• TABLE OF CONTENTS
HIDE
 Front Cover
 Books in print by UFLAW faculty,...
 Table of Contents
 News
 Advertising
 Partners
 America's lawyer
 Grassroots: UFLaw alums encouraged...
 Grassroots: UFLaw alums encouraged...
 Business travel overseas?
 Heritage of leadership
 Alumni
 Families and philanthropy
 Faculty
 Transition
 Calendar
 Building on past successes
 Back Cover






Group Title: UF Law: University of Florida Fredric G. Levin College of Law
Title: UFlaw
ALL VOLUMES CITATION PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00072634/00003
 Material Information
Title: UFlaw
Alternate Title: UF law
Physical Description: v. : ill. ; 28 cm.
Language: English
Creator: Levin College of Law
Publisher: Levin College of Law Communications Office
Place of Publication: Gainesville FL
Publication Date: c2002-
Frequency: irregular
completely irregular
 Subjects
Genre: government publication (state, provincial, terriorial, dependent)   ( marcgt )
 Notes
Statement of Responsibility: University of Florida, Levin College of Law.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 39, no. 1 (fall 2002)-
General Note: Title from cover.
General Note: Last issue consulted: v. 40, no. 1 (fall 2003).
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00072634
Volume ID: VID00003
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved, Board of Trustees of the University of Florida
Resource Identifier: aleph - 002972228
oclc - 53380492
notis - APL3981
lccn - 2003229880
 Related Items
Preceded by: University of Florida lawyer

Table of Contents
    Front Cover
        Front cover
    Books in print by UFLAW faculty, staff, alumni
        i
    Table of Contents
        Page 1
    News
        Page 2
        Pro bono students honored for caring
            Page 2
        Tuition competitive
            Page 3
        Iraq conflict
            Page 4
        Best Bar passage rate
            Page 5
        Feral cats
            Page 6
        Confirmation: notables/awards/accomplishments
            Page 7
            Page 8
    Advertising
        Page 9
    Partners
        Page 10
        Completion scheduled for Spring '05
            Page 10
            Page 11
        Invaluable experience
            Page 12
        'Trzydzieci lat w Polsce': thirty years in Poland
            Page 13
        Scholarship: FBI selects UFLAW
            Page 14
        ICAM
            Page 15
        Moot team wins two national titles
            Page 16
        Renewed 'firm giving' aids students
            Page 17
        Schwait 5-year plan pays off
            Page 18
        Power of words: to 'spin' or not to 'spin'
            Page 19
    America's lawyer
        Page 20
        Page 21
        Page 22
        Page 23
    Grassroots: UFLaw alums encouraged to join effort
        Page 24
        Page 25
    Grassroots: UFLaw alums encouraged to join effort
        Page 26
        Page 27
        Page 28
        Page 29
        Page 30
        Page 31
    Business travel overseas?
        Page 32
    Heritage of leadership
        Page 33
        Page 34
    Alumni
        Page 35
        Gators in Gotham
            Page 35
            Page 36
            Page 37
            Page 38
        Class notes
            Page 39
            Page 40
            Page 41
            Page 42
        Net gain
            Page 43
            Page 44
        In memoriam: Raymer F. Maguire 1921-2003
            Page 45
            Page 46
        In memoriam: Julian Derieux Clarkson 1929-2003
            Page 47
        Gator law grads honored
            Page 48
            Page 49
        In memoriam: Richard E. Nelson 1931-2003
            Page 50
    Families and philanthropy
        Page 51
    Faculty
        Page 52
        Trailbalzer takes a breather
            Page 52
            Page 53
            Page 54
            Page 55
        New professors
            Page 56
            Page 57
        New Race and Relations Center director: 'Renaissance woman'
            Page 58
        International distinguished foreign educators integral to UFLaw initiatives
            Page 59
        They impacted thousands of lawyers
            Page 60
            Page 61
        Equal protection: mental health and the death penalty
            Page 62
            Page 63
    Transition
        Page 64
        The man for the job
            Page 64
            Page 65
        31 days in July
            Page 66
            Page 67
        36 hours in San Francisco
            Page 68
        Mills closes circle
            Page 69
            Page 70
            Page 71
    Calendar
        Page 72
    Building on past successes
        Page 73
    Back Cover
        Page 74
Full Text
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BY UFLAW FACULTY. STAFF. ALUMNI
Call UFLaw Bookstore at 352.392.6141 or order through University ot Florida Bookstore at www.ufl.bkstr.com


I.-St"'M


African Americans at the
University of Florida
BETTY J. STEWART-DOWDELL,
KEVIN M. MCCARTHY
Whitehall Printing Company
Documents struggles/achievements of
African Americans on campus, and
those who accomplished "firsts" in
previously white-only activities.
Photos / information convey
perseverance needed to overcome
racial prejudice. UFLaw coverage
includes Virgil Hawkins story, details
on creation of Florida A&M law
school, inroads by George Starke Jr.
and George Allen, information on
now-Judge Stephan Mickle and Hazel
Land, John Marshall Bar Association
and its first black president, and relat-
ed law school history.


Law, Medicine and Medical
Technology: Cases and
Materials
BY LARS NOAH, BARBARA A. NOAH
Foundation Press, 2002
Comprehensive treatment of legal issues
surrounding development, testing,
approval and marketing of medical
technologies (including drugs, medical
devices, biotechnology). Examines
topics relating to government regulation
(such as categorization of products,
premarket approval, postmarket surveil-
lance, product information dissemina-
tion). Covers variety of tort issues,
intellectual property questions, considera-
tion of payment/pricing issues and
legal/ethical complexities posed by evolv-
ing technologies. Includes caselaw, regu-
latory materials, discussion problems,
extensive notes/questions.


Understanding Antitrust and
Its Economic Implications
E. THOMAS SULLIVAN,
JEFFREY L. HARRISON
LexisNexis, 2002
Introduces new antitrust challenges
as result of continued economic
globalization, technological advances.
Considers international reach of
U.S. antitrust law. Includes antitrust
principles, current developments,
trends/points of view likely to dictate
future direction. Discusses recent deci-
sions re: summary judgment, antirtrust
standing and injury. Explores implica-
tions of Microsoft decision for various
areas of antitrust law. Addresses issues
raised by intersection of antitrust
and intellectual property, exterritorial
applications.


iqul
Writing
by








Legal Writing By Design -
A Guide to Great Briefs
and Memos
TERESA J. RAMBO,
LEANNE J. PFLAUM
Carolina Academic Press, 2001
Shows how to transform ideas into
writing. Discusses legal rules/
reasoning and clear effective writing;
demonstrates how to design and write
predictive memo and persuasive brief.
Provides rules of style and citation,
editing tips, sample memo, multiple
sample briefs. Step-by-step guide
through each subject with strategies
that work. Reveals successful tactics of
oral argument, the culmination of the
persuasive process. Includes hypotheti-
cals, outlines, writing samples. Adopted
by number of law school research/writ-
ing departments.


Conspiracy Theories Secrecy
and Power in American Culture
MARK FENSTER
University of Minnesota Press, 1999/
Paperback 2001
Analyzes complex role of conspiracy
theories in the center and periphery of
American culture and politics.
Discusses competing approaches to
conspiracy theory's influence on main-
stream and extremist politics; conspir-
acy theory in popular culture (TheX-
Files, Oliver Stone's JFK), popular reli-
gion (Christian fundamentalist under-
standing of the endtimes); and the
"conspiracy community" of radio,
magazine /book publishers, Internet
resources, and role-playing games.
Publishers Weekly: "Commendably
level-headed analysis of the grip that
conspiracy theories maintain on con-
temporary America..."


Criminal Procedure:
Regulation of Police
CHRISTOPHER SLOBOGIN
LexisNexis, 2002
Focuses on search and seizure,
interrogation, identification, entrap-
ment. Describes everyday police
practices, potential methods of
regulating police (including state
law, departmental regulations, inter-
national treaties), and historical
perspective on and comparison of
U.S. approach (vs. other countries)
to police regulation. Empirical stud-
ies testing judicial assumptions re:
eyewitness identification, effect of
Miranda warnings, efficacy of police
sanctions. Promotes lawyering skills
through negotiation exercise,
problem method and motions/tran-
scripts/documents from real case.









EDI T 0 RS
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CONTENTS FALL 2003


NEWS
3 Tuition Value
4 Barristers in Iraq
5 Bar Passage Tops

PARTNERS
13 'Trzydzieci...
17 100% Firms
18 Trial Team Champs

ALUMNI
41 Three Rivers Celebrates
44 Triple Threat Gator
49 Too Young

FACULTY
52 Trailblazer Legacy
56 Outstanding New Hires
60 Retirees Leave Void
63 Administrators Promoted

COLUMNS
19 Writing Legally
51 Competitive Edge
62 Faculty Viewpoint
73 Closing Argument


* VOLUME 40 ISSUE 1


20 America's Lawyer
'World citizen, truly one of the most important figures in the
Greatest Generation...courageous visionary.'

24 Grassroots Political Action
Law Alumni needed to help ensure success of UF Political Network
COVER STORY
26 Women on the Rise BY KRISTEN HARMEL
70 years after first woman graduates from UFLaw, tables have turned
and enrolling females outnumber men

33 Heritage of Leadership
Former Florida Governors, U.S. Senators, College Presidents,
Justices named to new notable alumni Recognition Society

35 Gators in Gotham
UFLaw grads making mark in Big Apple academia, business,
government, court rooms and public service
COVER: Outstanding pioneering UFLaw alumnae from the 30s, 60s, 70s and 80s Rebecca Bowles
Hawkins, Susan Black, Martha Barnett, Carol Browner and Allison Bethel (profiled in our cover story,
Women on the Rise") make it easier for today's Levin College of Law female students, such as
Karen Persis 2L. Persis, typical of those now enrolled and those who will come, serves this Fall as presi-
dent of Florida Blue Key (third straight law school student to head that leadership organization), president
of Law Association for Women, in the top 10 percent of her class, a Criminal Law Book Award winner,
teaching assistant for Legal Research & Writing and Appellate Advocacy, and concentrating on constitu-
tional and governmental law. As a UF journalism undergrad (2001 with honors), Persis activities included
Delta Gamma president, Women s Affairs Director for Panhellenic Council and Student Government,
Homecoming Queen finalist, a Women s Leadership Conference director, Glamour Magazine /Cover Girl
regional "Women at Their Best" selection, and named to the UF Hall of Fame.


I~













4th Annual CSRRR Event Explores
Language/Race Influence

UF Law's Center
Sfor the Study
of Race and Race
Relations (CSRRR)
hosted its fourth
annual conference
this spring, "Rhyme,
Rhetoric and Race:
Exploring the Influence
of Language,
Keynoter Guinier of Harvard Literature and Lyrics
on Race Relations."
Harvard Law Professor Lani Guinier, the
first black woman appointed to a tenured
professorship at that school, was keynote
speaker. Conference organizer and CSRRR
Associate Director Desta Meghoo-Peddie '01
said, "she and the other presenters brought
great insight, understanding and assistance to
the improvement of race relations."
UFLaw Faculty participating in the confer-
ence included Assistant Professor Jonathan
Cohen, Levin Mabie & Levin Professor of Law
Berta Hernandez-Truyol, Associate Professor
Pedro Malavet, and Irving Cypen Professor of
Law Sharon Rush.
Conference 2004 will be a collaboration
with UFLaw's Center for Children and the Law
and will be March 26-27. Scheduled topic is
the 50th anniversary of Brown vs. Board of
Education.


PRO BONO

Students Honored for Caring


ore than 70 students who combined contributed more than 5,500 hours in
2002-03 to under served, under represented and those with limited resources -
were honored at a spring Pro Bono Awards brunch.
"Each year the Pro Bono Project gets bigger, with more students doing great
work in Alachua County and North Central Florida," said Jessie Howell, assistant
director for UFLaw Career Services.
About 320 students are currently involved, but the brunch honored those who
met a quota of 35 volunteer hours. Howell said this year's projects included prison-
ers' rights, children's issues and general civil work.
The 2003 Pro Bono Student of the Year Award for a graduating 3L went to
Darlene Corey of Miami who volunteered 436 total hours or an average of about
15 hours per school week. Corey hopes to start a career in the public sector.
"Darlene is a very compassionate student who came to law school to make a
difference and leaves having made great strides toward that end," Howell said. I


UFLAW I FALL 2 0 0 3


NEWS~w













4th Annual CSRRR Event Explores
Language/Race Influence

UF Law's Center
Sfor the Study
of Race and Race
Relations (CSRRR)
hosted its fourth
annual conference
this spring, "Rhyme,
Rhetoric and Race:
Exploring the Influence
of Language,
Keynoter Guinier of Harvard Literature and Lyrics
on Race Relations."
Harvard Law Professor Lani Guinier, the
first black woman appointed to a tenured
professorship at that school, was keynote
speaker. Conference organizer and CSRRR
Associate Director Desta Meghoo-Peddie '01
said, "she and the other presenters brought
great insight, understanding and assistance to
the improvement of race relations."
UFLaw Faculty participating in the confer-
ence included Assistant Professor Jonathan
Cohen, Levin Mabie & Levin Professor of Law
Berta Hernandez-Truyol, Associate Professor
Pedro Malavet, and Irving Cypen Professor of
Law Sharon Rush.
Conference 2004 will be a collaboration
with UFLaw's Center for Children and the Law
and will be March 26-27. Scheduled topic is
the 50th anniversary of Brown vs. Board of
Education.


PRO BONO

Students Honored for Caring


ore than 70 students who combined contributed more than 5,500 hours in
2002-03 to under served, under represented and those with limited resources -
were honored at a spring Pro Bono Awards brunch.
"Each year the Pro Bono Project gets bigger, with more students doing great
work in Alachua County and North Central Florida," said Jessie Howell, assistant
director for UFLaw Career Services.
About 320 students are currently involved, but the brunch honored those who
met a quota of 35 volunteer hours. Howell said this year's projects included prison-
ers' rights, children's issues and general civil work.
The 2003 Pro Bono Student of the Year Award for a graduating 3L went to
Darlene Corey of Miami who volunteered 436 total hours or an average of about
15 hours per school week. Corey hopes to start a career in the public sector.
"Darlene is a very compassionate student who came to law school to make a
difference and leaves having made great strides toward that end," Howell said. I


UFLAW I FALL 2 0 0 3


NEWS~w













TUITION COMPETITIVE

Even with 2003 Hike, UFLaw Still Best Value

Due to progressive decreases in state and university budgets during the first part
of this decade and a greater need for scholarship dollars, Levin College of Law
tuition for both in-state and out-of-state residents was raised approximately
15 percent effective the start of the Fall 2003 term.
"We have been great stewards of our funds and provide an outstanding
education," said associate Dean Pat Shannon. "As we strive to be a Top 10 Public law
school, however we cannot do it on the funds we have." The increase was approved
and implemented by the UF Board of Trustees and the State Legislature.
Per credit hour charges for in-state tuition rose 12.8 percent to $230 (compared
to approximately $200 in 2002), and out-of-state tuition rose 15.8 percent from
$709 to $823 per credit hour. Additional increases are expected for 2004-05, but will
not be determined until mid-2004 and also must be approved by the UF Board
and legislature.
As reflected below, even with the increase UFLaw still ranks well below most
other comparable public law schools in tuition charges. Students will see benefit of
the increase through additional financial aid monies, allocated to the law school by
UF, based on five percent of tuition income. EU

2004III' Il ION COMPARISON


IN-STATE Public Law Schools'
Michigan
Virginia
Minnesota
UCLA
Illinois
Texas
Iowa
California-Berkeley'
North Carolina'
Wisconsin
Alabama
Georgia
Levin College of Law


$27,850
$23,798
$17,150
$15,012
$12,822
$12,216
$11,603
$11,562
$9,966
$9,560
$7,252
$7,130
$6,890


OUT-OF-STATE Public Law Schools'
Michigan $32,850
Virginia $29,201
Minnesota $27,116
UCLA $26,012
Illinois $25,910
Iowa $25,361
Wisconsin $25,010
Levin College of Law $24,680
Georgia $23,898
California-Berkeley' $22,694
North Carolina' $21,822
Texas $20,784
Alabama $14,982
*Does not reflect 2003-04 rate increases


Transformative Mediation
Draws a Crowd: Dispute Resolution
Scheduled in September
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'Saving What's Left'
Subject of 9th Annual Public Interest
Environmental Conference

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Final Frontiers: Saving What's Left."
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FALL 2003 | UFLAW


GRADE CHANGE

Benefits Students, Makes UFLaw More Competitive

S ased on recommendations of the faculty Academic
L Standards Committee (ASC), changes were made in
-- UFLaw's grading system to make it more competitive
and to better reflect students' abilities.
The first-year grading curve was raised from
existing 2.80-2.85, with a mean grade for all courses of
L 3.0, to a mean range of 3.15-3.25. U














IRAQ CONFLICT

'Up Close, Personal' to Six UFLaw Students


While U.S. involvement in Iraq
results in some direct or indi-
rect impact to all Americans
and citizens of countries worldwide, six
Levin College of Law students were
involved "up close and personal."
According to the Military Law
Students Association (MLSA), a student
support organization formed in 2002-03,
information about students called to
active duty during Operation Iraqi
Freedom includes (due to nature of con-
flict, situation of each may have changed
prior to publication):


* Capt. Matt Brannen / 2L (Marine) -
One of founding members of MLSA,
he served in 4th ANGLICO Marine
unit and was leader on the Sea Air
Liaison Team (SALT). He was deployed
to Persian Gulf and has returned.
* Lt. Alex Harper / 3L (Navy) A Naval
Reserve Lieutenant sent to Kuwait for a
month-long deployment as a supply
officer.
* Lt. Ryon Little / 2L (Coast Guard) -
A 1996 graduate of the Coast Guard
Academy sent to the Port of Miami in
an anti-terrorism deployment.
* Sgt. Edward Lohrer / 2L (Army) -
Member of the 560th Movement
Control Team (MCT) at the Talil
Airbase in Iraq. (MCT tracks the
movement of military vehicles moving


through Iraq and Kuwait, ensuring
accountability of the vehicles and
efficient road networks.)
* Lance Cpl. Taylor Pancake / 2L
(Marine) Sent with Marine units to
an undisclosed location.
* Cpl. Juan Tabio / 2L (Marine) Was
with Brannen in 4th ANGLICO
Marine unit in Persian Gulf, also
SALT member and returned home.
Other UFLaw students, including
Capt. Steve Berlin / 3L MLSA member
and former Army field artillery officer -
are serving the country and its military


services in ways other than duty in Iraq.
Berlin and five others are preparing for
the Army's Judge Advocate General (JAG)
Corps while on active duty at the law
school, and five reservists are here with
JAG contracts.
"As an active duty officer, I knew the
Army had no intention to recall me to
participate in Iraq," Berlin said, "but that
is the hardest part of the conflict know-
ing that all my friends are over there.
I sometimes redouble my resolve as a
student because I sit in the comfortable
environs of Gainesville while my buddies
live in 125-degree heat and do not know
if the people they are trying to help are
going to thank or shoot them."
According to MLSA, the five UFLaw
students on active duty along with Berlin


and selected for JAG are third-year
students James "Lee" Marsh (Navy ballis-
tic missile submarine officer), Greg Fike
(Air Force civil engineer), Sean Boynton
(Marine helicopter pilot), second-year
student Jeff Breloski (Army Signal Corps
officer) and first-year Kevin Jinks (Army
infantry officer).
The reserve officers with the
Marine Corps are third-year students
Jenelle Douze, Courtney Walsh, Jay
Janabajal and Joel Maxson, and second-
year student Richard Donaldson
(Army).


Berlin credited formation of MLSA -
with membership consisting of military
officers, students interested in joining the
military, those with military family and
others who just want to actively show their
support as being of great assistance "in
trying times to all of us involved in any
way with military service."
"Captain Brannen was the backbone
of MLSA this past year and built it from
scratch," Berlin said. "We even started a
roster of volunteers to help his wife with
yard work and such." Berlin said
MLSA, which includes members who
served in Vietnam and Operation Desert
Storm, participated in "Toys for Tots"
and "Books for Tots" drives at the college
and intends to continue such activities
in 2003-04. M


I UFLAW I FALL 2003


NEWS~w













BEST BAR PASSAGE RATE

UFLAW Students Continue Success

Continuing their record of success over the last seven years, Levin
College of Law students came out on top in the Florida Bar spring
examination according to data released by the Florida Supreme Court.
Better than 82 percent of UFLaw students taking the exam in February
for the first time passed, making it the ninth time in the last 15 tests given
that Levin College of Law students lead the state's eight private and public
law schools from which students are being
tested. In four of the other exams, UF finished
second, giving it the best overall record of any fn sh
law school in Florida. a T
A total of 956 took the February test, with
728 or 76.2 percent passing. UF had 126 1 o ts,
of 153 participants pass, or 82.4 percent.
Other Florida law school passage rates were lai .
Florida State University, 80.5 percent;
Stetson, 77.3; Nova Southeastern, 73.1;
Florida Coastal, 69.8; University of Miami, 67.9; St. Thomas, 58.1; and Barry
University of Orlando, 37.5. Law graduates from non-Florida law schools
had a 79.6 rate.
Florida Bar Board of Examiners, an administrative arm of the State
Supreme Court, conducts exams every February and July for law school
graduates seeking to practice law in Florida. An average of about 900 take
the early test each year, and close to 1900 take each summer test.
In the last eight February tests, UF graduates have been first five times
and second twice in terms of percentage passing. In the last seven July tests,
UF grads finished first four times and second once. U


Students 'Selling' UFLaw

A rrionl his first .assignmnents fler joining the law school as Director of"
Admissions inr 2002. Lewis Hutclhinson .re.-terl a program to give law
students ,.1 c.haiice t1 help Irrip.a.t fliltire student bodies. Modeler after ,.1
program .at the Universit\, of Teias, where Huth.lhiiisor worked alld earned
his J D UFLaws new Studeit Recruitirenrt Team iSRT) provides a link
between inquisitive u idergraduates around ite riaticii and College of Law
students aind staff
SRT gives studeiits an opportunity to represent the school, arid I
thiiik that's something they re proud of,' Hutchinsonr said


Symposium Explores
Violence. Children


U I i ',i Caniil r I.ir Cliilil' ii jl l Ill- L i' iCC L
U i l..i I 'i1111 I.IF Ci- l I:r I.,.r C l it, lr l'
LiI llr ihirt i"il Ci llh tr' il Ilh 1 C,. tI.ll d.I L r,:r il A ri-
H111I l .l; t : '1: I I I. tI 'I;It r.I riiiil l liil l.: ,i i1hlri i ,
S.II;r;' i- "Children.
Culture and Violence:
Exploring Myths. Images
and Realities."
ThIr iiiii, i i: t: : iili
10< riIr I L, I
[lit: H im [,Iii. ti i ii r. .]rll
, .1 ,:i 111i l 1 :1 iii l iii I ii

Hi ii i,, ii I ii: l

"I S HAiiL Woodhouse. Jilslice Anslead
H lill ir :i
L ilc. 1 11 ll Ii hi:^i: .. I IIIIII l l l. 1

VV .hi llli... l I i ] H Lt i Cli ir i, F ill L i'-
ii Il I CC L [ r.i I..i

I ',: ii1 .i I l" IId Er i1i iii ill a ilra E IIIv
i, iii in lit ii.irl. C ir, ,l.: '. S li,.iiil i',.. i'
i l: .r ill. H 1iW-,h L,.,I A: I, : ll C.r C il, Ii l
.lihr: l .1 [.l it,: ,: I hi.ir l i., h L' '.oi ri ,
Till,., 6 1' C .'iirl' i t: -ill i, l i r i ., 2'i l _. LI'7 l
,,ill fit i |.. il i- ll Ill IFL iL Cilti h..r IIlI,
.hli I 'R 11.i1i R l R lil r:l l...rii i I llit
".,O lli iiiiII' t: r- i A..t P ..'o I I ; 8. '.'iii ,.'I E ilh,.ili,.,1


"It also has helped is trerrnern dusly in building relationships with stl-
dents wve bnrn in '
SRT has 20 inrmembers who each voluirteer one hour per week in
Admissions, c:iommunicating with prospective students via pliore eMal
or in person Some SRT mermibers are selected to attend recruiting forums
with Admissions stafi Working stri.tl\ as recruiters, they do inot have
a.I.ess to applicants' files.
'Creation of SRT is part of our effort to provide mnorrationr for candi-
dates enliance ou r reruiitinent efforts aind irteisit\, our post admissionr
tollow-up said Dean of Admiissions Michael Patrick


FALL 2003 | UFLAW


7 CONFERENCESrl


I HELPING IMPACT FUTURE1:1












C 0 NFERE

CGR Promotes Center for
Judicial Reform. Rule of Law




Thi lirijiui 'tl h iii -ii' i I Idrij i ri liet l -l tj 11







w,.- h IJFLamicD- iiine Fw Tf-'iti Juditii
Pini priipiu1I' ,i trl ir pI miltr II 4 Iitr i1)hi'jii ii
12 t LtF ii u ,id -iii Lj i i1s blS-iI ~d in lh
'illtll [ jT h it .1 dolli1lit Il t V11111t111 1:: In 4 01 tlS h
I -1 11j.- tI[, 'if Ils I( IIIcons Ili 0 11111.1", ~l I
cirriiiiiiiiiiii1%1, Inim III 1~1 Ille IL111ire ilif
Whell if 1c. 'Is lat-1 lic,.~ 1111] od Ind at t ~ I.I
rjI i l- :e 1 iijb h riid -, tlim il
Ili,! km r l d ly ,- m i~li..1t ling huv c m Illritis in this
liomispht a,~ ro t1I j+I Iht1 r 1 jid J11 iii fdhll, 11 11CR



RIM.~ ilixilS ropiresentodl 14 intor nali-in il nnII-

11311- l l i i ~iII I~. lnrr'. S 111111.111- i--:
12 UF I, jd, :1111 111(j5 r l lq. r .1 lltill l:11rjll


Panelisis included (Irom letli former ABA
President Martha Barnett '73. Juan Vargas
Viancos. executive director ol Justice Studies
Center of the Americas in Chile. former U.S.
Attorney General Janel Reno. then-Dean Jon Mills.


FERAL CATS

Law Student Research Shows Statewide Threat


eral or wild, free-roaming cats
pose an increasingly serious threat
to endangered species nationwide,
killing more than a billion small mam-
mals and birds each year.
That was among the findings of a
UFLaw Conservation Clinic research
project commissioned in 2002 by U.S.
Fish and Wildlife Service. The study
found the feral cat population has
grown out of proportion, largely
because local groups provide funding
and resources to sustain them.
Pamela Hatley '03 conducted the
research over a six-month period,
recommending to the Florida Fish and
Wildlife Conservation Commission
(FWCC) that it undertake a far-reaching
public education campaign. "It is
essential our state and local govern-
ments take steps to educate the public
about the destructive impact of free-
roaming cats on native wildlife, and
strictly enforce against the release of cats
into the wild," Hatley said.
The FWC agreed and at a May
meeting unanimously adopted policy
designed to protect native wildlife from
predation, disease and other problems
presented by feral cats.
"Despite tremendous pressure from
a vocal crowd of cat advocates urging a
delay or vote against the policy, the
FWCC remained focused on its duty
under the Florida Constitution to man-
age, protect and conserve Florida's
native wildlife resources," Hatley said.
U.S. Fish and Wildlife identified
UFLaw's Clinic which operates as part
of the law school's Center for
Governmental Responsibility as ideal
for the research as a result of a
Jacksonville biologist whose spouse
attended UFLaw and was aware of the
Clinic's activities.


Pamela Hartley '03 conducted research leading to
report on national danger of feral cats.
Hatley did the research under
auspices of Legal Skills Professor Tom
Ankersen '86 who directs the CGR's con-
servation activities. She graduated in
May after earning an Environmental and
Land Use Law Certificate and completing
her J.D. in two and one-half years. El


IllWll/I, I 1*llilll~llldl;l ll l

Excerpts from Report
... there are some 15 million cats, feral
and owned, spending all or part of their
time outdoors in Florida. This large
number takes a devastating toll on native
wildlife. FWCC estimates free-roaming
cats in Florida may kill as many as
271 million small mammals and 68 mil-
lion birds each year.. many of the ani-
mals preyed upon by cats are federal and
state listed threatened and endangered
species. In Florida, even domestic cats
have been recognized as predators and a
serious threat to federal listed species.


I UFLAW I FALL 2003


NEWS~w





















Thanks to Foley and Lardner, an experi- projects in leadership roles, including
enced career woman who decided to Environmental Moot Court Team...
enroll at UFLaw is one of eight students Lidsky joined UFLaw in 1994, and made
across the country to be honored professor in 2000. She was a Fulbright
through the national firm's Minority Scholar, earned her B.A. summa cum
Scholarship Program (reportedly the first laude at Texas A&M, and her J.D. with
of its kind by any U.S. law firm)... high honors at Texas...
Karla Haynes, Fall 2L, received a $5,000 Three consecutive Florida Blue Key presi-
scholarship (including firm internship). dents are from UFLaw: Colin Thompson
Haynes, who earned her B.A. cum laude '03 of St. Petersburg, also named to UF


irom Brauaora College, worKed as
business development manager for
Knight Ridder Digital in Miami, and held
several positions with U.S. Department
of Commerce (international trade
specialist, export trade specialist)...
Haynes and the seven other winners
were selected based on significant
involvement in community activities or
minority organizations, undergrad
record, personal achievements, and
interest in or ties to a city in which F&L
practices...F&L program is in its fifth
year, and law schools other than UF
benefitting are Duke, Georgetown,
Michigan, Northwestern, Stanford,
UCLA and Wisconsin...F&L has five
Florida offices plus 11 elsewhere in the
U.S. and internationally...
Two spring LL.M. Comparative Law
grads with environmental interests
received prized positions for which there
was international competition. Astrid
Puentes '03, Bogota, was selected to
serve as a paid intern in the international
office of Earthjustice in San Francisco...
Saskia Rohm '03 of Germany is intern-
ing at the Center for International
Environmental Law in Washington...
John Marshall Bar Association
announced its 2002-03 Professor and
Student of the Year: UF Research
Foundation Professor Lyrissa Lidsky
(internet law, torts, mass media law) and
Nicole Kibert '03 of Tampa (now working
for Carlton Fields in that city). Kibert,
who got her B.S. at George Washington,
earned two certifications in addition to the
J.D. one in Environmental & Land Use
Law, the second in International &
Comparative Law. She was active in
on- and off-campus organizations and


Hall of Fame, headed the organization in
Fall 2002. He is now with Piper Rudnick
LLP, the Tampa office of the national firm.
His successor was Richard Rosenblatt of
Tampa, Fall 2L. UFLaw Magazine cover
woman Karen Persis is Fall 2003 chief.
(Details page one)...
Thanks to friends, colleagues and
students of former UFLaw Professor
W. D. MacDonald, who retired in '85,
UFLaw graduating seniors with highest
cumulative law school average at end of
three years earns $3,000 W. E.
MacDonald Prize. Winner at December
'02 graduation was Jacob Payne of Key
West. As part of his academic achieve-
ments, he worked on Florida Law Review
and won seven book awards -Civil
Procedure, Corporate Taxation, Creditor's
Remedies & Bankruptcy, Estates & Trusts,
Evidence, Secured Transactions and Legal
Drafting. He also earned a concurrent
degree along with his J.D....
Bradley Harper '03 of West Palm helped
two different UFLaw teams win major
honors in 2002-03...He was a Trial Team
member when he earned Best Advocate in
the Chester Bedell Florida Bar Trial
Competition, and earlier was a Moot Court
Team member when it won the Thomas
Tang National Constitutional Law
Competition last Fall...Harper earned his
accounting degree with honors at
Morehouse College, and prior to entering
UFLaw worked as a financial analyst on
the Bank of America /NationsBank
merger in San Francisco. He externed this
spring with Federal Judge Stephen
Mickle '70. He now works for Olds and
Stephens P.A. in WPB. One partner is
Don Stephens '86...


FALL 2003 1 UFLAW


Lidsky












For 21 years, the Dunwody Distinguished
Lecture in Law series has secured nation-
ally noted legal academicans and experts for
the annual spring series coordinated
by the Florida Law Review...Professor
Lawrence 0. Gostin, Georgetown Law
professor and Johns Hopkins University
public health program co-director, spoke on
"When Terrorism Threatens Health: How Far
are Limitations on Personal and Economic
Liberties Justified?"...The Dunwody series is
made possible by Mershon Sawyer
Johnston Dunwody & Cole, Dunwody White
& Landon P.A., and U.S. Sugar Corporation
in honor of Elliot Atwood Dunwody '33...
Thanks in part to natural leadership
abilities, and in part his experiences -
including eight years with the Gainesville
Police Department and an internship with the
Commercial Litigation Section / National Bar
Association Christopher O'Neal, Fall 3L,
brings a new honor to UFLaw being a stu-
dent named as one of two executive direc-
tors of the National Black Law Students
Association...He served as a
special assistant to the NBLSA board in
2002-03, is new president of the campus
BLSA chapter, winner of the Clifford Crandall
Memorial Scholarship, named to UFLaw's
Trial Team in February,and voted
in the spring BLSAs Male Student of Year...
O'Neal has also been awarded a $3,000
National Bar Institute African American Law
Student Fellowship. NBI awards are given
annually to a maximum of three students -
all who must be carrying a full class load,
have at least two consecutive years as a full-
time law student, and intend to return to the
Black community to practice law once legal
training is completed.
Officials of Black Law Students Association
report its 2002-03 Student of the Year is
Edrene Johnson, Fall 3L, BLSA vice presi-
dent from Tallahassee...


Named BLSA Alumna of the Year was
Desta Meghoo-Peddie '01, Associate
Director the last year of the law school's
Center for the Study of Race and Race
Relations and named this summer
as inaugural Director, Diversity and
Community Development for the
law school...
Three deans from major U.S. colleges
plus three law professors and a partner
in the Birmingham-based firm of Bradley
Arant Rose & White were on campus this
spring conducting a periodic site visit for
the American Bar Association and the
Association of American Law Schools...
Led by W. H. Knight, University of
Washington law school dean, teams
members were David S. Watt, University
of Kentucky med school dean; Nell Jessup
Newton, University of Connecticut law
dean; law professors Marian Parker,
Wake Forest, Bryan Fair, Alabama, and
James A. Cohen, Fordham and A. H.
Gaede Jr., Duke law grad and partner in
the BARW firm.
West Palm Beach's Kimberly Rothenburg,
Fall 3L, was named this summer by The
Florida Bar Standing Committee on
Professionalism as winner of the Lion of
Justice trophy (to be housed at UFLaw for
one year) for her winning entry in the
annual law student Professionalism Essay
contest... Entitled "Professionalism:
No Laughing Matter," Rothenburg's essay
was praised by Florida Supreme Court
Justice Raoul Cantero III, who noted, "it
not only identified problems but also iden-
tified solutions," and praised Rothenburg
for "precocious and conscientious
thought"... The essay, selected by
Professor Amy Mashburn as the best to
submit, earns Rothenburg $1,000 as the
winning entry. f


:J Lo


What about Environmental? Sports Law? Health? Elder Law?


Thanks to expected participation of more than 20 Florida law firms and
their representatives, UFLaw students will hear next February about
the realities of practicing law. Occasion will be the third annual Career
Development Conference where students get opportunity to network with
leading practitioners and learn more about practice of law in
particular fields.
Following formats of previous conferences, attorneys will discuss
estates and trusts, environmental and land use law, intellectual


property, bankruptcy, litigation, real estate, alternative careers, corpo-
rations, criminal law, international law, labor and employment law, tax,
government and public law and family law. The event ends with a
Career Networking Reception.

Alumni interested in speaking at the conference:
Contact Mary-Ellen Cross, Assistant Director of Career Services
352.392.0499 or eMail: crossm@law.ufl.edu.


- UFLAW I FALL 2 0 0 3


W.C. Gentry '71
(left), Building
Campaign
chair, discusses
UFLaw library
expansion
with ABA site
accreditation
members.


I F EB R A R I NS I GH T NV I TEDI


NEWS~w


























bLC- *^-


FI~u~s


s -,i'me. ." UNIVERSITY OF

FLORIDA

BOOKSTORES
LAW BOOKSUORE: (305} 392-,6141


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| PARTNERS I


Completion Scheduled for




SPRING '05

Support of Alumni Paying Off as Vital Facilities
Expansion Underway


he "cheerios" have been
moved, the "bridge / habitrail"
is no more, the courtyard is
gone, one cannot go directly
from Holland Hall to Bruton-
Geer (and vice versa), green
construction safety fences and/or makeshift
plywood walls snake throughout the campus,
parts of the Legal Information Center are closed
and parking lots have been relocated.
Thus what some thought might not be
possible has begun.
Concrete results, literally, of the successful
six-month 2001-02 grassroots funding cam-
paign made possible by hundreds of alumni,
faculty, staff, students and friends of the state's
flagship law school and the support and finan-
cial backing of University of Florida President
Charles Young and Provost David Colburn -
already are beginning to take shape at the Levin
College of Law.
Construction on a $22+ million facilities
expansion and renovation project began in early
July, with advance planning and cooperation of
the law school community promising to keep
the College fully operational for 21 months -
until Spring 2005, when all involved promise the
"vision will be a reality."
"There's no question we are going to be
S Inconvenienced for at least three full terms, and
two football seasons," admitted Dean Robert
-Jerry, "but the payoff is going to be magnificent,
and such a tremendous reflection on and repre-
sentation of this school's graduates and a most
enticing environment for prospective students."


UFLAW I FALL 2003


Jerry said among results in 2005 will be an
increased number of technologically advanced
and spacious classrooms, an expanded state-
of-the-art Lawton Chiles Legal Information
Center and an aesthetically appealing and
functional campus.
Most noticeable to visiting alumni in the
next 12 months will be other than items
already noted steel structures for new class-
rooms towers that will connect two floors of
Holland and Bruton-Geer, demolition of most
of the classrooms and auditoriums in Holland,
and relocation of the loading/receiving dock
(now at northwest corner of Holland) to eastern
end of Bruton-Geer (the old cafeteria receiving
area). By end of 2004 Spring term, both the cafe-
teria and bookstore will be closed until con-
struction ends.
Completed facilities will include:
Renovated Holland Hall Law Center (named
after former Florida Governor and U.S. Senator
Spessard Holland '16) with its classrooms and
faculty offices.
New three-level towers featuring 15 classrooms
and a Ceremonial Classroom to seat up to 160
for conferences, receptions and sessions that will
allow students expanded opportunities to meet
visiting judges, academics and attorneys. Four
existing 20-seat seminar rooms will be refur-
bished, and most classrooms will accommodate
wireless laptops and contain "smart podia" for
benefit of faculty and students.
The library, doubled in size to 100,000 square
feet, will be named in honor of another Gator







| PARTNERS I


Completion Scheduled for




SPRING '05

Support of Alumni Paying Off as Vital Facilities
Expansion Underway


he "cheerios" have been
moved, the "bridge / habitrail"
is no more, the courtyard is
gone, one cannot go directly
from Holland Hall to Bruton-
Geer (and vice versa), green
construction safety fences and/or makeshift
plywood walls snake throughout the campus,
parts of the Legal Information Center are closed
and parking lots have been relocated.
Thus what some thought might not be
possible has begun.
Concrete results, literally, of the successful
six-month 2001-02 grassroots funding cam-
paign made possible by hundreds of alumni,
faculty, staff, students and friends of the state's
flagship law school and the support and finan-
cial backing of University of Florida President
Charles Young and Provost David Colburn -
already are beginning to take shape at the Levin
College of Law.
Construction on a $22+ million facilities
expansion and renovation project began in early
July, with advance planning and cooperation of
the law school community promising to keep
the College fully operational for 21 months -
until Spring 2005, when all involved promise the
"vision will be a reality."
"There's no question we are going to be
S Inconvenienced for at least three full terms, and
two football seasons," admitted Dean Robert
-Jerry, "but the payoff is going to be magnificent,
and such a tremendous reflection on and repre-
sentation of this school's graduates and a most
enticing environment for prospective students."


UFLAW I FALL 2003


Jerry said among results in 2005 will be an
increased number of technologically advanced
and spacious classrooms, an expanded state-
of-the-art Lawton Chiles Legal Information
Center and an aesthetically appealing and
functional campus.
Most noticeable to visiting alumni in the
next 12 months will be other than items
already noted steel structures for new class-
rooms towers that will connect two floors of
Holland and Bruton-Geer, demolition of most
of the classrooms and auditoriums in Holland,
and relocation of the loading/receiving dock
(now at northwest corner of Holland) to eastern
end of Bruton-Geer (the old cafeteria receiving
area). By end of 2004 Spring term, both the cafe-
teria and bookstore will be closed until con-
struction ends.
Completed facilities will include:
Renovated Holland Hall Law Center (named
after former Florida Governor and U.S. Senator
Spessard Holland '16) with its classrooms and
faculty offices.
New three-level towers featuring 15 classrooms
and a Ceremonial Classroom to seat up to 160
for conferences, receptions and sessions that will
allow students expanded opportunities to meet
visiting judges, academics and attorneys. Four
existing 20-seat seminar rooms will be refur-
bished, and most classrooms will accommodate
wireless laptops and contain "smart podia" for
benefit of faculty and students.
The library, doubled in size to 100,000 square
feet, will be named in honor of another Gator








































who served as Governor/U.S. Senator Lawton
Chiles '55 whose memorabilia will be the
focal point of a two-story gallery. Also featured
will be additional stack capacity, an open
reserve area, the Justice Stephen C. O'Connell
'40 Supreme Court Reading Room, an intimate
computer training lab, a bar of eight multi-
media work stations, and 13 student group
conference rooms.
"When completed, our new Legal Information
Center will be among the top 20 academic law
libraries in the U.S. based on size," Jerry noted.
Associate Dean for Administrative Affairs
Patrick Shannon is coordinating construction
activities on behalf of the law school, working
with UF Facilities Planning & Construction's
Howie Ferguson, project manager.
Alumni planning on visiting the law school
should plan to arrive earlier than necessary due
to construction arrangements, as should any law
alums and other UF grads who regularly use the
grounds for Fall tailgating.
By this fall, construction progress and visiting
instructions will be posted on the school's Web site
and a Web Cam will be operating to show contin-
uing construction progress. E

Go to www.law.ufl.edu/construction for details.


GRADS
Give at Graduation
L l' g C' uIId'j: 'l La',' Springj
L201:3 'jr.iin.i, pJirlHt:ll jn

a ilh .11d pl,- i l jl e'l 1., De,.ll
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Mills r,.ith ther reiluiestO it be
rusd I. t help 'suppurl 101 f Hle
s' lhuuiul s n.Itld rn i un.liii- ili.unr
inl .1 F.'riet" uf S ltdPieiL
f. 1, l,; prli.itr n iin i S ,lenit
einmnbers ifl hIe Ljan A111n111
Cu illl II uurdintl l t:' II,'
illl-rallilll] eh ur TIlls is Ihe
tuarijll raiii'.e iulI,'e a lI,]ss, lu
raise fund's, I.,r UFL.r.'.i slinre
re, e,'..iil t.,, F.ill 2001 .railin-
adi, i.il d Ir.ifililuii durll anld
in tI q90i VVWillh relrln l I the
l.s, ijif l iu. ri l li,. n St.6 -100
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WNW
TOP: Rendering of expanded Legal Information Center (right)
and connected Bruton-Geer Hall (left) as it might appear in
2005 from the east (UF tennis facilities).
ABOVE: New parking lot on Village Drive (south of former
U-drive and lot) was completed before Labor Day.
FACING PAGE: All it took was one week in August,
and "the bridge / habitrail" was gone with 3-story
academic tower to be in its place by 2005.


FALL 2003 I UFLAW








If!ARTNR I


Valuable to Firms
BY AMANDA GROOVER
Ufll:'-.r ..(' .luLriIrlrh I ~t u I r.'ii in i

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INVALUABLE EXPERIENCE

Supreme Court Externships


What's it worth in the job market to
have your resume include "work
experience as aide to Florida Supreme
Court justice '
Thanks to a UFLaw externship program
with the state's highest court, at least nine
current students eventually will find out.
Students picked for summer and
fall 2003 work with justices
are Lewis L. Ritter IV,
Jacksonville; Stephanie
Marusak, New Port Richey;
Rafael Ribeiro, Miami; and
Kevin Hoyes, Kissimmee.
Earlier in 2002 and this
spring, Robert Norway of
Newberry, Mike Bittner
of Jacksonville, and S.
Allister Fisher, Jessica M.
Callow and Joel Feldman
of Gainesville worked at StaffAttorneyTim
Responsibility coo
the Supreme Court. Among students se
Another UFLaw student, Kevin Hoyes (fall),
Tony Haber of Miami, (far right) Rafael R
Court of Appeal Ju
worked as an extern at the Court of Appeal J
Third District Court of Appeals.
Staff Attorney Tim McLendon '94 of
the law school's Center for Governmental
Responsibility, who oversees the extern-
ships, reports those picked typically are in
the top 25 percent of their class. Most also
have excelled in either Legal Research and
Writing or Appellate Advocacy, and are
members of Moot Court, Trial Team or a
teaching assistant.
"Participants will understand more
fully the appellate process and the intri-
cacies of the Court's jurisdiction over
appeals, as well as experience observing
oral arguments, doing research and
drafting memos for justices,"said
McLendon. "There will be real benefits,
both in seeking employment and later
in practice."
Determination and preparation
were key for Marusak, who started long


before she began her externship this
summer with Justice Barbara Pariente.
She and the other interns attended two
orientation sessions with McLendon to
review Article V of the Florida
Constitution, which explains when the
court has jurisdiction, together with
cases discussing jurisdiction. Marusak


McLendon (left) of the law school's Center for Governmental
rdinates the court externship program and selection process.
elected for 2003 externships with the Florida Supreme Court are
Stephanie Marusak (summer), Lewis L. Ritter IV (summer) and
ibeiro (fall). Tony Haber interned this summer with 3rd District
dge D. Bruce Levy '71 in Miami.

also read the Rules of Appellate Procedure
and "The Operation and Jurisdiction of the
Florida Supreme Court."
"I think the experience will be
invaluable because of improvement in my
writing skills, increased understanding of
the court system and substantive issues,"
Marusak said. "And, of course, it can only
help to have a supreme court justice write
you a letter of recommendation."
Former Chief Justice Ben Overton
'52 and then-Dean Jon Mills were instru-
mental in establishing the externship
program for UFLaw in 1997, though until
2001 only summer positions were
offered. Fall and spring semester oppor-
tunities also now are available, with 320
hours required of summer externs and
280 from fall and spring participants.
Students receive six summer credits and
five for fall and spring. U


SUFLAW I FALL 2003













'Trzydzieci lat w Polsce'
*THIRTY YEARS IN POLAND


UFLaw, Practitioners Help Poland

Become 'Model for the World'


(lP oland exemplifies in many ways a courageous
democracy that's transformed itself through the rule
.1. of law into a partner for America and a model for the
world."
Speaking was then-Dean Jon Mills in June during cele-
bration of a joint U.S.-Poland experiment begun in that
country 16 years before the fall of Communism.
It was in 1973 that five UFLaw professors traveled there to
participate in what was then called the Cambridge-Warsaw
International Trade Law Program organized by the law
school, Trinity College of Cambridge University and the
Institute of Legal Sciences of the Polish Academy of Sciences -
allowing American law students to take courses for credit in a
European Socialist Country.
Today, 30 years later, from those humble beginnings,
the Center for American Law Studies (CALS) a collabora-
tive venture between UFLaw's Center for Governmental
Responsibility and Warsaw University Faculty of Law &
Administration graduates annually an average of 100 cur-
rent and future Polish attorneys as trained practitioners in a
legal system that just 13 years ago was alien to Communist
officials then ruling the country.
Mills said a key to CALS success is that it takes tradi-
tional American law school practices and implements them
in the Polish classroom. Classes are taught in English and
help prepare participants for work as attorneys in Poland,
the European Union and the United States.
Graduation ceremonies for the fifth class of CALS stu-
dents combined with a commemorative 30th anniversary cel-
ebration of the law school's involvement in Poland was held in
mid-June at Warsaw University. Presiding were Mills and


UFLaw coaching enabled these Center for American Law Studies students from
Warsaw University to participate in Washington this spring in the U.S. finals of the
Jessup International Moot Courl Competition.
Dean/Professor Tadeusz Tomaszewski of Warsaw University,
and Stephen N. Zack '71 of Miami was keynote speaker.
According to Polish enrollees, the Center offers the
opportunity to learn not only foreign laws, but also foreign
ways of learning. Pawel Grabowski was one of the top three
students of the Center's first graduating class in 1999, and
from there went to study at Harvard Law School.
"Attending CALS courses was my first opportunity to
look into the American legal system," Grabowski said. "The
classes constituted a forum for legal discussions providing a
Continued...


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FALL 2003 1 UFLAW 3








If!ARTNR I


SCHOLARSHIP I FBI Selects UFLAW

When Charles M. Blalock '51 got the chance to award $2,500 to a student at any
school, he knew immediately where he wanted it to go. "It wasn't hard for me to
decide I'd like to give it to a deserving student at my alma mater," said Blalock.
The money came from the J. Edgar Hoover Memorial Scholarship Program, created
by the Society of Former Special FBI Agents of which Blalock is a member to honor
Hoover and deserving students. This is the second time the College of Law has received
such funding, the first coming in 1978 inaugural year of the program when UF was
one of seven schools to receive
a one-time scholarship.
Blalock with about 100
other classmates attended law
school in Bryan Hall, the orig-
inal building on University ]i
and 13th Street, and still
recalls details from long ago
when his rent was $28 a
month and no one had a
refrigerator. "My two favorite
subjects were Criminal Law
taught by Dr. Vernon Clark
and Constitutional Law with
Dr. John M iller," he said. Charles Blalock '51 (right) presents $2,500 J. Edgar Hoover Memorial Scholarship
"The law school prepared me to then-Dean Jon Mills for use by UFLaw student. Such scholarships and
contributions to existing scholarship funds are effective ways of helping the law
perfectly for my career. school remain competitive with peer institutions.
After graduation, Blalock
went on to the FBI, retiring in 1980 to become a professor at Florida Community
College in Jacksonville where he taught Criminal Justice and other legal subjects. Still in
Jacksonville, he's now completely retired. U


PO LAND continued


Associate Professor Danaya Wright (center, with students
in Warsaw) is one of many UFLaw faculty helping
make successful the law school's 30-year involvement
with Poland as have such firms as White & Case,
Altheimer & Gray, Baker & McKenzie, Hogan & Hartson,
Weil Gotshal & Manges, and Levin Papantonio & Partners.


chance for a high level of student
involvement in the teaching process,
rather unexpected in a Polish law school
environment which focuses more on
academic knowledge and professorial
lectures."
Since 2002, 1999 CALS grad Adam
Imielowski has been working as a legal
consultant to the management board of
PTK-Centertel, one of three cellular
phone operators in Poland.
Imielowski says the program is as
important to the country as a whole as
it is to individual lawyers and their
careers. "To be able to play its interna-
tional role, Poland needs well-educated


lawyers with international experience,"
he said.
Witols Danielowicz, managing
partner of White & Case in Warsaw,
agrees Center graduates are more
attractive to employers. "We clearly see
the distinction, and the contribution of
the Center shows in their work,' he said.
New York-based White & Case is
only one of the law firms in the U.S. and
Poland that have financially supported the
Center and its goals. Others include inter-
national firms Weil Gotshal & Manges,
Baker & McKenzie, Hogan & Hartson,
Altheimer & Gray and the Florida firm of
Levin Papantonio & Partners. M


SUFLAW I FALL 2003















ICAM

Practitioners Make Possible
UFLaw International Moot
Court Competition

For the fifth consecutive year, UFLaw's
International Commercial Arbitration
Moot Team (ICAM) competed in Vienna,
Austria, against some of the strongest law
school competition in the world at the
10th Annual Willem C. Vis International
contest held in the Spring.
And it was thanks to continuing sup-
port from the International Litigation
and Arbitration (ILA) Group of Steel
Hector & Davis LLP headquartered in
Miami, and John C. and Tifi Bierley of
Tampa. John '63, Trustee Emeritus of the
Law Center Association, specializes in
international real estate, maritime, trade
and immigration with Smith Clark
Delesie Bierley Mueller & Kadyk.
Goal of the competition is to foster
study of international commercial
law and arbitration for resolution of
international business and to train law
leaders of tomorrow in methods of
alternative dispute resolution.
Eduardo Palmer '85, chair of Steel
Hector's ILA group, said his firm sponsors
the team to allow UFLaw students "an
invaluable opportunity to gain experience
in a tremendously important field."


a I I ', H,
JEL


Members of this year's International Commercial Arbitration Moot Team were Aaryn Fuller (left), Lisset Gonzalez, S. Allister
Fisher, David Redfearn, team advisor Professor Thomas Hurst, student coaches (and 2002 participants) Jessica Parker and
Rjoberto Franco, and Alero Afejuko. (Not pictured is Assistant Professor Wayne Hanewicz who helps with coaching.)


More than 125 teams from 40 coun-
tries competed in this year's contest,
including squads from Thailand, China,
Austria, Denmark, Germany, India and
Russia. UF was among 30 teams from
the U.S., two from Florida (Stetson),
and four others from the South
(Georgia, Tulane, Virginia, Loyola-New
Orleans).
"It is extremely gratifying we have
support from practitioners who must
deal daily with the complexities of inter-
national law and who realize the


extreme importance of this field for the
future," said Professor Thomas R. Hurst,
Sam T. Dell Research Scholar and team
coach. "It is a unique and valuable expe-
rience for our students, and reinforces
the school's emphasis on mediation and
arbitration skills as well."
Hurst said each year it competes, the
UFLaw team is adding to its expertise
of international moot competition,
"especially with regard to understanding
what the judges, all foreign, consider
important." E.


I EN IRON ENTA & L ND U E LA


A Growing Practice Area
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FALL 2003 | UFLAW ]








If,!|A RTNEB I


Florida Bar: UFLaw Mentor

Program Unique in State



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MOOT TEAM Wins Two National Titles

Cc competing sharpens our written and oral advocacy skills, and winning major
U competitions increases UFLaw's prestige in the national community. I am proud of
the tradition of excellence we are creating."
Speaking is Steve Klein '03, coach of the law school's winners of the Herbert
Wechsler National Criminal Law Competition in New York this spring and
winner himself last fall of the Thomas Tang National Constitutional Law
Competition two national titles in less than six months.
Also nationally, the UF team
reached the Elite Eight at both
the John Marshall International
Technology and Privacy Law (Fall
2002) and Duberstein National
Bankruptcy competitions (Spring
2003).
Regionally, UF was a semifinal-
ist and won Best Written Brief at
the E. Earle Zehmer Workers'
Compensation Competition (Fall
2002); runner-up Best Memorial at
Stetson International Environment-
al Law Competition (Fall 2002);
and two UF Moot Court squads
swept every award at the Thomas
Tang Regional (First Place, Second,
Best Brief, Best Oralist.).
Faculty coaches for the team Steve Klein '03 (left), winner of a national competition last Fall, helped
are Henry Wihnyk, Director of coach Ashleigh Bartkus 2L of Clearwater and John Merchant 3L of
Gainesville to first place in the spring Herbert Weschler National Moot
Research & Writing and Appellate Competition in New York the second national title for UFLaw's Moot
Advocacy, and Leanne Pflaum, Court Team of 2002-03.
Legal Skills Professor.
"I have long admired the dedication and work ethic demonstrated by our Moot
Team students, and we're pleased they are getting the recognition they deserve,"
Wihnyk said.
The UF team is named after former Florida Supreme Court Chief Justice
Campbell Thornal'30, and is dedicated to excellence in appellate advocacy.
Main sponsors of team activities are Raymer F. Maguire / Holland & Knight
LLP, (Maguire memorial page 45) and Zimmerman Shuffield Kiser & Sutcliffe a
100-attorney firm in Orlando including partners Bernard J. Zimmerman '64
(retired) and Roland Sutcliffe Jr. '71, Law Center Association Trustee since 1990. U



Law Firms Encourage 'Shadowing'

G rJiil Into Its fourth year of operation, UFLaw's innovative 1 L Shadow Prograni places
first-year law students. such as these 2003 participants with leaiinlrj attorneys across
the state to gain willahble Uepostlre to dally law firril envirmirrients New Shadow opportunities
also will allow sllrdents to work with judiril.1 hearing officers or partir iplate in rAllndl.ables with
federal judges This unique Shujdow project s one of rniany practical exlperiences UFLiwv s Career
Services offers sltdents during each phase of their Levin College of Law edlic.ation
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UFLAW I FALL 2003


i














Renewed 'Firm Giving' Aids Students

Gator Alums Contribute 100% to Boost LFGP Support


Dozens of UFLaw alumni at more than
25 offices throughout Florida and
one in Washington took to heart a
competitive giving program announced
for 2002-03, and as a result helped the
College of Law achieve its fiscal year
Annual Fund goal of $500,000.
UF's Law Firm Giving Program
(LFGP), which encourages 100 percent
participation by Gator grads working in
any firm's office or offices, in its renewal
year saw 29 units of 21 firms in 10 Florida
cities and the nation's capital reach
the goal. (There is no minimum amount
each participant must give.)
Ken Johnson '81, current Law
Alumni Council president, championed
reinstatement of the program along with
three other Gators in his Goodlette
Coleman & Johnson P.A. firm in Naples.
Plus they decided to fund the Land Use
Planning & Control Book Award.
Law firm with offices in most num-
ber of cities with 100 percent UFLaw
alum participation is Carlton Fields P.A.
- with 33 employees in Miami, Orlando,
St. Petersburg, Tallahassee and West Palm
Beach getting involved. Next was Gray
Harris & Robinson P.A., with 30 employ-
ees in four cities Lakeland, Melbourne,
Tampa and Tallahassee participating.
Single office with most participa-
tion 18 UFLaw employees of Hill Ward
& Henderson P.A. in Tampa, who
directed their funds be used to set up a
HW&H Book Award in Professional
Responsibility & the Legal Profession.
Oscar Sanchez '82 spearheaded
efforts to involve 15 Gator alums in
Jacksonville and Tampa offices of
Akerman Senterfitt.


"It's exciting in my first 45 days on
the job to hear of this program's suc-
cess and the enthusiastic involvement
of firms and attorneys throughout the
state," said Dean Robert Jerry. "LFGP


at leading law schools across
the nation provide excellent examples
of creative ways to generate alumni
support, and I'm grateful to our
Alumni Council members and
Trustees who helped add UF to the list
of leading institutions with a LFGP -
and then helped ensure an impressive
first year."
Firms interested in participating
2003-04 are asked to contact Denise
Stobbie at the Development & Alumni
Affairs Office (392.352.9296, eMail
stobbie@law.ufl.edu). Monies con-
tributed are used through the Annual
Fund unless otherwise restricted by
donors to support student research
assistantships, student organizations, fac-
ulty scholarship, financial aid, and career
services for students and alumni. EU


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Schwait 5-Year Plan Pays Off

Trial Team Among Nation's Most Honored Thanks to Practitioners, Alumni Support

ard work by more than 40 UFLaw students, faculty advi-

sors and volunteer practitioners and financial support
from alumni and law firms paid off in 2002-03 as the
University of Florida Levin College of Law Trial Team garnered
a national championship and a variety of other major titles that
made the unit among the most honored in the United States.
This Spring, team units placed second of 150 teams at the
Association of Trial Lawyers of America Competition, and last
Fall team units won the First Annual National Civil Trial
Competition in Los Angeles.
Helping ensure team success over the last five years was
Advisor Carl Schwait, adjunct faculty member and senior
partner with Dell Graham P.A., Gainesville. TT President Tony
Sos '03 credits Schwait "with bringing the team to a whole new
level, and making us a strong national competitor." Schwait, who
stepped down as advisor this summer, is a Florida Bar certified
civil trial lawyer and began his career in Miami as staff counsel
for several insurance companies. He also served as City of South
Miami vice mayor/commissioner.
Assisting Schwait were practitioners who volunteered
20 hours weekly to coach the team, including Judge Phillis Kotey
'85, Maritza Arroyo '83, William Hoppe '67, Tom Farkash '76,
Karin Moore '82, Denise Ferrero '92, Jeanne Singer '77, Jennifer
Zedalis '84 and Robert Rush '85. Zedalis joined the UFLaw fac-
ulty in 2002, and is new TT advisor in her role as Virgil Hawkins
Clinics legal skills professor and Director, Trial Practice.
Members of one of the nation's most honored Trial Teams have a lot to smile about, based on its
recent record of success and continued support from alumni and firms. Bradley Harper '03, West Florida firms helping support the team through sponsor-
Palm Beach (left, front); Yolanda Green 3L, Tampa; Alexis Lambert 3L, Winter Haven; Shawntoyia ships are S. William Fuller Jr., Esq., Tallahassee; Rumberger Kirk
Grier '03, San Francisco; and Saynia Webb 3L, Miami, joined with (back row) Yohance Perris 3L, & Caldwell P.A., Orlando; Ronnie H. Walker, Esq. Memorial
Tampa; Della Jensen 3L, Sarasota; and Tameika Pottiner 3L, Ft. Lauderdale, to help compile one Scholarship Endowment; and Coker Myers Schickel Sorenson &
of the most impressive three-year records of any UFLaw team. Green P.A., Jacksonville. Vq



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SUFLAW I FALL 2003







TIIGLEALL


Power of Words

TO 'SPIN' OR NOT TO 'SPIN'

GERTRUDE BLOCK Lecturer Emeritus
To "spin" is to use language to create "facts."
Marketers and politicians have always known
this. For example, years ago, after Clairol
brought out a hair-color product making it
possible to simultaneously bleach, shampoo
and condition hair, advertisers changed the
word describing their product's ability from
"dye" to "tint"; eliminating the pejorative verb
"dye" made dyeing one's hair respectable and increased Clairol pur-
chasers by thousands.
Clairol advertisers did it again with the line, "Does she or doesn't
she? Only her hairdresser knows for sure.' Clairol used ads with pic-
tures of dyed-blonde mothers playing in the grass with their natural-
ly blonde children. And women who wanted to look beautiful but not
"cheap" began dyeing their hair. That line made "blonde" not merely a
sexy look, but an entire psychology, and Clairol profited: women using
the product went from 7% to 40%.
Politicians, too, spin language to create "fact.' Democratic Party
Chairman Terry McAuliffe is reported to have used the phrase "at the
end of the day" three times in a single sentence during a recent inter-
view. He chose that phrase because he considered it a "less hard-edged,
more atmospheric version of the Republican phrase 'bottom line."
Political strategist Frank Luntz advised Republicans to use "soft-
er, greener language" to improve their message on the environment. So
Republican politicians now speak of "climate change" not "global
warming.' "Environmental" issues are now "conservationist" issues. A
consultant for the Sierra Club acknowledges the new language has
succeeded in blunting the Democratic attack on Republicans' envi-
ronmental policies.
Public relations experts can replace negative with positive images
by using spin. Sears and Smith (in "A Linguistic Look at Aerospace
English") quote a technical editor as saying, "When I edit a report, my
first job is to change all of the errors to malfunctions and all of the
failures to partial successes."
But using language to "spin" may ultimately downgrade the
meaning of the substituted language. For example, the previously
innocuous adjective discreet became an euphemism in
"personal"columns for illicit sex. As a result, one major Web site's
overseer has banned the word discreet from online-dating services
because it's "often code for 'married and looking to fool around"'
So be careful that pet terms you have used to express "facts" and
help shape public perception are still perceived as positive language.


HE N RY WI H NYK Director, Research & Writing
Although use of "spin" often is
associated negatively with politi-
cians and advertisers, its use in
legal writing is acceptable and can
be effective. In briefs and memo-
randa, for example, attorneys are
fr obligated to disclose all legally
Significant facts even those unfa-
vorable for the client. Therefore, its important for
lawyers to be able to use language that helps
de-emphasize the negatives.
For example, assume John Smith is appealing his
murder conviction and assume its legally significant
Smith abuses crack cocaine. The prosecutors spin would

'Spinning' unfavorable facts can

be important in civil cases as well.

describe Smith as a "crack addict," while the defense
would say"Smith suffers from a dependence on addictive
drugs'. And describing the crime, the prosecutor would
emphasize its terrible nature ("Defendant bludgeoned
victim's head with a baseball bat."). Smith attorney's spin
on the crime: "The victim received a blow to the head" -
depersonalizing the victim, sanitizing the action, and
removing Smith from any direct action.
"Spinning" unfavorable facts can be important in civil
cases as well. Assume Linda Smith is appealing a person-
al injury case judgement. Smith sued Bob Jones for
injuries received in an automobile accident, thus the
injury description: "Smith's left leg was crushed between
the bumper of defendants automobile and her motorcy-
cle engine." Jones' attorney said: "Plaintiff injured her leg
in the accident."
So long as these "spinning" techniques accurately
reflect the record and provide information sufficient to
decide the issue, they are an acceptable means to soften
the blow of harmful facts. If this use of ameliorative lan-
guage is transparent as "spin," however, the technique
could backfire. A court will lose trust in a document that
reads like an advertisement or political puffery. FA


FALL 2003 I UFLAW M














America's Lawyer


One of UFLaw's greatest...1917-2003


S hesterfield Smith was a world citizen, truly one of the
most important figures in the 'Greatest Generation,' as
Tom Brokaw said in his book," said Dean Emeritus Jon
Mills on the day in July of the passing of Smith '48. "We
have lost a giant who set the highest standards of
courage, vision and commitment not only in the legal profes-
sion but in every other aspect of the wonderful, complete,
unselfish life he led."
An important figure in Florida legal history, Smith came to
national prominence as president of the American Bar
Association when he challenged President Richard Nixon during
the Watergate investigations telling him and the country that
"No man is above the law."
A World War II veteran, Smith reportedly raised money for his
UFLaw education by playing poker and shooting craps with
other soldiers on his way home from Europe. The Arcadia native
graduated with honors in 1948.
His innovative and entrepre- A g
neurial spirit was in evidence
during his tenure at Holland &
Knight LLP, which Smith joined b l s
when it was Holland Bevis &
McRae in Bartow.
(Editor's Note: Former Florida
Governor and U.S. Senator
Spessard L. Holland '16 formed
the Holland Bevis & McRae firm
that Smith joined in 1950.)
Smith quickly made partner
in the Bartow firm, and in 1968 his firm merged with Knight
Jones Whitaker and Germany in Tampa. Smith was a founding
partner when the firm developed into Holland & Knight and
served as chairman almost three decades. Under Smith's lead-
ership, H&K would grow to be one of the biggest in the coun-
try with 1,200 lawyers working in 32 offices across the country
and around the world.
As a trial attorney, Smith represented the phosphate indus-
try, citrus growers and other large commercial interests, but
with typical Smith candor he once told Congress that "I repre-
sent some of the biggest cruds in Florida, but I don't carry
their viewpoints past the time I go off the payroll."
Smith emphasized service as well as growth at Holland &
Knight, and the firm led the way in hiring women and minori-


ties and encouraging pro bono work. Smith also was one of the
earliest to recognize the national trend of increasing female
law school enrollment by recruiting many to his firm. Smith's
first such recruit Martha Barnett '73 would later become
president of the ABA, the second woman to serve in that role.
Barnett, Chair of Directors Committee, and 140 other UFLaw
grads now work at Holland & Knight.
"It is paramount that the great and historic professional
principles which have made the lawyer the champion of
human rights, the defender of man's freedom from oppression
by his fellow man, or by his government, be most zealously
guarded," Smith told 1965 College of Law graduates.
Before being named to head the ABA, Smith was president
of the Florida Bar Association and served on the Florida
Constitutional Revision Commission in 1966-67. The
commission reworked the 1885 Florida Constitution and its
revision was ratified by voters in 1968.
"Complete liberty for all means liberty for none," Smith
told his fellow commission members during their first meet-
ing. "Our rights as Floridians must be equally balanced with
our responsibilities as Floridians."
His work on the Commission was credited with ending
reign of the "Pork Chop Gang," a group of powerful rural
Florida legislators who, for many years, controlled state gov-
ernment by malapportionment. As Smith once described the
problem: "... the state was all out of whack. A rural county


| UFLAW I FALL 2003











I.

with 5,000 voters had just as much representation as .6
Miami with 400,000 people."
At a 20-year reunion of commission members,
Smith said he was proud of the revision which
cleaned up language that was discriminatory to
races and sexes; created the belief that no section of
the state could gain control of the state because of
provisions for automatic review of the Constitution
and initiative for amendments and constitution con-
ventions; established home rule for cities and coun-
ties as a local rather than a statewide issue; and
strengthened and modernized the Legislature and
made it a more responsive element of government."
Smith served as trustee of the UF Law Center
Association, president of the Law Review Alumni
Association, and member of the Center for
Governmental Responsibility's board of advisers. He
chaired his class of '48 reunion in 1983.
As Smith aged, his passion for justice never
waned. He continued to voice his opinion about
modern-day legal issues, including his opposition
to criminal penalties for marijuana possession
and "slow-motion justice," which he saw as the
"greatest single evil connected with administration
of criminal laws.
Following Smith's retirement from Holland &
Knight, the law firm donated $100,000 to establish
the Chesterfield Smith Professor of Law fund and
helped raise the remaining portion of the $250,000
initial endowment. That endowment now funds
three professorships. (See page 22.)
"Mr. Smith has been a generous, devoted and
loyal friend of this school," said Dean Robert Jerry.
"One of his greatest legacies to our students and
prospective attorneys everywhere is the very high
bar he set through personal example of the necessity
of active, effective involvement in the civic and char-
itable life of their communities."
Smith took pride in his status as a longtime
Floridian, spending 31 years in Arcadia, 31 in Bartow,
and his last 21 in Miami-Dade. Survivors are his wife
of 16 years Jacqueline Allee, two children by his first
wife of 43 years (childhood sweetheart Vivian who
died of cancer) Rhoda Smith Kibler and
Chesterfield Smith Jr., both of Tallahassee and two
grandchildren, Taylor and Chesterfield III. Jacqueline
Allee is a '78 UF Law grad, and served the College
1978-80 as Assistant Dean for Academic Affairs. W
Information pages 20-23 compiled, written and/or edited by C
S. Camille Broadway, UF C.,II11. of Journalism, and Stan e S
Huguenin, Editor and Director, Law Communications. a S












Six decades -


lifetime of compassion, fairness...


HONORS,AWARDS,APPOINTMENTS REFLECT CHESTERFIELD SMITH'S IMPACT


hanks t initialfundi ng i n!E~~l



[hisT.I frind andI patnrs I t"he
Chstri e LA ld~ Smit Profsso

of Law was createdm at L
Suseuntfndngadliers









endowment allo LIFw oreritJ
an ret in1ou tsJtand in fcl~ty:i






BS, M.B.A., Ph.D. University of
IFlord; Ji'q.D Unvesiyof o[rthJ
C r linaIII11


1948: Graduated with honors from
University of Florida College of Law
1964-65: President, The Florida Bar
1965-68: Chairman, Florida Constitution
Revision Commission
1969: Recognized as "Distinguished
Floridian of the Year" by Florida
Chamber of Commerce
1972: Chairman, Gov. Reubin Askew's
"Citizens for Judicial Reform"
I973: Received Arthur von Briesen Award
(exceptional achievements in pursuit
of equal justice for all), National Legal
Aid and Defender Association
1973-74: President, American Bar Association
1976: Member, Federal Commission on
Executive, Legislative and Judicial
Salaries
I977-78: Member, Federal Judicial Nominating
Commission of Florida
1979-80: President, UFLaw's Florida Law
Review Alumni Association
I980: Honored with Florida Bar
Foundation's "Medal of Honor"
1981: Awarded ABA Medal by Board of
Governors for exceptionally
distinguished service
UF Law Center Association
Trustees' Award
1983: American Civil Liberties Union
"Nelson Poynter Award"
First "Chesterfield Smith Award" from
Black Lawyers of America
I984: Chairman, Board of Trustees of
National Foundation for Advancement
in the Arts
American Jewish Committee's Learned
Hand Award (accomplishments, princi-
ples, and commitment to values reflect-
ing those of Judge Hand)


M UFLAW I FALL 2003


Honored with Jewish National Fund's
Tree of Life Award
1985: First Chesterfield Smith Professor of
Law recipient appointed at UF as result
of funding campaign begun by six for-
mer ABA presidents and friends, asso-
ciates, law partners
1991: Member, Gov. Lawton Chiles'
"Commission for Government by the
People "
1991-93: Chairman, Civil Justice Advisory
Commission on U.S. District Court,
Southern District of Florida
I994: "LeRoy Collins Lifetime Achievement
Award" from Leadership Florida
"Allies for Justice Award" from
National Lesbians and Gay Law
Association
I997: Named "Great Floridian" by
Gov. Lawton Chiles
1998: Naming of "Chesterfield Smith Center
for Equal Justice" Building in Miami
1999: Lifetime Achievement Award,
Lawyer's Committee for Civil Rights
Under Law
2000: Florida Chamber Foundation creates
Chesterfield Smith Public Policy
Research Endowment
"Distinguished Community
Service Award," National Conference
for Community & Justice
2001: Named Honorary Chancellor,
Florida Southern College
2002: Received "Justice Award" from
American Judicature Society
Received Laurie D. Zelon Pro Bono
Award in ceremonies held by U.S.
Supreme Court














Be a Chesterfield

Smith-type Lawyer

UFLi.- Dean Emeritus Joseph R.Julin i.sh .:. er.ed
I. dea3n 1971 -S' .81:11 :ppo.rced ir, I c.85 the I'.:c
C het[erielld Srnmh Pr.:.ofi ;.:.r :of: Li., At [he C:lle
p :'rint : .:'.rrimer, :eren[ |ulirn delivered r, idd.i'e enrit
tied Be Che terlf.eld Sr...ch I Kin.d :o LIeh r I x.:e,'p[
I'r-.r, hE h ddj ie:ll


SJust say the word 'lawyer' within
[Chesterfield's] hearing and you will see
the smile of a happy man. He loves lawyers.
his profession and his College of Law.

he er'lfield d.ei nr:.[ belle. e idn',Ior, to the Bir
be [th[ icE alone. mnake .:.ne ..:rthi of bir.; kriro.nr
;i Ij.iter A I-.. er ir. i hi:l i i .i r. i n r r.di.duil ..ho
entei ed [the leIl pil:.'.ife i..r. fr .:.r. j lil.pble, r.bi .c.
hjr. [the "i.:quinr. :o .*.e-l[h nd Iirr.e

[A Sr...ith.-Cp[ e] i.. ,l r I nr.e ....: .r.ter.d: [t: d.o
I-.d Th.i ,er ...ho .r[er.d: [t: r..ke i- d.lle.-
er..:e l'e er..:e ..h..:h I.kel, t r.'.pi.,r .e the
qu .il :,,f .fi fli :' "i I:[ :,I c i:e: :le ithe fc i : he b.id
[he bieiu. lul [he u l, n ..j r...:C.[ :I [the .*..: l ..hc 'e
;..ni .-.h iere' in t.er-.eer

A Che t[tield lI-.. er tend: to be very h.'d ,vockir.q

Thi; la,'/er krno.s orn car be ronl:; llect.e. .'hen
listening persuasively.This lawyer is one who well
understands it is counsel's responsibility to avoid
disputes and litigation, not to create either.

But ifldilpute there be thi I;...re.' iC h.e )bleuC of
id. .:j[e .~heChe' [he ft-.iur.i i ; ir.i.ir.~ .el t teirr.-
[i.. ,:,.' t." 'ditic, r.'IlI "-dl.er;'-jri-' l

Most important, to a Chesterfield lawyer the concept
of professionalism has no outer limit whatever the
matter at hand.

Y.:.u II pi'..bjble be *:)r.did if tou i'e Ike .CheI : ce'ield
[AC ;ri Ar.ei ic r. B i' A L'.:.atr o.r c' LE .: plrinir.ir
'e~ re'-C. Sr,,ich t tir"t que';[.:.r. ;] V'W h-'[ .:-r, che
30 '.lCC" i .l l i...e, : ..h ,, beI:.r. : che ABA do...
ol'i:up to berielit "o.:.e[r Arn. he ,qui.:kl added.
And I donr .,ir.[ 1 h.:i [ : r n .' .er uc.:h :, D.it.bir.d'

Watergate and the devastating aftermath of Vietnam
were to be events upon which he was to speak as
spokesman for the Bar.There were lawyers who from
time to time wish he had not.

Make sure you never forget what Chesterfield would
ia, ..ere he [ [rhi: 'io iuri. [:d:, Dc': G':o: d'

































Who better to help ensure UF political network success...


There is a unique and innovative Grassroots
Gator Network (GGN) being formed to assist
the University of Florida and its various enti-
ties including the Levin College of Law in
the tough new competitive environment now
shaping educational and budgetary legislation
coming out of Tallahassee and Washington, D.C.
Thanks to initiative and efforts of Vice President for
Government Relations Dr. Richard Bucciarelli and Marion S.
Hoffmann, Associate Vice President of Government
Relations, the GGN began taking shape during the 2003 ses-
sions to serve as advocates for UF and its legislative agenda.
And what better personnel to help its effectiveness than
UFLaw alumni?
"We are recruiting Gators throughout Florida to join
GGN in advance of the 2004 Legislative Session," Hoffmann
noted. "This geographically and politically diverse network
will be asked to represent the UF and College of Law -
with elected officials to advocate those ideas and issues
important to all of us."
Hoffmann emphasized there is no cost or fee, and those
joining will receive periodic legislative updates and calls to


action during legislative sessions. Extent of the action, she
explained, could be requests to send eMails and/or letters and
in some rare instances make phone calls.
"It would be gratifying to think most of our law alums
in Florida took this simple step to help advance causes vital
to the University and the law school," said Dean Robert
Jerry. "In fact, it would be excellent if the percentage of our
grads participating exceeded those of any other UF school
or college."
Hoffmann said UF is fortunate to have alumni, including
those who earned their UFLaw degrees, as elected officials in
Tallahassee (right) and in Washington (below), and said "in
Tallahassee, these men and women are part of the Gator
Caucus and they work hard to assist us legislatively."
Dr. Bucciarelli noted ability to communicate quickly
and effectively with what is hoped to eventually be thou-
sands of GGN members will help the Government Relations
group mobilize on a daily basis if necessary to help strongly
advocate UF positions to key legislators.
To join GGN and hundreds of already committed
Gator volunteers, contact Marion Hoffmann at
mhoffmann@aa.ufl.edu or 850.488.2447. U


M UFLAW I FALL 2003


UFLAW'S U.S.
REPRESENTATIVES
From left:
Mike Bilirakis'63
Tarpon Springs
Ander Crenshaw'70
Jacksonville
Jim Davis'82
Tampa









UFLAW'S STATE SENATORS


Walter Campbell'73
Coral Springs


Rod Smith'74
Gainesville


UFLAW'S STATE REPRESENTATIVES


I
Holly Benson'96
Pensacola


Dan Gelber'85
Miami


Dudley Goodlette'72 Jeff Kottkamp'87
Naples Cape Coral


Joe Pickens'83 Tim Ryan'81
Palatka Dania Beach


II,




















of .a en ..ee duig gAugus g
SSio to im edatl becoe atv


inasm ila anne in co m nt
activi.ties.5





topacie, .ti o goo nuht
eimpl beom a Soptn *S wye
Yo a so utlanwatmast





wh exempiyte se. veytat.m e beom Sctie lwes, askin Shtte
los gn .gorfieti J l ih gh nd3 tak g r oopoet uigFl em

pasngo Chsefe l Smt .me. setnexa .pe eo .m ndt e ...ir
pro me.so abu giigbcSosceytruhpbi evcspoto






n ew stdet to have th opotnt toraie and imp emn aer b



sriepoetithfistemm of thei .me..mnt
.me.... w ete thi me.o gasoos fotcnmaeadfeec

in te log rn, Jrryrespnde, "jst ook t t emnrbton aeb






























































Percentage of Women
Enrolling in UFLaw
BASED ON FALL ADMISSIONS
% l 1993 22
fill* I a rAVEAE=! I
55%


45'
40%
35%



1978-1M2 1983-1987 1988-1992 1993-1997 198-2002

Low point since 1978 = Fall 1980 when
29% of enrollees were women
Three years later, Fall 1983, women
enrollment hit 40% for first time ever.
For next decade (1983-92) average female
enrollment = 38%
Last Decade (1983-92), average female
enrollment = 48%
Last five years (1998-2002), average = 52%













































0 a-


. _


" B


41,


c~C1


R% 1i6


r-' s


































'a
A
Vr


Among Notable UFLaw Alumnae CompedbyAmandarover

Since 1933, thousands of women have graduated from the University of Florida College of Law. They subsequently have
achieved prominence at local, state, regional and national levels, earning praise for their work in academia, corporations,
governmental entities and the legal profession. Anilwng most rnotib,.


Clara Gehan '33
S Gradualed from UF as firsl
woridar Iv nralrl iulatejl as a
regiilar sludenl tllrioughl
the law slIoOll She was a
rmenmber of the Florida Bar
tr rnore than 50 years
and her Gainesville prai-
Iite speLiali:ed in pro.hale and real estale She
hiredd Ihe Giainesville Advisory Biracial
Cmrrmiltee in 1963-64 helping thle lriv pea.elful-
I. inrte' ate bv deseirei.lting public. ajcomnmou-
dalloris She died in 1992 and iarrnged tr a
UFL.av s,.holarship in her name


Rebecca Bowles Hawkins '35
The first vronman IO, serve,
starting in 1948 as
Assistant Attorney General
o Fl,'rida later headed the
Atlorne, Generals opinion
division for manr vears She
rbec.rne lihe first full-tiime
research assistant Io a Florida Supreme Court
Juslie in 1953, viorking for Chief Justlcp B K
Roberts 28 Hawkins who graduated seLonrid in her
-.lass vias admitted uo The Florida Bar in 1935 She
is pasl president of the Flonda National Ass'lafioll
of Women Layers and tormrr mnemhber of Arneriian
Bar AssoLlation House of Delegates She passed
away in May 2000


Lois Thacker Graessle '41 (Story page 48).


The first wanriini frrim
Marvland to l & leted tIc
Coiilres shIe served seven
tPerm in the U. S HiJse of
Relpresentative Holt irilri-
du,.ed legislatici that start-
I2.: edl the N.ational H,,rrestMa
AO and helped inlliate Mid-East lpea,.e allks will
the late Presiderd Arwar Sadat at l Egvpl ald Israell
Primi Mnlrllser Golila Melr She ser-,,d ,,n Hunte
Arned SelvileP BudgPt rind Jrlint Ec(aonmi(,:.Orni-
niitles Hilt iweive(l Tinutee's Award in 1984
from Law Center Asoiuationl


E UFLAW I FALL 2uO3


;s ~c;


































Women Presidents of the ABA

0 Roberta Cooper Ramo 11' i 5"-'~.C, :Iiir l iu I.d 1 .1 1 Iii 1 i.ii 1 ir, ..11
C l t. ... 1 I h ...... I ...I L inm 1'U. C l rriin:iill '*...r ill I ..., Ir ill
.l rl iii l RI.' i lil H11 r1 r F'I A I ii A ll. i. 11 1:r.1 Ii ] [,I i...

O Malrha W Barnell I I0 -O: i 1p l ;r iiiii itil I1.iii I.IFL '' 1i ll ;-.
11i.I I I, i nl i:r III H ,.IIlI 1 ,d .1 IhIIm l LLI I Ii. I i lliB ...IIII ,-
S.p ll l ., h.I .'ll I l .l I,1 h It ilih:
A 'A Hi .. ,ii: Li:lt:,l i:-1

.. UI,


Corise P. Varn '49
After several y.eais in U S riJ;v enrolled at UFLa.. in
1947 Beame first female editor ot Florida Law
Review Returned It? !Ja, matter graduation, se'ilnm in
ofti.es ot Chiet ot Na'al Operations, Naval Support
Actlvltv in Italy and as Judge Advocate General Medals
include Aierican Area Gai paignr Asialic Pacitic,
Campaigri World War II Vil.lrv National Defense
Service and Armed Forces Reserve Erided lini cLareer
as Navy Crnrmander

Anne Cawthon Booth '61
Graduated a&llh hirh hono'i .ard vorkiled as lelal aide toi
11 years for Supreime Court o Florida before starting
Bolh & Booth in Tallahassee in 1973 She has served
on the Florida First DistriLt Court ot Appeal since. she
as elected in 1973 anrd fromr 1935-87 was Chiet
Judge

Susan Black 567
LLM In 1984 University oft
Virinia Be-.ame in 1979 the first
female federal judge in FlIrida
Served in Middle DislriLt o,
Flonda 1979-92, and as Chiet
Judge 1990-92 President Bush


nonmiriated her in 1992 for U S Court of Appeals
11th Circuit in Atlanta, where she is still seivin.
Founding member of the Chesler Bedell Inn ot Court

Rosemary Barkett '70
First woman to serve on Florida Suprenme Court
(1985-931. and in 1992 first to e Chiet Justie She was
in private civil arid tlial law practice 1971-79 in West
Palm Beach and was ele,.led uriuit ludge for Fifteenth
Judicial Circuit of Florida in 1979 In 1934 she was
appointed appellate ludge Iof Flnrida s Fourth Dislrnct
Court of Appeals In 1993, President Clinlron ;appointed
her Io U S Court of Appeals for Eleventh Cirn-till Miami
where she presently sei'es

Patricia Fawsett '73
Graduated first in UFLaw LIass edilor ot Florida Law
Review and reLelved Outslanrding Graduate award
Joined Orlando firm ot Akerman Senterfitt & Eidson
after graduation i made partner in 1977 and headed
firms Livil Illilation section President I, f Orange Counlt
Bar Association 1981-82 1931 Orlando Business
Wrman of the Year and is on Boad of Direcltrs oct
Orlando Chalimber of Commerce In 1986 President
Readan appointed her Chief judge Iof U S Distillt Court
fo r Middle Disrinct of Florida in Orl.andoc


Hazel Land '73
First Atrican Ameitlari vi rnlan to graduate from UFLa..
Land served in Philippines arid Nigeria in the Peace
Corps anrd was a civil rights ,oitanizer tlbeore attending
law school o n fAACP scllolarship She was attorney
v!ith JcLksonville Area Legal Servies after .graduation
then worked in private prati,.e in Clearwater tor 10
years In 1985 began career vilth Withlacoochee Area
Leigl Services in Herrarido County Io help poor resl-
dents walh legal issues Land is novi retired and lives in
Blooksville

Martha Barnett '73
First female asso,,ate of Holland
& Knight LLP. now. partner and
chair of Direclcirs Committllee
First viornan to serve as ABA
House of Delegales chair, and
seLond v,'omran Io head ABA
i2000) Multiple State commis-
slins/iouncils, named in '98 one of "50 Most Influerntial
Women Ljwyersin U S ty National Law Journal.
Honored tbv Hillar; Clinton Florida Bar, Nalional and
Florida Assciajtio.ns of Women Lawyers. UF


FALL 21uO3 UFLAW [






















































Among Notable UFLaw Alumnae continued


Leslie Lott '74
Began practice with U S. Patent
31 nd Traldenark Oftic. in
WaLshinigrtun then walked with
internr3linal firn oit Prnnir. &
Ednirnd. in New YI'rk In 1983
funded il ntelle ltual iir,'peitv
firm Lott & Fridlalnrd in Coral
Gatl-s One ot two Southl Florida IP attorlleys list-
,d in Best Lawyers in America. Past chair at
Palent, Tiadirnark arid Copyright Lawi Coimmittt e
of Floriad Bar, and previously ion Boaild tf
Intlrnaltioil Trjdemark Association

M Bernestine Singley '74
Sprvpd as assistant attomcv
lelleral in Massachuselts
after ol)tiuning' sec',cd law
degree ifrm Hjrvaid
Foruided STRAIGHTALK a
T',, a c(ompanv ,tfeieing
legal dirinisltijll, ard ar-
poaite planning -eivic'.s Wiote critially a',.lainl ed
When Race Becomes Real in 2002.


Rpiuplent af Lila Wallac. Railers' Diqpst Emerging
Arti-t award .r i IrIrhoiin ty Te,.as Leglalative Black
C-uicus as 2001 OLltstarnding Te an

Jacqueline Griffin '75
Se.ornd woman editor orf Florida Law Review
named "Oultstlaiding Seniai Law Sltudri Begani
practiiing law foi Orlardo-iased Boroug'lis
Giimni Bennett & Grinfii in 1975, arid pjrlna r
1983-89 Serves ,,n Fitth Eistrit. Canit of Appeal
in Djaytonia B';-.II1 appoinled 1990 tb Gov
Maitine: arid was Chief Judge 1997-99

Elizabeth Jenkins '75
Served as As:istaint U S Att.rrlny 1978-85 aft'r
tenure as atl'rnry' will Department of Juttl,. e
1976-73 In 1985 appoint'l first female U.S
Magitliate Judge with US Ditii(tl Court for
Middle District of Flnrid.l Tarlmpj and re-appoint-
ed ta *a sei-ond term in 1993 Jenkins ir a Mastpr
of thi Bench, rid sel, s as Picsilent t Fe(lepal
Magitliate Judges Astocti'din


Carol Browner '80
Served in 1980 as Flaiid.
H,.use of Represenrttives
Genieil CoullriP: Wnlked
1986-38 in Wahirngltnr for
thern-Seinatlo Lawton Chile'e as
Legislative Diector for then-
Senal'it Al Gol S'i.retary of
Flodila's Department of Environmiental Regulation
1991-93 A)lointiled Iby Piesident Clinton in 1993
Browner was longest eiewing adminirstratlr ,t US
Enrdvii.nmnirtal Piltectioii Ag'piii 1993-01.

SMarybeth McDonald '82
Chair of the UF Law Center
Asiation[i Broaid of
Tlu.tes First w ,rmanr tI
lead iOr.iig Cruntv
(Orlando) Bar Associatini
I'r'ung Lawvels Committee
Past plre:idrit Oriirae
C',urnty Legal Aid S'u"lety Nairnmd 1990 Florid's
Most Produljtive 'i'rniiigi Lawy/r by Floiida Bar
Padler it Oriandao-tla.i McD'iralId & Roldgeis
sipea.ializii in iilsulra.ricn defense litigati on


M UFLAW I FALL i2003

























































Allison Bethel '84
A M Sin'- 2000 DireLtr of Civil
Rights or Flrinda Attorney'
General started in 1993 as
Assistant Director) In 1934
entered private pijLlite spe-
Sciali:ing in civil trial work In
1996 joined Fort Lauderdale
offie of Attornev General Past president of Florida
Chapter, Ndhaoial Bar Ass,',ciation served as ofli-
Leridirect,.r o1 tblak tar associatilons in Painm
Beach BrvJard and Dade ic.untites Presently
Chali Equal Opportuniries in Piofession Section
Florida Bar

Phyllis Kotey '85
Alahlua County judge since
1996 Was an Assistant
State Attorney in Gainesville
and was chiet of GCunly.
Court Division On Flonda
Supreme Courts Judicial
Ethics Advisoir; Commitlee
and its Cornmission on Fallness Lectures natlon-
ally on domestic violence ethics, criminal law and
tial procedure On facultes o0 Florida College ,of


Ad'anri ed Judil;ial
College


Studies, Nalionial Judiial


Patricia Kelly '86
Appoiniled by Governor Bush in
4 2001 I, Second Dislnrt Court
of Appeal After graduation
from UFLaw practed in West
Palm r'l B h and Tampa Beganr
in 1989 as staft attorney t'
Judge James E Leharn SecLnid
District Co.iilt ,A Appeal In 1993 returned to private
practice in appellate matters Member of Appellate
Court Rules CGnrimlitee, arnd active in Appellate
Practie arid Advoc..a. Sectinr' ,. Florida Bar

* Julia Johnson "87
President of Clerlmont-based
NETCOMMUNI CATION S
Served on Florida PutlliL
Servi, e Commission 1992-99
and as Chair 1997-99 Headed
FedeialState Joint B'arid ,on
Universal ServiLe (recLlrrnmn-
dations Io FCC 'n tele'onnriuniLations) Chaired
Florida s Inforniraldon Sreili.e Technlogv


Development Task Fore (advised Governor on Inlor-
mahon te'.hnolo.y) Appoinrled to Florida Board of
Education, for four-vear telm

Ava Parker '87
Served as general counsel, Edward Walers
College 1995-97 and started Jacksonlville prac-
tle 1999, Lavrence Parkle & Neighbors Currenl
president Florida Chapter, National Bar
Association past president Florida Association of
Women Lawyers Governor Bush appointed her in
2002 to Board of Gvelriors tor state university
system


Sandra Chance '90
Dire,.lor of UFs Brechner Center for Freedomn of
Inlforniatihn AssoLlate Professor ot Journalism
Graduated 11ih honors triom UFLaw and pratilied
with Holland & Knijhl, Tamrpa Serves on board of
diree lors of First Amendment Foundatin active in
Nadtonal Freedo,''m Irnfoirmation Coalition arnd is
Sunshine Chair for Society of Professional
Jouinjlisls


FALL 200i3 UFLAW M












BUSINESS TRAVEL OVERSEAS?

Ask for Directory of Foreign LL.M. Graduates

If overseas business takes you or representatives of your firm to
foreign countries on a regular basis, you may want to consider making
contact with one of more than 80 graduates of the LL.M. Comparative
Law Program.
Since the pro-
gram's inception in
1994, practicing
attorneys from more
than 20 foreign coun-
tries have taken
advantage of the
innovative UFlaw
program designed
for foreign law school
graduates who want
to hone legal skills
and gain detailed Students enrolled in the 10th class (2003-04) of UFLaw's LL.M. in
knowledge of U.S. law Comparative Law program include (back row, from left) Jan
e Pulda, Czech Republic; Jessica Marcos Arteaga, Peru; Yelena
"We are very selec- Brodkorb, Kazakhstan; Marcio Santos and Aline Varandas, Brazil;
tive in admitting Christoph Linhart, Germany; and Professor David Hudson,
students, usually Director. Also (front row, from left) E. Roberto Rosales, Mexico;
SShohei Yamamoto, Japan; Yiting Hu and Minhua Yan, China.
enrolling fewer than
20 each year," notes Professor David M. Hudson, director of the LL.M.
Comp Law program. "Those who are admitted have excellent creden-
tials, having graduated near the top of their classes from some of the
best law schools around the world."
Hudson credits initial program director Distinguished Service
Professor Emeritus Roy Hunt, 1994-98; and his successor, Professor
Emeritus Julian Juergensmeyer, 1998-99, with laying the strong foun-
dation on which Hudson has built during his four-year tenure.
Copies of the Comparative Law Alumni Directory listing
names/addresses/phone/eMail for each of the more than 80 graduates
are available simply by contacting the UFLaw Communications Office
(352.392.9586) or eMail huguenin@law.ufl.edu. The directory can be
eMailed to you the same day, or a hard copy sent overnight.
According to the directory, Korea leads with 11 graduates, followed
by Germany / Poland with nine each, and Brazil / China eight each.
Complete summary of grads and locations:


GRADS
11
9 each
8 each
5
4 each
3 each


COUNTRIES
Korea
Germany, Poland
Brazil, China
Venezuela
Turkey, Uganda
Georgia, Indonesia, Taiwan


Tax Grads Cover Country


since its inception almost
30 years ago, the College
of Law's Graduate Tax Program
has been considered among
the nation's elite. In fact,
USNews & World Report annu-
ally ranks it among the top two
in the country.
And since its inception,r
the program has attracted law
graduates and practicing i
attorneys from across the
country making it truly a
national program.
Nothing proves that more than an analysis of the zip
codes of approximately 1,000 graduates for which the
UFFoundation has current addresses.
It's no surprise the greatest number of Tax alumni live in
Florida (more than 500), but what may be surprising is the top
seven areas in which other Tax LL.M. grads live:

1. Georgia 4. Mississippi
2. Alabama/ California 5. Ohio
3. Washington, D.C. 6. North Carolina

Other indications of widespread nature of the
program and its participants:

Among universities for which Grad Tax alumni are working:
Arkansas, California, California State, Colorado, Florida,
Houston, Idaho, Mercer, Missouri, North Carolina Central,
Northern Illinois, Penn State, Pittsburgh, South Florida,
Stetson, West Florida, Texas Wesleyan.

State governments employing Grad Tax alumni:
Alaska, California, Florida, Ohio, Oregon, Washington

Governmental agencies include:
* Internal Revenue Federal Credit Union
* IRS Office of the Chief Counsel
* Los Angeles District Attorney's Office
* Office of the Judge Advocate General
* Treasury Department/ Internal Revenue Service
* U.S. Army
* U.S. Bankruptcy Court
* U.S. Department of Justice
* U.S. Senate Minority Staff
* V.I. Bureau of Internal Revenue
* Washington State Department of Revenue


m UFLAW I FALL 2003


2 each Czech Republic, France, Japan, Morocco, Thailand
1 each Cameroon, Costa Rica, Ecuador,
Italy, Kenya, Lithuania, Slovenia, United Kingdom













Heritage of




LEADERSHIP

Former Florida Governors. U.S. Senators, College Presidents. Justices
Named to New LIFLaw Heritage Society for Notable Alumni



two ,:ollege presidents and five State
5upremn Ctourt Chief Justices are among
12 grad uates of the Lexin College of Law\
inducted porsthumousL.i this spil in to 3-
new Heritage of Leade ship ( HOL i Reconition Society.
Othei s named by- the school's Law Center
Associatioln include a distinguished Li.S. Dist ict
Court Tudge and Miami-tDade Count' civic leader.
tirst chairman of the old Flo, ida Board of Regents.
and I ,eiimbei ot the Nzi W\\'ar Crimes Tribunil at
Nutemburg.
Induction Ceremonit.s vw.re, pa, t tof the Iaw
-" school's annual Spi ing Reunioln \\eelend, % ith fami-
lN members of 10 of the inductees on hand. Space
Honoring these anid ill tuture HOL inductees will be
featuiled in the expanded law school facilities.
"Since our founding more than 90 eais ago.
many of our more than 1o.000 graduates have been
itinong the nation's leaders in laV. business. ed uation
and government," said then-lDean Ion Mills. "It is
time to begin forinmll anld permanent recognizing
these outstanding dalulnni h11o hiAte done so much tor
their country, this stRat and university .
Top: Thrt ji rwflirlii o lamniln, nlnihfbi of Hrilig, ,,ii Lid& r hlpi iIjluTi , Jlnv
M Ar:onI:r II 4. w-re :n 111 nd or tlil forlinal :.rerli:ni.s Allenri:Illi
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viid .: -v rirtri'a 0 Co rnnell


FALL 2003 I UFLAW



















First Heritage inductees, year of law school graduation:


James C. Adkins Jr..
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E. Dixie Beggs Jr.

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Harold B. Crosby,

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UFLAW I F-LL :',il














































BY KRISTIN HARMEL


I n the heart of New York City, a thousand miles north
of Gainesville, thrives a community of attorneys with one
thing in common: a degree from the University of Florida
College of Law.
There are reportedly close to 300 UFLaw alumni working in
New York City, most not aware there are so many other Gator
lawyers in their midst. And they're very surprised to find that in the
Manhattan area including Connecticut, New Jersey and New York
- there are about 5,300 Gators of all degrees.
According to Ian Leavengood '00, Deloitte & Touche LLP, tax
manager and president of the overall Gotham Gators Club, "New
York state is second only to Florida in applications to UE So there
are a lot of family ties, and plenty of students have these roots before
they even go to Gainesville."
"It's also the financial capital of the world as well as world
capital for public relations, advertising and marketing,"


Leavengood said. "Because UF has such strong professional
programs medicine, law, journalism, accounting, business,
advertising you have alumni who want to be in the best market
for success plus those Gators who come back home."
David Cohen '89, senior vice president and general counsel for
the N.Y. Mets, agrees with Leavengood that the connection between
South Florida, UF and New York always has been strong. "They're
like sister states'"
As for Gator attorneys in Gotham, Leavengood points out "UF
is a top public law school with an exceptional Grad Tax program.
As a financial capital, New York is a great place for the practice of
tax law as well as for mergers and acquisitions."
If a recent survey of Big Apple Gator lawyers is any indication,
some prominent movers and shakers hail from UF and are impact-
ing most segments of the New York legal profession. Four of the
most influential practicing in New York and 78 of their peers...


FALL 2003 I UFLAW














































BY KRISTIN HARMEL


I n the heart of New York City, a thousand miles north
of Gainesville, thrives a community of attorneys with one
thing in common: a degree from the University of Florida
College of Law.
There are reportedly close to 300 UFLaw alumni working in
New York City, most not aware there are so many other Gator
lawyers in their midst. And they're very surprised to find that in the
Manhattan area including Connecticut, New Jersey and New York
- there are about 5,300 Gators of all degrees.
According to Ian Leavengood '00, Deloitte & Touche LLP, tax
manager and president of the overall Gotham Gators Club, "New
York state is second only to Florida in applications to UE So there
are a lot of family ties, and plenty of students have these roots before
they even go to Gainesville."
"It's also the financial capital of the world as well as world
capital for public relations, advertising and marketing,"


Leavengood said. "Because UF has such strong professional
programs medicine, law, journalism, accounting, business,
advertising you have alumni who want to be in the best market
for success plus those Gators who come back home."
David Cohen '89, senior vice president and general counsel for
the N.Y. Mets, agrees with Leavengood that the connection between
South Florida, UF and New York always has been strong. "They're
like sister states'"
As for Gator attorneys in Gotham, Leavengood points out "UF
is a top public law school with an exceptional Grad Tax program.
As a financial capital, New York is a great place for the practice of
tax law as well as for mergers and acquisitions."
If a recent survey of Big Apple Gator lawyers is any indication,
some prominent movers and shakers hail from UF and are impact-
ing most segments of the New York legal profession. Four of the
most influential practicing in New York and 78 of their peers...


FALL 2003 I UFLAW













Stephen D. Gardner '64
Partner, Kronish Lieb Weiner & Hellman
Professor, NYU School of Law
For Gators who graduated in the early
60s, the name Stephen Gardner might
ring a bell. After all, the Miami native -
who earned his bachelors degree from
UF in 1961 and graduated from law
school three years later- was a big man
on campus.


Betty Stinson '67
Bronx Supreme Court Justice
When Betty Stinson started at UF's
law school in 1964, female law stu-
dents were few and far between.
"There was one term when there
were 12 women in the school, and it
was the first time in history there had
been that many," she says. "They took
a photo of us in the jury box. It was an
unusual event."
When she graduated in 1967, she
didn't find the road to job success as
easy as she'd thought it would be.




Christine Markussen '72
Chief Counsel, Real Estate Investments
Metropolitan Life
After two years running a MetLife
division she founded in Warsaw, Poland,
UF alumna Christine Markussen
received a promotion in 2001 and began
preparing to move back to start her new
job as chief counsel in charge of real
estate investments.
Her first day on the job was Tuesday,
September 11.
"I remember driving into the city the
night of the 10th," she says. "I was with
my husband, and we said, 'Wow, this is
wonderful!' We had a view of the World
Trade Center from our apartment."



David Cohen '89
Senior Vice President and
General Counsel, New York Mets
David Cohen always has been a
baseball fan. But he never guessed as
he was growing up in North Miami
Beach he would one day be instrumen-
tal in inking multi-million dollar con-
tracts with some of the top names in
the game.
Cohen spent years as an Atlanta
Braves fan, but when the Mets asked
him to come aboard in May 1995, he
promptly abandoned his affinity for the
Braves, the Mets' league rivals.


He was president of Florida Blue
Key, and very active in many campus
organizations.
But his name might mean even more
to anyone who ever practiced law in New
York City. As a partner at Kronish Lieb
Weiner & Hellman, one of the city's pres-
tigious law firms (he was the managing
partner for 19 years) and as a professor
at New York University School of Law


"Women in a courtroom were a
strange phenomenon in Florida," she
says.
In 1980, she moved to New York,
where women were more commonplace
in the legal system. Sixteen years later,
she was elected to the bench as a Civil
Court judge for the City of New York. She
continued her ascent quickly and was
elected to the New York State Supreme
Court bench in 2000. She serves in
Bronx County, assigned to the Civil
Branch. (The NY Supreme Court is anal-
ogous to the Circuit Courts in Florida, the
highest trial court.)



The next day, as Markussen began
with MetLife's New York office, the world
changed forever. Markussen embraced
her role as a New Yorker with open arms
and began to rebuild with the rest of the
city.
Today, Markussen oversees all legal
aspects of MetLife's real estate portfolio,
worth around $40 billion.
"We have lawyers across
the country that do legal work to
support the company's real estate
investments," she says. "We invest in
shopping centers, office buildings,
hotels, apartments and agricultural
opportunities. We have an incredibly
varied portfolio."



"That interest in the Braves would-
n't have worked too well here," he
says.
In his eight years with the Mets,
he's participated in some of the most
interesting deals in baseball, including
the signing of pitcher Tom Glavine a
former Braves' star.
"I work on contracts of all our
major players," he says. "I also partici-
pate in baseball salary arbitration. It's a
process by which certain baseball play-
ers with certain numbers of years of
experience are entitled to seek arbitra-
tion to determine their salary. It's very


since 1966, he has touched a lot of lives
and made a name for himself in the Big
Apple.
After graduating from UF's law school
and receiving an LL.M. in taxation from
NYU, Gardner worked in Orlando for
seven months before being offered afull-
time teaching job in Manhattan at NYU.
He accepted and hasn't looked back. He
made New York home, where he and his


Today, she's just a couple of years
into a 14-year term, and she's enjoying
every second of it.
"I feel that I make a difference," she
says. "In one way, I help younger lawyers
learn skills they're going to need. I also
help the citizens who come to jury serv-
ice to appreciate the justice system and
their importance to it.
"I think that because some of the
decisions I write reflect changes in
society and what I feel should be
changes in the law to go along with
those I also make a difference,"
she says.



Markussen works an average of
55-to-60 hour work week and enjoys the
job completely.
"I'm having a wonderful time. The
people in my team are wonderful, and
the work is interesting."
Not that interesting work is anything
new to this former Gator. She started
with MetLife in Atlanta and soon had a
job as a general counsel in the London
office. She returned to the states to
become corporate secretary and the
Chairman's chief of staff.
After two years, Markussen accepted
a position in South America in interna-
tional operations. Next was Poland,
where she started a life insurance and



much a legal process with preparation
of briefs and oral arguments, but the
precedent is other baseball salaries and
statistics rather than court decisions."
During the baseball season, Cohen
typically spends the day working, then
stays at Shea Stadium where admin-
istrative offices are located for home
games.
"I'm there in a quasi-working capaci-
ty," he says. "A game for us is really a
working event, but there is some oppor-
tunity to watch the proceedings."
For Cohen, things around the office
never get dull.


M UFLAW I FALL 2003


Ilf,!ALnI


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AIll lil, l i i onI I hlill, I I. I l I, Il III

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schoo. .i 1: I and coun It e l .oIes I
IIs m o lIII illo ,l ll lh i .l II .dl h
11. .,n hII ,l I > nill.- l II li I IIl -
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I lln- I I ,i. ,II Ur. h .. .lIP "III"



,,I, Florida Law Review while in law
school. and counts UF memories as
some ol his lIndest.


I.,l ill III Ili I ii .-.- i Ii F Ii 111,

&iI ll III il E iiinni




:J~l -.11 1F., li I li, -u 'i ii


liii F''
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ii i- ll il. Hiili















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Tii i I' i Ii. Old I1,

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IIi Fill P.. 1..:-I bIvii b


I,,1 Il I I, I i, -jr I I,, wl ll: I. II I Iw ii


inth lga sstm


1960s
* Slephen Tochner '64
P ii li- F i,.. i 1 LI.i 1 i 1,.- :,-i ,
Hrlllil LLP'
* George W. Johnson 67



* Milchell H. Spingharn 68

F:: ini l. I Ill.. li

* Alex Spitzer g69

i],: il, HF -l NI,,.I In 11 i

1970s
* Richard A. Sleline 70
4 -itll FI'I.l1il 1 1 i ltllllr 'II
* Robert E. Carrigan 72

'I I --I I I' 1..:0 1-d,
'ih. lll i I, lI ,I I I FI l il

* David H. Schmudde 72
P i" :,',i ..I i 'iill


* Louis A. Tally 72
m .111n -w : -l Ii |l I .. l
* Joseph T. Jurkowski '74
r.1i,,n,1,,,,i mr,,,, h,,
t.:i : i ii m, '. I iI'I
* Howard R. Snyder '74
P .1111' l hi llnnll ,, I .I ,ll i ll1.1
'i lI l 11 '.i l :. fi lI 11 L L F
* Ronald Schwartzman '78

I ll l -11, I.i ll.l ,lll 1 -ii l i l I II,

* Edmund Dejowski '79
[m i, ill M IliiIIll :ll .i ,,l 111 l ,,I rJf =,
eIIi HIl- II ill ii F- lll. i
1980s
* Kalhleen Walson '80
H Nll ,lI E i, llll, I i I. i ,,l l m ,1
F i i ll ii IllI
* David H. Vickrey 81
I-n ., I, .i I Il lll'l Ii. nil F-'P r -i,
[ 1 1- 1 -1 II-
* Thomas R. Arnold 83

lli. PF.ilr, FP' liih
* Kalherine Davidson '83
A ili f, [ i l l .1i I ] ,
* Russell Leviln 83
Ti. l i. ii..i fi-., Ill .,,1 I P[.1l, __pF
* Carla Martin 83
S IIIH I Ii ll ,I

* Helen Bonomo Tvelenslrand 84
P iii, lI TIi.- Ii I, PF .-inllI .l I, .....J


FALL 2003 | UFLAW


* Lynne M. Davis 85
Fl I .I I 1-111F l 1 llF ll Li

* H. Douglas Garlield 85
T i II-ll n 1 ', ln..,li P l IIli.,li

* Leslie Y. Garlield 85

PI-i. L .ii,
* Karen Heiss Eisen '85
lill ,..IllllF ll. lll Phi l 1 .:.I yll
I, -, ,llIh ll' i .ll,. il l l i

* Mark K. Lindenberg 85
L ,ill ,rl ,. > .1l.11 ,, I .1

* Michael W. Smilh 85

I ,lik h rl l l l. 1 Il Ill -l lli ,,, l i ,lll ll
* Maurice Slone 85
I,,1i1,1, .: H il I,-,, I I l -I L LI
* Suzanne A. Solomon '86

L,: -l IP: :1ii, 1 11 .l .i : l. III .. Il

* Gregg A. Slone '86
'l IIi- It ll' i ll., i l

* Mark A. Nelson 87
SPll III 1 -11:'l 1 ll ini
.II i P l l :1 l r l l nl i ll l ** : ** i,, ll.,, l ll,,i,

* Susanne M. Roxbury '87
fP l. : ll.l ,11 :I ll ,,,r.l 1 P .. hill E :l
* Scon Markowilz'88

.il n I ,lill I J
* Hilary D. Unger 88
"i,,I ., [ i, i i ,iii r.
m'-l mlt It l Tl I II.H :

* Andrew D. Fisher 89

I ,lilll 11mlml illI LLI
* Gerard L. Mulhall 89
.iii 1ii.. 11 -.1 F', '' 1-Il'' ii: ii: 1i
., H .-lli.-i. hi
* Richard I. Slern '89
11lll 1 L.-,lil I1lhl I I I i l 1llill LU I
1990s
* Paul M. Faver 90
U. ihi ..Ii, .. mim i. .i .i E. I'.-il : [.i1i
IN, : I,,ll il'. --Ii,

* FrankJ. Konlely '90
F -' i i i.- F tl F-i.-:11 l. .1 1C
il.,I ..i I *:. : ,i i









If!ALUMII


Prominent Gotham Grads continued


* Juliet T. Wyne '90
Deplit, AtOine, irenepial Stle ul
JNe Jtii e, DIl':Si'liiul Lawd
* Bret Herman '91
ICnlliidlitire Trader Self Eimpluoed
* Randall J. Shaw 91
,itLe PeiPideri ABNI AM1PO
Heallhicare EBlirlm
* Sunil K. Agarwal '92
Pre-ilderid Sunil b Agar:jal PIG
* Steve Becker'92
Partner Sprcill Siruatirrl FuiindJs
* Bongard Stremler '92
Or Cuiurnspl DiLnren:u & Pu'h
* Walter Alex Fallis '92
A.s,'l) ale Willkie Farl & uallaghlii
* Robert Limerick '92
Direri ur. GI'-,'bjl Ta. Mr i ill L-,'iii
* Caren L. Loguercio Sikora '92
Princijal La Clleik to Hr.n Ernil
PuiN'. [J 'i"l Sull eir ie 'uI -

* Erin Richardson '92
Atirine-, Self Emiplired
* Rabbi Maria J. Feldman '93
Direrui Cunmiiirsslinr nil SuCual
Atliurn UliliiI ul AiA llcjin Hebti',,
Irnc'i'regaliuio
* Ronna Horwitz-Bard '93
Pariinei Turle. Rediarnir.
RP..st- LLP
* Deborah L. Litshey '93
Crii'.fil ahi Pearl f.lpr & Partneiir
* Jeffrey A. Tochner '93
Asuciatre Latlaril Watllkns LLP
* Linda B. Zuech 93
D lepur, Tuvin Alluirie',' T., i ul
[J.,11h Hoeim.Slejcl
* David H. Hall '94
Senii Mlanger Tai Piuce
WJlerhuu'.e Cuil.ers
* Steven J. Horn '94
Direrlur, Heid -''I U S O)erjliunlii
DILitsc hei Bjil'
* Trenton J. Schmatz'94
SIpLial Aerill FeJeial BireaiJ ul
Irli,'e .li altinrl
* Navaid Alam '95
Direi [rl IllrraSlt i l llr Fiiidii'ni'j
fGr OLin
" Joshua Benjamin '95
Sltal Atuilre, Lrjal Aild
Sro iety-1Iririiiial Dettiise D ,isitiuri
* Seth A. Levine '95
Alliln & Rlutilrari PC(


* Jamie B. Rainerman Mandel '95
As',uilate Dualhe Minrl LLP
* Richard F. Silverstein Nisim '95
A.'-iilalr Diuiaine Mullis LLP
* Seven Zimmerman '95
Atrloi ne, Lav .' Oitie o0 K le '1en
I ii r i c1i rir ir
* Scott A. Simon '95
AcV-Ciialt Le';',v BuriSll 4l .
l)irlelll. PC
* Leza S. Tellam '96
Sel'uIr 'iLiun' Ul tur MrAlelers aiild
Aiquill~l.l':n C-Iligi'uI l li
* Douglas Davis '97
Edl01il 'n BluIei. Clues PloCluilel ul
Drcinileritar, 'iJi' 24 Nickl'uluderii
* Kenneth P. Gavsie '98
As.nilateP Well Gulstial c
Majnaes.LLP
* Michael J. Schmidt 98
F.lallia.el ilerlis Acqui]jSitrinn'
Deloimtei Tout lie
* Michael Stonberg '98
Pjrliei lii.lirridcl e
I''.Jraile Def)en~se liti'jatlurl Luitill
& Biu:in
* Sam Borek' 99
Pi'-gian, Dnlle .,i i Carlll Laurel
* George A. Callas '99
Sernil Assila[e. Ta. lPM([, LLP
* Michelle Weithaas '99
Semiur Pirilect F.iiah.ti Inlerbjiand
WI,,ud Heallthicale
2000s
* Michael Hirsch -00
Seilui Tja C..,Imsiiltaril
DOtlitte & Triuclip
* Christopher Jackson '00
iUrihai Rerie:jal Cnrluratiuli
* Wendy Rubinstein *00
Asscimate DeC..llii FiliPairit
CI-le S' WisfIl
* Veronica Theresa Tucci O00
Assri.allt Bruo.,n Paysrnaii
Mill'.leii Feldei & Sleiriei, LLP
* Adam D. Wadler'00
Aitiiit-.' Slein iei'.el Pankren, &
Wull LLP
* Stacy L. Eberhart -02
Ta. (.uirn.iilani Delultre &
Tr-irliei LLP
* Douglas D. Nguyen '02
Assisrnr \'ice President
Wac hu-ia Ciol
* Alexa R. Sherr '02
LIingtiri AsSiciite
ijreeribtiie Trauiig


Four Gators at a recent New York City event were lan Leavengood '00 (story below),
two-year president of UF's Gotham Gator Club; presidential candidate Sen. Bob
Graham (UF '59); Laura Hammond Schmidt (UF '97 J-school grad and Ogilvy Public
Relations account director) and Michael Schmidt '98 (UF '94 B.S.B.A.-Finance), merg-
ers and acquisitions manager with Deloitte & Touche.


Law Grad's Leadership Helps

Gotham Gators Achieve Plaudits

U F College of Law grads make up only a small a of a tr &
percentage of its total membership, but it is
in part due to the leadership of a Gator law
grad that the University of Florida Gotham a 4 r *
Gators Club (www.gothamgators.com) is an hon-
ored group as far as the UF Alumni Association is con-
cerned.
In fact, according to UFAAs Duane Wiles, director of Club
Relations and Special Interest Groups, "the NYC-based group has
been one of our most active out-of-state clubs for the last couple
of years."
In his 24-plus months as president of the Gotham Club, Ian
Leavengood '00 helped the New York area group achieve positive
notoriety back home with UFAA honoring the club with five
major awards since 1999.
Perhaps it is partly attributable to Leavengood's Florida Blue
Key experience, and his UF undergraduate activities (including
Alpha Tau Omega, Florida Cicerones, Preview Orientation pro-
gram director) that got him elected to the university's Hall of
Fame. He graduated with honors with a B.S. and M.S. in tax
accounting in 1995, and went to work for Procter & Gamble
Distributing Co., as an internal business consultant. He returned
to UFLaw in '97, and during his second stint on campus served as
a judicial extern to Florida Supreme Court Justice Ben Overton.
Leavengood, born and raised in St. Petersburg, is currently a tax
attorney / accountant for Deloitte & Touche LLP, specializing in
federal taxation of mergers and acquisitions.
According to UFAA's Wiles, there are almost 5,300 known
Gator alumni living in the NYC area, and the Gotham Gators
consist of approximately 780 dues paying members. Awards
received by the group include Outstanding Overall Programming,
1999-00; Outstanding Communications, 1999-00 and 2000-01;
Outstanding Membership, 2000-01; and Outstanding Individual
UFAA Club Member 2000-01: Leavengood. !.


SUFLAW I FALL 2003


B i~CIY~ 6















S,]'i'l i .iriri itiui' h.r tli ,- tiir' l Iv' E litur IJFL i'' Milli:ilr' Li"'ii Cj ll,'Ii,' uf L i.'
Ci li h.llill .b',inp. O ni i e'..,, 11..633 i,*, l[ 32611 i i i ,.l"i nll IIII


1965
American Jewish
Committee/ Palm Beach
County Chapter presented
Michael H. Gora, Hodgson
Russ LLP partner in Boca
S Raton, the 2003 Judge
Learned Hand Award in recognition of
lifelong commitment to his profession and
contributions to institutions enhancing
quality of life in that area. Gora is certified
by the Board of Legal Specialization and
Education of the Florida Bar as a specialist
in marital and family law. He serving as
president of South Palm Beach County Bar
Association.

1966
Stephen F Rossman, partner with
Rossman Baumberger & Reboso in
Miami, was 2002-03 chairman of Easter
Seals Miami-Dade for third year.

1967
Florida Family Law America Inn of Court
presented its 2002 Hernandez
Professionalism Award to attorney
Barry S. Sinoff of Jacksonville. This
award is the only one presented by the
organization and recognizes the attorney
who demonstrates highest ideals and
goals for which the group was founded.

Clay A. Terry, senior partner with
Bradley Johnson, was named Citizen of
the Year by Lake Wales Chamber of
Commerce. Terry helped establish a
number of local facilities over the years,
including Lake Wales Family YMCA, Lake
Wales Care Center and Lake Wales
Retirement Center.

1968
Tom Lang has been named senior vice
president and trust officer of TexasBank in
Fort Worth, and his areas of responsibility
include estates, trusts, guardianships and


agency accounts. TexasBank serves north
central Texas in 27 locations. Lang, who
has been in banking since 1969, also earned
his B.S. degree at UF

The Congress of Racial Equality (CORE)
recently honored Dr. Andy Sheldon,
founder of Sheldon Associates in Atlanta,
with its annual Harmony Award for doing
"the-right-thing-not-the-race-thing" to
promote racial equality. For eight years,
Sheldon has provided legal and trial con-
sulting services to state and federal prose-
cutors of Civil Rights cases from the '60s
which could not then be tried because of
the climate in the South at that time.

1969
Joseph P. Milton, senior partner with
Milton Leach Whitman D'Andrea Charek
& Milton PA in Jacksonville, is serving a
four-year term on the Florida Supreme
Court Nominating Commission (2002-06).
He is recipient of the 2001 Outstanding
Past Bar President award presented by
Florida Council of Bar Presidents. In 2000,
the Florida Board of Trial Advocates
selected him State Trial Lawyer of the Year,
and the American Board of Trial Advocates
chose him Jacksonville Trial Lawyer of the
Year.

1971
Steve Uhlfelder, head of the Tallahassee
firm of Uhlfelder and Associates and
current member of the State University
System's Board of Governors, is proposing
an assessment test for university seniors.
He believes such a standardized test would
be a way to evaluate student learning and
give Florida universities more accountabili-
ty. Uhlfelder is a former member of the
now-defunct Board of Regents.

1972
James F. Page Jr. has formed Page
Mediation in Orlando, limiting


I ciass NotesI


FALL 2003 | UFLAW


his practice to mediation after 25
years working with Gray Harris &
Robinson PA.

John J. Schickel of
Jacksonville has been
appointed to a second
three-year term and an
At-Large Director of The
Florida Bar Foundation.
He specializes in civil trial work and
workers' compensation with Coker Myers
Schickel Sorenson & Green P.A. Schickel is
a past member/chairman of The Florida
Bar's Board of Legal Specialization &
Education and the Bar Trial Lawyer's
Executive Council. His UF accomplish-
ments include Sigma Alpha Epsilon, Blue
Key and UF Hall of Fame, and he is a past
"Lawyer of the Year" as designated by the
Jacksonville Bar Association.

1973
Martha W. Barnett, Holland & Knight
LLP partner and chair of its Directors'
Committee, received an honorary doctor
of laws degree at Wake Forest University's
May commencement. Barnett recently
was elected to the Appleseed Foundation's
national Board of Directors, a national
non-profit organization working to build
a just society through legal advocacy,
community activism and policy expertise.
She chairs Holland & Knight's Integrated
Security Strategies Initiative and practices
in the areas of administrative and govern-
mental law, public policy, and state and
local taxation. Barnett is a former presi-
dent of the American Bar Association,
and first woman chair of its House of
Delegates (See page 28).

1974
J. Bruce Hoffmann now serves as general
counsel to the Florida Department of
Revenue after more than 25 years in private
practice in Miami-Dade County.

Leslie J. Lott, founding partner of the Lott
& Friedland PA intellectual property firm
in Coral Gables, was appointed to the
Department of Commerce's United States








IfAUMII


Browner named as first
woman chair

C..irl r I I.' Br. I ni r 9 l s .il












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Theiin i 1.1iir l ,l i i i.,i l Pr i fre .,. des Al ,i.,,il
r[esi li1 i vI. in i:ao.ne II Ijir",, jli:.vl..l ri e init: s IJ
Fv..u i,,,d nI, 1905I ,: i d 1, in ,,, I.
iIh. ill,.,re thorn 500 000 11 11 ]ld ',.,iICnlll ,'
o inlls,, 100 l." I.i[ tirs im l .ltl 'I s I 2. iI?S
WVe ri furillli ][e u i uluni C irul Bruvll'
i[nulnil Ullr il nl i luited. Prufes,.,:.vr Al sorII
Fiiirli .ll ,l ire, I r i fj UFL i :r Eiiir'r'l lir'iiit is i i
Ljiiid U e L' 1 ,' Pri iIr ii Sl h 11i. I rPe it rul iisi .i
fur stiJle is i f ll i [ is ,i l ,.i ,iinlruiiis T riniiij 1 lier
Sitrise i;i i lher te i .i hr i I ii I Cusi i Rh j i i .l, a -
i,.I jt u irnin i.' eir nt~i ur str-i,, .l -i Ilie ELULP
.el ll IIll.e I nm itt II 11 i0 jbh ult f !i.. m illl ,s uif
b lh.I ',i llh I'b r Iu re illl O lih ,' .J ell',' sie is ,ull-
Iliilled tulU I rIi Ii 111 pile lit Ilter sl


Patent and Trademark Office's (USPTO)
Trademark Public Advisory Committee. It
advises the Under Secretary of Commerce
and Director of the USPTO. Lott also
recently represented the prevailing party
in a critical decision for the international
yachting community a federal court jury
in Florida's Southern District determining
the word "Yachtmaster" is generic and not
a valid service mark. Lott and Friedland,
now a 12-attorney firm is celebrating its
20th anniversary in 2003.

1977
Charles S. Modell, franchise group chair
at Larkin Hoffman Daly & Lindgren, Ltd.,
was recently named to the Strategic
Advisory Board of the International
Institute for Franchise Education at Nova
Southeastern University in Fort
Lauderdale. The institute's goal is to pro-
vide high quality programs for prospec-
tive and existing franchisors, franchisees
and franchise service providers as well as
academic teachers and researchers.

L Jack Kirschenbaum of
GrayHarris in Melbourne
is new president of the
Brevard Museum of Art &
Science. Kirschenbaum, in
addition to being a trial
lawyer, has an entertainment and sports
law practice and as a result of first amend-
ment law specialization also is representing
a regional newspaper and a TV station
news division.

Buchanan Ingersoll of Tampa reports
Richard Oliver has been appointed to
serve a three-year term on The Florida
Bar standing committee on Unauthorized
Practice of Law. He is a member of the
firms' Commercial Litigation and Health
Care Groups, and is a former staff attorney
for the 15th Judicial Circuit of Florida.

1979
James A. Edwards, board certified civil
trial lawyer and civil mediator, has
expanded mediation services his firm
offers. He was certified as an Appellate
Mediator by Fifth District Court of


Appeal, and also has been accepted to U.S.
District Court, Middle District's panel of
civil mediators.

I D. David Keller of
Bunnell Woulfe
Kirschbaum Keller
McIntyre & Gregoire PA
(Fort Lauderdale) was
appointed in January to
the American Bar Association House of
Delegates for a two-year term. Keller's
practice focuses on representation of
attorneys and other professionals in the
defense of liability claims and insurance
coverage litigation.

1980
8 Richard B. Comiter
(LLMT 81) of West Palm
Beach firm of Comiter &
Singer LLP is 2003-04
Chair-Elect of the Tax
Section of The Florida
Bar and a member of the Tax Section
Uniform Limited Partnership Act Review
Committee. Comiter is a board certified
tax lawyer and Certified Public
Accountant and recently was selected to
be a fellow of the American College of
Trust and Estate Councils. His firm
recently added two associates and moved
offices in Palm Beach Gardens.

Eric D. Olson is a new trustee of the
Allegeny Franciscan Foundation of Dade
County, Inc. (AFFDC), a non-profit reli-
gious foundation formed to make grants
to better serve underprivileged citizens.

1981
The Clara Gehan (see page 28)
Association for Women Lawyers
(CGAWL), formerly the 8th Judicial
Circuit's chapter of the Florida
Association for Women Lawyers (FAWL),
elected Howard M. Rosenblatt as presi-
dent for 2002-2003. He was first male
president of the local chapter, and the first
male to serve on the FAWL board.
Rosenblatt practices estate planning and
probate in Gainesville.


I UFLAW I FALL 2003











J. Mason Williams III of GrayHarris
in Melbourne received one of Junior
Achievement's highest forms of recog-
nition, the National Bronze Leadership
Award. Williams, currently on East
Central Florida's JA Board of Directors,
specializes in civil litigation, construc-
tion law, mediation and arbitration.

1983
Thomas J. Ali practices in Jupiter with
Kramer Ali Fleck Hughes Gelb &
Bornstein PA, where he has been a partner
since 1990.

Scott G. Hawkins, member of the firm of
Jones Foster Johnston & Stubbs PA in
West Palm Beach, was recognized in the
Best Lawyers in America publication. He
has served on the Board of Directors of
the firm for several years.

Terrence P. O'Connor was named attor-
ney of the month for Legal Aid Service of
Broward County's pro bono program
(Broward Lawyers Care). O'Connor
specializes in family law with Morgan
Carratt & O'Connor in Ft. Lauderdale.

1984
The Florida Bar designated
Lawrence J. Marraffino, sole
practitioner, a Certified Civil Trial
Lawyer. In addition to trial practice in
Gainesville, Marraffino also teaches
"Law Office Management and Practical
Skills" at the Levin College of Law.

1985
Dennis F. Ramsey sold his law practice in
Leesburg, and has retired to Las Vegas.

1986
William (Bill) I.Altfield, senior prosecutor
in public corruption unit of the Miami-
Dade State Attorney's office, uncovered and
prosecuted incidents of police corruption
which ultimately led to recent convictions
of four City of Miami police officers.
Altfield also is a member of the Florida
Bar's Grievance Committee, and teaches
drama to public school students.
continued...


Three Rivers Honors Grads
Creates Spitzer Award, Celebrates 25th
our UFLaw graduates were honored with an award named for a former profes-
sor and by State Supreme Court Chief Justice Harry Anstead '63 as part of an
event this spring celebrating Three Rivers Legal Services first 25 years of operation.
The four were the first recipients of the Anne L. Spitzer Award for Public Interest
Law. Spitzer, an associate law professor, taught family law, evidence, professional
responsibility and English legal history and helped establish the law school's Virgil
Hawkins Civil Clinics. Spitzer died in 1997 from Lou Gehrig's Disease.
The Spitzer Award honors Clinics students who have made notable contributions
as legal services attorneys or in other areas of public interest law. Clinic students
represent people on family law issues and offer a pro se program to advise clients
representing themselves.
The first four recipients of the Spitzer Award, introduced and honored by
Anstead during ceremonies, are Lynn Kish '91, Peggy Schrieber '79, Catherine Tucker
'75 and Thomas Williams '81.


* Kish worked with Spitzer at Virgil Hawkins Civil Clinics. She became a Three Rivers
staff attorney after admission to the Bar in 1991, primarily in Lake City.
* Schrieber worked as a Three Rivers staff attorney in Lake City following her admis-
sion to the Bar in 1980, eventually becoming the managing attorney. Schrieber left
Three Rivers to become a legal skills professor with the Civil Clinics. Currently, she
supervises students who assist pro se clients as well as the domestic violence externs
at Three Rivers and other public sector offices.
* Tucker was a Clinics student under supervision of Don Peters. She has worked
throughout her career in legal services and is currently deputy director and pro
bono coordinator for the Legal Aid Society of Orange County.
* Williams started as a Vista Volunteer Paralegal in April 1977 at Storefront Legal Aid,
one of the agencies that combined to form Three Rivers. After being admitted to the
Bar in 1981, Williams returned to Three Rivers as a staff attorney.

Three Rivers was founded in 1978 to provide free legal services to clients -
the poor, abused, elderly and disabled in a 12-county area. The College of
Law has provided support for a quarter of a century through Clinics' students,
Center for Governmental Responsibility and
Center for Career Services. T^ Re
Three Rivers serves clients in Alachua, Bradford, T e Rivers
Columbia, Dixie, Gilchrist, Hamilton, Lafayette, Levy, LEGAL SERVICES
Madison, Suwannee, Taylor and Union counties.


FALL 2003 | UFLAW








IfAUMII


Stewart '63 Honored for
Post 9/11 Leadership

S Larry Stewart '63 has been
honored by the Florida
chapters of the American
Board of Trial Advocates for
1 his national leadership on
behalf of consumers and
individual rights in the after-
math of 9/11.
Stewart partner in Stewart Tilghman Fox &
Bianchi P.A., Miami was presented with a spe-
cial President's Award, given for only the second
time by state units of ABTA .
"Larry's efforts on behalf of September 11th
victims were selfless and provided an important
service to the families during a difficult time,"
said Florida ABTA president Sonny Meyers in
making the award presentation. "He is a past
recipient of our Trial Lawyer of the Year award
and continues to stand for the highest levels of
integrity and professionalism."
Stewart created and served as founding
president of Trial Lawyers Care, Inc., an unprece-
dented national pro bono program that is deliv-
ering free legal services to thousands of the 9/11
victims and their families. He directed the orga-
nization's activities during its initial year 2001-
02, and continues on the TLC Board of Directors.
And for the fourth time, Stewart recently
was awarded the Association of Trial Lawyers of
America's Widemann/Wysocki Award given
annually to ATLA members who demonstrated a
commitment to the organization and the civil jus-
tice system.
He has held multiple ATLA national offices
in the past 20 years, including heading its
ethics and ethical conduct committees, serving
on the Board of Governors 11 years and the
Executive Committee seven years, and serving
as 1994-95 president. He has been president of
the Academy of Florida Trial Lawyers, active on
various Florida Bar committees, founding mem-
ber of the Dade County Trial Lawyers
Association, and a Fellow from 1989 of the
International Academy of Trial Lawyers (and on
its Board 1989-95).


John A. "Skip" Kirst Jr., shareholder in
Gray Harris & Robinson PA in Orlando,
was chosen for Leadership Florida Class
XX a statewide annual program of the
Florida Chamber of Commerce to develop
leadership skills and increase awareness of
key Florida issues among the state's lead-
ers. Kirst concentrates on commercial liti-
gation (including construction, employ-
ment and other civil matters).

Courtney B. Wilson, business litigation
section partner in Shook Hardy & Bacon
LLP, Miami, for second consecutive year is
included in the Labor and Employment
Law Section in Best Lawyers. Wilson is cur-
rent chair of The Florida Bar L&EL section.

Michael K. Wilson joined Broad and Cassel
as a partner in its Orlando office. He will
practice statewide in the firm's
Construction Litigation Practice Group.

1987
Mayanne Downs, attorney with King
Blackwell & Downs PA in Orlando, is a
member of the Board of Governors of the
Florida Bar.


in the Pensacola office of
Miller Canfield Paddock
and Stone PLC, received the
2003 Ethics Award from the
Florida Association of
County Attorneys for acting as a "whistle
blower" against the Escambia County
Commission for violations of Florida's open
meeting laws. Resigning in 2002 after nine
years as county attorney, Tucker was com-
mended for not compromising his legal
opinions or becoming complicit in unlaw-
ful acts that occurred during his service. He
since has provided grand jury testimony
and acted as a prosecution witness, helping
in a criminal investigation which to date has
lead to conviction of four suspended or for-
mer county commissioners. Tucker is a past
president of the FACA, was honored in
1990 for service by Second Judicial Circuit
Guardian ad Litem Program, and in 1991
received The Florida Bar President's Award
for pro bono service.


Jose Latour and his Latour & Lleras PA
firm has been named by Inc. Magazine in
its 4th annual Web awards as one of
America's 15 best Internet companies in its
Transformations category. Latour used Web
technology to transform his firm into a
national one, and credits the commensurate
improvement in efficiency with allowing
him to regain control of his life. The
Gainesville firm focuses on corporate
immigration compliance.

1988
Jeffrey A. Grebe with Williams Parker
Harrison Dietz & Getzen in Sarasota,
presented "AS IS and Other Related
Disclaimers" at the Knowledge Network
Fund Assembly 2003. He is a board certified
real estate attorney, and has taught as a
visiting professor at UF and Stetson
University law schools.

Greg McCann, professor
and Director of Stetson
University's Family
Business Center, received
the 2002 Leavey Award for
SExcellence in Private
Enterprise Education. It is given annually to
10-20 educators throughout the country for
innovative efforts to help young people
better understand function and benefits of
America's private enterprise system.

Darrell Payne is chair of WLRN (Miami)
Public Television and Radio Community
Advisory Board.

E Jorge J. Perez recently was
invested as a Circuit Court
Judge for the Eleventh
Judicial Circuit of Florida
(Miami-Dade County),
assigned to the Juvenile
Court Division, after an appointment to the
bench by Gov. Jeb Bush. Since 1994, Perez
had been serving as Assistant District
Counsel in the Department of Homeland
Security.


W UFLAW I FALL 2003













NET GAIN

Pressly Impressive In and On Court BY KELLEYWOOD


T hirty-five years after making his mark
on the Gator men's tennis record
book, James G. "Jamie" Pressly Jr. '72 is
still making a name for himself on the
court as well as in one.
Pressly, 55, was selected for the U.S.
Tennis Association (USTA) four-man
team that competed in August against
teams from about 30 other countries in
the Fred Perry Cup tournament in
Bielefeld, Germany.
Pressly secured his spot by winning
the Midwest Championship in July.
He is currently ranked No. 2 nationally by
USTA in his age group and has been
ranked consistently throughout his post-
collegiate career in each USTA division.
Pressly practices in West Palm Beach
with Pressly & Pressly P.A., established in
1990 with his brother David '79. Also at
the firm are Jamie's son Grier '99 and a
fourth Gator John Randolph Jr. '92.
Prior to starting his firm, Jamie worked
with former UF President and UF Board
of Trustees Chairman Marshall Criser '51
at a firm then known as Gunster Yoakley
Criser & Stewart. Pressly has been listed
in every edition of The Best Lawyers in
America for estates and trusts, and is a
Trustee Emeritus of the UF Law Center
Association (LCA).


James "Jamie" Pressly '72 was in Germany in August representing the
U.S. in the Fred Perry Cup Tournament. He is currently ranked No. 2
nationally in his age group by the U.S. Tennis Association
"I love the law school and have kept
up through my service on the LCA
Board, plus continuing relationships with


a number of professors including
Mandell Glicksberg, Mike Gordon, D.T.
Smith and Dennis Calfee," said Pressly,
who also served on Law Review and grad-
uated at the top of his class.
Pressly finished his Gator tennis
career earning All-America honors in
1969, receiving the Belden award present-
ed to the outstanding UF graduating ath-
lete, and earning a B.A. in liberal arts.
Overall he won three SEC individual ten-
nis titles from 1967-69, and remains at
the top of UF's list for single season win-
ning percentage with a .956 (1967).
The Gator sports and law tradition
runs deep in the Pressly family, with both
David and sister Julie '83 also having illus-
trious UF careers. David was All-SEC and
still ranks near the top of the record books
in career wins (1973-76). Julie earned
All-America honors in women's tennis in
1978 and 1980. And though they did not
pursue law degrees or play tennis, Jamie's
other sister Barbara, daughters Page and
Barbara, and wife Katie all attended UF.
Inducted in the UF Athletic Hall of
Fame in 1976, Pressly recently made a gift
of $1 million to Gator Boosters to
rename the soccer and track stadium the
James G. Pressly Stadium pending appro-
priate State approvals. V1


-- .m ..








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FALL 2003 I UFLAW
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IfAUMII


UFLaw Triple Threat Leader
andy D'Alemberte '62, triple-threat UFLaw
grad in major alumni leadership categories,
received in August the 2003 ABA Medal highest
honor bestowed by the American Bar Association
- recognizing his "exceptionally distinguished
service to the cause of American jurisprudence."


Sandy D'Alemberte '62 (left) met with Dean Robert Jerry
and W. Reece Smith Jr. '49 at San Francisco UFLaw alumni
reception prior to American Bar Association conference.
"He is known worldwide as a visionary who
helped bring hope and security to people who had
known only repression and totalitarianism,
through introduction of the rule of law as a funda-
mental concept of government," ABA President
Alfred P. Carlton Jr. said in announcing the award
presented at the group's annual meeting in San
Francisco.
"I'm very, very flattered," D'Alemberte said.
"Some great people have received this (including
Supreme Court Justices Thurgood Marshall and
Sandra Day O'Connor and Chesterfield Smith) and
I'm honored to be in their company."
In tracking history of UFLaw grads' state and
national leadership roles, six key categories
include college presidents, Florida governors,
State Supreme Court justices, law school deans
and Florida Bar and ABA presidents. D'Alemberte
hits on three of them: ABA head 1991-92, dean of
the Florida State University law school 1984-89,
and FSU president 1994-2002. He served in the
Florida House of Representatives 1966-72.
D'Alemberte was born in Tallahassee and
grew up there and in Chattahoochee. He did his
undergraduate work at University of the South in
Sewanee, Tenn., and was active in many UFLaw
activities before graduating in 1962. Since retiring
as college president, he has returned to teaching
at FSU's law school.


J. Timothy Schulte,
shareholder at
Zimmerman Shuffield
Kiser & Sutcliffe PA in
Orlando, recently
received the highest
available rating from Martindale-
Hubbell Law Directory indicating he
has demonstrated highest professional
and ethical standards. Schulte practices
commercial litigation, lender represen-
tation and construction litigation.

1989
Kenneth E. Crooks recently received a
promotion to Associate Dean, School
of Aeronautics, Florida Institute of
Technology, in Melbourne. His son,
Kerry A. Crooks, is an assistant vice-
president for public relations at the
University of Florida.

AAs president of Florida
Legal Services Inc.,
statewide legal aid
organization helping
ensure poor people
have access to justice,
Noel G. Lawrence has become a
Designated Director of The Florida Bar
Foundation. Lawrence is a principal
partner in Lawrence Parker &
Neighbors LLC in Jacksonville, on the
board of Florida Board of Bar
Examiners, and a past president of
Jacksonville Area Legal Aid Board,
Florida Chapter / National Bar
Association and the Jacksonville Urban
League Youth Auxiliary.

Steven J. Stolze of Rathman Holland &
Stolze LLC in St. Louis has been elected
to serve on the Missouri Association of
Trial Attorneys for 2003-04. The organ-
ization, founded in 1951, represents
more than 1,300 trial lawyers. Stolze
recently was recognized by Missouri
Lawyers Weekly for his role in a major
case against Kansas City Southern
Railway.

Michael Udine was recently elected as
city commissioner in Parkland (near
Boca Raton), Broward County.


1990
Ernest A. Cox, shareholder at Gunster
Yoakley at West Palm Beach and Stuart,
was appointed to the Rural Lands
Stewardship Council, which works to
create viable rural economies, protect
and maintain ecological values and pro-
mote land use patterns that retain rural
character. Cox, chairman of the firm's
Eminent Domain and Property Rights
Practice Group, represents property
owners in land use litigation, growth
management and eminent domain.

Heidi Feinman, senior trial attorney
with the U.S. Department of Justice,
Office of the U.S. Trustee in Miami, is a
special assistant U.S. Attorney. Feinman
has been living since 1998 in South
Florida with her husband, Skip Klauber,
and two sons, Andrew and Jesse.

Antoinette D. Plogstedt, Orange
County Judge since 2001, was recently
assigned to County Court Misdemeanor
Division. She and her husband live in
Orlando with their four daughters.

* David A. Wolf with
Wood Atter & Associates
PA, Jacksonville, lectures
regularly most recently
at the University of
North Florida on the
issue of Nursing Home Abuse /Neglect
in Florida.

1991
Larry C. Frarey was named partner with
Kansas-based law firm of Shook Hardy
& Bacon LLP in its Geneva, Switzerland,
office. Frarey is a member of the firm's
products liability litigation division. He
specializes in developing medical and
scientific expertise for the defense of
product liability cases in the U.S. and
foreign jurisdictions.

Keith Scott Grossman, attorney and
mediator who offers training and con-
sulting services, recently was awarded
designation of Advanced Toastmaster
from Toastmasters International.


SUFLAW I FALL 2003












Scott Rogers recently was promoted to
president of MetroGuide.com Inc.,
a Hollywood company maintaining
travel-related contextual commerce
Internet sites. Rogers retains the post of
general counsel.The Association of
Insolvency and Restructuring Advisors
(AIRA) certified Steven J. Solomon,
shareholder at Adorno & Yoss in Miami.
In addition to passing a comprehensive
three-part examination, Solomon had to
have a minimum of five years of
accounting or financial experience with a
certified public accounting firm, and
have completed (within last eight years)
4,000 hours of specialized insolvency and
reorganization experience.

Lee A. Weintraub is a new partner at
Becker & Poliakoff in Fort Lauderdale.
He specializes in commercial litigation
and construction law.

1992
Charles B. Costar III, shareholder at
Zimmerman Shuffield Kiser & Sutcliffe
PA, was appointed Chairman's At-Large
Representative on the Orange County
Board of Zoning Adjustment. He is a
2002 graduate of the Greater Orlando
Leadership Foundation, currently serv-
ing on its Board of Directors, and his


practice includes real estate, lender
representation, land development and
land use.

I Andrew D. Zaron joined
Holland & Knight LLP
as partner in Fort
Lauderdale. His practice
is in bankruptcy, work-
outs, debt restructuring,
corporate reorganization and creditors'
rights.

1993
Benjamin L Bedard
became a named share-
S holder in the West Palm
Beach firm of Roberts &
Reynolds PA (now Roberts
Reynolds and Bedard PA).
Bedard practices in products liability, gen-
eral casualty, negligence, personal injury,
employment discrimination, commercial
litigation and medical malpractice.

Turhan Robinson received the Maryland
Office of Attorney General's 2002-03
Exceptional Service Award (equivalent to
attorney of the year). He has been
appointed Civilian Aide to the Secretary of
the Army for the State of Maryland, and
served as Chairman of the American Civil


Liberties Union's Biennial Conference
held in June in Washington, D.C.

1994
J. Hugh Middlebrooks, shareholder of
Sarasota's Williams Parker Harrison Dietz
& Getzen, has been certified in Health
Law by the Florida Bar Board of Legal
Specialization and Education. His special-
ties are banking and tax-exempt finance,
mergers and acquisitions and healthcare.
He is on the Board of Sarasota County
Committee for Economic Development
and a member of American Health
Lawyers Association and Florida Bar sec-
tions on Business and City/County/Local
Government Law.

1996
SThe Florida Medical
Association named
Florida State Rep. Anna
(Holly) Benson, attorney
with the Pensacola firm of
Miller Canfield Paddock
and Stone PLC, Legislator of the Year in
2002, given to the legislator who provided
the most leadership on health care issues
during a legislative session. Benson is a
member of the firm's Public Law Group,
specializing in municipal finance and
tax-exempt securities.


19596 6 an fome SI~udto Trste pase awa inJl t8. He wa Profssioa66
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FALL 2003 1 UFLAW E5









|If,!AL I I


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I UFLAW I FALL 2003


Jim.i : A Tii. r ::-1
Ali W VV 1.11 ,,l r '...,,I 71

VV irrl A V ll .... Ill t.
.liiVV VV. Il JIT


R. Scott Collins (LL.M '98) shareholder
with Williams Parker Harrison Dietz &
Getzen of Sarasota, has been named to
advisory board of University of Florida
Shands Cancer Center. Collins, who
earned his J.D. and LL.M. in Taxation
from UFLaw, specializes in taxation,
estate planning and administration, and
trust administration. He is on The
Florida Bar's Real Property/Probate/
Trust Law Section committee on Estate
and Trust Tax Planning.

William R. Lowman Jr. (LLMT) share-
holder at Zimmerman Shuffield Kiser &
Sutcliffe PA in Orlando, recently was
named to the Board of Trustees of the
Junior Achievement of Central Florida
Foundation, Inc. It honors Lowman for
dedication and commitment to Junior
Achievement, a program that educates
young people concerning free enterprise.
Lowman practices in corporate law, tax
and business planning, mergers and
acquisitions, charitable organizations and
planning, securities law and international
business.

South Texas College of Law Board of
Directors recently granted tenure to
Bruce A. McGovern (LLMT), a professor
in the areas of federal taxation and busi-
ness organizations. He has twice received
outstanding teaching award from South
Texas Student Bar Association, and was
named Professor of the Year by the South
Texas Black Law Students' Association.

John Ruffier has been
named a firm partner
and shareholder by
Orlando's Lowndes
Drosdick Doster Kantor
& Reed P.A. Ruffier
specializes in real estate transactions,
intellectual property, and
development/finance. He is a director of
Coalition for Homeless, and past presi-
dent for Hope & Help Center of Central
Florida and the Orlando/UCF
Shakespeare Festival.


1997
Brian D. Burgoon, litigation associate
with Sutherland Asbill & Brennan LLP
of Atlanta, has been named 2003-04
co-chair of The Florida Bar's Disciplinary
Review Committee which reviews
complaints against lawyers and recom-
mends appropriate penalties, if any, to
Florida Bar Board of Governors. The
committee also supervises a trust fund
that provides financial relief to any
clients losing money due to Florida Bar
member misconduct. Burgoon was UF
Student Body president 1996-97.

Robert Gebaide, attorney in the
Orlando office of Baker & Hostetler,
celebrated with his wife the birth of their
son, Jordan David (Oct. 7, 2002).

Kurt A. Raulin is now General Counsel
with Royal Palm Communities, a devel-
oper of residential condominiums in Lee,
Miami-Dade and Palm Beach counties.
Raulin is located in Boca Raton and
practices in real estate development and
finance, corporate and partnership law.

Gary and Mary K. Wimsett recently
moved back to Gainesville with their
baby daughter, Emma. Gary is Associate
Director of contracts and related services
for the UF vice president of Health
Affairs; Mary is Program Attorney,
Guardian ad Litem Program.

1998
*E. John Wagner II
(LLMT 99), was elected
shareholder with
Williams Parker
Harrison Dietz &
Getzen in Sarasota. He
represents high net worth individuals in
tax, estate planning, and business
matters, and structures tax-deferred,
Internal Revenue Code Section 1031
exchanges. Wagner has served as
adjunct professor at UF Law and a
continuing education lecturer to the
Internal Revenue Service.












1999
Michael J. Wilson joined Williams
Parker Harrison Dietz & Getzen in
Sarasota. He will practice federal,
international, state and local taxation.
Wilson is also a Certified Public
Accountant.

2000
Rhonda Chung-de Cambre joined
Fisher & Butts PA in Gainesville as an
associate. Her practice is real estate
closings and construction law. She was
elected to a two-year term as a class
chair on the UF Law Alumni council,
and recently spoke about the U.S.
Constitution as part of the Eighth
Judicial Circuit Bar Association's Law
Week activities.

Kevin M. Eckhardt has joined the firm
of Weil Gotshal & Manges LLP as an
associate in the Business Finance &


Restructuring Department of its Miami
office. He previously worked as an
associate in the Miami office of
Holland & Knight LLP, and from
2000-01, he clerked for The Honorable
Jerry A. Funk, United States Bankruptcy
Judge, Middle District of Florida.

Sasha D. Oberle joined McDonough
Holland & Allen, a Northern California
firm based in Sacramento. She concen-
trates in estate planning, probate and
trust administration, taxation and busi-
ness organizations. Oberle is also a
Certified Public Accountant.

2001
Keith C. Kantack (LLMT) joined the
firm of Mitchell McNutt & Sams PA as
an associate in its Tupelo, Miss., office.

Steven J. Resnick joined Gray Harris &
Robinson PA in Orlando as an associate
in the health care law practice group.


2002
David N. Arizmendi joined Quarles and
Brady LLP in Naples as an associate in the
area of litigation. Her father, Judge

Thomas G. Freeman, swore Melanie F
Chase into the Florida Bar in September
2002.

Nancy Maurice joined Lindquist &
Vennum PLLP as an associate in real
estate practice in its Minneapolis office.

Melissa Wilson is an Assistant Public
Defender in the Office of Public
Defender, 13th Judicial Circuit, Tampa.

2003
Rose Anne B. Frano, J.D. with high honors
in '02, who graduated this spring with an
LL.M. from the Graduate Tax program,
has joined Williams Parker Harrison Dietz
& Getzen in Sarasota. Frano is working in
estate planning and tax. U


A Ilgaorpot e itor Flrd Blu Key U pe idet deoae Korea Wa pbishe tw bok on the hitr fFlrd ot
veteran, Gator football books author, called by some the dean of the ball "Let No Man Put Asunder," dealing with the


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wokdtee2 yers event all b eo ig. a pate Hepatie ol o Aligto. In adito to servi as hea of* Blu Ke hl tteUiesiy
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FALL 2003 1 UF LAW 77








If,! ALMI


Bar Foundation Bestows Highest Award


Gator Law Grads Honored

Two 1940s UFLaw graduates were honored in June with Florida Bar Foundation's highest honor its Medal of Honor -
but how different the paths that brought them to the podium during the organization's 27th annual recognition celebration.


Lois Thacker Graessle '41
...honored for "a lifetime of
selfless volunteer service in pursuit of
justice. A feminist, a philosopher, a
liberal, persisting in her mission yet
today and renewing her call that (we)
meet the challenge of making life more
equitable for all citizens."
Graessle was raised in
Kissimmee as daughter of an attor-
ney. She grew up assisting at her .
father's firm and in 1938 earned her
B.A. from Stetson University. The only woman to enter her law class
at UF in 1938, she had to sign an affidavit every semester that she was
over 21, a Florida resident, and could not obtain law classes she
needed at any other state university (see page 26). Her presence
among the male student body was greeted routinely with "shuffling"
and "other similar, what you might call uncivilized behavior."
After earning her J.D., she married class president Al Graessle, and
they moved to Jacksonville. As a woman, she was not able to find work
as an attorney and accepted a legal secretary position. She eventually
stayed home to raise five children, but in the 1960s plunged into vol-
unteer work and leadership throughout Jacksonville and Duval
County- raising issues for public debate few others dared to raise.
* Because she believed strongly in racial equality, among her first
battles was an effort to locally integrate the Girl Scouts.
* She chaired Jacksonville Mayor's Child and Youth Care Study,
leading to significant improvement in meeting needs of disadvan-
taged and troubled youth, racial minorities and the poor. She
helped establish child care centers, emergency shelters for abused
children, changes in day and foster care, juvenile court systems,
methods of child abuse reporting, and surplus food distribution
and school lunches.
* As co-founder of Hospice of Northeast Florida, she challenged
healthcare lobbyists to ensure legislation permitting terminally ill
to receive hospice care in their homes. And she helped safeguard
Legal Aid's advocacy for the poor when city leaders threatened
its credibility and funding.
Continued next page...


Robert M. Ervin '47
...honored for "dedication
to improving the administra-
I h tion of justice. A illllant
strategist, an academic, formi-
dable advocate, trusted coun-
selor to clients, wise mentor to
aspiring lawyers. In service to
the public, typifies highest ideals
of the profession."
Ervin was born in
Marion County, but grew up
in Tallahassee. He earned his B.S. and J.D. from UF, though
his law studies were interrupted by Marine Corp service in
World War II where he served two Pacific tours and
attained the rank of major.
He has practiced law in Tallahassee since graduation, and
is now of counsel to Ervin Chapman & Ervin.
Early in his legal career, Ervin demonstrated his commit-
ment to the poor as Tallahassee Bar Association Legal Aid
Committee chair at a time when pro bono service received lit-
tle emphasis. His professional leadership includes presidency
of The Florida Bar, American Bar Association House of
Delegates 1966-91, president of the Florida Supreme Court
Historical Society, and member of the law school's Center for
Governmental Responsibility appellate litigation board. As
member of Florida Constitution Revision Committee 1966-
68, he introduced the proposal permitting constitutional
amendment by ballot initiative.
* He chaired ABA's Criminal Justice Section, served as deputy
chair of the special committee that implemented the ABA's
Standards of Criminal Justice, and helped secure adoption
of ABA's Code of Judicial Conduct.
* As Florida Bar president, he was instrumental in establish-
ing a permanent headquarters for the organization in
Tallahassee, and shepherded creation of the Bar's Client
Security Fund a then revolutionary and controversial
program.
Continued next page...


Atime of is gz. [lraduation,. Williamli, S1. Gr-sl '8 wa tol byTl PrfssrJel 1 itl that helJI might bthfirstl! an-d1 only= College oft Law gad wo ha bot




SUFLAW I FALL 2003














GRAESSLE CONTINUED...


* In the 1980s, she chaired a committee of 150
that investigated and reported the most seri-
ous unmet needs of Duval County. In 2003,
she is heading a group examining status of
residential resources and services for foster
children.
"She spends most of her days outraged at
how the legal system is failing children," said her
son, William Graessle '85.
Honored in 2000 by The Florida Bar as
"One of Florida's First 150 Women Lawyers,"
discrimination more than 60 years ago kept
Lois Thacker Graessle from becoming a prac-
ticing attorney. Retired Justice Ehrlich, who
earned his UF J.D. one year after Graessle and
is himself a Medal of Honor recipient, said sev-
eral years ago, "She was a victim of her genera-
tion. There weren't many places for women in
law, and she never practiced. What a waste of
human talent. Society was the loser."


ERVIN CONTINUED...

He is a member of the University of Florida
President's Council, served on the board of
the Florida Endowment for Vocation
Rehabilitation and on the Florida Parole
Qualifications Committee.
Ervin was nominated for the Medal by
attorney Wm. Reece Smith Jr. '49, a 1981 Award
recipient and one of four Gators to serve as pres-
ident of the ABA in the last 40 years the most
of any law school during that time period.



In 1977, the Foundation established its Medal of
Honor, setting up two categories:
The first recognizes a Bar member who has
demonstrated dedication to organization objectives
to "inculcate in its members the principles of duty
and service to the public, to improve the administra-
tion of justice and to advance the science of jurispru-
dence."
Second category is for a nonlawyerr or person
not actively engaged in practice of law who has made
outstanding contribution to improvement of admin-
istration of justice through research, writing or other
deeds of such character and quality that warrant the
(Foundation's) highest award."


Seventy-two months between gradua-
tions, two lifetimes between categories. U


Citrus Chairman Brewer '85 Killed in Crash

Classmates Considering Memorial Scholarship


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FALL 2003 I UFLAW








A-I noI I I


Richard E. Nelson 1931-2003


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Richard E. Nelson was honored in 2000 by goveinmenlal ollicials and law school
represenlalives receiving a plaque and gills lo Ihank him and his wile lot Iheir
support ol more Ihan $1 million lo establish Ihe Nelson Chair in Local Governmenl
Law and sponsorship ol Ihe annual Nelson Symiposiums. On hand were Mary
Nelson Bryanl ol Tampa ilhe Nelson's dalghlerl. his wile. Jane. and Ihe Nelson's
son Edward ol Pompano Beach.

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i '..111 .1i n!d ]:, .'.lin Lin .i !r.


M UFLAW I FALL 2003







COMPEITIVE EDGE


Families & Philanthropy

BY DONALD J. HALE Senior Director of Development


For those of us still fortunate
enough to have our fathers and
grandfathers in our lives, we were
happy to be able to take time in
June to celebrate Father's Day. And
to pay homage to the person who
may have taught us about or
at least expressed his views on -
relationships, religion, politics,
automobiles, apartments, homes,
the need for education, and careers.
Perhaps we wrestled with the dilem-
ma of what to get Dad for a present.
A card or another tie did not seem
to cut it.

Why the focus on fathers in
the alumni magazine?
Because our fathers and mothers
play a vital role in shaping what we
hope to become and the persons we
are today, it is unsettling to think
about a time when they will not be
with us. No child likes to be
reminded of his/her parents' mor-
tality, let alone his/her own. Yet one
of the most significant life lessons
may be skipped if families do not
talk about how they will pass their
wealth from one generation to the
next.
In his book, Wealth in Families,
Charles W. Collier of Harvard
University addresses this missed
opportunity. He notes that typically
a father and mother meet with a
lawyer about executing their last
will and testament, and it is usually
a private conversation between the
spouses and their trusted advisors.
Collier, though, is now asking his
clients: "Could you give your chil-
dren a say in their financial inheri-


a


Collier: Families Need to
tance?" He observes that among his
clients who do this, "the benefits of
including the children in this con-
versation at the appropriate time
fosters open and clear communica-
tion and encourages responsibility
in the next generation".
Collier also points out there is
more to family wealth than the finan-
cial dimension, referring to human,
intellectual and social capital.
"Human capital refers to individ-
ual family members and who they
are and what they are called to do.
Intellectual capital refers to how
family members learn, communicate
and make joint decisions. Social cap-
ital denotes how family members
engage with society at large. The
financial capital, of course, repre-
sents the property of the family.


Discuss Wealth Transfer
"Families that include focus on
the human, intellectual and social
capital of each member have a bet-
ter chance at growing great human
beings and continuing as a cohesive
group that enjoys meeting, working
and being together for more than
one generation," Collier says.
I solved my annual dilemma this
year by giving my father a foldable
hammock. I hope he will use this
new sanctuary to read his copy of
Wealth in Families.
He taught me everything else,
and now it is time for him to teach
our family one more critical les-
son. How will our family values be
preserved when wealth is trans-
ferred from one generation to the
next? Every family should know
the answer to that question. U


FALL 2003 I UFLAW m







If,!FACU L


Trailblazer


Takes a Breather


Betty Taylor Leaves 50-Year Legacy,

Sets Precedent for Women (and Men)

BY KRISTIN HARMEL

n 1950, Betty Taylor graduated from Florida State
University with a master's degree in library science and
wanted to go to Harvard Law School, but was told she
could not. "They wrote and said there were many fine law
schools in the Cambridge area I could attend, but Harvard
did not accept women," Taylor recalls.
Because she still owed the state of Florida money or employ-
ment for a scholarship, she applied instead for a library job at the
University of Florida. She was hired in the summer of '50, and
subsequently also was accepted in a part-time program at
UFLaw.
This June, Taylor a Levin College of Law Clarence J. T. 5, II,
Professor and Director of UF's Legal Information Center retired
after more than five decades as one of the most importantfemale
forces on campus and one of the foremost authorities of comput-
ers-and-the-law-research.
"She led the academic law nation to investigate, try, develop
and push the envelope to insure legal research and information is
available to users and in the best and latest format," says Billie Jo
Kaufman, law library and ;*le,..l..,;i director at Nova
Southeastern University. "Her early work in ,,l. .,; l is in part
why we all are where we are today." In between her 1950 arrival
in C-i i. II, and her June exit exists a remarkable story of
perseverance, pride and accomplishment.

In 1950, Betty Taylor arrived in
Gainesville and started taking law class-
es at the nearly-all-male UF law school.
SMeanwhile, she supported herself by
working 30 hours a week at the main
UF campus library.
"Two days after starting at the
library, I had to work on a Sunday


B:Ms]TEW Betty's husband, Edwin Stewart Taylor, died in January, 1979.
As for her two daughters: Carol Taylor Crespo lives in Ft. Lauderdale, and has
two sons: Antonio (married to Jeanine with a three-month old daughter, Anglique)
and Daniel. Nancy Taylor Filer lives in Gainesville and has a daughter, Brittany
Ann, 13, and Delano, 10.

night," she said." I got there just before they reopened at 7 p.m.,
and a student assistant wouldn't let me in. He said, 'I've never
seen you before,' and I said, 'That's because I just started on
Friday."
The student assistant was Edwin Taylor, and he wasted lit-
tle time getting to know the new staff addition. "He and I were
married in February, seven months later," Taylor says with a
smile.
After her marriage, Taylor's bucking of established tradi-
tions became more complex. Already a trailblazer few women
attended law school in 1950 she became even more rare by
sticking with her law program although now married.
"When I told the library director I needed a few days off to
go on a honeymoon," Taylor said' he said, 'Well, that's the end
of your legal career.' I said,'Not necessarily."
Instead of backing down, she decided to work full-time at
the library and lessen her law school course-load. Subsequently
she hit another obstacle that could have ended her legal career.
"Four years after I told the director I was getting married,
I had to go ask him for maternity leave," she says. He
said,'Well, this will be the end of your legal career.' I said,'Not
necessarily.'


M UFLAW I FALL 2003







If,!FACU L


Trailblazer


Takes a Breather


Betty Taylor Leaves 50-Year Legacy,

Sets Precedent for Women (and Men)

BY KRISTIN HARMEL

n 1950, Betty Taylor graduated from Florida State
University with a master's degree in library science and
wanted to go to Harvard Law School, but was told she
could not. "They wrote and said there were many fine law
schools in the Cambridge area I could attend, but Harvard
did not accept women," Taylor recalls.
Because she still owed the state of Florida money or employ-
ment for a scholarship, she applied instead for a library job at the
University of Florida. She was hired in the summer of '50, and
subsequently also was accepted in a part-time program at
UFLaw.
This June, Taylor a Levin College of Law Clarence J. T. 5, II,
Professor and Director of UF's Legal Information Center retired
after more than five decades as one of the most importantfemale
forces on campus and one of the foremost authorities of comput-
ers-and-the-law-research.
"She led the academic law nation to investigate, try, develop
and push the envelope to insure legal research and information is
available to users and in the best and latest format," says Billie Jo
Kaufman, law library and ;*le,..l..,;i director at Nova
Southeastern University. "Her early work in ,,l. .,; l is in part
why we all are where we are today." In between her 1950 arrival
in C-i i. II, and her June exit exists a remarkable story of
perseverance, pride and accomplishment.

In 1950, Betty Taylor arrived in
Gainesville and started taking law class-
es at the nearly-all-male UF law school.
SMeanwhile, she supported herself by
working 30 hours a week at the main
UF campus library.
"Two days after starting at the
library, I had to work on a Sunday


B:Ms]TEW Betty's husband, Edwin Stewart Taylor, died in January, 1979.
As for her two daughters: Carol Taylor Crespo lives in Ft. Lauderdale, and has
two sons: Antonio (married to Jeanine with a three-month old daughter, Anglique)
and Daniel. Nancy Taylor Filer lives in Gainesville and has a daughter, Brittany
Ann, 13, and Delano, 10.

night," she said." I got there just before they reopened at 7 p.m.,
and a student assistant wouldn't let me in. He said, 'I've never
seen you before,' and I said, 'That's because I just started on
Friday."
The student assistant was Edwin Taylor, and he wasted lit-
tle time getting to know the new staff addition. "He and I were
married in February, seven months later," Taylor says with a
smile.
After her marriage, Taylor's bucking of established tradi-
tions became more complex. Already a trailblazer few women
attended law school in 1950 she became even more rare by
sticking with her law program although now married.
"When I told the library director I needed a few days off to
go on a honeymoon," Taylor said' he said, 'Well, that's the end
of your legal career.' I said,'Not necessarily."
Instead of backing down, she decided to work full-time at
the library and lessen her law school course-load. Subsequently
she hit another obstacle that could have ended her legal career.
"Four years after I told the director I was getting married,
I had to go ask him for maternity leave," she says. He
said,'Well, this will be the end of your legal career.' I said,'Not
necessarily.'


M UFLAW I FALL 2003














"By the way, while I was pregnant,
they didn't know what to do with me,"
she says. "When women on the secretar-
ial staff became pregnant, they were
required to quit, as it wasn't appropriate
at that time for a pregnant woman to be
working out in public. They finally
decided I must leave two months before
the baby was born and stay out two
months afterward."
As for her slowly progressing legal
education, Taylor spent 12 years
enrolled in law school part-time, and
during these years the male-female
ratio began slowly to change.
"It was very exciting," she says. I
never went to class unprepared. I'd
wake up most mornings at 4'o'clock to
study, because I was exhausted by 9 the
night before after working full-time and
tending to a baby. But I did not dare to
go to class unprepared."
Taylor eventually transferred from
the main campus library to the law
library, which she'd been interested in
all along. She had her second child in
1958, and now that she was the mother


of two young girls, her former director
again thought she'd quit law school. But
Taylor wouldn't dream of it.
Taylor graduated August 12, 1962,
and took a job as the law library's head
librarian just three weeks later at a
salary 20 per cent less than advertised
and offered to a male candidate. The
move proved to be a baptism by fire -
literally.
"About a month after I took the job,
the library just before closing time
caught on fire from cigarette butts in a
wastebasket" Taylor says. "The fire
department sprayed water over the
entire reading room, although they only
needed to wet the circulation area. All
the books were soaked, so we had to air
them out and get a dehumidifier. It took
us six weeks to return to normal. What
a start!"
Taylor noted when she was appoint-
ed head librarian, she was invited to
faculty meetings. "So I went to my first
and participated in their discussions. As
the only female, I was immediately
appointed secretary. After that, I


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Among her many accomplishments during 50-plus years at UFLaw, Betty Taylor in 1981 served as Acting Dean. Here at
Spring Commencement she is believed to be congratulating Donald Moore.


FALL 2003 | UFLAW








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Media Law Issues Focus

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Betty Taylor (center) visited in September 2001 with UFLaw Class of '51 grads (and spouses) who gathered to be
inducted into the UF Grand Guard those who graduated at least 50 years ago. Though Taylor did not graduate
until '62, she first enrolled in the College of Law in 1950 and went to class with these individuals.


advised women not to go to predomi-
nantly male meetings with a yellow pad
in hand."
Because Taylor was the first profes-
sional woman to join the law faculty, she
said the men were unsure how to treat
her in other ways as well.
"They'd never had a woman before
on the faculty," she says. "I was all by
myself, and I was very conscious of this.
I knew no matter what I did, the men
were all evaluating me and that it would
affect women following me. So I was
very careful about what I did, what I
said, what I wore."
Even social relations proved diffi-
cult.
"The dean's wife invited me to a pro-
fessors' wives' function one morning,
and I was very pleased. I enjoyed it, but
she called me a couple weeks later and
apologized. She was concerned she had
offended me by inviting me to the wives'
function. I said,'Oh my goodness, don't
feel like that; I enjoyed meeting them.'
But I never received another invitation.
Over time, though, Taylor began to
truly fit in, and gained tremendous fac-
ulty respect.
By the middle of the 1960s, as baby
boomers began hitting college age,
admissions soared, and the number of
female law students began to rise.
Colleges across the nation were begin-
ning to be overrun by unanticipated
numbers of students.


"Schools were overwhelmed,"
Taylor says, "and our dean decided this
was going to happen to the law school,
too. He appointed a planning commit-
tee, and I was appointed to it as the
research person."
It was an appointment that would
change the course of Taylor's work for-
ever.
"I got in touch with a statistics pro-
fessor and told him we needed to pre-
dict how many law students would be
coming in four years," Taylor says. "The
final number was so large nobody
believed me. We had 300 students then,
and the prediction was more than dou-
ble in four years 700."
The statistics professor had taken
Taylor to UF's new computer lab, some-
thing that piqued her curiosity because
her sister at that time was doing top
secret work with computers for the
Defense Department. Because the UF
computer was being used only a third
of the time for research not enough
time to fulfill the school's contract with
IBM a lab official asked Taylor if there
was something she was working on for
which the computer might be used.
"I told him I was working on an
index to the Florida Bar Journal, but
that it was text, not figures," Taylor
recalls. "But he said let's see what we
can do with it, and assigned me a grad-
uate assistant. We worked on convert-
ing all this data to punch cards for the


l UFLAW I FALL 2003











computer, and eventually printed out
the index to Bar Journals.
It was one of the first times a
computer had been used to organize
legal documents. A UFLaw professor
wrote an article about it, earning Taylor
an invitation in 1967 to speak at the
inaugural International Computers-in-
Law Conference in Geneva, Switzerland.
"I had never been out of the country,
so I was petrified," Taylor says. "I was
one of only two women out of about 500
attending, and was the only woman to
give a speech.
"I'd been told complete library cata-
logues couldn't be put on computers
because the equipment couldn't handle
other languages, and here I was in the
exhibits area watching computers print-
ing in German, Italian and others," she
said. "It changed my whole life.
"From that point on, I started writ-
ing papers about where we were going in
librarianship and law, and I was going to
meetings and conferences with deans
and judges and professors and giving
speeches about the impact of computers
on law, she said. "They considered my
speeches so outlandish. There was great
resistance to computers for a long time,
and no-one believed they would become
such an integral part of law."
But Taylor hung on to her belief and
became an outspoken international
advocate of using computers to assist in
legal research. It was during this time she
convinced West Publishing executives to
install WestLaw at UFLaw, the first such
law school installation in the country.
She also was invited to join the first
WestLaw Advisory Board.
"She was one of the first law librari-
ans to see the value of technology, and
had several grants to foster her research
interests in this area that resulted in sig-
nificant publications," says M. Kathleen
Price, former Law Librarian of Congress
(1990-94) and most recently director of
the New York University College of Law
library and professor of law (1994-
2003). (Price in July succeeded Taylor,


being named UFLaw Associate Dean,
Library & Tl.-;l.-',, and Clarence J.
T 5, II,' Professor of Law).
While at UF,
Taylor has served I1
numerous posi-
tions, on more
than 100 commit-
tees, given more
than a hundred
speeches and pub-
lished eight books
and pamphlets. In
addition to serving
as director of the
Legal Information
Center and a J
TeSelle Professor
of Law (teaching
Computers and
the Law seminar Betty Taylor (second from rig
21 years, she was faculty of the UF College of
on needs for the now under-i
law school in- sion. Taylor through dean ap
terim dean (1981), construction projects Holla
research editor of '80s, and the $22+ million ci
research editor of
Florida Law Review, president of UF's
chapter of Phi Beta Kappa, first woman
to chair Southeastern Library Network,
president of Online Computer Library
Center Users Council and chair of the
Joint Committee of American
Association of Law Libraries, the
Association of American Law Schools
and the American Bar Association for
LAWNET.
She was granted law librarianship's
highest honor the Marian Gould
Gallagher Distinguished Service Award,
presented annually by the American
Association of Law Libraries. Taylor was
the first woman at UF to hold an
endowed professorship, and was the first
Distinguished Alumnus recognized by
FSU's library school.
Her retirement in June leaves
behind a legacy at UF and the College
of Law that will last at least another
half-century.
"Betty's name is synonymous with
UF, where she spent her entire profes-
sional career," says Price. "She is the only


person capable of writing the history of
UFLaw (which Taylor will finish during
her retirement), both as compiler of


a-
iht) works with then-Dean Jon Mills (left) and members of the
Design, Construction & Planning in 2001 preliminary research
construction Levin College of Law library and facilities expan-
pointments was an integral part of all three major law school
nd Hall Law Center in the '60s, Bruton-Geer addition in the
construction in 2003-05.

archives and participant in the school's
historic glory days."
Says Nova's Kaufman: "Her contri-
butions have been balanced, and her
interest in 'the new' never waned. She
still gets excited about new endeavors,
still has the desire and motivation to
learn. I suspect she won't be missed
immediately because most of us will
know we still can pick up the phone and
seek her guidance and input long after
her 'official' retirement. She deserves
time off to do some fun things but I
suspect Betty thinks work is fun."
Indeed, Taylor does seem to look
back at the last five decades with a twin-
kle in her eye.
"All in all, it's been wonderful" Taylor
says. It's been a very exciting experience.
My daughters occasionally asked what
they could do to have such a unique
career or position," she says. "And
though it might have been more difficult
for them, being one of the first women
astronauts is what I would compare it to.
It's been an honor. F


FALL 2003 | UFLAW








IlflAC TI


New Professors

Add Years of Professional Success & Scholarship
BY S. CAMILLE BROADWAY

Fifteen degrees, 36 years of teaching experience, 28 years of professional experience, and pages and pages of
publications. Breaking down the numbers on four new faculty hires at the Levin College of Law, it is apparent
the newest educators represent success in both academic and professional arenas. The group includes two
environmental law specialists, an international finance expert and a consumer credit protection advocate.


Michael Allan Wolf


An expert in land-use planning, local government,
urban revitalization and environmental law and policy,
Wolf will serve as the inaugural Richard E. Nelson
Chair in Local Government Law.
"The Nelson Chair will give me the a platform
for continuing to explore intriguing questions
concerning essential roles state and local government officials play
in shaping the nation's developed and undeveloped landscape,"
Wolf said.
Wolf, who has taught for more than 20 years, was most recently a
professor of law and history at the University of Richmond, where he
earned a distinguished educator award from the university and an out-
standing faculty award from the State Council on Higher Education for
Virginia.


Christine A. Klein
A dual passion for water sports and water law helped
draw Klein to the position at UF's College of Law,
where she joins the Environmental and Land Use Law
Program as a professor.
Klein worked four years as an assistant attorney
general for Colorado in the natural resources section,
specializing in water rights litigation, and was a visit-
ing fellow in the University of Colorado's Natural Resources Law Center.
"I spent considerable time working with the prior appropriation
water law system of the West and the web of treaties and statutes
governing the use of the Great Lakes, and will enjoy studying water
issues from the perspective of Florida's unique challenges and innova-
tive legal structure," Klein said.
She will teach courses in property, natural resources law and water
law. Prior to coming to UF, Klein was the chair of the environmental law


Extensively published in law journals, Wolf also is co-author of Land-Use
Planning and general editor of the 17-volume Powell on Real Property.
"Michael draws on legal history extensively in his work on land-use law;
and his interest in the intersection of land-use and environmental law is a
great fit with our program, which emphasizes the relationship of these two
fields," said Alyson Flournoy, program director for the Environmental and
Land Use Law Program. "As the Nelson Chair, his interest in land-use will
enrich our program in state and local government law."
Wolf earned a bachelor's degree in history and English from Emory
University, a J.D. from Georgetown University, and an A.M. in history and a
Ph.D. from Harvard University. He is a native of Lakeland.
"I am excited about joining the outstanding faculty of my home state's
premier law school and looking forward to doing my part to help UFLaw
achieve its ambitious goals," Wolf said.


concentration program at Michigan State University.
Published in multiple law reviews and environmental law journals,
Klein has a contract with Aspen Publishing Company to be the lead
author of a natural resources casebook to be published in 2004-2005.
"Christine's scholarship addresses important issues relating to
public lands and water law, and helps build our strength in those fields."
said Alyson Flournoy, program director for the Environmental and Land
Use Law Program.
Klein earned a B.A. from Vermont's Middlebury College, J.D. from
the University of Colorado and LL.M. from Columbia University. She
clerked for U.S. District Court Judge Richard P. Matsch before joining
the Colorado attorney general's office.
"I look forward to joining UF's talented and dedicated law faculty,"


M UFLAW I FALL 2003












Cally Jordan
* Most recently a senior counsel at the World Bank, Jordan
brings a world of experience literally from Armenia to
Vietnam- to her associate professor position.
At the World Bank, she was an advisor on financial
regulatory reforms, capital markets, and corporate law
and governance, and previously practiced law in Canada,
New York, California and Hong Kong.
Her experience covers Europe, Africa and Asia and
includes experience with Indonesia, Korea, Egypt, Macedonia, Armenia,
Slovakia, Tunisia, Vietnam, China, Lithuania, Turkey, Uganda, Tanzania,
Kenya and Laos.
"In coming to UFLaw, I hope to pursue my career-long interest in
international and comparative financial law, both in my teaching and
writing. My recent experience with World Bank has given me a very privi-
leged view on the foment and activity in this area, across every continent,
and provided me with boxloads of research ideas," Jordan said.



Christopher Peterson
SAn advocate for consumer protection who spent time
lobbying Congress and federal regulators, Peterson joins
the UF faculty as an assistant professor.
He was most recently a consumer attorney with the
United Sates Public Interest Research Group, acting as
lead lobbyist on reform of predatory lending practices
and as an advocate for bankruptcy reform and open
consumer access to the civil justice system.
"Rules, like all other social institutions, can be misappropriated,"
Peterson said. "For this reason, it must be the occupation and obligation
of lawyers to make law serve the interests of the people."


She already has published two monographs, a book and had more
than 50 articles in newspapers as well as scholarly and professional jour-
nals. Her research publications have been on international capital markets,
international trade, corporate governance and commercial reform.
The Canada native earned her bachelor's degree from Carleton
University, and a master's from University of Toronto. She holds degrees
from McGill University in common and civil law (B.C.L. and LL.B.), and a
D.E.A. in French civil law from University of Paris I (Pantheon-Sorbonne).
She was a law clerk for the Supreme Court of Canada's former Chief
Justice Brian Dickson.
Jordan also worked for private firms in New York, California, Toronto
and Hong Kong, specializing in corporate finance, international securities,
privatization, and international trade. Between positions in Toronto and
Hong Kong, she was an associate professor at McGill University Faculty of
Law and was a member of Institute of Comparative Law.
"The world is a small place these days. International and comparative
law are essential to every student's legal education," Jordan said.


Peterson frequently has been a media source on consumer protection
issues and has been quoted in stories by the Associated Press, National Public
Radio, New York Times, Wall Street Journal, CNBC, Reuters News Service and
American Banker. Peterson will teach courses in consumer law, secured
transactions and sales.
He earned a B.A. in philosophy and B.S. in political science at University
of Utah, and a J.D. at Utah's College of Law. He clerked for 10th Circuit
Appeals Court Judge Wade Brorby.
As part of his consumer protection work, Peterson has written a book,
Taming the Sharks: Towards a Cure for the High Cost Credit Market, being
published by the University of Akron Press.


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1,200 Resumes Reviewed

Prestigious Appointments Committee
Hires Outstanding New Faculty

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New Race and Relations Center

Director: 'Renaissance Woman'


described by a search committee mem-
ber as a renaissance woman,
Katheryn Russell-Brown will be able to
exercise the full range of her expertise as
new director for the Center for the Study
of Race and Race Relations.
"We were looking for a person of
vision and versatility but we never
dreamed we could find a lawyer, scholar,
teacher, sociologist, mentor and adminis-
trator wrapped up in one," said Barbara
Bennett Woodhouse, a search committee
member and David H. Levin Chair in
Family Law, director of Center on
Children and the Law and co-director of
the Institute for Child and Adolescent
Research and Evaluation.
Taking the position previously held
by Assistant Dean Rahim Reed, Russell-
Brown will head the multi-disciplinary
center established to promote racial
understanding, interracial dispute resolu-
tion, racial equality and racial healing.
The center seeks to influence public poli-
cy through projects at the university, local,
state and national levels and through
guest lectures, and annual state and
national conferences.
"The Center originated from a group
of faculty at the Levin College of Law and
is housed there, but it has functioned with
the support of faculty throughout the
university as well as community leaders
locally and across the state," noted Provost
David R. Colburn.
Russell-Brown comes to UF from the
University of Maryland, where she was an
associate professor of criminology and
criminal justice and director of under-
graduate studies. She previously worked
at Alabama State University and Howard
University, and was visiting professor at
City University of New York Law School
and the American University Law School.
Russell-Brown earned a bachelor's
degree in legal studies from the University
of California-Berkeley; a J.D. from
University of California's Hastings Law
School; and a Ph.D. from Maryland. After


getting her J.D., she worked two years as a
legal fellow at the Southern Poverty Law
Center.
"We conducted a thorough national
search to find someone with Katheryn's
unique combination of scholarship and
leadership," said then-Dean Jon Mills,
who has returned to director of the
Center for Governmental Responsibility.
"She not only has strong academic cre-
dentials, she possesses the ability to foster
unity and understanding across campus
and throughout the state. I believe she will
deepen our knowledge of racial issues and
help us develop strategies for the future"'
An expert in race and crime issues,
Russell-Brown is author of two books:
The Color of Crime: Racial Hoaxes,
White Fear, Black Protectionism, Police
Harassment and Other Macroagressions
and the forthcoming Underground
Codes: Playing with Race, Crime &
Related Fires. She has co-authored two
other books and published numerous
book chapters and articles.
"This is a wonderful opportunity to
continue and elevate the important but
challenging local, national and global
conversation on race," Russell-Brown
said. "UF's law school offers an intellectu-
ally rigorous and welcoming environment
for this work." U


SUFLAW I SUMMER 2003














International

Distinguished Foreign Educators Integral to
UFLaw Initiatives
BYAMANDA GROOVER
European taxation, international banking law, public prosecu-
tion and international financial crimes were among topics
discussed with UFLaw students and faculty by noted internation-
al educators on campus in 2002-03.
South Africa, the Netherlands, Australia, France, Turkey and
Germany were among countries represented by foreign professors
participating in one of the College of Law's many international
program initiatives.
"During this time of increased globalization, we have the
challenge to teach International Law and the international aspects
of every area of the law," notes Associate Dean for International
Studies Stuart Cohn, Gerald A Sohn Scholar and law professor.
"That's why visiting foreign faculty each term are so important to
our students and programs."
Hugh Culverhouse Eminent Scholar in Taxation Lawrence
Lokken's spring class on European Taxation was enriched with
lectures from Dieter Birk, Westfalische Wilhelms University in
Germany; Kees Van Raad, Leiden University, Netherlands; and
David Oliver, Cambridge University.
Other spring visitors included Charl Hugo, an international
banking law expert from University of Stellenbosh, South Africa;
Jos6 Ribas Vieira, a contemporary constitutional law expert from
Pontificia University, Brazil; and John Duns, professor of compe-
tition and insolvency law at Monash University, Australia.


Professor David Oliver of Cambridge University (left) was one of many visiting foreign faculty on
campus 2002-03 contributing to UFLaw's international emphasis.
Last fall, foreign guests lecturing for Chesterfield Smith
Professor Fletcher Baldwin's class on International Financial
Crime were Pierre Mousseron, Universit de Montpellier, France;
Barry A.K. Rider, Director, Institute of Advanced Legal Studies,
London; and Peter German, Chief Superintendent, Royal
Canadian Mounted Police, Canada.
Professors William Swadling, Arianna Pretto and J.W. Davies
- from Brasenose College in Oxford, England -
lectured for Trustee Research Fellow and Professor of
Law Winston Nagan's class on Developments in
English Private Law.
Legal experts from South Africa participated in Nagan's
enrichment class on public law, including Saras Jagwanth and
Anashri Pillay, University of Cape Town, and Templeton
Mdlalana, an advocate from the Eastern Cape. U


FALL 2003 | UFLAW








IlfAlTa Y


They Impacted Thousands of Lawyers

UFLaw loses five unique, experienced educators to retirement

BY S. CAMILLE BROADWAY

Service to school, community, state and nation is the common thread twisting through lives and labors of five College of Law
retirees. Collectively, the five who retired from their positions as of July put in more than 140 years of service to UFLaw and
more than 40 years in private practice. The group includes veterans, advocates, outstanding teachers and scholars
(separate story on Betty Taylor, page 52).


Francis McCoy '55
Joined UFLaw 1956; Law Librarian 1957-62; named Professor 1962.
In the academic world where resumes can run to vol-
umes, Professor McCoy's summary of his vast and var-
ied experiences takes up a single page.
SIt succinctly summarizes his time as PanAm flight
steward, his work with the U.S. Foreign Service in Asia
and Africa, and a long military career that took him from
the infantry to military intelligence and finally to judge advocate. Somewhere
near the bottom of his resume is his own UF career summary: assistant
librarian, law librarian and "full-time law teaching."
His resume's brevity reinforces McCoy's reputation for modesty, an oft-
repeated description from his peers. And his reputation for modesty is only
exceeded by his reputation among faculty and students as an intellectual
with a wealth of knowledge and an insatiable curiosity about other languages
and cultures.
"When foreign students have needed help and attention, Professor
McCoy has been the first called to counsel and inform them, for more likely
than not, he speaks their language," notes Cheryl Priest 3L.



David "D.T." Smith
Joined UFLaw as Associate Professor 1968; named Professor 1969.
I A famous wit with a skeletal sidekick (see UFLaw, Fall
2002), Professor Smith is identified most frequently by
his initials "D.T." and known most readily for his leg-
endary classroom humor.
A Boston University law school graduate, Smith
joined UF's law faculty in 1968 after teaching stints at
Case Western Reserve, Duquesne and Indiana. He taught courses in per-
sonal property, real property, trusts, wills, fiduciary administration, future
interests, trial tactics, professional responsibility, and legal research and
writing.
It is his Estates and Trusts classes that for more than a decade fea-
tured a skeleton nicknamed "Trixie the Testatrix" -to demonstrate line-
of-vision for witnessing will signing. Students report frequent Trixie/Smith
debates and frequent laughter.


He brought this zest for learning to discussions of admiralty law, legal
history and family law. His exams were described by one colleague as "price-
less," weaving in current and historical events to give his discussions a
sense of reality. One exam focused on a painting of Queen Isabella, and a
1977 exam discussed a hypothetical "war" for the oil deposits of Kuwait.
On 9/11, his class shaken by the day's events was reluctant to dis-
cuss the assigned course topic. Instead, McCoy delivered an impromptu lec-
ture on Middle Eastern history, explaining to his students the origins of
Middle Eastern attitudes toward the U.S.
"I am sure he held the class spellbound that he could talk for an hour
or so on this history of the Middle East, bringing it up-to-date, without any
advanced preparation," said Betty Taylor, former director of the Legal
Information Center. "He is truly an extraordinary intellectual."
His students valued both McCoy's intellect and his skills as an
educator.
"Faculty and students recognize him as a person who diligently,
thoroughly and patiently benefits all of us with his tremendous knowledge
and ability to communicate that knowledge," Priest said.


"In between the laughter, you realize you are learning," said Bradley
Rothman 3L.
An authority on probate law, Smith is author of the Florida Probate
Code Manual, which he plans to continue updating after retirement. He
also has authored the Florida Estates Practice Guide and The Family and
Inheritance.
He is known for his service as well as his humor, playing instrumental
roles in recent years on the law school's Admissions Committee, serving
as a Faculty Senate member and frequent committee chair, and advising
many student organizations through the years. He will teach at the
University of Georgia College of Law in Spring 2004.
"His unique combination of humor, scholarship and community
involvement have made him an absolute legend in the Florida legal com-
munity," Rothman said.


M UFLAW I FALL 2003











Winton E. "Skip" Williams
Joined UFLaw as Assistant Professor 1969; named Associate Professor 1973; Professor 1977.
On a national level, Professor Williams is known for his work on consumer credit practices;
at UF, he is known for dedication to teaching and his concern for students.
Described as a "Southern gentleman" by former students, Williams served two years on
active duty in the U.S. Navy before getting his law degree at the University of Mississippi. He
worked in private law practice seven years, focusing mainly on commercial law, real property and
probate issues. He joined UF in 1969, and earned an LL.M. from Yale four years later.
Williams over the years taught courses on contracts, consumer law, business organizations,
legal ethics, creditor's remedies and bankruptcy, secured transactions in personal property, sales and commercial
transactions.
His work in consumer credit law has had a national impact, winning him an university-wide Increased
Productivity Award in 1999. He authored a 1998 book, Games Creditors Play: Collecting from Overextended
Consumers, critiquing U.S. collections systems.
But it is his work with students that earned Williams the most heartfelt praise.
"He is most well-known and respected for his approachability and generosity to students. He genuinely
takes an interest in his students, welcoming them to his office and encouraging their thoughts and ideas in the
classroom," said student Lori Moore 3L.


Elizabeth McCulloch
Joined UFLaw as Division Director, Center for Governmental Responsibility 1980.
As director of social policy for the Center for Governmental Responsibility (CGR), McCulloch
spent her career fighting for the disadvantaged, elderly and the poor.
First a VISTA volunteer and then a staff attorney at the Jacksonville Area Legal Aid,
McCulloch served in the elderly and family law units. The Duke law school graduate took the
position with CGR in 1980. As part of her duties, McCulloch spearheaded community educa-
tion and advocacy efforts concerning poverty, health policy and family policy. She published
a manual, Making Welfare Work (foryou!), to help clients and advocates navigate the Florida
system.
"Liz has been a great advocate for the less fortunate of Florida and this area. She has been our
conscience," said Dean Emeritus Jon Mills, founding and current CGR director.
Her teaching was focused on poverty law and policy, and family law. She also was director of the Florida
Bar Foundation Public Service Law Fellows program, which funds students who serve in agencies providing
legal services to the poor.
She chaired the Board of Directors at Peaceful Paths (domestic violence shelter), served on an Alachua
County task force on indigent health care, and chaired an anti-poverty coalition. She was honored in 2001 as an
Alachua/Bradford County Woman of Distinction for her community service efforts.
"She has changed the lives of many people and has changed the perspective of many others. We owe her
a great debt," Mills said.


Richard Hiers '83
Joined UF as Assistant Professor of Religion 1961; named Associate Professor of Religion 1966;
Affiliate Professor of Law 1994.
While "lifelong learning" is a phrase many use, Professor Richard H. Hiers has exemplified it
throughout his UF career. He joined as an assistant professor of religion in 1961, after earn-
ing four degrees from Yale (including a Ph.D.).
Not content with four degrees, Hiers stepped back into student role at UF's College of
Law and earned a J.D. in 1983. As part of his legal training, he clerked 1987-88 for Judge
Jerre S. Williams on the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Fifth Circuit.
Widely published in the field of Biblical studies, Hiers combined his interest in Biblical
ethics with interests in modern law, social ethics and the environment to publish in numerous legal journals.
One of his most recent publications in the Journal of Law and Religion is Biblical Social Welfare Legislation:
Protected Classes and Provisions for Persons in Need. His scholarship has additionally focused on academic
freedom, employment discrimination and government employee free speech issues
As a UFLaw affiliate professor, he taught courses in law, ethics and social policy.
He served on the Faculty Senate and various campus-wide committees, serving as president of UF's
American Association of University Professors, and UF chapters of Phi Beta Kappa and Phi Kappa Phi.


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FALL 200a | FLAW a n







FACUTMWON j


Equal Protection

MENTAL ILLNESS &THE DEATH PENALTY
BY CHRISTOPHER SLOBOG IN Stephen C. O'Connell Professor of Law
Note: Excerpted from article in New Mexico Law Review


Our society has long been
ambivalent about mental ill-
ness. Nowhere is this ambivalence
more dramatically exposed than
in death penalty cases. Mental ill-
ness is expressly recognized as a
mitigating factor in death penalty
statutes, yet research amply
demonstrates that it is considered
an aggravating circumstance by
most capital sentencing juries.
In Ford v. Wainwright, the
Supreme Court prohibited execu-
tion of people who become
"incompetent" once on death row
but, because of narrow interpreta-
tions of the Ford ruling, people
with serious mental illness are
routinely executed, sometimes
after they have been forcibly med-
icated to "restore" their compe-
tency and sometimes even while
they are still flagrantly mentally
impaired.
There are at least three reasons
why the death penalty, even if
generally a valid exercise of state
authority, should never or rarely
be imposed on those who are
severely mentally ill.
First: Now that the Supreme
Court has prohibited imposition
of the death penalty on people
with mental retardation, it cannot
continue to countenance execu-
tion of those who suffered from
severe mental illness at the time of
their offense. Any state that exe-
cutes such people is violating the
Equal Protection Clause.
Second: Even if, contrary to
the first argument, imposition of


tion of Ford, or because their
competence is maintained
through an unconstitutional
imposition of medication.
The first argument: It flows
from last year's Supreme Court
decision in Atkins v. Virginia,
which held that execution of peo-
ple with mental retardation vio-
lates the Eighth Amendments pro-
hibition on cruel and unusual
punishment. Principal normative
reason the Court gave for this
decision was that mentally retard-
ed people who commit murder
are neither as culpable or as
deterrable as the average murder-
er. The equal protection argument
is simply that the same assertion is

"A sizeable number of people who were
experiencing psychosis at the time of their
capital offense are sentenced to death."


the death penalty on people with
mental illness is constitutional as
a general proposition, the fact that
capital sentencing juries usually
treat such illness as an aggravating
circumstance despite instructions
to the contrary means the bulk of
death sentences imposed on men-
tally ill people are deprivations of
life without due process of law.
Third: Even on the assumption
that an individual death sentence
is valid, most people who remain
mentally ill or become so once on
death row should not be executed,
either because they are incompe-
tent under the correct interpreta-


true about ,., r,.illi ill people who
kill, at least when mental illness is
equated with psychosis. That con-
dition's association with delu-
sions, hallucinations and other
serious impairments in judgment
and behavior significantly lessens
blameworthiness and ability to
abide by the law, probably more so
than mental retardation does.
But only one death penalty
state (Connecticut) prohibits exe-
cution of a person who was men-
tally ill at time of the offense.
Juries and judges are very hostile
to defensive claims based on men-
tal illness (in fact, as noted above,


m UFLAW I FALL 2003








NEW ADMNIT


they often treat mental illness
as an aggravating circum-
stance). As a result, a sizeable
number of people experiencing
psychosis at the time of their
capital offense are sentenced to
death. In contrast, at the time
Atkins was decided, at least
half the states that authorize
the death penalty banned its
application to people with
mental retardation, and the rest
rarely, if ever, actually put them
to death.
These facts have diametrical-
ly opposed implications for the
two constitutional doctrines
most relevant to the proper
scope of the death penalty.
They undercut an Eighth
Amendment cruel and unusual
punishment claim on behalf of
the mentally ill, because that
claim requires a national con-
sensus against the type of pun-
ishment in question, which
clearly does not exist when it
comes to execution of people
with mental illness. But the
very notion that these people
can continue to be executed
when people with retardation
cannot be shows an "irrational
prejudice" against the first
group that is not justified by
any legitimate state goal, and
thus violates equal protection
of the laws.
I can conceive of three
reasons why a state might claim
that, even after Atkins, execu-
tion of people with mental
illness is legitimate, to wit:
compared to mental retarda-
tion, mental illness is (1) hard-
er to diagnose; (2) more avoid-
able; (3) more likely to lead


to violent behavior. None of
these reasons withstands close
analysis.
Unfortunately, research
about attitudes toward individ-
uals with mental illness strong-
ly suggests most of us inaccu-
rately view such people to be
abnormally dangerous. More
direct proof of the irrational
prejudice at work in capital
cases comes from the mam-
moth Capital Jury Sentencing
Project, which included analy-
sis of emotional responses of
187 jurors serving on 53 capital
cases 1988-97. That analysis
revealed that of the eight most
common emotions experienced
during the jury's sentencing
deliberations (including fear,
sympathy, anger and disgust)
only "fear" of the offender cor-
related significantly with the
final sentencing vote.
Researchers also found the
most feared type of offender
was one perceived to be a "mad-
man" or "vicious like a mad
animal." The type of offender
most likely to fit the "madman"
category, of course, is one who
exhibits symptoms of mental
illness.
Now that people with mental
retardation cannot be executed,
execution of people who were
afflicted with significant mental
illness at the time of the offense
has no rational basis. The only
reason such executions contin-
ue is a disproportionate fear of
these people. One very signifi-
cant way in which the irra-
tionality of that fear can
be exposed is by halting these
executions, now. U


Associate, Assistant

Deans Named
BY AMANDA GROOVER
Three new associate and two new assistant deans have been
named by the law school administration to help lead
the College of Law on its march toward eventual
Top 10 public law school ranking.
Gerald A. Sohn Research Scholar and Professor
of Law Stuart Cohn is now also Associate
Dean of International Studies. Cohn, named
coordinator of International Programs in 2001,
has been at UFLaw since 1977. His accomplish-
ments include supervision and development of COHEN
international law curriculum. He has an LL.B.
from Oxford University, and two B.A's one from Yale and
a second from University of Illinois.
Patrick Shannon, also already on staff, was
promoted to Associate Dean of Administrative Affairs.
He joined the law school as Assistant Dean of
Student Affairs in 1996, serving as a liaison among
students, faculty and administration. He earned
undergraduate degrees from Kentucky Christian
College, two graduate degrees from Abilene
Christian University, and a Doctor of Education and
J.D. from the University of Louisville. He will be
responsible for the school's budgeting process,
personnel and physical plant including coordina- a
tion for the new and renovated facilities.ANN
New to UFLaw and its administration is
Kathleen Price, new Associate Dean of Library and
Technology and Clarence J. TeSelle Professor of
Law (see page 57).
Richard Ludwick succeeds Shannon as new
Assistant Dean for Student Affairs, his same title
since 1999 at the University of Oregon. He will assist
students with personal and academic counseling, PRICE
oversee registration, and coordinate accommoda-
tions underthe ADA. Ludwick earned his B.A. from
University of Evansville, M.A. from Columbia, and
J.D. from Indiana. He has prior academic experience
at Ball State University and American University, and
worked eight years as partner at Indiana law firm of
Ludwick & LaRue.
Linda Calvert Hanson '86 has been named
Assistant Dean for Career Services, coming to LUDWICI
UFLaw from Florida Coastal School of Law where
she held a similar position since 2000. Previously,
Hanson was General Counsel for the Flagler Estates
Road & Water Control District and worked for State
Department of Business & Professional Regulation.
Her background includes assistant professor at
University of Central Florida (Department of Criminal
Justice & Legal Studies) and as staff associate in
UF's Center for Criminology & Law. While teaching at HANSON
UF, she served on the Athletic Association Board of
Directors and multiple committees.


Complete information on UFLaw administrators: www.law.ufl.ed uif


FALL 2003 I


aculty.


UFLAW


N
N


I







If,!TRAnSIT


THE JOB


Help wanted: Noted scholar, educator, leader, communicator, long-range planner with proven skills in money
management, curricula, employee supervision, public relations, diversity promotion. Commitment to integrity,
academic excellence, professional service, cultural diversity. Fund-raising abilities a must. Interpersonal skills essential.
BY S. CAMILLE BROADWAY


T he search committee for
the University of Florida's
13th dean of its College
of Law had a tall order:
Find a candidate with a
national reputation who
could handle all roles
required of the leader of a top-tier insti-
tution seeking to become one of the
Top 10 public law schools in the country
and in the initial phases of a $22-plus
million facilities expansion program
designed to make it a state-of-the-art
campus.
In Robert H. Jerry II, 50, the
University and its law school believe they
have found a person who understands
completely what is needed at the Levin
College of Law and what it will take to
meet its aspirations and objectives.
In addition to 22 years of teaching
experience, scholarly research and the
writing of books and articles, Jerry
served before as a law dean from 1989
to 1994 at the University of Kansas
School of Law.
In announcing his selection, UF
Provost David Colburn noted, "he is a
leading scholar in his field and widely
respected nationally. He practiced law
before joining academia, and it is this
combination of private-sector experi-


ence and national standing as an admin-
istrator that attracted us to Professor

"He practiced law before
joining academia, and it is
this combination of private-
sector experience and
national standing as an
administrator that attracted
us to Professor Jerry."


Jerry. We believe he offers the Levin
College of Law great leadership."
And Dean Emeritus Jon Mills, who
has returned to the faculty and director-
ship of the Center for Governmental
Responsibility, said "he brings tremen-


dous breadth and depth of experience
and an outstanding reputation for excel-
lence with him, and we are truly fortu-
nate to have attracted someone of his
caliber. He understands the issues this
law school faces, has great vision and
understands where we're going."
During his first 24 months at UF,
Jerry will oversee the multi-million dol-
lar facilities expansion and doubling of
Legal Information Center space. He also
will assume the task of raising UFLaw's
ranking into the top 10 of public univer-
sities, oversee a faculty of 59 tenured /
tenure-track professors and several hun-
dred legal skills professors and other
educators and staff, and counsel the
1,200 students making up the second
largest public law school class in the
country.
"You already have faculty, staff and
students of extraordinary quality," Jerry


M UFLAW I FALL 2003


cnideiri~l d'-nating 'one~ Ihour a yar o he ollge If N may ore[= of'l our~zl a lum wold sup-
prill llt, ourl student andT!'l programsI with~~ th equivalent of just on ho ur peryeri -] iaqtte!or

defendr or such wel woul be able 'J tomk hind1q of Tinvsmet tht'~ wil"pope u







If,!TRAnSIT


THE JOB


Help wanted: Noted scholar, educator, leader, communicator, long-range planner with proven skills in money
management, curricula, employee supervision, public relations, diversity promotion. Commitment to integrity,
academic excellence, professional service, cultural diversity. Fund-raising abilities a must. Interpersonal skills essential.
BY S. CAMILLE BROADWAY


T he search committee for
the University of Florida's
13th dean of its College
of Law had a tall order:
Find a candidate with a
national reputation who
could handle all roles
required of the leader of a top-tier insti-
tution seeking to become one of the
Top 10 public law schools in the country
and in the initial phases of a $22-plus
million facilities expansion program
designed to make it a state-of-the-art
campus.
In Robert H. Jerry II, 50, the
University and its law school believe they
have found a person who understands
completely what is needed at the Levin
College of Law and what it will take to
meet its aspirations and objectives.
In addition to 22 years of teaching
experience, scholarly research and the
writing of books and articles, Jerry
served before as a law dean from 1989
to 1994 at the University of Kansas
School of Law.
In announcing his selection, UF
Provost David Colburn noted, "he is a
leading scholar in his field and widely
respected nationally. He practiced law
before joining academia, and it is this
combination of private-sector experi-


ence and national standing as an admin-
istrator that attracted us to Professor

"He practiced law before
joining academia, and it is
this combination of private-
sector experience and
national standing as an
administrator that attracted
us to Professor Jerry."


Jerry. We believe he offers the Levin
College of Law great leadership."
And Dean Emeritus Jon Mills, who
has returned to the faculty and director-
ship of the Center for Governmental
Responsibility, said "he brings tremen-


dous breadth and depth of experience
and an outstanding reputation for excel-
lence with him, and we are truly fortu-
nate to have attracted someone of his
caliber. He understands the issues this
law school faces, has great vision and
understands where we're going."
During his first 24 months at UF,
Jerry will oversee the multi-million dol-
lar facilities expansion and doubling of
Legal Information Center space. He also
will assume the task of raising UFLaw's
ranking into the top 10 of public univer-
sities, oversee a faculty of 59 tenured /
tenure-track professors and several hun-
dred legal skills professors and other
educators and staff, and counsel the
1,200 students making up the second
largest public law school class in the
country.
"You already have faculty, staff and
students of extraordinary quality," Jerry


M UFLAW I FALL 2003


cnideiri~l d'-nating 'one~ Ihour a yar o he ollge If N may ore[= of'l our~zl a lum wold sup-
prill llt, ourl student andT!'l programsI with~~ th equivalent of just on ho ur peryeri -] iaqtte!or

defendr or such wel woul be able 'J tomk hind1q of Tinvsmet tht'~ wil"pope u













said, "but I am confident if we work together and
make good decisions that build on this great foun-
dation, the law school's best years are in the
future."
In addition to improved facilities, the school's
strategic plan calls for more alumni participation, a
larger endowment, a better student/teacher ratio,
more spending per student, and greater faculty
research and scholarship.
"I want to take a look at all the resources that
support our research mission and see if we can't
get more efficiency to advance our research
agenda," Jerry told the CGi n, i I / Sun.
A prolific researcher himself, Jerry taught and
published in the areas of insurance law, contracts
and health-care finance and access. He also has
authored Understanding Insurance Law, now in its
third edition, and co-authored Insurance Law:
Cases and Material and an accompanying teacher's
manual.
In an open letter to the law school community,
Jerry wrote that he "did not want to be a dean
again unless it could be at an institution where
there was a shared commitment among faculty,
administration and alumni to take a strong insti-
tution to the next level. I believe I have found that
situation at Florida."
Jerry earned a bachelor's degree magna cum
laude from Indiana State University in 1974, and
his law degree cum laude from the University of
Michigan in 1977. He clerked for Judge George E.
MacKinnon on the U.S. Court of Appeals, District
of Columbia, and then spent three years in private
practice with the Indianapolis law firm of Barnes
Hickam Pantzer & Boyd.
Most recently, Jerry was the Floyd R. Gibson
Endowed Professor of Law at the University of
Missouri. He also taught 1981-94 at Kansas and
1994-98 at the University of Memphis, where he
was the Herbert Herff Chair of Excellence in Law.
"When you talk about laws, you're talking about
how we order society and how we value our com-
munities," Jerry told the Sun. "For people who are
committed to service in the community, we have
the opportunity to make life better for a lot of peo-
ple, and that can bring a lot of fulfillment."
He and his wife, Lisa, have two sons John and
James and daughter Elizabeth. Ul


Six months, hundreds of hours

and 30 candidates later...

he Levin College of
Law's dean search that
resulted in the hiring of
Robert Jerry (story left) took
six months and involved offi-
cials from the law school, the
university and the community.
Beginning June 2002,
the official search committee
solicited nominations, recruit-
ed prospects, and reviewed
qualifications of more than 30
potential candidates.
By November, the com-
mittee narrowed the list to
eight and invited those candi-
dates to interview in person
or via videoconference. Four
were chosen to make on-cam-
pus visits, after which the
committee submitted two
names unranked -to UF
President Charles Young and
Provost David Colburn: Jerry
and Burnele Powell
(University of Missouri-
Kansas City dean and profes-
sor since 1995, and previous-
ly on the faculty of the Incoming/Outgoing Deans Robert Jerry and Jon Mills during
University of North Carolina law this year's Florida Bar convention UFLaw reception used a
school.) historical shovel during a symbolic changing of the guard: It
school.) was used to break ground in 1966 for Holland Law Center, in
The committee was 1982 for Bruton-Geer Hall, and this summer for the current
co-chaired by Professors facilities expansion.
Christopher Slobogin, then-Associate Dean of Faculty Development, and Barbara
Bennett Woodhouse, David H. Levin Chair in Family Law and director of the Center on
Children and the Law.
Other members included law faculty Alyson Flournoy, director of the
Environmental and Land-Use Law Program; Berta Hernandez-Truyol, Levin Mabie and
Levin Chair; William Page, Marshall M. Criser Eminent Scholar; and Henry Wihnyk,
legal skills professor and director of Research & Writing and Appellate Advocacy.
Also Willard Harrison, dean emeritus of UF's College of Liberal Arts and
Sciences; Marybeth McDonald, chair of the Law Center Association Board of Trustees
and partner in McDonald & Roberts P.A.; and Justice Charles Wells,
Florida Supreme Court. Two ex-officio members were Vice Provost Charles Frazier and
law student Dexter Smith 2L.


FALL 2003 | UFLAW








If,!TRAnSIT


31 Days in Jul

If This is Tuesday, It Must Be Palm each...

Though Robert H. Jerry took
office on July 1st, becoming the
University of Florida Levin
College of Law's 13th dean, his
primary meeting space the
balance of the month was on
the road in Miami, Fort
Lauderdale, West Palm Beach,
Jacksonville and Tallahassee, to
be exact.
Dean Jerry, Dean Emeritus
Jon Mills and representatives
of UFLaw's Development &
Alumni Affairs office spent
most of July meeting with and
calling on Gator law alums in
five major cities. The same
group in late June met with
Orlando alumni at a symbolic
changing-of-the-guard leader-
ship reception during The
Florida Bar annual conference.
Collectively, more than 400
grads and their spouses /
friends turned out for the six
evening events.
In addition to those city
receptions, Jerry also made vis-
its to more than 50 offices and .
firms to talk with and meet
UFLaw alums. I / /


Note: In photo outlines on pgs. 66-67
LAC = Law Alumni Council
LCA = Law Center Association


1) West Palm Beach
Dean Robert Jerry (center) presents Estates &
Trusts Book Award sponsor plaque to members
of Jones Foster Johnston & Stubbs PA -
including (from left) Theo Kypreos '02
(LAC); Sid Stubbs '65 (LCA); Larry Alexander Jr.
'01; and Adams Weaver '70 (LAC).
2) Miami
Gunster Yoakley & Stewart was well represented
with (from left) Ingrid Hamann-Ponce '98
(expecting, ironically, weekend of the Gator/UM
game), Spencer Crowley '01 (LAC),
Aaron Resnick '97, and Mark Scheer '87 (GYS
shareholder who heads the Miami office).


3) West Palm Beach
Bill Bone '84 (LCA Trustee and LAC past president)
of Larmoyeux & Bone and his wife, Dr. Melanie
Bone, were hosts for this reception and among
individual sponsors.
4) Tallahassee
Reception attendees included Judge Charles Kahn
'77; Florida Division of Administrative Hearings
Judge Barbara Staros '77, and her husband
Joseph Mellichamp '70 (LAC) with the Tallahassee
office of Carlton Fields.


M UFLAW I FALL 2003


















Firms, Individuals

Make Receptions Possible


5) West Palm Beach
Kevin Bennett '92 of Grossman & Goldman,
Boca Raton, with P. Kristen Kay '94, in-house
counsel forThe Breakers.

6) Tallahassee
Dave Mica, Florida Petroleum Council executive direc-
tor and immediate past president of the UF Alumni
Association, visits with (center) Larry Sellers Jr. '79
(LCA) of Holland & Knight LLP, and Gary Printy '82
(LAC).

7) Jacksonville
Among 60 alumni at this reception were law school
classmates L. Kinder Cannon III '66 (left) of Holland
& Knight LLP Circuit Court Judge Charles 0.


Mitchell Jr. '66, and Eric Smith '67, Assistant Dean for
External Affairs, Florida Coastal School of Law.

8) Miami
Jeff Feldman '81 of Feldman Gale & Weber (LAC) and
Oscar Sanchez '82 of Akerman Senterfitt were two of
the close to 100 alumni turning out in South Florida.
Sanchez becomes LAC president this fall.

9) Jacksonville
John DeVault '67 (left) of Bedell Dittmar DeVault &
Pillans PA., S. Grier Wells '75 of Akerman Senterfitt,
UFLaw Development & Alumni Affairs Director
Kelley Wood, and George E. "Buddy" Schulz Jr. '73
of Holland & Knight, LLP


JULY
ORLANDO RECEPTION
Firnn Sponsors

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MIAMI RECEPTION
Firan Sponsors

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Individual Sponsors
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FT. LAUDERDALE
RECEPTION
Host and Sponsor
Northern Tlrs! Bank


WEST PALM BEACH
Hosts: lelanie & Bill Bone
Firm Sponsors
G i tll:l .lll TIIIIIIji P,

Sriii'i;r.i: Pi
Individual Sponsors
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JACKSONVILLE RECEPTION
Firm Sponsors
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Individual Sponsors
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TALLAHASSEE RECEPTION
Individual Sponsors
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AUGUST
OCALA RECEPTION
Hosted by
Wayne & Belh McCall

GAINESVILLE RECEPTION
Hosled by
Danny & Nancy Ponce

Firm Sponsors

S idl, l ini. LI' ,

Individual Sponsors

.i in n I i: 1ll1-i
B ill H ,:,i:,.


FALL 2003 | UFLAW


7i








If,!TRAnSIT


36 Hours


in San Francisco New Month, New Territories...


New Dean Robert Jerry, with
assistance from Dean Emeritus
Jon Mills and Senior Director
Donald Hale of Development
& Alumni Affairs, changed his
travel routine starting in August
- heading out of state for the
American Bar Association
annual meeting and an oppor-
tunity to meet with alumni.
(An Atlanta reception also was
held in August, with New York
and Washington in September).
More than 120 UFLaw
alums were confirmed as work-
ing in the Bay Area, and 40
alumni and guests turned out
for a reception hosted by Barry
Abbott '75 of Howard Rice
Nemerovski Carrady Falk &
Rabkeir. The firm, started in
1954, employs 140 attorneys
and has among its clients the
city and county of San
Francisco, Oakland Raiders,
Major League Baseball
Properties, Hewlett-Packard,
University of California, Pacific
Gas & Electric, Sears, The Gap
and Starbucks.
Abbott is a director of the
firm, heads its financial services
group and is immediate past
chair of the business depart-
ment. He was on the Adjunct
Faculty 1998-99 at the Boalt
Hall School of Law at the
University of California -
Berkeley. He earned his A.B.
magna cum laude at
Dartmouth, M.B.A. from
Stanford, and his UFLaw J.D.
was with honors. EU


1. Judge William Dorsey '77 (left)) of the U.S. Department of Labor
in San Francisco and Gerald Rosenberg '80, president of
NewTechLaw in Palo Alto. Both men also earned their undergraduate
degrees at UF Dorsey in political science '74, and Rosenberg '78 in
electrical engineering.
2. Barry Abbott '75 (center) was host for the San Francisco reception
(story left). Among those attending were (right) Carol McLean
Brewer '79 (UF B.S.B.A. with honors) of Kemnitzer Anderson Barron
& Ogilvie, LLP, headquartered in San Francisco, and her husband,
Andrew J. Ogilvie, KAB&O partner. Ms. Brewer before joining KAB&O
in 2001 practiced in West Palm Beach more than 20 years, was on
the Florida Bar Board of Governors, and is a former president of the
Palm Beach County Bar Association.


3. Craig Wolfson '75, CEO of non-profit S.S. O'Brien, National Liberty
Ship Memorial docked in San Francisco, visits with Wm. Reece Smith
Jr. '49 of Carlton Fields Ward Emmanuel Smith & Cutler PA., Tampa.
A Rhodes Scholar at Oxford University, Smith was American Bar
Association president 1980-81 (one of four Gator law grads to serve
in that capacity), serves on the Council of the American Law Institute,
and received the ABA's Gold Medal for "exceptionally
distinguished service to the cause of American Jurisprudence."
4. Mrs. and Leonard Strickman were reception guests. Strickman,
former dean of University of Arkansas School of Law 1991-99, is
founding dean of Florida International University College of Law in
Miami. He was followed as UA dean by former UFLaw Professor
Robert Moberly, who joined the College of Law in 1977 and at one
time directed the Institute for Dispute Resolution.


M UFLAW I FALL 2003















Mills Closes Circle


"Most of my life, I've been in charge of one thing or another, so it is good right now to take a
break. There are a lot of things I want to do, including supporting the new dean."

BY KRISTEN HARMEL


A s Jon L. Mills stepped down in June after serving as
the 12th dean of the University of Florida Levin
College of Law, one thing was for sure: "The imme-
diate future is to be reserved for Beth, Marguerite
and Elizabeth."
"I've been dean (four-year-old) Elizabeth's entire life, which
means I've been away a lot," Mills said. "Frankly, not having kids
until your late 40s and early 50s in some ways makes it more spe-
cial. I just want to spend more time with the girls (Marguerite is
8) and more time with (wife) Beth."
As for hobbies, Mills said he occasionally plays golf, but not
nearly as well as five or six years ago. He looks forward to spend-
ing more time at a vacation home on Lake Santa Fe, and to
renewing his interest in good books. As for movies, he hasn't
"seen one in about four years that wasn't animated"'
"Marguerite plays a little golf, so sometimes we'll play"' he
says. "We fish off the back deck occasionally. I take her to drama
practice when she's in plays, and Elizabeth also fishes. Elizabeth
has the higher energy gene. They're both very smart. I'm looking
forward right now just to being Daddy"
There's also speculation Mills eventually will make another
dramatic career turn.
"I guess a number of people see me running for something.
Yes, I would consider it, but who knows. In the last four years, I
had to be politically totally neutral. You cannot consider a politi-
cal career while dean of a public law school."
Mills refers to a Winston Churchill quote where Churchill
says, "'I was a pretty good wartime prime minister, but am not
sure how good I'd be in peacetime.' Perhaps the same applies to
me. I think we've accomplished a lot during a tough time, and
now I'm very happy to pass the baton."
Just 48-plus months ago, late in 1999, Jon Mills' future did
not look quite so leisurely, family oriented or relaxing after the
resignation Dean Rick Matasar. Then-UF President John
Lombardi asked Mills that September if he would step in on an
interim basis "because of Mills' leadership experience, long asso-
ciation with UF, and his love and loyalty to the school '
"I didn't really plan to stay long," Mills said. "I was thinking
I'd help organize things and move the place forward a little."
But Mills had stepped into the middle of a brewing storm,
and as he began to take charge and move things ahead, he real-


Dean Mills regularly and in many public forums throughout his tenure credited his
wife, Beth '88, with being the "true power behind the throne," and enabling him to trav-
el extensively on behalf of the College of Law taking care of the home front and their
daughters Marguerite and Elizabeth.
ized it would take longer than a few months to set the school
back on track.
"The alumni were fairly agitated by a combination of con-
troversies, we had an enormous number of senior faculty about
to retire so recruiting and hiring was critical," Mills noted. "The
American Bar Association previously had warned us we had
inadequate facilities and that it was an accreditation issue. And
we soon had controversies over racial issues."
After Mills had been at work about six months, UF President
Charles Young came by, chatted briefly, and asked Mills to remove
the Interim title and stay permanently. "At that time, I figured
doing this for four years would be about right. I truly thought I
could get done what I wanted to accomplish in that time."
Born and raised in the Miami area, Mills was an avid golfer
and captain of his high school team (finishing fourth in statewide
competition).
Mills is the only child of Herb (who worked for a restaurant
equipment sales company) and Marguerite (high school English


FALL 2003 I UFLAW








If,!TRAnSIT


Mills presided at eight commencements, and visited with UFLaw alumni and friends such as Lonnie and
Emily Wurn of Jacksonville at hundreds of on- and off-campus gatherings.

KUDOS...


"Having entered the University of Florida
College of Law in '46, 1 have experienced
dean leadership almost to the beginning. I
thus believe I am entitled to state it will be
many years before we get another dean as
good as Jon Mills. Jon and Dick Julin are
the two very best. While you were one of
the great Speakers of the Florida House,
you are even a better dean. I have seen no
action taken that did not seem to me to be
right, proper and in the best interest of
my College of Law. I very much regret
your decision to not remain after 2003."
-Chesterfield Smith '48
Former President, American Bar Association
Founder and Principal Architect,
Holland & Knight LLP


"Jon provided more support to develop
law school International Programs than
any dean I have served in 35 years. What
cannot be replaced is his love for this
state, city, university and law school that
is reflected in his dedicated and tireless
efforts over the past four years."
-Michael Gordon
Chesterfield Smith Professor of Law

"Jon has helped build the College of Law's
reputation literally around the world. He
has a great ability to pull people together.
His strength and leadership style came
just when we needed it most. He is always
positive that good things are going to
happen."
-Marybeth McDonald '82
Chair, Law Center Association Board of Trustees


"I learned working with Jon that he
embodies all the characteristics of a great
leader. He has vision, and is a terrific 'idea
guy' who listens to and learns from those
around him and lets them have the credit
and spotlight. I learned a lot from his
patience and belief in the goodness of


people...and his absolute dedication to
and love for the institution he has served
so well."
-Professor of Law Mike Seigel
Associate Dean, Academic Affairs (2000-02)


"Jon empowers people to express their
views. As a student leader, I found he
always listened, then helped find a solu-
tion. Our school is stronger for the storms
it has weathered under his leadership."
-Chris Hand '03
President, John Marshall BarAssociation


"Jon did not seek this deanship; it was
thrust upon him by sudden circumstances
and in difficult times. He was 100%
devoted to being the quality dean this
school needed and deserved, and he rose
to the occasion with a modest but effec-
tive style, an open door policy, and an
eagerness to bring us to new levels. He
has been a major factor in the great
strides we have made regarding funding,
hiring, program development, and overall
student-faculty respect and collegiality."
-Stuart R. Cohn
Gerald A. Sohn Scholar,
Associate Dean, International Studies


"You have brought leadership and stability
to the College of Law, with the result it is
functioning better than in recent history.
Your achievements in fund raising have
been equally crucial...The campaign to
regain alumni support and to get financial
commitments to renovate and add new
facilities was remarkable. I also value your
commitment to the students... My only
regret is you decided to serve only into
2003 as dean."
-David R. Colburn
UF Provost, Senior Vice President


teacher from Georgia). Perhaps thanks to his
mother now 90 and living in Gainesville Mills
learned ease in front of others; in 1933, she was the
first-ever Orange Bowl Queen.
Despite early aspirations of becoming an
architect, Mills began to think of a law career.
"Off and on, I'd been talking about being a
lawyer since I was 10," he says. "My mother also
taught debate, so that and Perry Mason inspired
me to think that way."
After graduating from Coral Gables High
School, Mills went to Stetson University, where he
majored in economics and played on the golf
team, again as captain.
In 1969, Mills made a connection that helped
shape the rest of his life. Fresh out of Stetson with
his bachelor's degree, he enrolled at UFLaw.
"It was accessible, I wanted to stay in the
state, and most importantly it was then, as now,
easily the best law school in Florida," he says.
Mills made the most of his experience, partici-
pating in Moot Court and becoming Florida
Law Review editor. In 1972, he graduated fifth in
his class with honors, and received book awards
in four courses (given to the top student, thanks
to alumni contributions, in each class).
"I went on military duty at that point, and
was at Ft. Knox for a while," Mills says. "This was
as the war in Vietnam was winding down. I was
waiting to be sent, but it turned out I just con-
tinued training. UFLaw Dean (Richard) Julin
called about that time, and asked me to a football
game I think the Gators lost and while there
asked if I would consider directing a six-month
project at the law school."
Mills agreed to what turned out to be a major
factor in shaping his career and somewhat the
course of the College of Law.
"We had a grant to study President Nixon's
cutting of housing and civil rights programs
funding. So I got a bunch of students together,
and we ended up suing the federal government
in three or four federal courts. We were quoted in
the New York Times and the Washington Post.
And with Fletcher Baldwin, we filed an amicus
brief in the U.S. Supreme Court in a case involv-
ing the Environmental Protection Agency. We
were involved in things all over the country that
were relatively high profile. Ironically, one of our
CGR students on the project Carol Browner -
became the longest-serving EPA administrator in
its history.
"Michael McIntosh, donor financing the
short-term project, thought we had been most
successful, and expanded our resources," Mills


I UFLAW I FALL 2003











said. "That was a project Dean Julin devised, and we converted it
into what became the Center for Governmental Responsibility. It
seemed a natural outcome after the success of the project to have
a Center that would do research and public policy work that
could change things for the good associated with the law
school."
After a few years of heading CGR, Mills decided in 1978 to
run for State Legislature.
"It seemed a natural progression in the sense I wanted to have
an effect on public policy and it seemed logical," he says."I was not
thinking of or predicting a political career."
Predicted or not, he had one. In 10 years as a Florida legisla-
tor two as Speaker of the House
- Mills accomplished a number of "It seemed a natu-
key changes: He was on a commit-
tee in 1981 that created one of the ral progression in
State's first child abuse programs,
enabling law enforcement agencies the sense I wanted
to come together and deal with the to have an effect on
problem.
He was instrumental in public policy and it
enacting major environmental
legislation such as the Water seemed logical."
Quality Act. He helped on appro-
priations for UF, and spearheaded the drive to fund what is now
the university's Center for Performing Arts.
While in the legislature, Mills continued his work with
UFLaw and moved to the classroom in 1983, stepping in to teach
a legislative drafting course. In 1988, after a decade in the legisla-
ture, Mills made an unsuccessful run for Congress.
"It was not a good year for Democrats, but it was a good
focusing experience. I did well and met lots of people that are still
our friends. It was a very difficult 24 months with the campaign
loss and coming right after my father's severe illness and death (in
1987). But thankfully, the law school at that time asked me back."
Mills returned to direct CGR, and it was soon suggested he
teach more. In 1992 he became a professor, and in'96 was tenured.
He taught Florida Constitutional Law, trade and environment,
legislation and several comparative international law seminars.
During those years, he came into personal contact with nearly
every UFLaw student.
"Florida Constitutional Law is a course almost everybody
takes because it's on the Bar exam. So for six or seven years, every-
body going through law school at some point was in my class. A
number of Congressmen, members of the legislature, students
now managing partners of diverse law firms all went through
my classes."
In 1998, Mills put his Florida Constitutional Law work to
practical use. Then-Gov. Lawton Chiles appointed him to the
Florida Constitution Revision Commission, where he served
for two years. He chaired the Style & Draft Committee,
authored a provision on high quality education and was chosen
the most valuable commission member. And then, in '99, the
Lombardi visit.


Whelher lacking lIne lo lalk wilh news media represenialives ilop). serve as wailer lor
slidenis lo raise hinds lot charily. or hobnobbing wilh Albeil al a UFLaw rally. Mills
look seriously his charge lo represent Ihe sale's Ilagship law school and ils lacnilly.
slalf and sludenls 241,7 and lo advance ils cause and obleclives al every opporlinily.


As FOR THE LAW SCHOOL FUTURE?
"I think the future is incredibly bright," Mills notes "The
direction is set. Dean (Bob) Jerry believes in the strategic plan
developed by the faculty, and agrees with our vision which
looks to the future and recognizes our past and what this law
school has meant to Florida and the country. I think the
College has a good feeling about itself, is headed in a most
positive direction, and I think the facilities will be the major,
immediate symbol of that direction."
As he steps down, Mills feels good about the changes that
have taken place at UFLaw.
"I think the way you assess an educational institution is the
faculty, students, alumni and the facilities. And all those are
dramatically different than they were." E


FALL 2003 I UFLAW



































State Prosecutors, Defenders Train at UFLaw
One of the most important annual on-campus events is the Gerald T. Bennett Prosecutor/
Public Defender Training Program coordinated by The Florida Bar and Levin College of Law.
Each Circuit in Florida sends participants, such as the more than 70 attending the 2003 ses-
sion in August. Prominent judges and trial lawyers from throughout the state are on the facul-
ty, plus one of an elite group of London barristers. Program Director is Claire Luten, Clearwater
attorney on The Bar's Criminal Law Section and Executive Council. Coordinator is UFLaw Legal
Skills Professor Jennifer Zedalis, former assistant public defender for 5th and 8th Judicial
Circuits. The program was started in 1977 by UF Professor Bennett, one of the nation's preem-
inent criminal law scholars who died in '99.


EM1IMPORTANT DATES""

SEPTEMBER 2003
23 Washington, D.C. Law Alumni Reception
24 NewYork City LawAlumni Reception
OCTOBER 2003
2-4 1953 Grand Guard Weekend
3 Nelson Symposium
"New Perspectives on Historic Preservation"
3-4 Law Center Association Board of Trustees
13 Center for American Law Studies/ Classes Begin
(Warsaw University & UFLaw Joint Program)
NOVEMBER 2003
8 University of Florida Homecoming


FEBRUARY 2004
19-21 10th Annual Public Interest Environmental Conference
Environmental and Land Use Law Program
20 3rd Annual Law &Technology Conference Orlando
MARCH 2004
25-27 "Beyond Brown: Children, Race and Education"
Center for Study of Race and Race Relations and
Center for Children and the Law
TBA BLSA Alumni Reunion Weekend
TBA Dunwody Distinguished Lecture Florida Law Review
APRIL 2004
TBA "Legal & Policy Issues in the Americas"
CENTER FOR GOVERNMENTAL RESPONSIBILITY
TBA Annual Orange & Blue Reunion Weekend
2nd Annual "Heritage of Leadership"
MAY 2004
14 College of Law Graduation
JUNE 2004
TBA Warsaw Program Graduation


W UFLAW I FALL 2003













Building on Past Successes

ALL NEED TO BE INVOLVED

BY DEAN ROBERT JERRY


Long before I was invited to
serve as the College of Law's
next dean, I had a good sense
of the strength of your feelings for
your law school. After all, no public
law school could enjoy the respect
that UFLaw has across the nation
without the strong support of its
alumni. In my first 25 days on the
job, this good sense became a con-
firmed belief; there is nothing more
compelling than alumni receptions
in seven cities across Florida and
visits to more than 50 law graduates'
offices to give me an up-close-and-
personal view of your feelings about
this great law school.
My original feelings about why I
should accept the deanship at the
Levin College of Law have been con-
firmed threefold. I had decided, having
been a dean before and being happy
with my situation at the University of
Missouri, that any opportunity offered
would have to be at a very special place
to convince Lisa and me to leave
Columbia, and move our three chil-
dren to a new community.
I had always respected the law
school at the University of Florida,
but after I was contacted about the
deanship here and agreed to take a
look at it, the more I learned, the
more excited I became. It took less
than 24 hours during Lisa's first trip
to Gainesville for her to be convert-
ed. My talks and visits with you and
my contacts with our exceptional
staff, faculty and students have only
reinforced the wisdom of the move -
and the outstanding future that lies
ahead. I am very proud to say that
the Levin College of Law is now my
academic home.


As we seek to elevate the
College into the ranks of the
nation's finest, there will be both
obstacles and opportunities along
the way:
1) UFLaw is the envy of many
other law schools around the
nation. But, when we realize that
Florida is one of the three or four
largest and most dynamic states in
the nation, it is reasonable to
expect that Florida would have a
law school considered among the


four or five best public law schools
in the nation.
That UFLaw is not consistent-
ly recognized as being comparable
to schools at that level is unaccept-
able. When someone asks, "what
are the very best public law schools
in the nation," the Levin College of
Law should consistently be
mentioned in everyone's answer.
No Florida resident should think
that he or she needs to leave
Florida to get the highest quality
legal education possible.
2) Our current facilities are in
keeping with neither that kind of goal
nor our students' and faculty's needs
or expectations. Our $22+ million
construction project now underway
will substantially alleviate the short-
comings in our facilities and will pro-
vide us a Legal Information Center
and classroom facilities comparable
with any in the country.


3) Last, but certainly not least,
our financing is not at the level of
those law schools connected with
institutions that belong to the
Association of American Universities.
There are many pieces to the
financing puzzle, and I will work hard
to rectify that situation. One piece
involves the percentage of our alumni
who participate in our annual giving
program. Those who give do so
generously, but our participation
percentage last year was about 12-13


percent, below the percentages for not
only the very top public law schools
but also many of our peer institutions
in the Southeast, including some
in Florida.
Elevating the law school
involves pulling many individual
components together.
I will assess my own perform-
ance as your dean, and have so told
the Provost, by our progress
toward essential goals. In giving
you that promise and my commit-
ment of full energy and undivided
attention, I also pledge to do my
best to make sure that the College
is, and will continue to be, worthy
of your continued support.
I look forward to meeting you -
either during one of my trips to a city
near you, or during one of your trips
to Gainesville and the opportunity
to get better acquainted. W


'No Florida resident should think he or

she needs to leave Florida to get the

highest quality legal education possible.'








MUFLAW






Leadership Heritage


EXTENSIVE


Eight graduates of the University of Florida Levin C, 11. g
of Law became presidents of Fbl ,1 i, i g including
UF and one was president of two.
BACKGROUND
The graduates (year of law degree) and their schools:
1. George E Baughman'39
New College of Florida (Sarasota)
2. Stephen C. O'Connell '40
University of Florida
3. Harold B. Crosby'48
Florida International University (Miami)
West Florida University (Pensacola)
4. Wm.Reece Smith Jr.'49
University of South Florida/Interim (Tampa)
5. Marshall M. Criser'51
University of Florida
6. Ray E Ferrero Jr.'60
Nova Southeastern University
(Fort Lauderdale)
7. Talbot"Sandy" D'Alemberte '62
Florida State University (Tallahassee)
8. John Delaney'81
i ,, .C ,. ..I .,t l, Jl t,c l,


-. f i I I ,, .. .. i I 1 I II.t I H i r r
L.t Alt. adl ''h; .' I I '; J .'rll .' Il, i. ,
* ,,11 ... i ,i t,. i i *i, .. i,., ,'t ,, -. l t ,,
1 ., l i ,,,,rt

B AC KG RO UN D
I II. [i| h Ir. .i r | l., r I '! .. .. l. ll, ll,

k1ho kdam S l 1i,. 1.I i ,. I.. ....... t',l', -1

Fillies: I .. 1.1 ... ... [.1i i r ., rl. 's 2


Sixties: Roberts, Campbell Thornal '30, Stephen C.
O'Connell '40, and Richard Ervin '28.
Seventies: Roberts, James Adkins Jr. '38, and Ben
Overton '52.
Eighties: James Alderman '61, Parker McDonald '50,
Raymond Ehrlich '42.
Nineties: Rosemary Barkett'70, and Stephen Grimes'54.
2000: Charles T. Wells '64, and Anstead '63.
Other Gators serving as Justices were David L. McCain
'55 and Paul Barnes '20. At one time in the late 1980's,
five of the seven justices were UF law grads.



Ten graduates of the Levin ( .- _. of Law have
served as deans of law schools, including three who
led their alma mater.
BACKGROUND
Law schools at the universities of St. Thomas, Yeshiva,
Florida State, Stetson, Idaho, Indiana and Toledo have
been headed by UFLaw graduates, as has UF's own law
school. They are:
Jacqueline Allee '78 (St. Thomas, 1987-93);
Lester Brickman '64 (Yeshiva acting dean 1980-82);
i ,II Sd% J"D'AlemberLe 6'o i i '- i *
Brue R. Jlaob. LL.M.'9 i, I ,n lI,. I' .'I. Frank, E
Malone '42, I1F 1,',1 I-' John X."ladk" Miller.
LL.M '87, Il..11, 11 i. Ion M ills '72 I "' 1 ,
'2,,, Sheldon la Plager '58, hI id.l I'). '4
i. lien Sm ilh '48 1.I..to l'I ...., ,i .
Grace \' Bern Ta lor '1 Y .II i i i dc I' ,.





,oII. P.e. i d it


BACKGROUND
The first four presidents of the Florida Bar, the associa
tion of all lawyers licensed by the Florida Supreme
Court, were Gator law grads, as have been 28 others.
They have served in each of the Bar's five decades,
and in the Sixties every president (1960-69) was a UF
graduate. This almost happened again in the
Eighties, when eight of 10 were Gators. As of 2003,
the Bar's active membership is more than 70,000.


Four graduates of the Levin (..C ..FLaw have served
as governors of Florida.

BACKGROUND
UF law grads serving in the state's highest elective office
were Spessard L. Holland'16, 1941 45; Reubin O'D
Askew'56, 1971 79; Lawton M. Chiles Jr.'55, 1991-98;
and Kenneth H."Buddy" MacKay '61, who moved up
from Lieutenant Governor to serve after Chiles' death-in
office. Hundreds of other UFLaw grads served as state
senators and representatives, including Speakers of the
House and Presidents of the Senate, and Bruce Smathers
'70 in 1975-78 was Secretary of State.


b ... I .. I ., ,..... ,. I. I.
* I. .. .. I ... r'. ,., ..,, ..,',., i '. ..I

BACKGROU ND
I.. ,Ir I II .. lh Ti in111 hl,l r .- r-,-c ... l h .1. h
l ', [ ,rr ikli.nl Cheslerfield Smith '46 1I I
\ .Reece Smith Jr. '49 I1 IM.,l Talllbt"Sand'"
D' lemberte'(2 I,91 '." ,in Marthi \V. Barnett
' ........I i l, .h, Ti *-il., Ih l ll l l 'n i' Ti1 Ti1
Ii .... I ,,,, id T. h T... ll I. Ih I1 l ill
t I ,,- I. ,i I, I1 .. II


Non-Profit
Organization
U.S. Postage
PAID
Gainesville, FL
Permit No. 94


El My 1 --*
Afleuurler, *P.rpnestj sl^^^to Jbulurr
Levin College of Law
P.O. Box 117623
Gainesville, FL 32611-7623


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