones
Frederick W & Patricia PH. Jones
Jason Z. Jones
Karin M. Jones
Milton D. Jones
Peter C. Jones
John D. Jopling
Terrill E Jordan
William S. Josey
Suzanne M. Judas
Joseph T Jurkowski Jr.
Matthew R. Kachergus
Sandra C. Kahle
David L. Kahn
Penny Kahn
Rachel Kaloski
Randy M. Kammer
Murray Kanetsky
Russell D. Kaplan
Nicholas E. Karatinos
Neisen O. Kasdin
Stewart L. Kasner
Russell H. Kasper
George W Kates
William A. Kebler
Lawrence Keefe
Craig C. Keller
Christopher Kelly
Deborah J. Kemp
Pamela J. Kemp
Sandra A. Kenny
Thomas F III & Sherri L. Kerney
Mark S. Kessler
Michael H. Kestenbaum
Gregory M. & Janis B. Keyser
Nicole C. Kibert
Robert A Kimbrough


James J. Kincheloe
Catherine T King
The Hon. Frances S. King &
Mr. William A. King
James T King Jr.
Donald R. Kirk
Pamela W Kirsch
Lucy Graetz Kish
E. C. Deeno Kitchen
Henry M. Kittleson
Karl T Klein
Mark W Klingensmith
& Wendy H. Werb
Susan M. Klock
Richard M. Knellinger
David T Knight
James N. Knight
John E. Knight III
Donald S. Kohla
Eric S. Kolar
Alan H. Konigsburg
Paul M. & Judith M. Korchin
Thomas J. Korge
Michael J. Korn
Richard R. Kosan
Lisa C. Kotora
Robert M. Kramer
Charles A. Krawczyk
Frederick L. Kretschmer Jr.
Scott D. Krueger
Christopher L. Kurzner
Stephen L. Kussner
Steven R. Kutner
Louis Kwall
James La Fata
Althea M. Lachicotte
Roger C. Lambert
Sheree H. Lancaster
Hazel M. Land
Frank A Landgraff
Mary C. Landt
Joseph H. LangJr.
William E Langdon
Herbert A. Langston Jr.
Michael J. Laporte
Erin R. McCormick Larrinaga
Roger A. Larson
Roy H. Lasris
Martin E. Leach
John T Leadbeater
Fabienne E. Leconte
Andrea W LeDew
Renee F Lee
William A. Lee III
Brian D. Leebrick
Kelly B. Lefferts
Benjamin J. LeFrancois
Timothy A Legare
Janella K Leibovitz
Laura B. Lerner
Ross T Lessack
Gary B. Leuchtman
William P Levens
Julie M. Levitt
Russell D. Levitt
The Lewis Schott Foundation
C. D. Lewis Jr.
Leslie A. Lewis
Mark F Lewis
Samuel A. Lewis
Sigmund J. Liberman
Alton L. & Kathleen Lightsey
Scott R. Lilly
Mark Lindenberg























Paul R. Linder
Robert R. &
Cheryl K Lindgren
Hubert R. Lindsey
Virginia A. Lipton
William J. Liss
Donna C. Litman
Joseph W Little
Michael G. Little
Gloria M. Lockridge
Christina V Lockwood
Scott Lodin
James J. Logue
Peter D. Loguidice
Lawrence A. Lokken
Richard J. Lombardo
James J. Long
Lamont C. Loo
Lott & Friedland
Michael T Moore &
Leslie J. Lott
Marc I. Sachs &
Karlyn A. Loucks
Debra L Lowman
Lowndes, Drosdick, Doster, et al.
John T Wettach Jr &
Amy S. Lowndes
Matthew C. Lucas
Lance C. Lucey
Barbara H. Luikart
P Matthew Luka
Lori-Ann Lukacsko
Donald J. Lunny Sr.
Donald A. Lykkebak
William P Lyshak
Gov. Kenneth H.
"Buddy" MacKay Jr
Joseph M. Madden Jr.
Paul J. Magnarella
Robert C. Maland
Robin P Malloy
Henry E. Mallue Jr.
Kenneth M. Malnik
Robert A Mandell
R. Layton Mank
Mark E. Manovich
Carol L. Marden
Jeffrey B. Marks
Randolph A Marks
Christine N. Markussen
Samuel A. & Sarah G. Maroon
Joyce R. Marr
John T Marshall
J. Gary Martin
Karen L. Martin
Rebecca E. Martinez
Gregory D. Martinson
Jodi M. Marvet
Monica B. Mason
Morris C. Massey
Richard L. Massey
John J. Masternick
Maureen Monaghan Matheson
Deborah E Matthews
Kevin M. Mayeux
Wesley W Mayhall Sr.
Matthew B. Mayper
Phillip J. & Stacey L Mays
Helen W McAfee
Derrill L. & Megan E McAteer
Laura A McCall
Wayne C. McCall
Mr. & Mrs. Harold E McCart Jr.
J. Michael McCarthy


Sigrid S. McCawley
Tyler S. McClay
Chad M. McClenathen
Patrick E McCormack
James E McDonald
Eric W Jarvis &
Marybeth McDonald
John R. McDonough
G. Carson McEachern
Michael M. McFall
James A. McGee
Col. Howard O. McGillin Jr
Carl S. McGinnes
Deborah L McGovern
Patrick J. McGowan
Barbara B. McGriff
Larry J. & Lynette E. McGuinness
Lila L. McHenry
The Hon. Donna L. McIntosh &
Robert K McIntosh
Robert D. McIntosh
James E McKenzie
John D. McKey Jr.
William C. McLean Jr
Michael J. McNerney
Daniel Medina
Joshua D. Medvin
Telly J. Meier
Mr. Joseph C. Mellichamp
& The Hon. Barbara J. Staros
Kathryn L. Mennella
Lee T Mercado
Jason E. & Frances M. Merritt
Alexandre M. Mestdagh
Irvin A. Meyers
Michaud, Buschmann et al.
Stephan P Mickle
Frank E. Miller
Jennifer Q Miller
Robert T Miller
Dean Emeritus Jon L. &
Beth B. Mills
Charlton Mills
Frederick J. Mills
Milton, Leach, Whitman, et al.
William L. Mims Jr.
Michael J. Minerva
Rodney K Mintz
Cathryn A Mitchell
J. Neal Mobley
Marc Mobley
David B. Moffett
Thomas E. & Nichole M. Mooney
Charles T Moore
Edgar M. Moore Sr.
Heather D. Moore
Horace N. Moore Sr.
John H. Moore II
W Taylor Moore
George R. & Karen K Moraitis
Jon A. Morris
Thomas E. Morris
Robert T Mounts
Ross E. Mowry
The Hon. Jon C. Moyle &
Jean M. Moyle
Perry M. Muhebwe
Gerard L. Mulhall
Cynthia S. Munkittrick
Murphy & Walker
Lewis W Murphy Jr.
Niels P Murphy
Kristie J. Myers
M. Wayne Myers


A. Guy NeffJr
Jeffrey A Neiman
Kevin D. Nelson
Stuart A. Nelson
David P Newman
Tracy A Nichols
Andrea L. Niedermeyer
William C. Nijem Jr
James P Nilon
Carolyn O. Nofal
Northern Trust Corp.
JeffM. Novatt
Melody A. Nundy
Sean W & Paula P O'Brien
Terrence P O'Connor
E Perry Odom
Richard L. Oftedal
Keith M. Olivia
Eric D. Olson
Solon E O'Neal Jr.
Michael L. O'Neill
Brian N. Onek
Gary D. O'Nolan
Frank A. Orlando
R. Brady Osborne Jr
LaraJ. Osofsky
Tanja Ostapoff
Wm. A. Oughterson
Patryk Ozim &
Tracy C. Reinman
Ernest M. Page Jr
Frederick D. Page
Richard Paladino
Stephen L. & Barbara R. Pankau
William A. Parady &
Salome J. Zikakis
Dale L. Parker
Donovan L. Parker
Matthew R. Parker
Thomas M. Parker
Liza V Passalacqua
Dorothy H. Pate
Ben Patterson
Christopher D. Patterson
Neal G. Patron
Kathleen M. Paustian
Frank A. Pavese Jr
Joshua A. Payne
Shelekenesis W Payne
Kevin L. Pearson
S. Austin Peele
Anthony H. Pelle
LaraJ. Peppard
Leonard Pepper
Brooke E. Perez
Patricia A. Petruff
Kara E. Pfister
T C. Phillips &
Andrea E. Zelman
Francis E. Pierce III
Robert A Pierce
Robert J. Pile
William A. Pinto Jr.
Nicholas J. Pisaris
Charles L. Plank
PMBR Multistate Specialist
Richard L. Polin
Jennifer T Pollock
Scott D. Ponce &
Ingrid H. Ponce
E Wallace Pope Jr.
Kenneth C. Pope
Matthew N. Posgay
Becky A. Powhatan


Loren D. Prescott Jr
Ruth H. Prescott
Leslie A. Press
Pressly & Pressly
David S. Pressly
J. Grier Pressly III
Mary A. Price
Nancy H. Pridgen
Gary Lee Printy
Barbara A. Puestow
Richard L. Purtz
Louis D. Putney
Ransford C. Pyle
Rahul P Ranadive
Charles M. Rand
Patrick C. Rastatter
Louis E Ray Jr.
Rachel P Ray
Daniel C. Re
Austin E Reed
Denise A Reeder
Kelly D. Reese
Richard W Reeves
Jeffrey C. Regan
Jacob I. Reiber
Charles A. Reinhardt Jr.
Roland R. Reis
Dee D. Reiter
William C. Rencher
Renee L. Renner
Aaron R. Resnick
Steven J. Resnick
Lillian J. Reyes
W Joseph Reynolds
Kimberly B. Rezanka
Lawrence S. & Rebecca W Ribler
Barbara L Richard
Erin M. Richardson
Hugh A Richeson Jr
William D. Ricker Jr.
Glenn M. Rissman
Peter A Rivellini
Keith W Rizzardi
George J. Roark III
Hardy L. Roberts III
James G. Roberts
Kathleen H. Roberts
Mark E. Robinson
Richard M. Robinson
The Hon. Renee A. Roche &
Richard P Siwica
Doyle Rogers
Kimberly S. Rogers
Paul G. Rogers
Scott T Rogers
John T Rogerson III
William H. Rogner
Steven E. Rohan
George W Rohe
Lawrence C. Rolfe
Cecil D. & Jacquatte L. Rolle
William J. Romanos III
John E Roscow III
Gerry B. Rose
Mr. & Mrs. David A. Rose
Taylor K Rose
Louis K Rosenbloum
Steven M. Rosenthal
James J. Rosloniec
Stephen E Rossman
Paul S. Rothstein
Paul A. Rowell
Susanne M. Roxbury
John D. Ruffler


Sarah E. Rumpf
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2003-2004 thank you


The crtcal need

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Un.epnso .o





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in lu in th ne

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Mr. & Mrs. Stephen W Sessums
Ned M. Shandloff
Mr. & Mrs. Nicholas A Shannin
L. David Shear
W Paul Shelley Jr.
John A Shipley III
Jodi L Siegel
Michael A. Silva
Chester L Skipper
Mr. & Mrs. Donald D.
Slesnick II
Adam M. Slipakoff
Christopher Slobogin
Dexter A Smith &
BonitaJ. Young
Douglas A. Smith
Frederick D. Smith
Thomas B. Smith
Richard S. Sparrow
Andrew M. Stanko
Law Offices of Steinberg
& Brown
Mal Steinberg
Mr. & Mrs. Robert A Stern
John D. Stewart
William H. Stolberg
Sidney A Stubbs Jr
Timothy M. Sullivan
Lynn H. Sumlin
Dale M. Swope
TO.P Jewish
Foundation, Inc.
Grace W Taylor
Misty M. C. Taylor
Robert W Thielhelm Jr
Gregg D. Thomas
Charles D. Tobin


Diane A Tomlinson
John A Walker &
Stephanie J. Toothaker
Jonathan B. Trohn
M. Stephen Turner
Samuel C. Ullman
United Way of Miami-Dade
John J. Upchurch IV
Sylvia H. Walbolt
Jeffrey W Warren
Rob Webb
Jack A Weiss
John A Weiss
John M. Welch Jr.
Thomas P Wert
Edmund S. Whitson III
Robert G. Whittel
J. J. Wicker II
James R. Wiley
Joe C. Willcox
Charlotte W Williams
J. Mason Williams III
Kathryn B. Williams
Mr. & Mrs. Courtney B. Wilson
John D. Wilson
Scott E. Wilt
Winderweedle, Haines,
Ward, et al.
MarkJ. Wolfson
R. Duke Woodson
Leo Wotitzky
Mr. & Mrs. Douglas A. Wright
Leighton D. Yates Jr.
Yegelwel Family Foundation
Evan J. Yegelwel
C. Steven Yerrid
Gwynne A Young
Richard M. Zabak
Leslie B. Zacks
Peter W Zinober

Justice Stephen C.
O'Connell Reading Room
Martin L. Bowling Jr
Warren M. Cason
John F Cosgrove
The Hon. & Mrs. Irving Cypen
W Dexter Douglass
James E. Eaton Jr
Robert M. Ervin Sr.
Stephen H. Grimes
Frank D. Hall
Hill, Ward & Henderson
Mr. & Mrs. J. Bruce Hoffmann
Ronald C. LaFace
Cynthia F O'Connell
The Hon. & Mrs. Benjamin F
Overton
S. Daniel Ponce
W Paul Shelley Jr
W Crit Smith
Thomas R. Tedcastle


Memorials

As a fitting tribute to the memory
of outstanding men and women
who played an important part in
the history of the College of Law,
contributions were received from
alumni, friends and family to
support specific areas and areas
of greatest need.


In memory of
Chesterfield Smith
Mr. & Mrs. Richard L. Abedon
Thomas E. Bishop
Mr. & Mrs. David E. Blabey
Paul S. Brown
Dennis L. Bryant
H. George Burke
Dennis A. Calfee
Warren M. Cason
Cobb Family Foundation, Inc.
Community Foundation of
Tampa Bay, Inc.
The Conese Foundation, Inc.
Mr. & Mrs. Marshall M. Criser
Pres. Talbot D'Alemberte
Benjamin E Diamond
Elaine B. Duncan
Adele B. Durrance
Justice Raymond Ehrlich
Robert M. Ervin Sr.
Florida Chamber of Commerce, Inc.
John E Germany Sr.
Jane R. Gibbs
Mr. & Mrs. Edwin M. Ginsburg
U.S. Chief Justice Ruth B.
Ginsburg
Warren M. Goodrich
Albert J. Hadeed
Mr. & Mrs. Reginald T Hamner
Joseph W Hatchett
Holland & Knight Charitable
Foundation, Inc.
Edward E Koren
Landis Graham French
Mr. & Mrs. John R. Lawson Jr.
Richard A. Lenon
Mr. & Mrs. Robert MacCrate
Gwendolyn G. Mathews
Thomas M. McAleavey
Elizabeth T McBride
The Hon. &
Mrs. Howell W Melton
Lynne M. Moeller


The Hon. Jon C. &
Jean M. Moyle
M. Roland Nachman Jr.
The Hon. & Mrs. Benjamin
E Overton
Mr. & Mrs. Bruce H. Roberson
Sisser Family Foundation, Inc.
Patrick W Skelton
Janet R. Studley
The Adam Putnam
Committee-2002
The Mailman Foundation, Inc.
Mr. & Mrs. Bert Turner
Phyllis E. Walters
James P White
Nelson C. White


In memory of
James C. Quarles
Prof. & Mrs. Mandell Glicksberg


In memory of
Michael J. Moorehead
Nancy T Bernstine
Heather A. Bristol
Barbara A. Burkett
Dennis A. Calfee
Lynn C. Dirk
Ann L. Foreman
Dr. & Michael K. &
Jacqueline K. Friel
Prof. Mandell & Joyce K.
Glicksberg
Harry H. Griggs (D)
Mr. & Mrs. John A. Hill
E. L. Roy Hunt
Gainesville Chapter Links, Inc.
Dr. Walter Probert &
Dr. Barbara L. Probert
David M. Richardson
Dr. & Mrs. Richard Scheaffer
Dr. & Mrs. Jonathan J. Shuster
Eileen McCarthy Smith
Jill Carolyn White
Edward O. Wolcott


In memory of
Prof. Kenneth Hughes
Margaret M. Maxfield

In memory of
Robert T. Mann
Roxanna Austin


UF LAW 69























* JD Alumni


-ae financi-

comitens *to



hel -he cle-ge

gro strne and

exan Sro.6m

andserics


Class of 1936
Class Total:
No. in Class:
Participation:

Enrichment Society
A. Edwin Shinholser

Class of 1939
Class Total:
No. in Class:
Participation:


Class of 1947
$100.00 Class Total:
9 No. in Class:
11% Participation:


$3,637.70
29
14%


Founders Society Gold
Mary B. Bryant


$23,100.00
11
18%o


Founders Society Gold
W Paul Shelley Jr
Enrichment Society
Leonard Pepper


Class of 1940
Class Total:
No. in Class:
Participation:

Enrichment Society
Col. Wilson Freeman

Class of 1941
Class Total:
No. in Class:
Participation:
Enrichment Society
Ross E. Mowry

Class of 1942
Class Total:
No. in Class:
Participation:


$100.00
22
5%


$100.00
13
8%o


$100.00
5
20%


Enrichment Society
Justice Raymond Ehrlich

Class of 1943
Class Total: $5,0
No. in Class:
Participation:

Founders Society Gold
Irving Cypen

Class of 1945
Class Total: $2
No. in Class:
Participation:

Enrichment Society
Ralph C. Dell
Harry P Edwards

Class of 1946
Class Total: $42,2
No. in Class:
Participation:

Founders Society Gold
Lewis M. Schott &
Marcia Whitney Schott (
Partners
Patrick G. Emmanuel

Enrichment Society
John H. Dewell
Ernest J. Hewett (D)


00.00


Partners
Robert M. Ervin Sr.

Enrichment Society
Judge William L. D
David W Hedrick

Class of 1948
Class Total:
No. in Class:
Participation:
Founders Society- (
Gerald J. Klein
Sherwood L Stokes

Enrichment Society
James P Bennett (D)
Morison Buck
Marie G. Garrett
Warren M. Goodricl
Howell W Melton
Ernest M. Page Jr.
Paul G. Rogers
Wilfred C. Varn

Class of 1949
Class Total:
No. in Class:
Participation:
Partners
D. Burke Kibler III

Trusler Society
John A. Jones


Wesley W Mayhall Sr
Wm. A. Oughterson
John M. Scheb
Rupert J. Smith
Thomas L Treadwell


Class of 1951
Class Total:
No. in Class:
Participation:


burden


$133,226.70
89
11%


Founders Society Gold
James D. Camp Jr.
Marshall M. Criser


$62,777.06 Associates
77 Mandell Glicksberg
1 .3 Trusler Society
Gold Frank D. Hall
Enrichment Society
(D) George A Dietz
Fred J. Krim
William C. McLean Jr.
Gilbert A Smith
Winifred L. Wentworth
h Robert H. Willis

Class of 1952
Class Total: $
No. in Class:
Participation:


$5,345.00
86
17%


3 Enrichment Society
33% Thomas H. BarkdullJr.
William J. Castagna
Bart L Cohen
Herbert E Darby
Preston W DeMilly
30.00
D Howard L. Garrett
9
Milton D. Jones
22%
2 George W Kates
Robert T Miller
Al L. Schneider
Larry G. Smith
Corise P Varn
00.00 Richard S. Weinstein


1 Class of 1950
38%o Class Total:
No. in Class:
Participation


$21,750.00
86
13%


Founders Society Gold
Warren M. Cason

Enrichment Society
AIJ. Cone
John M. Farrell
I. Patrick Golden
John P Howard
Sigmund J. Liberman


Associates
William O. E. Henry
Benjamin E Overton

Enrichment Society
Roy W Caldwell
Doyle Rogers


Class of 1953
Class Total:
No. in Class:
Participation:


$16,896.66
47
30%


Founders Society Gold
Charles W Abbott

Partners
Anthony S. Battaglia
Trusler Society
Edward M. Booth
Robert S. Edwards
W William Ellsworth Jr.
Melvyn B. Frumkes
Henry M. Kittleson
Thomas C. MacDonald Jr
Gene Moore III
Robert G. Murrell
Richard S. Sparrow
Leo Wotitzky
Enrichment Society
Andrew G. Pattillo Jr.
Joe C. Willcox


Class of 1954
Class Total:
No in Class:
Participation:


$4,020.00
50
14%


Founders Society Gold
Robert L. Trohn

Trusler Society
Stephen H. Grimes
Enrichment Society
Tyrie A. Boyer
Monterey Campbell
William H. Corbley
Richard W Reeves
W Joseph Reynolds


Class of 1955
Class Total:
No. in Class:
Participation


Associates
Robert J. Beckham
W Dexter Douglass
Enrichment Society
Francis T McCoy
Edward Siegel

Class of 1956
Class Total:
No. in Class:
Participation:
2,850.00 Associates
................45 Peter T Fay


$11,606.05
30
13%


$5,100.00
38
21%


Trusler Society
Reubin O. Askew
Johnson S. Savary
Enrichment Society
Jerry B. Crockett
Marion M. Cromwell
Robert P Gaines
Solon E O'Neal Jr.
William A. Zeiher


Class of 1957
Class Total:
No. in Class:
Participation.


$2,735.00
48
13%


Associates
James E. Yonge

Trusler Society
Robert M. Montgomery Jr
Enrichment Society
Jack W Belt
James O. Driscoll
Hon. William L. Hendry
Young J. Simmons


Class of 1958
Class Total:
No. in Class:
Participation:

Trusler Society
David Hyman
Enrichment Society
Robert S. Hewitt
Edward M. Jackson
Donald J. Lunny Sr.
S. Jay Plager


$3,850.00
68


























Class of 1959
Class Total:
No. in Class:
Participation


$1,125.00
61
5%


Associates
Stephen W Sessums
Enrichment Society
Robert J. Boylston
Joseph Q Tarbuck

Class of 1960
Class Total: $5,0
No. in Class:
Participation

Founders Society Gold
Ray F Ferrero Jr
Trusler Society
Stanley W Rosenkranz (D)
Bill Wagner
Enrichment Society
Edward B. Davis Jr.
Robert A Kimbrough
L. David Shear
Chester L. Skipper


Class of 1961
Class Total:
No. in Class:
Participation:


George E. Bunnell
John E. M. Ellis
Robin Gibson
James H. Gilbert Jr.
Jane R. Harris
James C. Hoover
Peter C. Jones
R. Layton Mank
Michael M. McFall
David P Newman


Class of 1963
)0.00
Class Total:
72 in Clss
S No. in Class:
10% Participation


$8,950 00
71
13%


Barristers
Jon C. Moyle
Associates
E. Thom Rumberger

Trusler Society
Edwin C. Cluster

Enrichment Society
John T Brennan
Neil H. Chonin
George T Dunlap III
Irvin A. Meyers
John H. Moore II
Thomas H. Thurlow Jr.


Class of 1962
Class Total:
No. in Class:
Participation:


$38,075.00
107
19%


Founders Society Gold
W George Allen
Barristers
C. DuBose Ausley
Partners
Wilton R. Miller
Ernest A Sellers

Associates
Grace W Taylor
Trusler Society
Pres. Talbot D'Alemberte
Herbert A Langston Jr.
Don R. Livingstone

Enrichment Society
Byron B. Block
Leon H. Brush


$9,250.00
14
14%


Founders Society Gold
John C. Bierley
Associates
Tad Davis

Trusler Society
W O. Birchfield
Stanley B. Levin
Enrichment Society
Larry C. Fedro
John F Harris
Murray Kanetsky
Wm. Bruce Louden
E Perry Odom
Frank A. Orlando
S. Austin Peele
Larry S. Stewart
Sylvia H. Walbolt

Class of 1964
Class Total: $6,
No. in Class:
Participation:
Partners
Michael L. Jamieson
Associates
Robert R. Feagin III
George D. GabelJr.
Trusler Society
Justice Charles T Wells
Enrichment Society
Lester M. Blain
John W Caven Jr
Edwin M. Ginsburg
Edgar M. Moore Sr.
Nicholas J. Pisaris
Hugh E. Starnes


Class of 1965
Class Total:
No. in Class:
Participation:


Enrichment Society
Cecil L. Anchors Jr
Russell P Chubb
Victor M. Halbach Jr
Steve C. Horowitz
Michael J. Minerva
W Taylor Moore
Jeremy P Ross


Thomas G. Schultz
Philip Tatich
M. Stephen Turner
Richard H. Wilson

Class of 1966
Class Total:
No. in Class:
Participation:


Robert J. Head Jr
Louis Kwall
Roger A. Larson
Stephen B. Lewallen
Gov. Kenneth H. "Buddy" MacKay Jr
J. Michael McCarthy
Ransford C. Pyle
R. William Rutter Jr
William H. Seaver
Barry S. Sinoff
Samuel C. Ullman
E. John Wherry Jr


$50,496.19
173
10%


Founders Society Gold
W Kelly Smith
Partners
Ronald C. LaFace
Charles P Pillans III
Stephen F Rossman
Associates
L. Kinder Cannon III
Richard M. Robinson

Trusler Society
Charles H. Baumberger
J. Thomas Cardwell
Eugene J. Howard
Osmond C. Howe Jr
George R. Moraitis
Enrichment Society
88928 Stephen B. Calvert
132 Elizabeth J. du Fresne
8. Hubert R. Lindsey
Robert T Mounts
Stephen J. Powell
Louis F Ray Jr.
John F Roscow III


Class of 1967
Class Total:
No. in Class:
Participation:


$24,284.00
134
13%


Partners
Gerald D. Schackow

Associates
Stumpy Harris
Sidney A Stubbs Jr
Trusler Society
Norman A Coll
Charles E. Commander
Benjamin H. Hill III


$48,225.00
228
11%


Barristers
E. C. Deeno Kitchen

Partners
John A DeVault III
Frederick A. Hazouri
Bill Hoppe
Associates
Thomas M. Ervin Jr

Trusler Society
Gary C. Simons
Enrichment Society
Susan H. Black
Fred M. Cone Jr
Barry R. Davidson
Diana J. Dilling
Roberta F Fox
William A. Hamilton III
Calvin E. Hayden Jr


Class of 1968
Class Total:
No. in Class:
Participation:


$12,774.96
189
13%


Founders Society Gold
Andrew C. Hall
Partners
Patrick E. Geraghty Sr.
Associates
George Barford
LesW Burke
John J. Upchurch IV
Trusler Society
Warren E. Williams

Enrichment Society
Richard C. Ausness
Fred R. Baisden Jr.
Douglas D. Bachelor Jr.
Stephen John Bozarth
Thomas C. Cobb
Clinton H. Coulter Jr.
Ronald S. Frankel
Colonel Jonathan C. Gordon
Donald J. Hall
Colonel Edwin F Hornbrook
Nicholas E. Karatinos
Robert D. McIntosh
John D. McKey Jr.
Michael A. Oberst
Charles T Sands
Donald D. Slesnick II
Mitchell H. Spingarn
Winfred A. Stevens


Class of 1969
Class Total:
No in Class:
Participation:


$31,915.08
187
17%


Barristers
James A. Hauser
E Wallace Pope Jr.
Partners
Robert W Mead Jr
Peter W Zinober

Trusler Society
J. Stephen Gardner
Joseph P Milton
Mike Segal
Enrichment Society
A. Graham Allen
James O. Birr Jr.


Michael L. Bryant
Charles H. Egerton
William A. Evans
Frank H. Fee III
James C. Fleming
Richard D. Holt
A. McArthur Irvin
Timothy A. Johnson Jr
William M. Lederer
Henry E. Mallue Jr.
Karen L. Martin
John R. McDonough
Noel H. Nation
Ben Patterson
John C. Patterson Jr
George W Rohe
David W Rynders
Roger D. Schwenke
Michael P Smodish
Donald R. Tescher
Robert F Williams
Brian R. Wright


Class of 1970
Class Total:
No. in Class:
Participation


$13,060.00
208
13%


Associates
Ronald A Carpenter
Mercer K Clarke
Ronald Y Schram

Trusler Society
S. William Fuller Jr.
Joseph C. Mellichamp III
Enrichment Sodety
Howard W Brill
Steven W Carta
E. Hugh Chappell Jr.
Dabney L. Conner
Guy S. Emerich
Charles M. Gadd Jr.
Judge Harvey L. Goldstein
James T Haley
David F Hannan
Donald A. Lykkebak
Stephan P Mickle
Dorothy H. Pate
Charles L. Plank
John C. Randolph
Bruce S. Russell
Bruce A Smathers
Robert A Stern
John C. Taylor Jr.
Harry Tempkins
William A. Van Nortwick Jr
William E. Williams


Class of 1971
Class Total:
No. in Class:
Participation:


$52,075.00
225
12%


Founders Society Gold
W C. Gentry


UF LAW 71















2003-2004 thank you





m Annual Fund cont.


Barristers
Howard C. Coker

Partners
Robert F Hudson Jr.
Associates
Roger L. Blackburn
Phillip R. Finch
J. Fraser Himes
John K Vreeland
Enrichment Society
Larry B. Alexander
Timothy C. Blake
Darryl M. Bloodworth
John G. Delancett
Robert V Duss
Alan P Dye
Ronald D. Fairchild
Edward H. Fine
Ira C. Hatch Jr.
Louis F Hubener III
Thomas E. Morris
James G. Roberts
Steven E. Rohan
Gerry B. Rose
Martin J. Sperry
Kevin A. Suffern
Roland A. Sutcliffe Jr.
Robert J. Telfer Jr.
Everett H. Wilcox Jr.
J. Maxwell Williams

Class of 1972
Class Total: $57,505.00
No in Class: 355
Participation: 11%

Barristers
Bruce H. Bokor
John J. Schickel Sr.
Partners
Cesar L. Alvarez
G. Thomas Ball
Richard C. Grant
James F Page Jr.
Jeffrey W Warren
Associates
Mark Hicks
Hal H. Kantor
Dean Emeritus Jon L. Mills

Trusler Society
Gene K Glasser
Donald S. Kohla
Robert A Mandell
Christine N. Markussen
Ray Peacock

Enrichment Society
James W Almand
Thomas G. Christmann
Frederick M. Dahlmeier
Richard J. Dungey
Christopher M. Fear
Representative John Dudley Goodlette
Julian E. Harrison
Divid I Kihn


Russell H. Kasper
James J. Kincheloe
William P Levens
Elliott H. Lucas
Wayne C. McCall
G. Carson McEachern
James A McGee
M. Wayne Myers
James P Nilon
James G. Pressly Jr.
Jerome R. Schechter
David A. Schmudde
Robert L. Taylor
Dale W Vash
W Eric Venable
Don T Wilcox
D. Frank Winkles


Class of 1973
Class Total:
No. in Class:
Participation:


$109,205.00
390
13%


Founders Society Gold
Gerald A. Rosenthal

Founders Society Silver
Walter G. Campbell Jr.
Barristers
John H. Haswell
Michael J. McNerney
George E. Schulz Jr.
Partners
Peter C. K Enwall
S. Daniel Ponce

Associates
Martha W Barnett
Pamela O. Price
Mal Steinberg
William H. Stolberg

Trusler Society
Mary B. Ellis
James F McKenzie
Enrichment Society
Allan Bartholomew-Cook
George Z. Bateh
Dale A Beardsley
Thomas W Bell
W Roderick Bowdoin
Scott R. Christiansen
Paul W A. CourtnellJr.
Paul M. Cummings
Lawrence J. Davis
George R. Dekle Sr.
Susan F Delegal
Col. Charles W Dorman
E Joseph DuBray
Patricia Combs Fawsett
Luanne E. Ferguson
Stanley G. Halliday
Thomas C. Heath
Gerald L. Knight
Alan H. Konigsburg
Hazel M. Land
Andrew J. Markus


Marion J. Radson
Patrick C. Rastatter
Hugh A Richeson Jr.
Lawrence C. Rolfe
Richard D. Saba
Jan K Seiden
Frederick D. Smith
W Russell Snyder
Tracy E. Stafford
Bruce W Talcott
Kenneth A Treadwell
S. Thomas Ullman
Joseph H. Williams
Dale S. Wilson
Robert B. Worman
Art G. Wroble
Leighton D. Yates Jr.

Class of 1974
Class Total: $92,53813
No. in Class 295
Participation: 17%

Founders Society Gold
Robert G. Merkel

Barristers
J. Bruce Hoffmann
Partners
Leslie J. Lott
Michael T Moore
Louis K Rosenbloum

Associates
Timothy G. Anderson
Joseph P Carolan III
Robert E. Glennon Jr.
Edward F Koren
Frederick W Leonhardt
Gwynne A Young

Trusler Society
Richard P Cole
Andrew J. Fawbush
M. Lanning Fox
K Lawrence Gragg
David T Knight
Robert M. Kramer
Harley E. Riedel II
Edward O. Savitz Jr.

Enrichment Society
John T Alderson Jr.
Gregory V Beauchamp
Barry W Bennett
Zelma L. Berger
Neal L. Betancourt
John L. Bryan Jr.
Hugh A Carithers Jr.
John T Chandler
R. John Cole II
Robert S. Cross
Clay S. Davis Jr.
Thomas J. Ellwanger
Theodore A Erck III
James L. Fly
Peter J. Fryefield
Rev. Robert C. Gibbons


Albert J. Hadeed
Samuel J. Henderson III
Nancy H. Henry
Frederick W Jones
Joseph T Jurkowski Jr.
Richard M. Knellinger
Judith M. Korchin
Thomas J. Korge
Jeffrey B. Marks
James E. L. Seay
Larry M. Stewart
John M. Stipanovich
Suzanne H. Vitunac
John A. Weiss
Bruce I. Yegelwel

Class of 1975
Class Total: $64,268.00
No. in Class 365
Participation: 18%
Founders Society Silver
Kitty Phillips
Partners
John W Campbell
J. Joaquin Fraxedas
Jeffrey A. Hirsch
John A. Shipley III
Associates
Ronald A. David
Marsha G. Madorsky
R. Duke Woodson

Trusler Society
Barry A Abbott
James B. Barnes
Bernard A Barton Jr.
Anne C. Conway
Maureen G. Gragg
Robert M. Harris
A Guy NeffJr.
Janice Burton Sharpstein
Barry L. Silber
Patrick W Skelton

Enrichment Society
Moses J. Baker Jr.
James A. Barks
David C. Beers
Carlton F Bennett
Robert L. Bogen
Craig Corbett
Theodore A. Deckert
Erin L. Fernandez-Ely
DeHaven W Fleming
Wayne E. Flowers
Kent Fulton
Alan M. Gerlach Jr.
Gary D. Grunder
Kim Patrick Hart
Robert A. Heekin
Frederick C. Heidgerd
Sherry L. Hyman
Craig C. Keller
Enrichment Society
Paul M. Korchin


Althea M. Lachicotte
Roger C. Lambert
John E. Lawlor III
Jack A Levine
Robert C. Maland
William H. McBride Jr
Howell W Melton Jr.
Barbara R. Pankau
Stephen L. Pankau
Austin F Reed
William D. Ricker Jr.
George H. Russ
Stephen G. Sewell
William E. Shannon
Joy B. Shearer
Charles L. Shelfer
M. Stephen Smith III
Tito S. Smith
Gregory T Stewart
James B. I I.....
Catherine A Tucker
Barbara J. Twine
Jose E Valdivia Jr.
Vicki J. Weinstein
John M. Welch Jr.
Terry A. Wex
Gerald A Williams
Craig G. Wolfson

Class of 1976
Class Total: $61,063.00
No in Class:38
Participation: 13%

Founders Society Silver
Peter M. MacNamara
M. Therese Vento
Barristers
Kevin A. Malone
Partners
Janet R. Studley
Associates
William A. Boyles
W Michael Clifford
James L. George
Gregg D. Thomas

Trusler Society
R. Vinson Barrett
Sally A. Dorn
William H. Ferguson
Becky A. Powhatan
Hans G. Tanzler III
David R. Tyrrell

Enrichment Society
Brett D. Anderson
Michael R. Band
Mark P Buell
Elias N. Chotas
Diane T Covan
Samuel G. Crosby
Lawrence M. Flaster
Betsy J. Gallagher
Donald L. Gibson
Evelyn D. Golden


72 UF LAW
























Daniel B. Harrell
Elizabeth A. Jenkins
James T King Jr.
Mark E Lewis
Donna C. Litman
James J. Long
Carl S. McGinnes
Carolyn 0. Nofal
Donald R. Odom
Richard L. Oftedal
Tanja Ostapoff
Richard L. Polin
Charles A. Reinhardt Jr.
George J. Roark III
Paul E. Rosenthal
Paul A. Rowell
Marc I. Sachs
Jack M. Schemer
Stephen W Seemer
Kenneth M. Sigelman
Ellis E Smith
Samuel M. Streit
Marjorie B. Thomas
Amanda M. Traweek
B. Thomas Whitefield III
Scott E. Wilt
James L. Yacavone III
Stuart A. Young

Class of 1977
Class Total: $23,249.00
No in Class: 324
Participation 14%

Associates
Lauren Y Detzel
Steven H. Friedman
Thomas R. Tedcastle

Trusler Society
Nola S. Dyal
Virginia A. Lipton
John J. Scroggin
Barbara J. Staros
Enrichment Society
Michael R. Aronson
Dennis L. Blackburn
David S. Boyce
Thomas H. Catalano
Kathleen A Cooper
Catherine C. Cosby
Robert E. Cosby
Lewis F Crippen
James M. Donohoe Jr.
Kevin J. Egan
Jay Fleisher
Sally H. Foote
Jane B. Forbes
Don H. Goode
Freddie L. Goode
Patti W Halloran
Susan M. Klock
Roy H. Lasris
Renee F Lee
William A. Lee III


James J. Logue
Richard J. Lombardo
Karlyn A. Loucks
Charles S. Modell
Leslie K O'Neal-Coble
Louis D. Putney
Jacob I. Reiber
Janice L. Russell
Lewis E. Shelley
Linda L. Shelley
John H. Skinner
Thomas B. Smith
Aberdeen R. Speights
Harry B. Stackhouse
Richard Tombrink Jr.
James F Valenti Jr.
Arthur R. Wiedinger Jr
Claudia T Wright
Howard L. Zoller


Class of 1978
Class Total:
No. in Class:
Participation:

Barristers
Pedro A. Martin
W Crit Smith
Dale M. Swope


$32,731.60
377
17%


Partners
C. Randolph Coleman
James E. Eaton Jr
Gary S. Rabin
Associates
Linda C. McGurn
Daniel F Molony
Ned M. Shandloff

Enrichment Society
MarciaJ. S. Adler
R. Gene Aldridge
Charles J. Bartlett
Debra H. Bernes
E. Sue Bernie
Henry H. Bolz III
Michael J. Brudny
Humberto I. Cancio Jr
Kendall Coffey
Barry M. Cohen
Carol A. Cohen
Jay P Cohen
Kaye Collie
A. J. Donelson
Charles F Edwards
Gail G. Fagan
Patrick J. Faucheux
Luis Fernandez
Robert S. Ferrante
Mitchell I. Fried
Howardene G. Garrett
Paul C. Gibson
Cheryl L. Gordon
Robert E. Gordon
Peter J. Gravina
Caleb J. Grimes


Michele B. Grimes
Jay A. Halpern
Thomas L. Howard
Barbara C. Johnston
Patricia P H. Jones
Randy M. Kammer
Sheri L. Kerney
Thomas F Kerney III
Mark S. Kessler
Steven C. Lee
Chauncey W Lever Jr
Austin H. Maslanik
Jon A. May
Frank E. Miller
Patricia A. Petruff
Francis E. Pierce III
Robert A Sandow
Valerie D. Schaub
Jeffrey D. Segal
Joseph B. Shacter
Susan E. G. Smathers
Sandra G. Smith
Michael H. Streater
Kenneth W Sukhia
Michael W Tittsworth
Angela D. Vickers
Thomas J. Wilkes Jr
William M. Wilson Jr
Mary E. Wright
Richard M. Zabak

Class of 1979
ClasTotal: $92,555 2
No. in Class 329
Participation: 14%

Founders Society Silver
Carol M. Brewer
Partners
Brian M. O'Connell
Lawrence E. Sellers Jr.
Associates
Alfred J. Malefatto
Moria Rozenson
Trusler Society
John L. Holcomb
Peter T Kirkwood
Scott Lodin
Enrichment Society
Christine K Bilodeau
Ronae K Bitter
Faye A. Burner
Cynthia K Christen
Joni Armstrong Coffey, Esq.
V Robert DenhamJr.
Ronald G. Duryea
James A. Edwards
Ladd H. Fassett
Beatriz Bru Fernandez
Fred Herbert Flowers
Joseph E. Foster
James S. Garbett
Roy E. Granoff
Winslow D. Hawkes III
Charles V Hedrick


Jeanette K Helfrich
Stuart N. Hopen
Neisen O. Kasdin
Michael J. Korn
David M. Layman
Warren W Lindsey
Joyce R. Marr
James B. Murphy Jr
David S. Pressly
Mary A. Price
Renee L. Renner
Richard J. Sarafan
David C. Sasser
Harold G. Schenker
Peggy F Schrieber
A. Russell Smith
Scott A Specht
Timon V Sullivan
Robert W Wattwood
Jennifer A. West
Gail I. Winson


Class of 1980
Class Total:
No. in Class:
Participation:


$42,834.76
362
13%


Founders Society Gold
Ultima D. Morgan
Partners
Peter J. Genz
Associates
Charles M. Rand
Rob Webb
Evan J. Yegelwel
Trusler Society
Allen L. PoucherJr.

Enrichment Society
Alejandro Alvarez
Terrell K Arline
Richard K Bowers Jr
Steven L. Brannock
Penny H. Brill
Johnny R. Brown
Darrell F Carpenter Sr.
Jon C. Chassen
Russell W Divine
Linda Ebin
Kerry I. Evander
Robert I. Goldfarb
Mark E. Goldstein
Catharine M. Goodwin
Kenneth A Harrison
Cynthia A. Hawkins
Jonathan Hollingshead
Leonard H. Johnson
Michael W Johnston
Gregory M. Keyser
Sharon Strayer Learch
Ross T Lessack
Robin P Malloy
Chad M. McClenathen
Kathryn L. Mennella
Horace N. Moore Sr.
Stuart A. Nelson
Eric D. Olson


Anthony H. Pelle
Lillian J. Reyes
Paul S. Rothstein
Randolph J. Rush
Jeffrey A Rynor
Carl S. Schuler
Debbie S. Ruskin
David L. Smith
R. Frazier Solsberry
Byron E. Townsend
Richard B. Troutman
Charles D. Wingate
Jan A. Yelen


Class of 1981
Class Total:
No. in Class:
Participation:

Barristers
Leslie S. Haswell


$23,123.33
384
15%


Partners
Jeffrey D. Feldman
Kenneth R. Johnson
Kimberly L. Johnson
Associates
R. Mason Blake

Trusler Society
Michael D. Minton
David H. Vickrey
Patricia A. Willing
Enrichment Society
Luis A Abreu
Mary C. Arpe
Edward W Becht
Raymond 0. Bodiford
JaneJ. Brooks
Charles J. Cacciabeve
Susan E. Cook
Frederick C. Craig Jr
Sharon E. Cromar
Alan H. Daniels
Rick E. Dantzler
Joseph H. Davis III
Daniel L. DeCubellis
Lisa H. Enfield
Elizabeth K. Evander
Eileen C. Forrester
Robert D. Henry
Robert A Higbee
Nancy H. Jackson
Bruce D. Johnson
Lee S. Johnson Jr
William S. Josey
Brian B. Joslyn
Thomas R. Julin
Deborah J. Kemp
Gary B. Leuchtman
Cheryl K Lindgren
Robert R. Lindgren
Randolph A Marks
Deborah L. McGovern
Barbara B. McGriff
David B. Moffett


UF LAW 73















2003-2004 thank you




m Annual Fund cont.


Kathleen M. O'Connor
Neal G. Patton
Carl R. Pennington III
Howard M. Rosenblatt, C.L.U.
Lawrence J. Semento
Scott A. Silver
Vicki L. Stolberg
Gary L. Summers
Robert L. Tankel
Laurie W Valentine
Wallace C. Von Arx III
Richard B. Warren
Ronald W Wells
J. Mason Williams III
Thomas R. Williams
Carl J. Zahner
Sharon A V Zahner

Class of 1982
Class Total: $84,890.92
No. in Class: 402
Participation.n 15%.

Founders Society Gold
John B. Morgan
Partners
R. Lawrence Heinkel
Paul R. Linder
Margaret D. Mathews
Gary Lee Printy
Oscar A. Sanchez

Associates
Nathan S. Collier
Scott J. Feder
Gregory A Nelson
Trusler Society
John N. Giordano

Enrichment Society
Robert W Anthony Jr
Susan T Balsley
Walter G. Benjamin
Jeffery A Boone
John C. Bovay
Carlos F Concepcion
Alys N. Daniels
Michael H. Davis
Thomas E. Dougherty
Nancy J. Faggianelli
Richard R. Garland
Michael J. Gelfand
Linda R. Getzen
Joel B. Giles
Karen M. Gilliam
Michael P Haymans
Robert F Hoogland
Jacinta M. lezzi
Richard A. Jacobson
Grant C. Jaquith
Michael D. Joblove
John D. Jopling
Penny Kahn
Janis B. Keyser
Frances S. King
Lucy Graetz Kish
Mary C. Landt
Timothy A Legare

74 UF LAW


James R. Lussier
Kenneth M. Malnik
Rebecca E. Martinez
Marybeth McDonald
William L. Mims Jr
Kevin L. Pearson
Michael A Piscitelli
Anita J. Ponder
Brian P Rush
Schuyler S. Smith
David Smolker
Robert A. Solove
Tracye K Solove
Mark Somerstein
Samuel C. Stephens III
Edward T Stockbridge
Sharon 0. Taylor
Louis Thaler
David Trachtenberg
R. Dennis Tweed
Steven E. Waggoner
Stephen L. Walker
Mark J. Wolfson

Class of 1983
Class Total: $24,94242
No in Class: 338
Participation: 14%

Partners
Thomas J. Ali
James A Gale
Scott C. Ilgenfritz
George A. Vaka
Associates
Scott G. Hawkins
Edward E. Sawyer

Trusler Society
Charles L. Cranford

Enrichment Society
Stephen K Boone
Col. Leroy C. Bryant III
Gerald M. Cohen
Stephen C. Emmanuel
Kara L. Evans
Maggie B. Evans
Gregory A. Fox
James A Freese
William F Hamilton
Edward B. Helvenston
Elizabeth M. Hernandez
Eugenio Hernandez
Richard H. Hiers
Steven Hurwitz
Edmond D. Johnson
William A King
Pamela W Kirsch
John E. Knight III
Stephen L. Kussner
Steven R. Kutner
Russell D. Levitt
Laura A. McCall
Donna L. McIntosh
Robert K McIntosh
Paul L. Nettleton
JeffM. Novatt


Terrence P O'Connor
Brian N. Onek
R. Brady Osborne Jr
T C. Phillips
Dee D. Reiter
Charles D. Rubin
Lorinda S. Schreier
Sidney S. Simmons II
Marte V Singerman
Paul S. Singerman
Richard P Siwica
Dyla L. Warren
James R. Wiley


Class of 1984
Class Total
No. in Class:
Participation:


$9,830.00
326
12%


Trusler Society
Bill Bone
Allen N. Jelks Jr

Enrichment Society
Jack J. Aiello
Brian M. Bez
Kenneth C. Bronchick
Allen L. Cannon
Scott W Cichon
Stephen M. Durden
John D. Emmanuel
Kenneth G. Ferguson III
Brian T Fitzgerald
Robin K Froug
F Allison Gerencser
Marlene Hammock
Christopher C. Hazelip
Charles B. Hernicz
Nancy C. Jacobson
C. D. Lewis Jr.
Cheryl J. Lister
Gloria M. Lockridge
Elizabeth T McBride
Joshua D. Medvin
Frederick J. Mills
Tracy A Nichols
Michael L. O'Neill
Richard Paladino
David R. Punzak
Jeffrey C. Regan
Lawrence S. Ribler
Renee A. Roche
Kenneth K Schwanger
Stephen B. Shell
Brian J. Stack
Brian D. Stokes
William R. Swindle
George J. F Werner
Sarah R. Williams
Andrea E. Zelman

Class of 1985
Class Total $160,057.93
No. in Class: 364
Participation: 12%

Founders Society Gold
Glenn W Sturm


Partners
Mark A. Nouss
Associates
William J. Schifino Jr.

Trusler Society
Steven A Williams

Enrichment Society
David Alschuler
Elizabeth L. Bevington
Amelia M. Campbell
Susan Z. Cohen
Raul A. Cuervo
Brenna M. Durden
Steven Ellison
Musa K Farmand
Ariadne M. Fitzgerald
Amy J. Galloway
Robert M. Geller
Stanley A. Gravenmier
Timothy D. Haines
Jeremy J. Hart
G. Calvin Hayes
Russell D. Kaplan
MarkW Klingensmith
Scott D. Krueger
William F Langdon
Robert W Lee
Robert E. Lewis
Mark Lindenberg
Lila L. McHenry
Marilyn Ann H. Moore
Michael E. Neukamm
Lisa O. O'Neill
Nancy H. Pridgen
Roland R. Reis
Rebecca W Ribler
Robert C. Sanchez
Harry R. Schafer
Lee A. Schreiber
Jodi L. Siegel
Lisa S. Still
Perry Tanksley
Martha R. Thomas
Lisa L. Troutman
Salome J. Zikakis


Class of 1986
Class Total:
No. in Class:
Participation:


$14,167.60
395
10%


Partners
James E. Thomison
Douglas A Wright

Trusler Society
Frank M. Bedell

Enrichment Society
Robert G. Abood
J. Parker Ailstock
Alan M. Applegate
Frank A. Ashton
Emmett K Bittick Jr.
Mary C. Crotty
Phillip S. Dingle
James R. Franklin Sr.
Paul R. Game


Lucy W Hoover
Scott E. Hunt
Lawrence Keefe
John A Kirst Jr.
Sheree H. Lancaster
Steven D. Lear
Barbara H. Luikart
Morris C. Massey
William A. Parady
Frank A. Pavese Jr
Natasha W Permaul
Barry W Rigby
Alison S. Schefer
Steven R. Schooley
Debra A. Schrils
Frederick S. Schrils
Susan M. Seigle
Thomas F Slater
Richard A. Solomon
James A. Taylor III
Mary E. Taylor
Joseph D. Turner
William P Weatherford Jr
Frederick S. Werdine
Wade D. White
Courtney B. Wilson
Wynnora S. Wilson
Wendy E. Witten

Class of 1987
Class Total: $6,52500
No inClass 379
Participation: 10%

Enrichment Society
Alan B. Almand
Mary Jane Angelo
Jane D. Callahan
Robert Casassa
James E. Collins
Kathleen S. Cumming
Mayanne Downs
Kurt H. Dunkle
Harolyn H. Dutt
Joanne Fanizza
Thomas M. Findley
Mark C. Greene
Dianne D. Hagan
Susan L. Hanlon
Arthur S. Hardy
William A. Kebler
Andrea W LeDew
Jodi M. Marvet
Amy R. Mashburn
Maureen Monaghan Matheson
Helen W McAfee
Gary M. Pappas
Kathleen M. Paustian
Lisa M. Porter
PaulS. Quinn Jr
Kelly D. Reese
Mark E. Robinson
Susanne M. Roxbury
Kayla B. Rynor
Alan F Scharf
MarkJ. Scheer
David L. Schick
























Houston E. Short
James A. Smith
Kurt M. Spengler
Sharon T Sperling
Linda L. Winchenbach


Class of 1988
Class Total:
No. in Class:
Participation:


$15,409.96
367
11%


Associates
Beth B. Mills
Darrell W Payne
Trusler Society
Stephen F Aton
Martin H. Levin
Alton L. Lightsey

Enrichment Society
Glenn A. Adams
Robert B. Battista
Maj. Michael J. Benjamin
Douglas A. Booher
Charles H. Carver
Karen M. Chastain
Kevin G. Coleman
Kraig A. Conn
Susan S. Culmo
Robin K Davis
Jonathan W Dingus
Michael P Donaldson
Teri L. Donaldson
Robert T Geis
Paula W Greene
Paul J. Healy
Thomas D. Hippelheuser
Mark S. Howard
Frederick L. Kretschmer Jr.
Edward J. Kuchinski
Frank A. Landgraff
John T Leadbeater
Carol L. Marden
Mark S. Meland
Cathryn A Mitchell
Kara E. Pfister
Richard L. Purtz
Scott E. Ray
Denise A Reeder
Douglas A. Smith
Donald W St. Denis
Harold Bradley Staggs
Joseph W Standley
Mitchell A. Stone
Gerard E Wehle Jr.
Wayne S. Wilson


Class of 1989
Class Total:
No. in Class:
Participation


$39,245.92
358
9%


Barristers
Corinne C. Hodak

Trusler Society
Frances A. Borland
Brig. Gen. Michael L. Ferguson
Robert A Shimberg


Enrichment Society
Joseph E. Ankus
Cathleen G. Bell
Rhonda B. Boggess
W Bard Brockman
Julianna K Burke
John A. Camp
Marc D. Chapman
Donald A Dvornik
Amy B. Grass Gilmore
Jennifer C. Harrington
Hope A Iseley
Robert F Iseley Jr.
Katherine M. Koops
Richard R. Kosan
Joseph M. Madden Jr.
Col. Howard O. McGillin Jr
Larry J. McGuinness
Lynette E. McGuinness
Gerard L. Mulhall
Scott T Rogers
John T Rogerson III
Cheryl A. Rundle-Borowski
Robert E Sentell III
Mark A Sessums
Michael J. Shapiro
Mark E. Stein
Richard I. Stern
Charles D. Tobin
Elizabeth A. Webb


Class of 1990
Class Total
No. in Class:
Participation:


$10,655.00
383
10%


Associates
Glenn L. Criser
Jonathan B. Trohn
Jack A Weiss

Trusler Society
Robert B. Gough III
Enrichment Society
Joseph L. Amos Jr.
Gregory S. Band
Steven M. Berman
David L. Bilsker
Casey M. Cavanaugh
Tracy D. Chapman
Ernest A Cox III
M. Chris Edwards
Laura A Eidson
Todd W Fennell
Karen G. Getelman
Sheri L. Green
Leenetta B. Grizzard
Andrea S. Hartley
Jodi J. Jaffe
Suzanne M. Judas
Christopher L. Kurzner
Laura B. Lerner
Bernardo Lopez
W Wesley Marston
John J. Masternick
Deborah P Matthews


Tyler S. McClay
Edward M. Mullins Jr.
Kenneth C. Pope
Ruth H. Prescott
William H. Rogner
Bradley M. Saxton
Cmdr. Carolyn C. Slowikowski
Robert G. Stern
Robert W Thielhelm Jr.
John T Wettach Jr.
Ted W Whitlock
Robert E. Wideman

Class of 1991
Class Total: $7,64992
No inClass 379
Participation 13%

Partners
Phillip J. Mays
Enrichment Society
Michelle Anchors
Steven L. Beiley
Patrice L. E Boyes
David A Brennen
Thomas P Briggmann
Michael S. Budwick
G. Brian Butler
Craig J. Cannon
Valerie A Conzo
Pamela J. Crone
Lon W Crow IV
J. Bruce Culpepper
Terri R. Day
Thomas G. DePeter
Maria I. Escoto-Castiello
Angelica G. Fleites
Joan D. Flocks
Martha H. Formella
John M. Gillies
Patricia L. Hartley
Philip B. Hathorn
Bradford D. Kimbro
Lisa C. Kotora
Charles A. Krawczyk
Kelly B. Lefferts
Leslie A. Lewis
Paul J. Magnarella
Gregory D. Martinson
Erin R. McCormick Larrinaga
Heather D. Moore
Jon A. Morris
Rima Y. Mullins
Lewis W Murphy Jr.
Dale L. Parker
Robert J. Pile
Kimberly B. Rezanka
Glenn M. Rissman
Kelly B. Rose
Robin L. Rosenberg
Richard G. Salazar
Edwin A. Scales III
Alan B. Schneider
Stuart A. Thompson
John V Tucker
Joseph N. Tucker


Megan Wall
Wendy H. Werb
Karen E. West
Edmund S. Whitson III

Class of 1992
Class Total: $6,145.00
No. in Class: 367
Participation: 8%

Trusler Society
S. Katherine Frazier
Barbara A. Puestow

Enrichment Society
Morgan R. Bentley
Thomas E. Bishop
Elizabeth A. Carrie
Regina L. Deiulio
Michael G. Dupee
Lisa A. Esposito
Patrick J. Formella
Vincent P Gallagher
Dana M. Gallup
Marcelo R. Gomez
Courtney K Grimm
Jane A. Houk
Marilyn R. Israel
Eric S. Kolar
Amy S. Lowndes
Lee Marcus
Matthew B. Mayper
Paula P O'Brien
Sean W O'Brien
Frederick D. Page
John W Randolph Jr.
Erin M. Richardson
Randi P Spallina
Lynn H. Sumlin
Diane A. Tomlinson
Terri G. Tucker
Mark E. Walker
Kevin D. Zwetsch

Class of 1993
Class Total: $11,399.00
No. in Class: 406
Participation: 9%

Partners
Bruce M. Harris

Trusler Society
Kathleen R. Lightsey
Enrichment Society
Kathryn M. Anbinder
Todd A Bancroft
Ross L. Bilbrey
J. Craig Bourne
Cecilia R. Boyd
Heather B. Brock
Martin T Buckley
David E. Cannella
Joseph S. Coppola
Christine C. Daly
Jere F Daniels Jr.
Angela C. Dempsey
Rabbi Maria J. Feldman
Todd B. Grandy


William P Gray III
Robert D. Grode II
Rebecca L. Henderson
Terrill E Jordan
Karl T Klein
Donna L. Longhouse
Matthew S. McAfee
Daniel Medina
Rachel P Ray
Janice Matson Rickert
Kathleen H. Roberts
Lili M. Romero
Michael D. Simons
Phillip S. Smith
Christopher P Tessitore
Jeffrey A Tochner
A. Scott Toney
Jason L. Unger
Karen M. Walker
Thomas P Wert
Leslie B. Zacks

Class of 1994
Class Total: $6,595.00
No. in Class: 382
Participation: 1 1
Enrichment Society
Stacey Y. Adams
Richard R. Alexander
Lisa Bisagni
Kimberly Bryars-Blanchard
Edward B. Cole
Duane A. Daiker
Scott C. Davis
G. Ray Driver Jr.
Aimee K Elson
Kenneth R. Fountain
Barry S. Goldsmith
William C. Guthrie
Megan A. Kelly
Michael E. Kinney
Martin E. Leach
Peter D. Loguidice
Midori A Lowry
Thomas M. McAleavey
Paul B. McCawley
Michael W McNatt
Lee T Mercado
J. Neal Mobley
Mark R. Mohler
Fehintola Kemi Oguntebi
Thomas M. Parker
Christopher D. Patterson
Matthew N. Posgay
Barbara L. Richard
Keith W Rizzardi
Jason A. Rosenthal
Carol B. Shannin
Nicholas A Shannin
Michael A. Silva
Jason E. Slatkin
Lori A Sochin
John D. Stewart
Cathleen A. Talbot
Lewis A Watson

UF LAW 75















2003-2004 thank you





m Annual Fund cont.


John D. Webb
Levi G. Williams Jr.
Marc A. Wites

Class of 1995
Class Total:
No. in Class:
Participation:


$9,524.84
382
14%


Associates
Joseph H. Lang Jr
Trusler Society
Frank A. Hamner
Enrichment Society
Hal B. Anderson
Scott P Andrew
Caryn L. Bellus
Christopher G. Commander
Michael D. Crosbie
Karen C. Danser
Stephen J. Delaney
Justin C. Fineberg
Elizabeth M. Franks
Eric K Gabrielle
Laura Ann Gardner
Richard S. Gross
Melissa O. Hanson
Shane A. Hart
Zana E. Holley
Glen J. Ioffredo
Christopher Kelly
Joanna H. Kinney
Samuel A. Lewis
Ellen L. Koehler Lyons
James M. Matulis
Patrick F McCormack
Kevin J. McGrath
Robin G. McGrath
J. Andrew Meyer
Nichole M. Mooney
Thomas E. Mooney
Charles T Moore
Niels P Murphy
William C. Rencher
Hardy L. Roberts III
Richard A. Rodgers
Steven M. Rosenthal
Matthew L. Rosin
Samuel J. Salario Jr
Peter A Schoemann
Justin M. Senior
Christine R. Sensenig
Christian D. Shields
Lori W Smith
Jeffrey M. Taylor
Lisa S. Taylor
Misty M. C. Taylor
Ron Van Gent
Stephanie J. Waidner
Harold J. Webre III
Daniel R. Weede
Jewel White-Cole
Charlotte W Williams
Steele T Williams


Class of 1996
Class Total: $7,790.00
No.in Class: 376
Participation: 9%

Trusler Society
Greg Brown
Enrichment Society
Daniel Bachrach
Lynne F Bachrach
Bob Butts
Lorraine H. Clark
R. Scott Collins
Ana M. Craig
Roberto J. Diaz
Dwaine E. Eastham II
Christine M. Eckstein
Andrea J. Fowler
Kevin D. Fowler
Brian J. Gavsie
Jonathan S. Gowdy
Adam S. Hall
Herbert H. Hinson
James F Johnston
Sandra C. Kahle
Sandra A. Kenny
Catherine T King
Donald R. Kirk
Kevin M. Mayeux
Scott Michelman
Cynthia S. Munkittrick
Kristie J. Myers
John D. Ruffier
Esteban F Scornik
Jeremy M. Sensenig
Henry T Sorensen II
Casey Walker
John A. Walker
Dabney D. Ware
Kathryn B. Williams


Class of 1997
Class Total:
No. in Class:
Participation:
Partners
Rahul Patel


Holly L. Haworth
L. E. Hutton
Jeffrey A. Jacobs
Jay T Jambeck
Cristin H. Julian
Matthew P Julian
Jay Kim
Michael J. Laporte
Jason D. Lazarus
Thomas R. Levy
Scott R. Lilly
Jillian E. Marcus
John T Marshall
Sigrid S. McCawley
Campbell McLean IV
Jennifer Q Miller
M. Scotland Morris
Gary D. O'Nolan
Donovan L. Parker
Joshua A. Payne
Aaron R. Resnick
Justo Rodriguez III
Andrew Serano
Joseph H. Shaughnessy
Suhag A Shukla
Stephanie J. Toothaker
Christopher M. Tuccitto
Caroline A Watson
John D. Wilson
Bonita J. Young

Class of 1998
ClassTotal: $12,345.00
No. in Class: 391
Participation: 14%
Trusler Society
Timothy C. Ford
Tyler Hill
Karl N. Klein
Enrichment Society
Linda A Alley
J. Carter Andersen
Brannon B. Belcastro
Terryl Blackmon
Kenneth J. Bonenberger Jr.
Brent F Bradley
Derek E. Bruce
Ruth N. Campbell
Andrew L. Chapin
Alfred E. Corey III
Dennis G. Corrick
Michael L. Cotzen
Jorge De La Osa
Josias N. Dewey
Michael S. Dorris
Alistair D. Edwards
Eric M. Ellsley
Robert T Ervin
Craig D. Feiser
Peter D. Fellows
Marco Ferri
John C. Goede
Shawn C. Gray
Jeffrey M. Hazen
Kristy M. Johnson


$12,409.92
372
12%


Associates
Maria C. Carantzas

Trusler Society
MarkJ. Criser
Lara J. Tibbals
Enrichment Society
Marve Ann M. Alaimo
F Eugene Atwood
Christina Bohannan
Rabian M. Brooks III
Brian D. Burgoon
Christa E. Calamas
Cristin A. Conley
Scott T Farrell
David M. Fowler
N. Vail Gardner
Robert H. Gebaide
Shannon B. Gray


Fabienne E. Leconte
Julie M. Levitt
Richard L. Massey
Robert E. McFadden
Brooke E. Perez
Ingrid H. Ponce
Scott D. Ponce
Kari J. Roberts
Kimberly S. Rogers
WilliamJ. Romanos III
Taylor K Rose
Cristine M. Russell
Brian J. Sasadu
Michael J. Schmidt
David M. Seifer
R. Diane Senkowski
MonaJ. Shah
Lorraine H. Sherman
Carol R. Simpson
Brian K Szilvasy
Sami Thalji
Matthew E. Thatcher
Phillip W Thron
Daniel A. Tressler II
E. John Wagner II
Joshua B. Weingard

Class of 1999
Class Total: $6,934.97
No. in Class: 390
Participation: 14%

Enrichment Society
R. Bradley Adams
Benjamin R. Alvarez
Ronald C. Baldwin
Shannon M. Balloon
Bradley T Borden
Jeffrey P Brock
Wendy R. Brown
Johanna Wills Clark
Matthew R. Cogburn
Dena L. Copulsky
William P Daniel
Eric A. Dentel
David L. Dixon
Donna J. Ernest
Terrence N. Freeman II
Andrew M. Fussner
Bryan S. Gowdy
Matthew L. Grabinski
Steven M. Greenberg
Holly J. Greer
Kimberly J. Gustafson
Gregory C. Harrell
Maureen M. Hazen
Christina M. Johnson-Boyce
Jason Z. Jones
Matthew R. Kachergus
Antony B. Kolenc
Brian D. Leebrick
Janella K. Leibovitz
Christina V Lockwood
Kristin D. Mallatt
Kathy-Ann W Marlin
Samuel A. Maroon


76 UF LAW
























Sarah G. Maroon
Michael G. Moore
Joy Sabino Mullane
Liza V Passalacqua
William A. Pinto Jr.
Jennifer T Pollock
J. Grier Pressly III
Joel E. Roberts
Richard P Rollo
Alec D. Russell
Denise M. Scanziani
Scott T Shattuck
Richard N. Sherrill
John S. Simons
Adam M. Slipakoff
Sidney T Smith
Heath R. Stokley
Jeffrey M. Sullivan
Timothy M. Sullivan
Melissa R. Thalji
Brian P Trauman
Jeannine S. Williams

Class of 2000
Class Total:
No. in Class:
Participation:

Trusler Society
Landis V Curry III
Marc Mobley


$8,095.00
393
10%


Enrichment Society
Cristina Alonso
Christine A. Anchia
Paul B. Bernstein
Brandon C. Biederman
Hunter W Carroll
Mark H. Dahlmeier
Tricia A Dytkowski
Barbara D. Farb
Franklin D. Fields Jr.
Beth A. Gause
Austin J. Goodrich
Osvaldo L. Gratacos
Eric J. Hall
Pamela J. Kemp
Russell Koonin
Robert L. Lancaster
Debra L. Lowman
Matthew C. Lucas
Clint S. Malone
Frances M. Merritt
Jason E. Merritt
Ashley B. Moody
Andrea L. Niedermeyer
Donny A. Owens
Steven J. Resnick
Jeremy S. Sloane
Lisa A. G. Smith
Roy J. Smith IV
Andrew P Speranzini
Andrew M. Stanko
Chris R. Strohmenger
Louis C. Taormina
Sara A. Tolliver


R. Howard Walton
K Taylor White
Robert G. Whittel

Class of 2001
Class Total: $5,
No. in Class:
Participation:

Enrichment Society
Trevor B. Arnold
Rocky M. Cabagnot, Esq.
Tenesia C. Connelly
T Spencer Crowley III
Frank Cruz-Alvarez
Carol A. Daly
Lawrence A. Dany III
Paul E. De Hart III
Christine M. Donoghue
Brian C. Dowling
Christy S. Etheredge
Loren W Fender
Daniel P Galfond
Jon T Gatto
Lisa Z. Geiger
Jaime R. Girgenti
Laura A. Giuffrida
Bradley R. Gould
Joshua R. Heller
Robin L. Henderson
James N. Knight
Clyde J. LaForestJr.
Matthew B. Lerner
Samuel R. Linsky
Stacie M. Linsky
P Matthew Luka
James F McDonald
Jason S. Miller
Rodney K Mintz
Keith E. Myers
Jeffrey A Neiman
William C. Nijem Jr.
Melody A. Nundy
LaraJ. Osofsky
Matthew R. Parker
LaraJ. Peppard
Christopher M. Sacco
Callie N. Sandman
Erica S. Shultz
Shayne A. Thomas
Michelle R. Thresher
Justin B. Uhlemann
Joanna G. Walton
James B. Young Jr.

Class of 2002
Clas Total: $8,
No. in Class:
Participation:

Trusler Society
Derrill L. McAteer
Megan F McAteer

Enrichment Society
Jeffrey W Abraham
Lynn S. Alfano


181.00
379
12%


Amanda W Arnold
Jermy J. Ashby
Robert M. Barfield
Michael B. Bittner
StacyJ. Borisov
John D. Campo
Ryan M. Cardoso
Nancy E. Cason
Catherine J. Chamblee
Rhonda T Chung-de Cambre
Srinivas R. Dantuluri
Sara S. Davis
John T Dekle
James E. FryeJr.
Ana M. Garcia
Christian J. Gendreau
Steven T Gold
Joey Gould
Amanda M. Gruzas
Melody A. Hadley
Alexa Sherr Hartley
Kimberly D. Healy
Dawn R. Henrichon
Kim E. Howard
Rachel Kaloski
Peter S. Kezar
Brian H. Koch
Theodore S. Kypreos
Philip R. Lammens
Benjamin J. LeFrancois
Lori-Ann Lukacsko
George R. Moraitis Jr.
Steven A. Osher
Allyson Y Owens
Patryk Ozim
Matthew D. Patterson
Willie L. Prince II
Tracy C. Reinman
Cherie L. Sargeant
Jill A. Sausser
Scott R. Sausser
Heather R. Schwarz
David C. Scileppi
Kellye A Shoemaker
Rebecca S. Smith
Julian M. Smothers
Vance C. Stallings
Darryl C. Stangry
Fradyn Suarez
Gloria R. Walker
Robert W Westrick Jr.
Rosemarie A. Wildman
Allen C. Winsor


827.00
404
14%


Class of 2003
Class Total:
No. in Class:
Participation:

Trusler Society
Marilee A Mark
Robert M. Norway
Enrichment Society
Lisa M. Acharekar
Tomasz M. Bartosz


Joshua L. Becker
Jonathan T Brand
Brenda E. Byrne
Jessica M. Callow
Angela M. Chesser
Miguel Collazo III
Sarah E. Corbett
Darlene M. Corey
Donald H. Crawford II
James L. Davidson
Benjamin F Diamond
Meredith T Fensom
Melissa Fernandez
Christine C. Geraghty
Charles L. Gibbs
JoAnn M. Guerrero
Bradley G. Harper
Pamela J. Hatley
Nailah A. Jaffree
Talibah A. Jaffree
Karin M. Jones
Paul J. Kelly
Nicole C. Kibert
Traci A Kratish
Barry D. Lapides
Brian M. McPherson
Susan L. Mikolaitis
B. Darin Patton
Leslie A. Press
Sharletta A. Roberts
Cecil D. Rolle
Bradley P Rothman
Sarah E. Rumpf
Christopher T Rushing
Dexter A Smith
Scott K Smylie
Mitzi D. Sommer
Michael G. St. Jacques II
W Gregory Steube
Sabina Tomshinsky
Scott A Underwood
Julee K Vance
Matthew C. Vinton
J. Phillip Warren
Richard L. Weldon II
Lisa M. Wolgast
Joelle E. Zambello


$7,373.00
427
12%


UF LAW 77















2003-2004 thank you


* LLMT Alumni


Pro-ra -










colge cou-

cotiu t6 o S eeS

th -hleg S o-

-c ivn top- tier

exc-llnce 6' -


-S.a -educaion


Class of 1975
Class Total:
No. in Class:
Participation:


$4,925.00
39
26%


Associates
Robert E. Glennon Jr
Trusler Society
K Lawrence Gragg
H. Wynne James
Enrichment Society
Dennis A. Calfee
Thomas G. Christmann
Harry S. Colburn Jr
Richard A Fortunati
David M. Hudson
Stephen B. Lewallen


Charles B. Reber

Class of 1976
Class Total:
No in Class:
Participation


$3,225.00
42
24%


Trusler Society
Bernard A Barton Jr.
Enrichment Society
Thomas J. Korge
Jack A. Levine
R. Neal Manners
Charlton Mills
Robert A. Pierce
Ronald L. Rowland
Ralph E. Tallant Jr
W Eugene Tillman Jr
Stephen P Zagelow


Class of 1977
Class Total:
No. in Class:
Participation:


$4,348.88
39
13%


Founders Society Silver
Peter M. MacNamara
Trusler Society
Nathaniel L. Doliner
Hans G. Tanzler III
Enrichment Society
Patrick M. Andreotti
James A. Watson

Class of 1978
Class Total: $3,97500
No in Class: 69
Participation 20

Associates
William A Boyles
Enrichment Society
Kathleen A. Cooper
Kevin M. Daly
Paul D. Fitzpatrick
Glenda H. Gallagher-Ekasala
Don H. Goode


Bradley C. Grossenburg
Richard B. Hadlow
Frank J. Hammond III
John D. Owsen
James D. Pobjecky
Susan Slagle
B. Cary Tolley III
Howrl I 7nller


Class of 1979
Class Total:
No. in Class:
Participation
Associates
Jean C. Coker
Trusler Society
John J. Scroggin
Enrichment Society
Cheryl L. Gordon
Jonathan C. Gordon
Steven C. Lee
William J. Lindsay Jr
Robert F O'Connell

Class of 1980
Class Total:
No. in Class:
Participation:


$6,789.13
47
15%


$5,115.00
49
20%


Partners
Brian M. O'Connell
Trusler Society
Peter T Kirkwood

Enrichment Society
Harris H. Barnes III, Esq.
Gerald R. Kleedehn
William P Lyshak
Joyce R. Marr
Charles I Nash
Robert C. Rogers Jr.
Mark O. Scioscia
Ronald A Worley

Class of 1981
Class Total: $2,
No. in Class:
Participation:

Enrichment Society
Michael N. Annis
David E. Bowers
Phillip W Hegg
William R. Lane Jr
Joseph W Mathews Jr
Melinda M. Mathews
Patrick J. McGowan
Robert O. Middleton
Daniel C. Re
Randolph J. Rush
Gerald F Stack
Harry B. Stackhouse
Anton H. Zidansek


Class of 1982
Class Total:
No. in Class:
Participation:

Trusler Society
Michael D. Minton
Patricia A. Willing
Enrichment Society
Steven R. Cole
Gary B. Leuchtman
Roger J. Rovell
Alan L. Rubens


Class of 1983
Class Total:
No. in Class:
Participation:
Partners
R. Lawrence Heinkel

Trusler Society
John N. Giordano
Enrichment Society
Kent B. Cronquist
Alan H. Daniels
Michael H. Davis
Mark E. Manovich
Robert L. Miller
Leonard T Provenzale
John F Shreves
James P Stevens
Mark A. Stiebel
Gregory F Wilder
James B. Wiley

Class of 1984
Class Total:
No. in Class:


$2,800.00
63
10%


$7,675.00
60
22%


Enrichment Society
Tracey A. Anderson
Hamden H. Baskin III
Robin K Froug
John A Garner
Adil Haradhvala
John P lurlano
John E. Knight III
Stephen R. Looney
Richard Paladino
Lawrence S. Ribler
Stephen T Rushing
Thomas M. Sowa
William R. Swindle

Class of 1986
Class Total: $
No. in Class:
Participation:
Trusler Society
J. Carter Perkins Sr.
Enrichment Society
David P Webb

Class of 1987
Class Total: $
No. in Class:


Participation


Partners
Douglas A. Wright
Enrichment Society
Anthony D. Bartirome


$8,575.00
74


Partic ipati[on: 12%
Associates
Edward E. Sawyer
Trusler Society
Lisa C. Berry


195.00 Enrichment Society
67 John A. Bobango
1 Lloyd V Crawford
John M. Farris
Rick H. McClure
Charles D. Rubin
R. Dennis Tweed
Sharon A. V Zahner


Class of 1985
Class Total:
No. in Class:
Participation
Associates
W Michael Clifford


$2,885.00
74
19%


Garey F Butler
David L. Fish
Shawn M. Flanagan
Scott E. Hunt
Dennis M. O'Leary
Antonie W Walsh

Class of 1988
Class Total:
No. in Class:
Participation:


Enrichment Society
John C. Bovay
Jane D. Callahan
J. Frank Hall Jr
Bruce D. Johnson
Dirk Andrew Williams


Class of 1989
Class Total:
No. in Class:
Participation:
Enrichment Society
Allen Buckley
Charles L. Cooper Jr
Vitauts M. Gulbis
Dianne D. Hagan
John E. Lawlor III


$1,200.00
49
4%








,2,295.00
63
13%


$1,225.00
43
12%


$1,225.00
63
13%



























I I... I I 11

I I.. I I I I I

Class ol 1990
I, I ,1



Trs r S


Enridlinent ear
' I ....ll I ....
I .'' I, ,..



' I li I
I I I I I I ''
.. I.I I.11 h ''.. 1

Class of 1991
I, I, I






















Truslr e *I
I ,























Enriliinent ?-arnr
I II I1...




| I I .. .











Class of 1993
I ,, '1 '





I I























John E Jewell
Lester B. Law
Matthew B. Mayper
I 11 .1 I I Ii Ih













Douglas A S 199
Willia Zox
I ,,,, I "








Ih I I I.





Douglas A. Smith
William P Zox


Class of 1994


EnI Idinen
,,, I,


I ,, ,, 'I I "




I I i . I I i

I I,, i ,,
I.. ..,I I il l I





Class of 1995























Trusler -ihnil
I I I I I I












Class of 1997
I, I 1
,,, I,































Eiirlnienlltii i s.?Iir
I .... I I II
i I I ,
',,, i I I I ....

I ,,,I II i. I



























Class of 1998














Enrichment Society
Matthew J. Ahearn
Robert J. Barna
Class ol 1997







I ...... I I I
I 'I 1 I i



EnIchment. SocIety
Ma..hew J Ahearn
Robert J Barna,


I II..,
I , , 1


I,, I I I ,

I .. I I I


I ... I I
I, I|


Class ol 1999
I, I 1
,, I,


E lit illllllll Joi)le [
I i I I .
I,, I I I .. .

I i l ,..... Ii
i i l.. II I h. 1

I.. I I I hI I


,I I I I. II


Class of 2000

, I, I
,, I,



I .i I I i



I .. 1 ......


I ... I I
I... il I I Iii Ii
I Ih I I I
I .. .. 1 1 I 1i
I I i I I I l Ill

Class ol 2001
I, I 1
I,


E lit illllllll Joi)le [
Iih I I
I I... I I
I I I I I I
i I I i. .. ..

I i i I I .
i .l~li hI I I I
I Ih i
I ...l I I......


Class of 2002

No. in Class:
Participation:

Trusler Society
Marc Mobley


Ennrdinent s-?ler[
FnirIilin I il lIi
I .. 11 1 1 .






11l ...

Class of 2003
, I I 1I
I,



I . I I .


Enrlninilinent 'Ieri







... .... ....
, 11 ,, [ I, ..


f o r wh at I re i ved
+I.E














IB ?1 lit)l iiIl ^ NP lII K lllllllllllllllllll







m~l,
frma h, law






















bla, I lieve my
tfA ^ ainjgibil supporHtA Eiii^^
hep th l.aw



andMl^?1| ^ re l~fflects in, ^






of Flr'a an th





plys inS -~i Ip wMrovidingl|
hig qu ltS lgi

edctin in

Iloridl*


64
13%


I i i ....














FOUR STUDENTS SELECTED FOR


Public Interest



Internships


F our University of Florida Levin College of Law students
will spend this summer providing critically needed legal
assistance to low-income or underserved communities as a
part of Equal Justice Works' Summer Corps program.
Andrew Brajcich, Kara Coggins, Dina Finkel and Jill
Mahler will each receive a $1,000 education award voucher
through this national AmeriCorps-funded program.
Applicants from 113 schools competed for the opportunities
to intern with nonprofit public interest law organizations
nationwide.
Brajcich will intern with Hale & Dorr Legal Services
Center in Jamaica Plain, Mass., Coggins with the Georgia
Resource Center in Atlanta, Ga., Finkel with Jacksonville
Area Legal Aid in Jacksonville, and Mahler with the Legal
Aid Society of Palm Beach County in West Palm Beach.
The first- and second-year students will each spend at
least 300 hours assisting clients and gaining first-hand experi-
ence and lawyering skills in areas such as client intake, indi-
vidual representation, and legal research and writing.
"Given the pervasive need for well-qualified law students
committed to public interest law, it is exciting that four law
students were selected from UF for this wonderful opportuni-
ty," said Linda Calvert Hansen, assistant dean for the Center
for Career Services. "I am confident the experiences they gain
and services they will provide will prove personally rewarding
and help further their career goals."
Equal Justice Works (formerly the National Association
for Public Interest Law) was founded in 1986 by law students
working for equal justice on behalf of underserved communi-
ties and causes. Today, Equal Justice Works is the national
leader in creating summer and postgraduate public interest
opportunities for law students and lawyers, as well as in urg-
ing more public interest programming at law schools.


UF LAW www.aw.ufl.edu

UF Law magazine, produced by the Communications Office:
Debra D. Amirin Tim Lockette Design
Director Senior Writer JS Design Studio
Kathy Fleming Nekita Robinson Printing
Associate Director Program Assistant StorterChilds Printing, Co.
UF Law Editor
UF Law magazine: 352-273-0650, fleming@law.ufl.edu


Dean
Robert H. Jerry II
Associate Deans
ACADEMIC AFFAIRS
George Dawson
GRADUATE TAX PROGRAM
Michael K. Friel
INTERNATIONAL STUDIES
Stuart R. Cohn
FACULTY DEVELOPMENT
Lyrissa Lidsky
LIBRARY &TECHNOLOGY
M. Kathleen Price
STUDENTS, PROFESSIONALISM,
AND COMMUNITY RELATIONS
Gail E. Sasnett

ADMINISTRATIVE AFFAIRS
J. Patrick Shannon


UF LAW CENTER

Michael J. McNerney (JD 73)
Chairman
W.C. Gentry (JD 71)
Chairman-Elect
Marybeth McDonald (JD 82)
Immediate Past Chair
Dennis A. Calfee (JD 75)
Treasurer
E.L. Roy Hunt
Secretary

Active Members
C. Wayne Alford (JD 61)
Charles Abbott (JD 53)
W. George Allen (JD 62)
C. DuBose Ausley (JD 62)
Jean A. Bice (JD 75)
Bruce H. Bokor (JD 72)
Bill Bone (JD 84)
Les Burke (JD 68)
Jeanelle G. Bronson (JD 78)
J. Thomas Cardwell (JD 66)
Joseph P Carolan II (JD 74)
Lawton M. Chiles III


Complete list of all faculty, staff.
www.law.ufl.edu/faculty

Assistant Deans
CAREER SERVICES
Linda Calvert Hanson
STUDENTS
Richard L. Ludwick
ADMISSIONS
Michael Patrick

Development &Alumni Affairs
Donald Hale
Senior Director
Kelley Frohlich
Director
Andrea Shirey
Associate Director
Kerrie Mitchell
Assistant Director


R ASSOCIATION

Thomas C. Cobb (JD 68)
Charles Commander Ill (JD 65)
John H. Dyer Jr (JD 87)
Ladd H. Fassett (JD 79)
Patricia C. Fawsett (JD 73)
Michael Ferguson (JD 89)
Linda Getzen (JD 82)
Gene K. Glasser (JD 72)
Scott G. Hawkins (JD 83)
Michael Heekin (JD 78)
Jeffrey A. Hirsch (JD 75)
Corinne C. Hodak (JD 89)
Hal H. Kantor (JD 72)
Ronald C. LaFace (JD 66)
Frederick Leonhardt (JD 74)
Christine N. Markussen (JD 72)
Pedro A. Martin (JD 78)
Margaret D. Mathews (JD 82)
Clifton A. McClellond Jr JD 69)
Michael D. Minton (JD 81)
S. Austin Peele (JD 63)
Becky A. Powhatan (JD 76)
J. Wallace Pope Jr. (JD 69)
Juliet Roulhac (JD 87)


INC. 2004-2005

E. Thom Rumberger (JD 61)
Everett J. Santos (JD 66)
Johnson S. Savary (JD 56)
John J. Schickel (JD 72)
Lawrence E. Sellers Jr (JD 79)
Linda Shelley (JD 77)
Glenn W. Sturm (JD 85)
Frank D. Upchurch III (JD 74)
John J. Upchurch (JD 68)
Bill Weber (JD 76)
Malcolm B. WseheartJr (JD 70)
Jean E. Wilson (JD 82)
Evan J. Yegelwel (JD 80)
Gwynne A. Young (JD 74)
Peter W. Zinober (JD 69)
Ex-Officio
J. Bernard Machen
Robert Jerry
George Dawson
Paul A. Robell
George Vaka
Donald Hale
Kelley Frohlich


Complete list of Law Center Association Emeritus Trustees:
www.law.ufl.edu/alumni/trustees.shtml


LAW ALUMNI COUNCIL EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE
Officers At Large Members Gary L. Printy (JD 82)
George Vaka (JD 83) Leon Brush (JD 62) Sarah Rumpf (JD 03)
President C. Randolph Coleman (JD 78) Misty M.C. Taylor (JD 95)
Oscar Sanchez (JD 82) Barry Davidson (JD 67) Bonita Young (JD 97)
Immediate Past President Mayanne Downs (JD 87)
Tim Cerio (JD 95) Adam Hall (JD 96) Ex-Offico
President-Elect Kenneth R. Johnson (JD 81) Michael McNerney
Mark W. Klingensmith (JD 85) Kimberly Leach Johnson (JD 81) Robert H. Jerry II
Secretary Joseph C. Mellichamp III (JD 70) William H. Page
Rahul Patel (JD 97) Andrea Shirey
Matthew N. Posgay (JD 94) Kerrie Mitchell


80 UF LAW






FINAL THOUGHTS


What We Do For a Living


When you meet new peo-
ple in a social situation,
one of the factors that shapes
your first impression is occupa-
tion. When you tell someone
you are a lawyer, I'll bet a
myriad of responses occur.
Unfortunately, some people
gravitate toward the negative
images of the legal profession
and too often assume your sole
purpose as a lawyer is to find
legal loopholes rather than to
seek truth and justice.
Now put yourself in my size
11 shoes for a moment. When I
introduce myself, I proudly tell
people I am a member of the


alumni office that specializes in
fundraising for the Levin College
of Law. A frequent response, "I'm
glad I don't have your job."
I will admit my work, at
times, has a steep incline. Those
are the times I remember why we
do what we do: the world needs
capable men and women who
can seek truth, fight for justice
and become a public servant to
all citizens. I'm proud to be part
of this place because I know our
work produces the competent
attorneys of good character our
nation needs.
At very critical junctions in
our lives we all need a lawyer.


Invest in the Future...
and Your Own Legacy

Investing in your law school can bring returns of many kinds,
from a sense of fulfillment and renewed affiliation with your
alma mater to the tangible tax savings provided by wealth
transfer models that support your family and your interests.
The most popular ways of supporting the college include:

Outright gifts of cash or securities

Real estate gifts

Gift annuities

Charitable Remainder Trusts and Charitable Lead Trusts

Planned gifts through your estate

To learn more, contact Donald Hale at 352-273-0640 or
haled@law.ufl.edu.


When we buy our first home,
adopt a child, start a business,
need an advocate for individual
rights or a community project,
have tax problems or make our
estate plans, we not only need a
lawyer, we need a good lawyer.
The guardians of all of our rights
and values are held in the hands
of those who support, defend,
and honor our constitution. This
responsibility is in your hands.
Yes, I am a fund raiser, but I
like to think of myself as an advo-
cate of the legal profession first. My
advocacy is focused on harvesting
gratitude from those who benefit
from our faculty and our programs.
The primary mission for me -
and the other dedicated staff in my
office is to help you renew ties
with the college in the hope it will
lead toward an investment in the
form of an annual fund donation
or a major gift.
Why should you make an
investment? Because the roots of all
good UF lawyers are planted in this
law school ... your law school.
Your gift is an investment in your
legacy as much as the future of our
students.
Your college and your profes-
sion need your investment. It
might not change the reaction you
and I receive when we introduce
ourselves at parties, but it will bring
far more returns than you could
ever envision a sense of fulfill-
ment, pride in our law school, and
a stronger, better legal system.


BY DONALD HALE
Senior Director,
Development and
Alumni Affairs
Please note new telephone
number for Alumni Affairs:
352-273-0640
haled@law.ufl.edu


UF LAW 81



















Getting


to Work
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UNIVERSITY OF
FLORIDA
FREDRIC G. LEVIN COLLEGE OF LAW
P.O. BOX 117633
GAINESVILLE, FL 32611-7633


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