• TABLE OF CONTENTS
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 Front Cover
 Front Matter
 Table of Contents
 50th Chief Justice
 News
 Alumni
 Partners
 Faculty
 Back Cover






Group Title: UF Law: University of Florida Fredric G. Levin College of Law
Title: UFlaw
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00072634/00001
 Material Information
Title: UFlaw
Alternate Title: UF law
Physical Description: v. : ill. ; 28 cm.
Language: English
Creator: Levin College of Law
Publisher: Levin College of Law Communications Office
Place of Publication: Gainesville FL
Publication Date: c2002-
Frequency: irregular
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Genre: government publication (state, provincial, terriorial, dependent)   ( marcgt )
 Notes
Statement of Responsibility: University of Florida, Levin College of Law.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 39, no. 1 (fall 2002)-
General Note: Title from cover.
General Note: Last issue consulted: v. 40, no. 1 (fall 2003).
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 Related Items
Preceded by: University of Florida lawyer

Table of Contents
    Front Cover
        Front cover
    Front Matter
        Front matter
    Table of Contents
        Table of contents
    50th Chief Justice
        Page 4
        Page 5
        Page 6
    News
        Page 7
        UFLaw remembers 9/11
            Page 7
            Page 8
        'Shadowing'
            Page 9
        Estate abd elder law planning
            Page 10
        The plant 'inventor'
            Page 11
        Strategic plans shaping UFLaw future
            Page 12
            Page 13
        Con'grad'ulations!
            Page 14
            Page 15
        JAG
            Page 16
            Page 17
        State's first music law conference
            Page 18
    Alumni
        Page 19
        Dasburg
            Page 19
        Alumni briefs
            Page 20
        'Dignity in law'
            Page 21
        In memoriam
            Page 22
            Page 23
            Page 24
        Improving servie through technology
            Page 25
        Politics on campus
            Page 26
            Page 27
            Page 28
            Page 29
        Poland
            Page 30
            Page 31
        Philanthropy outlook
            Page 32
    Partners
        Page 33
        Moving toward the Top 10
            Page 33
        Council seeks alumni participation
            Page 34
        David H. Levin
            Page 35
        Reunion brings alumni to campus
            Page 36
        Holland
            Page 37
        Dispute resolution
            Page 38
            Page 39
    Faculty
        Page 40
        Artichokes and lobsters
            Page 40
        Faculty views
            Page 41
        Scholarships and activities
            Page 42
        'Skeletons in the classroom'
            Page 43
            Page 44
            Page 45
            Page 46
            Page 47
            Page 48
            Page 49
            Page 50
        Conferences, symposia, and CLE
            Page 51
            Page 52
        Legal writing
            Page 53
            Page 54
        Closing arguments
            Page 55
    Back Cover
        Page 56
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CONTENTS


FALL 2002 VOLUME 39 ISSUE I


4 Cover Story: Anstead
50th Chief Justice
12 Strategic Planning
Impacts Future
16 JAG Alumni Serve
the Nation
30 Poland American
Firms Benefit From
UFLaw Affiliation
38 Dispute Resolution
Reduces Court Time


32 Philanthropy Outlook
41 Faculty Views
51 Conferences, Symposia
53 Effective Legal Writing
55 Closing Arguments -
Dean's Message


/ News
7 UFLaw Remembers 9/1 I
9 'Shadowing' Benefits Firms, Students
9 Serving The Youngest Clients
10 New Estate and Elder Law Center
II The Plant 'Inventor'
14 Con'grad'ulations
18 Music Conference First in State



19 Alumni
19 Burger Chef to Burger King CEO
20 Briefs
21 'Dignity in Law'
25 LTI Makes Technology Work for Firms
26 Politics on Campus


33


II Plant 'Inventor'


19 Dasburg


Partners
33 Architects Named at Ceremony,
Groundbreaking Set for April
34 Council Seeks Alumni Participation
35 David Levin: A Life for the Law
36 Alums Returns to Campus


40 Grateful Author


40 Faculty
40 'Artichokes and Lobsters'
42 Scholarship & Activities
42 Research Has Practical Applications
43 Skeletons in the Classroom'


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PLN IMATFUUE 1

G UO'tRA1 TISN


9/11 and the Law:

One Year Later



fWE


UFLaw Remembers 9/11
Ceremony Honors Public Safety and Military Service
Personnel Whose Efforts Help Ensure Our Safety


ean Jon Mills (with Associate
Dean Gail Sasnett, inset) began
UFLaw's 9/11 anniversary
ceremonies with these remarks:
"A year ago we stared with disbelief
at the knife edge of evil. When we awoke
from the nightmare, we discovered the
nightmare was true. We cried. We grieved.
And we were angry.
"But that day also awoke other feel-
ings. We rediscovered our passion for
patriotism and freedom. We rediscovered


our feelings for family and home.
"And we rediscovered our pride in
the people who protect our freedom and
our flag our military, our police and
our firefighters.
"We as a college community have
many among us who serve (see below).
We thank them. Each of us as a citizen
and a member of this college community
- now feel more united. We renew our
personal duty to seek justice and to honor
our country. We will meet our promise."

At law school 9/11 ceremonies with Dean Ion Mills
(left) were UFLaw students Christopher O'Neal,
Gainesville Police Department officer; Cpl. Juan
Carlos Tabio, Reservist Marine Corps & Elite 4th
Anglico; 2nd Lt. Tae Shin, Army Infantry; 2nd Lt.
lenelle Donze, Marine Corps; 2nd Lt. lay-lay
janabajal, Marine Corps; 2nd Lt. Courtney Walsh,
Marine Corps; Capt. Matt Brannen, Marine Corps;
Capt. Gregg Fike, U.S. Air Force; Capt. Sean
Boynton, Marine Corps; 2nd Lt. Samuel Londono,
Marine Corps; and Associate Dean Gail Sasnett.


The John Marshall Bar Association
organized a panel discussion, "911
and the Law: One Year Later," to
discuss how the attacks changed
political institutions, media culture,
law enforcement agencies, relations
with foreign countries and legal
systems. Panelists included
Gainesville Sun Editorial Page Editor
Ron Cunningham (left), Senator/
Former State Attorney Rod Smith,
Former Governor Buddy MacKay, JMBA
President and event organizer Chris
Hand (3L), UF Medical Professor Fred
Southwick and UFLaw Professor Nancy
Dowd. u


9/11 DISPLAYS


III \ L S-
Ken Grace 13L) was one of many visirors to
a display by student organizations honoring
citizens of New York and law srudenrs with
pasr or piesent military service.


UFLAW 7








PLN IMATFUUE 1

G UO'tRA1 TISN


9/11 and the Law:

One Year Later



fWE


UFLaw Remembers 9/11
Ceremony Honors Public Safety and Military Service
Personnel Whose Efforts Help Ensure Our Safety


ean Jon Mills (with Associate
Dean Gail Sasnett, inset) began
UFLaw's 9/11 anniversary
ceremonies with these remarks:
"A year ago we stared with disbelief
at the knife edge of evil. When we awoke
from the nightmare, we discovered the
nightmare was true. We cried. We grieved.
And we were angry.
"But that day also awoke other feel-
ings. We rediscovered our passion for
patriotism and freedom. We rediscovered


our feelings for family and home.
"And we rediscovered our pride in
the people who protect our freedom and
our flag our military, our police and
our firefighters.
"We as a college community have
many among us who serve (see below).
We thank them. Each of us as a citizen
and a member of this college community
- now feel more united. We renew our
personal duty to seek justice and to honor
our country. We will meet our promise."

At law school 9/11 ceremonies with Dean Ion Mills
(left) were UFLaw students Christopher O'Neal,
Gainesville Police Department officer; Cpl. Juan
Carlos Tabio, Reservist Marine Corps & Elite 4th
Anglico; 2nd Lt. Tae Shin, Army Infantry; 2nd Lt.
lenelle Donze, Marine Corps; 2nd Lt. lay-lay
janabajal, Marine Corps; 2nd Lt. Courtney Walsh,
Marine Corps; Capt. Matt Brannen, Marine Corps;
Capt. Gregg Fike, U.S. Air Force; Capt. Sean
Boynton, Marine Corps; 2nd Lt. Samuel Londono,
Marine Corps; and Associate Dean Gail Sasnett.


The John Marshall Bar Association
organized a panel discussion, "911
and the Law: One Year Later," to
discuss how the attacks changed
political institutions, media culture,
law enforcement agencies, relations
with foreign countries and legal
systems. Panelists included
Gainesville Sun Editorial Page Editor
Ron Cunningham (left), Senator/
Former State Attorney Rod Smith,
Former Governor Buddy MacKay, JMBA
President and event organizer Chris
Hand (3L), UF Medical Professor Fred
Southwick and UFLaw Professor Nancy
Dowd. u


9/11 DISPLAYS


III \ L S-
Ken Grace 13L) was one of many visirors to
a display by student organizations honoring
citizens of New York and law srudenrs with
pasr or piesent military service.


UFLAW 7





























Brazilian Legal Professionals Visit Campus
In July, Brazilian judges, prosecutors and attorneys attended a week-long summer
program provided by the College of Law Center for Governmental Responsibility (CGR).
The program combined lectures by UFLaw professors with site visits to the court
system, local government agencies and regional resource management agencies. Among
participants were Ana Moura (left), Ruy Alves, Carlos Leprevost, CGR Staff Attorney Tim
McLendon, Diocelia Fivaro, Saint-Clair Honorato Santos, CGR Director of Environmental
Studies Jeff Wade. UFLaw Adjunct Professor Judge William Wagner. Leila Carla Leprevost.
R. Jerome Sanford, Rosana Lima and Robertson Azevedo.


UF Research: Historic
Preservation a Boon to State
Historic preservation helps bring an
additional $4.2 billion a year to the
Florida economy and more than 120,000
jobs a year to Sunshine State workers,
according to a study by researchers in the
Center for Governmental Responsibility.
Commissioned by the Florida
Department of State and conducted by
CGR and Rutgers University's Center for
Urban Policy Research, the study is the
first of its kind in Florida to research the
impact of historical preservation.
"We examined the value of maintain-
ing and renovating historic
properties and sites amidst the
pressures of new develop-
ment," said CGR study
authors JoAnn Klein and .
Timothy McLendon (right).
They also considered direct
and indirect financial impact
of activities, such as rehabili-
tation of historic properties,


heritage tourism, grants, tax incentives,
museum operations and investment in
Florida's Main Street Program.
For more information, go to: www.
!., 1 l t.. II h .. / \ .. I.. ...\ t% I 1 1 i t o il 04,

Law Students UF Leaders
For the first time, r


S3


UF's three most pow-
erful student offices
are held by women.
Two leaders -
2002-03 Honor Court
Chancellor Leslie Press (left) and UF
Student Body President Nikki Fried -
are UFLaw students. (The third, UF
student Kimberly James, is student senate
president.)
Florida History on Web
It may be difficult to imagine, but in
early territorial Florida before it
became a state public divorce proceed-
ings before the Florida Legislature in
Tallahassee's state government buildings
were commonplace.


This is one of many historical tidbits
revealed on the new Florida Historical
Legal Documents Web page, among the
first of its kind in the country and put
together by a UFLaw team.
"If you're interested in
state laws and history, it's
fascinating," says Mae Clark
(right), assistant director of
technical services for the law
school's Legal Information
Center and coordinator of the online
catalog of 1822-1845 Florida laws and
legislative proceedings included in the
Florida Heritage Collection.
"Mae and other of our library person-
nel did an outstanding job on this, which
is another example of how our College of
Law serves all of the people of this state,"
said Betty Taylor, law library director and
professor of law. "Future state funding
would allow Mae and her colleagues to
extend information available into the
1900s."
Visit "Florida Historical Legal
Documents" at http ;,,.ili : i.. 1I .A .1 /.. n .
'Haiti Conflict Resolution'
The Center
for Governmental
Responsibility
(CGR) and Dean
Jon Mills (left,
with Port-au-
Prince law student
Martine Daceus,
Jacmel school principal Eddy Simplice
and Port-au-Prince lawyer Sandra Louis)
hosted 11 Haitian visitors as part of its
Haiti Conflict Resolution Program, spon-
sored by the U.S. Department of State.
The CGR program is in its sixth year.
CGR Development Director JoAnn Klein
and Staff Attorney Tim McLendon coordi-
nated the visitors' two-week visit in
Gainesville and Tallahassee. Haitian par-
ticipants included lawyers, law students,
social workers, educators and community
organizers. Activities included negotiation
and interviewing classes conducted by
Professor Don Peters and visits to the
Florida Legislature and Supreme Court.


8 UFLAW


N EWS


1












'Shadowing'

Innovative Program Benefits Firms, First-Year Students


A unique professional shadowing
program for first-year law stu-
dents developed by the College of
Law and its Career Services office
was formally launched this summer.
Ten students volunteered
July-August at eight
Florida firms to gain ',;
experience and assist
the organizations.
"First-year stu-
dents often are hungry
to get real-world expe- J
rience, but few firms
are ready to hire them
so early in their legal careers," said
Assistant Dean for Career Services
Kathy Urbach, who helped organize
the program.
It is "designed for a student to
follow or 'shadow' key firm attor-
neys and experience their daily rou-
tines," according to student Richard
Weldon of Sarasota, who worked in
Tallahassee at Akerman Sente! fii
during a test run of the program in
Summer 2001.
Akerman Sen e! fi i's Bruce
Culpepper described Weldon as "a
lifesaver. We ended up putting him
on some major projects."
George Moraitis, partner in the
Fort Lauderdale firm Moraitis Cofar
and Karney, which participated in
the 2001 test and this summer's
implementation, said the program is
"a great experience for students, and
certainly beneficial for us."


Moraitis said student Juan Perez
of Fort Lauderdale, who is bilingual,
helped with foreign clients and par-
ticipated in real estate closings.
"This is a win-win situation
where we can provide first-year
students with valuable
practical experience,"
said Dean Jon Mills,
"and participating firms
have an opportunity to
see firsthand the quality
of UFLaw students."
Firms and students
involved this summer:
* Ocala: Siboni Hamer &
Buchanan PA I Barbara Walker
* West Palm Beach: Adams Coogler
Watson et al. I Holly Ann Bower,
Stacy Paige Feingold
* Jacksonville: Corrine Hodak PA I
Geetha Nadiminti
* Coral Gables: George Hartz Lundeen et
al. I JaDawnya Butler, Vanessa Maiorana
* Fort Myers: Geraghty Dougherty
& Edwards I Michele Gazica
* Ft. Lauderdale: Moraitis Cofar
Karney I Heather Runyan
* Tampa: Zinober & McCrea I
Vivianne Grajales
* Miami: Law Offices of Peter
MacNamara I Hollie Noblick
Additional firms participating in
the 2001 pilot were Hoppe Law
Firm, Miami; Morgan Colling &
Gilbert, Orlando; and Zinober &
McCrea PA, Tampa.
Firms interested in being con-
sidered for Summer 2003 should
contact Urbach (352.392.0499). U


Serving The Youngest Clients
according to UFLaw Center for Children and
the Law (CCL) Director Barbara Woodhouse
(center, above), "Children are the least powerful
people, but most in need of high quality advoca-
cy. They depend on adults often lawyers to
vindicate their rights. Each time the system fails a
child, society pays a heavy price in lost human
capital and ruined lives."
To help meet this need, CCL was formed and
Woodhouse a nationally recognized expert in
family and children's law was hired in 2001 to
direct it. Assisting her are UFLaw faculty/Associate
CCL Directors Sharon Rush (left), Iris Burke,
Claudia Wright, Alison Gerencser, Kenneth Nunn,
Christopher Slobogin, Valerie Sanchez, Sherry
Russell-Brown, Nancy Dowd and Mae Clark -
experts in criminal law, juvenile justice, child
development and child issues, conflict resolution
and/or constitutional law.
CCL is playing an integral role in plans for a
"Unified Family Court," recently mandated by the
Florida Supreme Court. It hosted an October
workshop for judges and statewide law faculty to
develop teaching methods reflecting the family-
court model. Florida Supreme Court justice
Barbara Pariente and judge Sandy Karlan, chair of
the Commission on the Legal Needs of Children,
were among those participating.
CCL in March will hold its second annual
conference, "Children, Culture and Violence,"
co-sponsored by UF's Center for Study of
Children's Literature and Media. The event will
explore connections between youth crime and
popular culture.
A UFLaw Family Law Certificate Program
also is now offered, as well as related courses
on Perspectives on the Family, Economics of the
Family, and Child, Parent & State.
For information: www.law.ufl.edu or
http://lic.law.ufl.edul-woodhouse.


UFLAW 9


N EWS


COLLEGE PARTICIPATES IN NATIONAL fl.-F PROGRAM


T he College of Law has joined the network of continuing legal education
(CLE) producers offering courses online through West LegalEdCenter.
Initial UF program offering is the ELECTION 2000 conference. Hundreds of CLE
courses from other law schools are posted, and may be of value for profes-
sional development. For details: www.westlegatedcenter.com/home/home.jsp.




























Estate and Elder Law Planning

New Center Unique in Emphasis on Tax Law


'a6 h here is no similar institute or
center in any state university
system, and it is quite unlikely
T there ever will be," said
Professor C. Douglas Miller, longtime
member of the Graduate Tax Faculty,
director of the Estates and Trusts Practice
Certificate Program, and faculty advisor
to the Estates, Trusts and Elder Law
Society (student organization). Miller
(above, with students), is speaking of


Elderly Impact State Finances
Florida is second only to California
in number of elderly, and at 19 percent
has the highest proportion of any state.
According to a recent study by the
consulting firm Thomas, Warren and
Associates funded by WCI Communities:
The over-50 population in Florida was
5.3 million in 2000, growing by about
I million during the 1990s. More than
half moved to Florida after turning 50.
Seniors provided about $2.7 billion in
economic benefits through sales and
other taxes, while costing the state
about $1.28 billion in health and
human services a net benefit of
$1.4 billion.
Seniors paid $4.4 billion in property
taxes in 1999 47 percent of
Florida's total residential property
taxes.


UFLaw's new Center on Estate and Elder
Law Planning. Under his direction, it will
integrate teaching, training, research,
scholarship and public service. And it will
work closely with the Graduate Tax
Program and develop a relationship with
UF's Center for Gerontological Studies,
which conducts research on aging issues
and draws from faculty in multiple UF
departments.
Tax issues are pervasive in estate and
elder law planning, and no other institu-
tion can offer the participation of the fac-
ulty of a premier tax program. UF's
Graduate Tax Program is ranked in the
top two in the nation.
"Doug has been a leader in our tax
program, and is the perfect choice to head
the new center," said Mike Friel, Grad Tax
Program director and associate dean for
academic affairs. "This center will
address issues of critical importance to
our state's burgeoning elderly population
and the legal profession that serves their
interests."
While estate planning has occupied
the public's attention for more than 50
years, elder law is a new specialty involv-
ing a variety of interdisciplinary issues.
Substantial new legislation has been
directed at seniors, further adding to this
specialty's complexity and importance.
"The center will advance knowledge,
professionalism, skills and policy in these


Centers & Institutes
The Center in Estate and Elder Law
Planning is the latest in innovative cen-
ters and institutes at the College of Law.
These include the Center for Children and
the Law created just last year (see page
9), Center for Governmental
Responsibility the state's premier legal
and public policy research institute,
Institute for Dispute Resolution (page
38), Center for the Study of Race and
Race Relations, and UF Center for
International Financial Crimes Studies.
In addition to these units, the
college also has developed expertise in
a variety of specialized law areas and
curricular concentrations, including
Environmental and Land Use, Intellectual
Property, International, Tax, Children's
and Family Law; and Estates and Trusts
Practice. Visit www.law.ufl.edu for more
information.



key areas and help to educate and train
students and lawyers," said UFLaw Dean
Jon Mills.
Miller said, "The focus of the center
notwithstanding, a lawyer cannot practice
estate planning or elder law without
understanding that the needs of the client
may extend well beyond legal and tax
problems."
Declining mortality rates suggest the
elderly population will more than double
by the year 2050. According to Miller, the
growth of the senior population has had
- and will have a profound effect on
our legal system.
In addition to teaching and research,
the center will sponsor continuing legal
education programs and offer skills train-
ing to professionals. It also will sponsor
annual conferences, and provide commu-
nity service though judicial externship
programs already in place in Ft.
Lauderdale, Gainesville and Tampa -
where students will do pro bono work in
judicial circuit probate divisions. U


10 UFLAW


N EWS











The Plant 'Inventor'

Student Beautifies School, Studies to Seek Infringement Rights


Those returning to UFLaw this fall
found the Schott Courtyard adrift in a
sea of flowers. The blooms are courtesy of
first-year law student Dave Chopin (right),
who donated his patented Crape Myrtles
and is maintaining them as well. He made
the gift after noticing the courtyard
"lacked color."
A 25-year veteran of the nursery busi-
ness, Chopin was the first in the U.S. to
miniaturize the Myrtle, and holds seven
patents. His "Dwarfs" range from five to
15 feet, while his "Miniatures" are below
five feet and make impressive hedges,
covers and hanging plants. Chopin's cre-
ations were named the Official Plant of
the 1984 World's Fair and have been fea-
tured in publications such as Southern
Living and Florida Agriculture.
Chopin moved to Gainesville in 1998,
and decided to apply to law school after
his patents fell prey to infringement.


UF was the natural choice, he said,
"because our law school is Florida's best,
and UF is the South's leading university
for agricultural studies."
Chopin also plans to pursue a
Certificate in Intellectual Property. UF is
the only law school in the Southeast with
an Intellectual Property (IP) program,
which focuses on patents, trade secrets,
copyrights and trademarks. When he grad-
uates, he may be the first horticulturist-
lawyer in the state.
"With expertise in both horticulture
and patent law, Dave can make valuable
contributions to both fields," commented
IP Director Thomas Cotter.
Chopin has six employees who run
his nursery operation a primarily mail-
order business (www., .. .i.. .I I i.. ., ....)
that serves customers across the U.S. -
while he attends law school. U


UFLAW I I


N EWS













Strategic Plans Shaping UFLaw Future

Needed: Higher Tuition, Increased Alumni Participation, Out-of-State Students


efforts earlier this year, the future
of the Levin College of Law has
been brought more clearly into
focus. And it looks something like this:
* Achieve recognition as a
Top 10 public law school.
* Improve efficiency and effectiveness
in resource utilization.
* Increase resources.
* Improve quality of education for
students and quality and quantity of
scholarship and public service.

Those are among major aspects of the
College of Law future as determined by
both the school's own Strategic Plan
Steering Committee appointed by Dean
Jon Mills and in information provided to
University of Florida President Charles
Young's Presidential Task Force on the
Future of UF (see story page 13).
Headed by Gerald A. Sohn Scholar
and Professor of Law Jeffrey Davis (left
above, with committee member/Director
of Research & Writing and Appellate
Advocacy Henry Wihnyk), the steering
committee identified changes needed in


the structure and functioning of the
law school in order to adequately
prepare students to meet demands
of a changing profession and its
shifting client demographics, serve
the state and its constituents, and
join the nation's Top 10 public law
schools.
The committee also empha-
sized the importance of increasing
financial resources of the law
school to provide necessary funding to
implement these and future improve-
ments.
"This strategic plan represents an
imaginative and innovative vision by our
faculty," Mills said. "We are pleased we
reached agreement on where we will be in
10 years and on what we need to be one
of the best law schools in the United
States."
Among recommendations, as
affirmed by law school faculty this spring:

* Raise tuition to approximately the
mean of Association of American
Universities public law schools, and
increase resources for recruiting
entering students.


ABA/AALS Accreditation, Conformity Review Visits
The American Bar Association (ABA) and Association of
American Law Schools (AALS) will send representatives to the
law school next spring as part of the ABA accreditation
process and AALS review for conformity.
The ABA requires an assessment of current programs and blueprint for the
future, with input from faculty, students, alumni and local bench and bar. At the
request of Dean Jon Mills, faculty members Alyson Flournoy (chair), Jeffrey Davis,
George Dawson, Mike Seigel, Christopher Slobogin, Betty Taylor, Barbara Bennett
Woodhouse and Patrick Shannon will serve on a Self-Study Committee responsible
for providing the information.
"This is a timely opportunity for the law school, and will build on the solid
foundation created by Jeff Davis' Strategic Planning Committee," said Flournoy. "We
began intense work in August and are now soliciting input from alumni, faculty, staff
and students for a report to be presented for faculty review in January."


* Reduce student-teacher ratio.
* End twice-a-year admissions by
eliminating spring entering classes.
* Dramatically increase efforts to seek
financial support from the 87
percent of alumni who do not
participate.
* Review school's "signature" and
other special programs to improve
or eliminate where necessary.
* Develop high-quality litigation/skills
program.
* Increase out-of-state admissions.
"Our tuition for in-state residents
ranks among the lowest in the nation,"
Davis said. "We anticipate some of the
increased resources could be used to pro-
vide scholarships to needy students poten-
tially disadvantaged by higher tuition."
Serving with Davis were Levin
Mabie & Levin Professor of Law Berta
Hemandez-Truyol, Irving Cypen
Professor of Law Sharon Rush, then-
Associate Dean for Academic Affairs
Mike Seigel and Wihnyk.
The group spent six months develop-
ing recommendations and proposals, and
then went to small group faculty sessions
to discuss and revise the report before its
April approval by all faculty.
"A true indicator of how seriously we
took this assignment is the overall facul-
ty's agreement that we will seek to


12 UFLAW


N EWS











improve our own effectiveness by experi-
menting with flexible productivity stan-
dards," Davis said, pointing out a key
proposed change is elimination of spring
admissions, with the faculty directing the
administration to study all aspects of such
a move anticipated to take effect after
Spring 2005.
"This could further improve the qual-
ity and education of our single entering
class, which would average about 300
admissions compared to 400 total fall and
spring enrollment," Davis continued.
Inherent in the committee's recom-
mendations is the assumption UFLaw's
physical facilities would be expanded as
previously announced. (Seepage 33).
"It is exciting and rewarding that one
of the best and most loyal group of law
faculty in the nation have come together
to agree on what needs to be done to
move the flagship law school in this state
well along the path to even greater
accomplishments in the 21st Century,"
Mills said. U

For a copy of the complete Strategic
Plan Steering Committee report, go to
ww' /.I i il,..Ii/news/strategic.shtml/.




CHARACT: ERISTICS~l OF [l
ll0'TO I1[0' LAWt'l SCHOOLS]


I . I


Road Map to

the Top 10

early in 2002, as College of Law facul-
ty and staff were developing their
own strategic plans for the nation's
I I th largest law school (see adjacent
story). President Charles Young asked
UF college deans to make recommenda-
tions on how their units could best
enhance UF's achievements, advance its
reputation and raise it to one of the
country's top educational institutions.
In Young's "Strategic Approach to
Accomplish University Goals and Long
Term Success," announcing formation of
his Task Force on the Future of the
University of Florida, he singled out the
law school as one of the UF colleges
that has "played an important role in
addressing the needs of the state and
advancing its interests."
Young also said that the law school
remains critical to UF's future, and "we
clearly must maintain and strengthen
the program of this college."
In response to Young's assignment,
Dean Jon Mills and then-Associate Dean
for Academic Affairs Michael Seigel in
February provided an I I-page report to
the Task Force. Among highlights:
t*The College of Law has taken
significant steps in many cutting-edge
areas, including globalization, interdisci-
plinary study, specialization, faculty
research and scholarship, and clinical
and skills training.
Among main contributors to the
excellent reputation of the law school
are Graduate Tax, Center for Children
and the Law, Institute for Dispute


Lc'jl Inlorniali[,o
Cenictr Dirc.ior _e[i
-IylIor liielh .-,Li.jitlt
Dirci or ki,
orc.rcilVI IL onL c cI
ti'h l .:ulIy h\o 'ill
sIcp ,LJdli Lor rcIlrc iri
2Lul'.. The iollcee
ntcd, addJitlr,al
Ijuliv jr.J rfri ,
lor ...*.mpcinlvc 31jrlc,
rincded to hire 1t.c
ber


Resolution, Gator TeamChild,
International Programs, and Certificate
Programs for Environmental and Land
Use, Intellectual Property, Estates and
Trusts, and International and
Comparative Law.
Resources needed to continue our
climb into the ranks of Top 10 public
law schools which would place
UFLaw in the Top 25 of all U.S. colleges
of law include:
Additional support to build new
and upgrade current facilities and
technology, fund competitive faculty
and support staff salaries, hire faculty
in priority areas, and add support
personnel for student services (includ-
ing Career Services and financial aid),
development, admissions, communica-
tions and faculty support.
We also must increase endowments
for chairs, professorships and priority
academic programs, and raise tuition to
reasonable levels and use the additional
dollars for program enhancements.**

NOTE: Complete text of the report to
President Young and his Task Force
available at www.ufl.edulnews/
strategic.shtml.


MAJOR NEW TRENDS AMONG LAW SCHOOLS
The College of Law report to the UF Presidential Task Force identifies eight
important trends among U.S. law schools, impacting students and facultylstaff,
with UFLaw having made progress in four:
I. International Focus and Programming 5. Clinical and Skills Teaching
2. Interdisciplinary Approaches to Law 6. Technology Upgrades
3. Specialization 7. Loan Forgiveness
4. Reduced Course Loads and 8. Associate Dean for Scholarship and
Frequent Research Leaves Faculty Development


UFLAW 13


N W





UF BOARD OF TRUSTEES CHAIR/FORMER UF PRESIDENT
MARSHALL CRISER ADDRESSES 2002 GRADUATING CLASS

Con'grad'ulations!


14 UFLAW


N EWS

















































--


UFLAW 15


SPIN 202CLSSS~S IG MRK



















f Alumni Serve Nation in U.S. Military

* Judge Advocate General Corps

During the Gulf War in 1991, two young Black Muslim seamen -
James Moss and apprentice Abdul Shaheed on the aircraft carrier
U.S.S. Ranger were accused of sabotage and plotting to take over the
ship on behalf of Iraqi President Saddam Hussein. UFLaw alumnus
Brendan Ward (JD 87) was the only person standing between Moss, 21,
and Shaheed, 22, and life behind bars. Ward meticulously researched the
situation and built a case to combat the mutiny charges.
"The case received worldwide publicity and was
the subject of numerous articles in national and inter-
national newspapers," Ward says. "We were able to F *
successfully attack the credibility of the sole witness .
against the sailors and charges were dismissed before .
trial."
This may sound like a plot from the popular TV
show JAG, but the story is real, and Ward is just one
of many UFLaw alumni serving in the U.S. Military JAG Judge
Advocate General's Corps. Another is Col. Charles Dorman, USMC
(JD 73, see inset t,. i assistant judge advocate general of the Navy for
Military Justice.
JAG attorneys serve as prosecutors and defense attorneys for crimi-
nal trials under the Uniform Code of Military Justice. They also practice
civil law, including international, operational, personnel and administra-
tive law. But unlike civilian lawyers, their roles stretch far beyond the
courtroom as they also play a vital role in the defense of our nation.
They provide legal and ethical advice to commanding officers, help draft
rules of engagement and act as sounding boards for operational ideas.
"Commanders often look to JAG officers to provide them with a dif-
ferent angle of attack on a problem and to comment on or 'sanity check'
ideas and courses of action that others may have come up with in a plan-
ning process," explains Ward, most recently chief of the Operational
Law Division for U.S. Forces Korea. Now from Ft. Myers, Ward grew
up in Montclair, NJ. His wife, Lea, is a businesswoman.
"It has been exciting to be part of the team that
stands at the forefront of protecting our country,"
says Jack McDonald (JD 84), legal advisor to the
commander of the U.S. Navy's Submarine Force in
the Pacific. A Cincinnati native who grew up in
Lakeland, he is married to Karen Niemantsverdriet
McDonald, a commander in the Nurse Corps of the
U.S. Navy and family nurse practitioner assigned to
the Medical Clinic at Pearl Harbor.


I


An aircraft returns to base after a joint U.S./New Zealand
operation to resupply stations in Antartica.
U.S. Air Force photo.








"I am first and foremost a naval offi-
cer," said McDonald. "My fellow officers
drive ships and submarines or fly aircraft.
I practice law. As a naval officer, I have
sworn to protect and defend the
Constitution and the country whose
course it directs. I can think of no better
way to protect and defend the
Constitution than through the defense of
sailors prosecuted under the Uniform
Code of Military Justice, the enforcement
of laws, and legal advice to military
commanders carrying out our mission
of defending the United States."
Since Sept. 11, the JAG Corps serv-
ice to country has grown in meaning and
importance to others, particularly to law
students considering alternative careers.
One perk of being a JAG officer is
the immediacy with which young lawyers
are asked to practice.
"I went right into the courtroom in
the Navy and gained invaluable experi-
ence as a litigator," McDonald says. "I
was trying cases three days a week as
compared to classmates who had been to
court three times as second chair for an
appearance in the same 24 months."
Jennifer
Blazewick of
Nashville, TN,
graduated from UF's
College of Law just
five years ago and
already has a wealth
of experience. She is
now a lieutenant stationed in Naples,
Italy. Her husband is Commander Robert
Blazewick, JAGC, USN, also a JAG attor-
ney, and staff judge advocate for the com-
mander, Fleet Air Mediterranean.
"I am a legal assistance attorney, but
have had the opportunity to do defense
cases in Sigonella and onboard the U.S.S.
Kitty Hawk in the Arabian Sea,"
Blazewick says. "It was fun to fly to the
Kitty Hawk, meet my client, and go to
court three days later.
"Soon I'll be in Kosovo, where I'll
do basic work, brief soldiers on rules of
engagement, and possibly be involved in
investigating war crimes. Other attorneys
who have gone have done everything
from examining crops damaged by NATO
for claims purposes to investigating bat-


tery factories for violations of environ-
mental laws."
Another JAG perk is variety. After
16 years in the Corps, Ward who has
traveled with the Navy to 25 countries
throughout the world has had adven-
tures difficult to imagine in the civilian
world.
"I traveled to Kyrgyzstan as part of a
Defense Department team whose role
is to train leaders in newly emerging
democracies about our military justice
system in 1997," he says. "I hosted
contingents in the United States from
Moldova and Mongolia. I survived the
eruption of Mt. Pinatubo in the
Philippines as well as six coup attempts,
numerous typhoons, worker strikes and
assassinations of Americans. I've taken
off and landed as a passenger, for sure
- on an aircraft carrier many times. I've
flown in tons of helicopters. I've gotten
picked up and dropped off from a heli-
copter to a ship by a winch. I've had a
piece of the fuselage pop off a helicopter
in mid-flight, then had the crew chief of


the helo tell us the flight records for that
aircraft go back to 1964 and detail many,
many bullet holes repaired during the
Vietnam war. I would not have traded this
for anything. It's the greatest experience
in the world."
UFLaw alumni in the JAG Corps
fondly recall their "Gator roots."
Attending UF's College of Law prepared
Ward, McDonald, Blazewick and their
colleagues for life in the JAG Corps in
more ways than one, they say.
"I think UF has a nice balance
between teaching the practical and the
theoretical, which is great for a young
attorney who has to take care of clients
right away," Blazewick says.
To Ward, UF's role was even more
profound.
"The training at UF emphasized the
importance of truthfulness, ethics and
devotion to concepts of fairness and
justice," Ward says. "These are exactly
the same characteristics and qualities
that make an individual a successful
JAG Corps and military officer." U


UFLAW 17


Gator Earns Top Navy Post

olonel Charles Dorman, USMC OD ......... convictions, and wrote
C 73), is now assistant judge advocate more than 900 opinions.
general of the Navy for Military justice, His personal decorations
serving as principal legal advisor to the include Legion of Merit
judge advocate general for Navy and (two gold stars) and
Marine Corps military justice/criminal medals for Meritorious
law matters. He oversees policy relating Service (three gold
to military trial, defense and appellate stars), Navy Commendation, joint Services
counsel, and trial and appellate judges Achievement and Military Outstanding
concerning courts-martial and related Volunteer Service.
proceedings at commands worldwide. A native of Jacksonville, he earned
Dorman was commissioned in 1970 his undergraduate (BA 70, history/politi-
through the PLC Graduate Studies cal science) and JD from UF, and Master
Program, and has been on active duty of Laws (LLM 80, labor law, with highest
since September 1973 as a Marine judge honors) from George Washington
advocate in the U.S. and Japan. University. At UF he served in leadership
Immediately prior to his current post, roles for the Student Senate, Honor
Dorman served as senior judge, Navy- Court, Interhall Council and Florida Blue
Marine Corps Court of Criminal Appeals. Key Speakers, among others. He and wife
While on the appellate bench, he partici- Mariellen have four children: Alicia (22),
pated in review of over 1,700 criminal Chad (20), Danielle (18) and James (14).


























State's First Music Law Co
STUDENT-INITIATED/PRODUCEC


nferenc
EVENT


BRINGS 'ENTERTAINMENT' TO CAMPUS

A UFLaw student organization capital- Composers,
ized on Gainesville's reputation as an national en
incubator for aspiring musicians by host- and produce
ing the state's first Music Law Conference tured was E
in October. Leading American entertain- UFLaw Cei
ment professionals and some of Florida's Race Relati
most noted new bands participated in two Marley, anc
days of performances and panels on criti- the Entertai
cal issues in music and music law. section of 7
"Discussion of Internet music issues assisted wit
was critical, including protection of music
online and who controls online music dis-
tribution and 'FLORID
money collec-
tion," said Gro'
Brian Mencher from aro
1/, (2L, left) of the practitio
Entertainment, cuss lan
Art and Sports Florida a
S Law Society. second R
SMencher Symposil
organized the Beyond:
i event with help focused
from more Georgia;
than 30 student and Eurc
volunteers. He noted Gainesville's history deputy s
as a launching pad for such nationally Schneide
known performers as Sister Hazel, Less assistant
Than Jake and Tom Petty, plus the intel- Sheryll C
lectual property and Internet law expertise Rich
of the college's faculty "made this a logi- annual s
cal setting for this unique event." Governm
"Certainly no other field of entertain- Local Go
ment is now as legally involved as the and honi
music industry," said UFLaw Dean Jon


Mills, "and we're
pleased our students
found an innovative,
creative way to focus
widespread attention
on this important
national topic. The
conference showed
initiative and creativ-
ity on the part of the
students who organ-
ized it."
Speakers includ-
.e ed keynoter Todd
Brabec, executive
vice president of the
American Society of
,Authors and Publishers;
*ertainment lawyer Peter Laird;
er Tony Bongiovi. Also fea-
)esta Meghoo-Peddie of the
enter for the Study of Race and
ons and manager for Rita
1 Louis Tertocha, chairman of
nment, Art and Sports Law
'he Florida Bar which
h coordination.


Gainesville lawyer/club owner turned
Los Angeles entertainment lawyer Laird,
who represents acts including Bon Jovi,
Prince, Dolly Parton and Bette Midler,
told students, "You must learn how the
industry and laws have evolved and
where they are heading. The days of self-
contained artists, such as the Beatles or
Bob Dylan, are over."
Producer and 35-year industry
veteran Bongiovi, said, "Today, music is
the least important part. It's all about the
business, and lawyers are essential."
Bongiovi has contributed to more
than 40 gold and platinum records for
artists such as Aerosmith, Stevie Wonder
and Talking Heads.
Brabec oversees ASCAP's member-
ship division and is co-author of Music,
Money and Success.
More than 25 musical groups and
soloists from across Florida performed at
multiple Gainesville clubs and locations
during the two days, while panels
explored topics such as recording
contracts, intellectual property, taxes,
deals, negotiations and ethics. U


A GROWTH IMPLICATIONS' SUBJECT OF NELSON SYMPOSIUM
wth management experts
und the nation met with
ners in September to dis-
d use and growth issues in
*nd the United States. The
ichard E. Nelson
um. "Smart Growth and
Lessons for Florida,"
on topics such as approaches to smart growth in Canada, Maryland and
American anti-terrorist planning and design strategies: land use and race:
opean growth experiences. Featured speakers included Ronald Young. former
secretary or the Maryland Department of Planning: Professor Richard H.
vr UF Department of Urban and Regional Planning; Mary Jane Angelo. senior
General counsel, St. Johns River Water Management District: and Professor
:ashin. Georgetown University Law Center.
ard Nelson and his wife, Jane. created an endowment to help fund the
ymposiums co-sponsored this year by The Florida Bar Sections on Local
ent and Environmental & Land Use and establish the Nelson Chair in
vernment. Richard is a longtime former Sarasota County attorney recognized
ored for his many contributions to local government law.


18 UFLAW


N EWS



















Dasburg

From Burger Bill Chef to Burger King CEO


W hen John Dasburg (JD 73) was cooking up burgers as
a short-order chef at the now-defunct Burger Bill's
restaurant on Gainesville's University Avenue in the
1960s, he never dreamed his future would revolve around beef
patties.
After all, Dasburg, a charismatic overachiever who had
grown up in Miami, was an industrial engineering student at
the University of Florida, and he had big dreams for his future.
"I was inspired by Sputnik, and all the things going on at
that time made engineering seem like an exciting and lucrative
field," he says.
Soon after graduating, the Vietnam War took hold of the
country, and Dasburg went off to serve three years in the Navy.
By the time he got out, his engi-
neering degree had lost value. "In law school, yoi
"Engineers everywhere type of thinking. Y
were being laid off," he says.
"There was just no postwar deductive and infe
need for them."
So Dasburg, an avid Gator fan who enjoyed his UF under-
graduate years, used the GI bill to return to his alma mater. In a
year, he earned his MBA, and then deviating even further
from his original engineering path earned a UF law degree.
Almost three decades later, he's back where he started in
the burger business, though a bit higher up on the chain than at
Burger Bill's. After serving as president of the Marriott Lodging
Group and CEO of Northwest Airlines, Dasburg was hired in
2001 as chairman, president and CEO of Burger King Corp.
Under his direction, Burger King has begun to change its
image and increase its market share. With the help of a
Shaquille O'Neal advertising campaign, Burger King has
become hipper, and the food has improved, Dasburg says. Since
he's taken the reins, the chain has introduced a milkshake made
from real ice cream, a "Chicken Whopper," improved fries and
onion rings, a chicken Caesar salad, low-fat mayonnaise and
better garnishes for the Whopper burger.
And thanks to earlier Dasburg business connections when
he headed Northwest Airlines with Texas Pacific Group, a
private investment firm security analysts and BK franchises
who own 92 percent of the company's restaurants now see an
even brighter financial future for the world's second-largest fast-


U

Ye


food chain. Texas Pacific this July outbid six other entities and
paid $2.26 billion to buy Burger King from Diageo P.L.C., the
British liquor giant that had owned BK since 1997.
Analysts indicate the Texas Pacific ownership, which plans
to keep Dasburg and BK's current management team, "will go a
long way toward stabilizing the company and reinvigorating its
business."
Dasburg credits much of his success to his days at the
University of Florida.
"You learn a lot about how to think in undergraduate
school, since so many of the subjects are quantitative, cause and
effect, relationship driven, which helps one think that way in
his/her career. And in business school, you learn the foundations
and fundamentals of business.
learn another "In law school, you learn anoth-
)u learn to have er type of thinking," he says. "You
learn to have deductive and inferen-
ential skills." tial skills. You learn precise and
inferential thinking. Not a day goes
by that I do not benefit from my time at UF's law school."
A member of UF's Board of Trustees, Dasburg remains
attached to his alma mater and enjoys rooting for the Gators.
Wife Mary Lou (JD 80) is also a graduate, so being a Gator
is a family affair. Mary Lou worked and helped put her husband
through law school in the early 70s; when he got out, he helped
put her through school.
They have had three children, Meredith Anne, John Peter
and Kathryn Anne. Meredith Anne, born in 1982, was killed in
a schoolbus accident when she was just six.
"Everyone carries a bag of cement," Dasburg says. "Some
are just heavier than others. That was a long year. It was a
nightmare."
The Dasburgs live in Key Biscayne, and in his spare time
Dasburg enjoys all types of fishing and high-altitude mountain-
and ice-climbing, and has climbed Africa's Mt. Kilimanjaro
twice. He is, however, adamant about the value of work and
insists he's only taking time off for leisure now because he's
worked so hard for years.
"My view has been that at first, you work as hard as you
can, and play is for losers," he laughs. "But when you get older,
play as hard as you can. Work is for losers." :


UFLAW 19



















Dasburg

From Burger Bill Chef to Burger King CEO


W hen John Dasburg (JD 73) was cooking up burgers as
a short-order chef at the now-defunct Burger Bill's
restaurant on Gainesville's University Avenue in the
1960s, he never dreamed his future would revolve around beef
patties.
After all, Dasburg, a charismatic overachiever who had
grown up in Miami, was an industrial engineering student at
the University of Florida, and he had big dreams for his future.
"I was inspired by Sputnik, and all the things going on at
that time made engineering seem like an exciting and lucrative
field," he says.
Soon after graduating, the Vietnam War took hold of the
country, and Dasburg went off to serve three years in the Navy.
By the time he got out, his engi-
neering degree had lost value. "In law school, yoi
"Engineers everywhere type of thinking. Y
were being laid off," he says.
"There was just no postwar deductive and infe
need for them."
So Dasburg, an avid Gator fan who enjoyed his UF under-
graduate years, used the GI bill to return to his alma mater. In a
year, he earned his MBA, and then deviating even further
from his original engineering path earned a UF law degree.
Almost three decades later, he's back where he started in
the burger business, though a bit higher up on the chain than at
Burger Bill's. After serving as president of the Marriott Lodging
Group and CEO of Northwest Airlines, Dasburg was hired in
2001 as chairman, president and CEO of Burger King Corp.
Under his direction, Burger King has begun to change its
image and increase its market share. With the help of a
Shaquille O'Neal advertising campaign, Burger King has
become hipper, and the food has improved, Dasburg says. Since
he's taken the reins, the chain has introduced a milkshake made
from real ice cream, a "Chicken Whopper," improved fries and
onion rings, a chicken Caesar salad, low-fat mayonnaise and
better garnishes for the Whopper burger.
And thanks to earlier Dasburg business connections when
he headed Northwest Airlines with Texas Pacific Group, a
private investment firm security analysts and BK franchises
who own 92 percent of the company's restaurants now see an
even brighter financial future for the world's second-largest fast-


U

Ye


food chain. Texas Pacific this July outbid six other entities and
paid $2.26 billion to buy Burger King from Diageo P.L.C., the
British liquor giant that had owned BK since 1997.
Analysts indicate the Texas Pacific ownership, which plans
to keep Dasburg and BK's current management team, "will go a
long way toward stabilizing the company and reinvigorating its
business."
Dasburg credits much of his success to his days at the
University of Florida.
"You learn a lot about how to think in undergraduate
school, since so many of the subjects are quantitative, cause and
effect, relationship driven, which helps one think that way in
his/her career. And in business school, you learn the foundations
and fundamentals of business.
learn another "In law school, you learn anoth-
)u learn to have er type of thinking," he says. "You
learn to have deductive and inferen-
ential skills." tial skills. You learn precise and
inferential thinking. Not a day goes
by that I do not benefit from my time at UF's law school."
A member of UF's Board of Trustees, Dasburg remains
attached to his alma mater and enjoys rooting for the Gators.
Wife Mary Lou (JD 80) is also a graduate, so being a Gator
is a family affair. Mary Lou worked and helped put her husband
through law school in the early 70s; when he got out, he helped
put her through school.
They have had three children, Meredith Anne, John Peter
and Kathryn Anne. Meredith Anne, born in 1982, was killed in
a schoolbus accident when she was just six.
"Everyone carries a bag of cement," Dasburg says. "Some
are just heavier than others. That was a long year. It was a
nightmare."
The Dasburgs live in Key Biscayne, and in his spare time
Dasburg enjoys all types of fishing and high-altitude mountain-
and ice-climbing, and has climbed Africa's Mt. Kilimanjaro
twice. He is, however, adamant about the value of work and
insists he's only taking time off for leisure now because he's
worked so hard for years.
"My view has been that at first, you work as hard as you
can, and play is for losers," he laughs. "But when you get older,
play as hard as you can. Work is for losers." :


UFLAW 19











Alumni Briefs

SEND US YOUR NEWS
Colleagues, friends and fellow alumni
enjoy reading news of career changes,
marriages, births and other notable events.
Share them via letter (address on back
cover), e-mail (F!. /i. /. ii ,il ... i),
news release or the Web (submission form
at wwv :I /.I itl ...1, .,lit i.,, And please
notify us if your address changes.

1948
The American Judicature Society has given
its 2002 Justice Award, recognizing a life-
time dedication to improvements in the
administration of justice, to Chesterfield
Smith, one of four Gators to serve as presi-
dent of the American Bar Association in the
last 30 years.

1957
Robert P. Smith has opened a practice in
Tallahassee, and will concentrate in trial and
appellate advocacy. Smith formerly was
with Hopping Green Sams & Smith, and
prior to that served as Court of Appeal
judge, First District.

1963
SI W.O. Birchfield has joined
Lewis Longman & Walker,
PA, in Jacksonville. His
practice includes mediation,
eminent domain, govern-
mental and land use law.
Birchfield earlier served
two terms in the Florida
House of Representatives


and was a member of the Jacksonville
Transportation Authority (eight years) and
Jacksonville Florida Bar's 2002 G. Port
Authority (four).

S Larry S. Stewart (LLB) of
Stewart Tilghman Fox &
Bianchi PA in Miami, was
awarded the Kirk Hass
Humanitarian Award for his
work as president of Trial
Lawyers Care. TLC is a
national legal pro bono
program established to aid victims/victims'
families of Sept. 11. Stewart also received
the Association of Trial Lawyers of America
2002 Leonard M. Ring Champion of Justice
Award in recognition of his lifetime com-
mitment to civil justice and his contributions
to the public good and welfare and to the
legal profession.

1965
Ben H. Hill III was elected 12th president
of the Florida Supreme Court Historical
Society, a non-profit organization founded
to preserve judicial history and educate
citizens about the importance of the third
branch of government. Hill is president and
senior trial attorney at Tampa's Hill Ward &
Henderson firm.

Sidney A. Stubbs was board certified as a
trial advocate by the National Board of Trial
Advocacy.


1968
William L. "Bud" Kirk Jr., founding part-
ner in the Orlando office of Rumberger Kirk
& Caldwell, recently was appointed to the
Supreme Court Committee on Appointment
and Assignment of Senior Judges. National
Law Journal in 1999 listed Kirk among its
top 10 Florida Civil Litigators.

Dr. Andy Sheldon and his Atlanta-based
trial consulting firm, Sheldon Associates,
were used by prosecutors to evaluate the
jury pool and assist in jury selection in the
high profile, Birmingham, Ala., case against
Frank Cherry (1963 murder of four girls)
and in a prior case against Cherry's co-
conspirator, Thomas Blanton. Both defen-
dants were found guilty. Sheldon's firm has
provided consulting services in a number of
major Civil Rights murder cases, and ABC
News' Nightline in May profiled Sheldon's
work.

1971
Self-employed Miami attor-
ney Glenn Terry directed
S Miami's first water festival,
.- A. "WaterFest 2002." Terry
S founded in 1982 and served
as executive director of
Coconut Grove's "King
Mango iiiI^ a zany
annual spoof of the former
Orange Bowl parade.

Wayne Lee Thomas, sole
Practitioner and certified
mediator in Tampa, is listed
as one of "The Best
Lawyers In America,"
business litigation category,
2001-02 edition.

J. Maxwell Williams is co-chair of
American Public Power Association's Legal
Conference, an annual meeting of public
utility executives and attorneys to be held in
Savannah. He is vice-president/general
counsel for Memphis Light, Gas & Water in
Tennessee. His practice areas include energy
and environmental law, corporate legislation
and ADR.


20 UFLAW


ALUMNI












Steven J. Uhlfelder resigned as a partner at
Holland & Knight to open his own firm. He
will continue to represent many existing
clients, including American Express
Corporation and Pearson Education, the
firm that administers FCAT student assess-
ment tests to Florida public school students.
President George W. Bush appointed
Uhlfelder to serve on the prestigious J.
William Fulbright Foreign Scholarship
Board for a three-year term ending in 2004.
He serves on the Florida State University
Board of Trustees, was a member and past
chair of the Florida Board of Regents, and
is co-chair of Governor Jeb Bush's
Mentoring Initiative.

1972
Cesar Alvarez, chief executive officer of
Greenberg Traurig, was named Lawyer of
the Year by the Hispanic Bar Association
honoring him for outstanding contributions
to the legal profession and the Hispanic
community. Alvarez is the first Cuban-
American lawyer to receive the award since
its inception four years ago. He is credited
with building Greenberg Traurig into a
national firm of more than 800 lawyers with
lobbyists in 17 cities.

S G. Thomas Ball, managing
partner of Baker &
Hostetler LLP in Orlando,
has been named to the
firm's 14-member Policy
S Committee. Ball concen-
trates in corporate and part-
nership governance, merg-
ers and acquisitions, commercial matters,
real estate and domestic relations.

Hal H. Kantor, shareholder with the
Orlando firm of Lowndes Drosdick Doster
Kantor & Reid PA, was named to the Board
of Trustees of the University of Florida Law
Center Association. Kantor concentrates in
the areas of real estate, land use and zoning
with an emphasis on general business law
and commercial development. He currently
serves as president of the Orlando Museum
of Art, trustee of Rollins College Hamilton
Holt School, and member of the City of
Winter Park Economic Development and
Public Facilities task forces.


'Dignity in Law'
CAMPAIGN UNDERWAY PROMOTING PROFESSION'S POSITIVE IMPACT


T he Florida Bar recognized achievements
of former UF football players now
practicing attorneys during the
September Gators vs. University of Miami
game as part of its "Dignity in Law" cam-
paign, a statewide effort to publicize the
positive impact of the legal profession and
good works of lawyers and judges. Florida
Bar President Tod Aronovitz and Dean Jon
Mills during an on-field presentation recog-
nized eight of more than 50 former UF foot-
ball players who went on to become lawyers:
David Bludworth (D 64), Defensive Back
Bruce Culpepper (JD 66), 1962 Captain
Brad Culpepper (JD 01), Defensive Tackle
Broughton Lang (D 91), Wide Receiver
Tony Leon (D 92), Defensive Back
William Lewis Lee Jr. (D 70), Center
Wayne McCall (D 72), Linebacker
Mathew Earl Morrall (D 81), Center
The Bar also showcased in a special
gameday exhibit the UFLaw Center on


Children and the Law and Gator TeamChild
to demonstrate how the legal profession
contributes to society. According to a recent
American Bar Association survey, the profes-
sion is among the least reputed institutions
in America, ranking only above the media in
consumer confidence.
"Distrust for lawyers and judges has
reached such vast proportions that it is
turning people away from the legal system,
and that is a dangerous trend for all
Floridians," said Aronovitz, a leading trial
lawyer and managing partner of the Miami-
based firm Aronovitz Trial Lawyers.
The Dignity in Law campaign is an
unprecedented undertaking by The Florida
Bar and its 70,000 members to improve
their profession's reputation. Its 2001
Member Opinion Survey shows the majority
of Florida Bar members believe public educa-
tion is the most important issue facing the
profession.
"While a handful of high profile cases
and some television and movie portrayals
have eroded confidence in the legal system,
the reality is Florida has some of the best
lawyers and judges in the nation, whose
good work goes unnoticed," said Aronovitz.
"We are collecting their stories and bringing
them to Floridians."


UFLAW 21


ALUMNI


































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22 UFLAW











James F. Page Jr., shareholder with
GrayHarris in Orlando, recently was elected
to the Orange County Bar Association
Executive Council. Page's practice empha-
sizes complex commercial and plaintiff's
personal injury law and non-compete issues.
He also is a certified circuit court and fami-
ly law mediator.

1973
John H. Dasburg, chairman/CEO/president
of Burger King Corp (storypage 19) has
been elected to the Board of Directors of
Winn Dixie Stores, Inc. Dasburg also is a
member of the UF Board of Trustees.

Donald S. Hart Jr. was elected to the
Board of Trustees of Presbyterian College,
Clinton, SC. He is board certified in real
estate law and practices with Glenn
Rasmussen Fogarty & Hooker PA in Tampa.

Jeffrey R. Garvin was board certified as a
trial advocate by the National Board of Trial
Advocacy.

Gerald Rosenthal and his wife pledged $1
million to the Carter Center in Atlanta, and
addressed the 300-member Center
Ambassadors' Circle. Rosenthal, a specialist
in workers' compensation, is senior partner
of Rosenthal & Weissman PA in West Palm
Beach.

1974
Leslie J. Lott, founding
partner of the intellectual
property firm Lott &
Friedland PA in Coral
Gables, is listed in the 2002
edition of the Guide to the
World's Leading Trademark
Law Practitioners by
Euromoney, British publisher of business,
legal and financial information. This sum-
mer she spoke on cross-examination at the
International Trademark Association's Trial
Advocacy Workshop in Atlanta, and on use
of Alternative Dispute Resolution in trade-
mark disputes at the International
Trademark Association's annual meeting in
Washington, D.C.. She is past chairman of
The Florida Bar Intellectual Property Law
Committee, former director of the
International Trademark Association, and
member of the CPR/INTA Panel of
Distinguished Neutrals for the Resolution of


Trademark Disputes. Lott also is listed in
The Best Lawyers in America.

Stephen A. Walker, shareholder in Lewis
Longman & Walker PA in West Palm
Beach, was appointed to the Board of
Directors for the Corkscrew Regional
Ecosystem Watershed Land & Water Trust.
Walker practices in the areas of water,
administrative and water utilities law.

1975
David E. Cardwell has opened The
Cardwell Law Firm in Orlando. He prac-
tices primarily in election, local govern-
ment, redevelopment and sports facilities
law.

Governor Jeb Bush appointed Judge
Mitchell Barlow to the 18th Judicial Circuit
Court, serving Brevard and Seminole
Counties. Barlow has been working as a
Brevard judge since 2000. Prior to that he
practiced with Barlow & Bohne, and served
1976-2000 as assistant city attorney for the
cities of Indian Harbour Beach and West
Melbourne.

1977
J. Randall Hooper was board certified as a
trial advocate by the National Board of Trial
Advocacy.

Minnesota Law & Politics
and Twin Cities Business
I l/, ,i, r!xc li, named
S Charles Modell a "Super
L 1 1. )!"' for demonstrated
excellence in the practice of
law, an honor bestowed on
fewer than six percent of
the Minnesota legal community. Modell is
chairman of the Franchise Law Group in the
firm of Larkin Hoffman Daly & Lindgren
Ltd in Minneapolis.

John J. Scroggin (LLMT 79), Roswell,
Ga., was elected to the Board of Directors
of the National Association of Estate
Planners and Councils. He is serving as
president of the Estate Planning Council of
North Georgia and as voluntary legal advi-
sor to the Rendezvous & Living History
Foundation. Recent articles by Scoggins
appeared in CCH's Practical Estate
PF. -. American Bar Association's Real
Property and Probate and Trust Journal,


and he was quoted in 2001 in Fortune
Magazine and Blumberg's Personal Finance
on year-end planning ideas. His article, "Tis
Better to Give," in Financial Planning
Magazine, was recognized by the Certified
Financial Planner Board of Examiners as
one of the top seven articles for 2000.



Grads in 'Best

Lawyers' in U.S.

ore than 170 UFLaw graduates
are considered among the best
in their fields in the United Stares,
according to the current edition of The
Best Lawyers in America. The 2001-02
issue of what is regarded as the preem-
inent referral guide to the profession
lists 27 legal specialties and indicates
the "Best Lawyers" in each feld in all
50 states and Washington, D.C. Data is
compiled through an exhaustive peer-
review survey, in which thousands of
the top lawyers in the U.S. confidential-
ly evaluate more than 350,000 of their
professional peers. Lawyers are not
required or allowed to pay a fee
to be listed.

Lj\ specialrtes and number of
Garor la %e rs in Florida include
Banking: 2
Bankruptcy/Creditor-Debtor Rights: 8
Business Litigation: 22
Corporate, M&A, and Securities: 7
Criminal Defense: 14
Employee Benefits: I
Environmental: 5
Family: 10
First Amendment: 4
Health Care: 2
Immigration: I
Intellectual Property: I
Labor and Employment: 10
Legal Malpractice: 3
Maritime Law: 2
Personal Injury Litigation: 23
Public Utility: I
Real Estate: 20
STax: 19
Trusts and Estates: 13
Worker's Compensation: 4

Note: UFLaw graduates also may be
ranked among the best in these
fields in other states.

For more information:
www.bestlawyers.com/blal.


UFLAW 23


ALUMNI










The American Bar Association published
Dennis J. Wall's article, "Seeking
Discovery in Third-Party Bad Faith Cases
The Federal Rules of Civil Procedure" in
a recent issue of the Litigation Committee's
Coverage magazine. Wall also is author of a
leading treatise on insurance bad faith,
Litigation and Prevention ofInsurer Bad
Faith, published by West Publishing Co.
Wall practices in Orlando in the areas of
insurance coverage, insurance bad faith and
appeals.

1979
Michael J. Korn of Korn & Zehmer PA in
Jacksonville is on the Board of Directors of
the United Way of Northeast Florida, and
chaired its new initiative to coordinate and
enhance services for independent living for
senior citizens. Korn practices in civil trial
and appellate work.

Governor Jeb Bush appointed Judge Allen
L. Register to the 14th Judicial Circuit
Court. Register has been a judge in the
Washington County Court since 1992. Prior
to that, he served 11 years as an assistant
state attorney in the 14th Judicial Circuit.


1980
j The Board of Regents of
the American College of
STrust and Estate Counsel
a national association of
more than 2,700 lawyers
who have made outstanding
contributions to the field of
trust and estate law
elected Richard B. Comiter (LLMT) of the
West Palm Beach firm of Comiter & Singer
LLP to be a fellow of the counsel. Comiter
is a past president of Palm Beach Tax
Institute and the Palm Beach-Martin County
Estate Planning Council, and is listed in
Woodward & White's The Best Lawyers in
America.

Gary Saslaw, an attorney in
Aventura, recently was
elected to a two-year term
on the National Board of
S the American Heart
Association.


1981
Scott Thomas Fortune, after maintaining
his own practice since 1985, has opened


Fortune & Gossett on A1A in Jacksonville
Beach. Fortune represents plaintiffs involv-
ing employment discrimination laws,
including Title VII, Florida Civil Rights Act,
ERISA, HIPAA, ADA, ADEA, FMLA,
OWBPA and other statutes. His firm recent-
ly successfully sought a writ of certiorari in
the Supreme Court in an important Title
VII/42 U.S.C. Section 1981 case.

1982
Lee Stapleton Milford has joined Baker &
McKenzie as an international partner. Her
primary areas of practice will be commer-
cial litigation and white-collar criminal
defense. Milford serves as director of divi-
sions for the American Bar Association's
Section of Litigation and also is serving a
three-year term on the 18-member Section
of Litigation Council.

Anita J. Ponder has joined the Chicago
office of Quarles & Brady LLC as a partner.
She is a member of the government and
commercial law groups and will spearhead
the firm's government contract and procure-
ment practice.

Gary Lee Printy, sole practitioner in
Tallahassee, successfully represented the
appellant in a landmark case in employment
law concerning statute of limitations. Printy
practices in areas of employment, criminal,
administrative and appellate law.

The Dallas County Commissioners Court
recently appointed Lynn Pride Richardson
as acting chief public defender for Dallas
County. Since 1995 Richardson has worked
as an assistant public defender handling
felony, misdemeanor and juvenile cases in
the county's Public Defender's Office. Prior
to her appointment, she worked as supervi-
sor for misdemeanor attorneys.

Oscar A. Sanchez, with
Akerman Senterfitt in
Miami, participated in the
4 Best Buddies Volvo
Hyannis Port Challenge to
raise money for people with
mental disabilities.

1983
The Cuban American Bar Association
recently installed as president Eugenio


24 UFLAW


ALUMNI


Grad's Comic Book Anthology Benefits Victims


milk
a. I










Hernandez, partner in the
Miami office of Holland &
Knight LLP.

Leonard Milcowitz and his
partner recently created a non-
profit corporation, Extra Innings
Youth Foundation, Inc., to help
at-risk boys. The program initi-
ated at Kings Highway
Elementary in Clearwater uses
the incentive of baseball taught
by former pro players and com-
puters, textbooks, snacks and
one-on-one tutoring to help
boys with homework after
school five days a week. The
successful program is being
expanded to other elementary
schools and counties.

John G. (Jay)
White III has
joined Richman
Greer Weil
Brumbaugh
Mirabito &
Christensen PA
in West Palm
Beach as a shareholder. His
practice includes commercial,
personal injury, wrongful death
and professional malpractice
litigation. He was a founding
shareholder with Cole White &
Billbrough PA. He is on The
Florida Bar Board of Governors,
and a past president of the Palm
Beach County Bar Association.

1984
Michael G. Lindner is founder
and chairman of Translegal
Language Services in
Stockholm, Sweden. The organ-
ization is the largest legal trans-
lation firm in Europe, with 30
international lawyers on staff.
Lindner's lawyers -bilingual
and skilled in two legal systems
-translate documentation
involving many of the largest
international transactions in
Europe. The firm also provides
training in terminology used in
the United Kingdom to Europe's
legal community.


The law firm of Kirk Pinkerton
PA has elected David M.
Silberstein (LLMT) to serve as
president and managing share-
holder. His practice focuses on
corporate and tax law, and estate
planning and administration,
and he is board certified in tax,
wills, trusts and estate law.

1985
Rashad El-Amin has joined
Troy Ferguson and Associates in
the area of insurance defense.

Brenna M.
Durden, share-
holder with
Lewis Longman
& Walker PA in
Jacksonville,
was honored in
May by the
Jacksonville Community
Council, Inc., for chairing the
"Making Jacksonville Clean"
study. She also helped in a com-
munity clean up of the St. Johns
River.

1986
William E.
Ruffier recently
joined
Dellecker
Wilson & King
PA in Orlando.
Formerly a
shareholder
with McEwan Martinez Dukes
& Ruffler PA, he practices in
personal injury, wrongful death,
medical malpractice, auto and
trucking accidents, defective
products, nursing home abuse
and neglect, insurance company
bad faith, and premises liability.
He is a board certified civil trial
lawyer admitted to practice in
all courts of Florida, U.S.
District Court, U.S. Court of
Appeals, Eleventh Circuit, and
Supreme Court.

David A. Wallace, shareholder
with the Sarasota firm of
Williams Parker Harrison Dietz


Improving Service Through Technology

LTI BENEFITS STUDENTS, LEGAL PROFESSION

T he Legal Technology Institute (LTI), established at the UF College
of Law in 1997, is a boon for the law school and students,
according to LTI Director Andrew Z. Adkins III.
"Our presence helps attract students interested in learning
about the practical use of technology in the legal profession,"


said Adkins. "LTI provides examples
and demonstrations of technologies
and advanced techniques used in
settings from small private firms
to courtrooms.
"LTI doubled in clients and revenue
during 2001-02, and we expect contin-
ued growth during 2002-03. But we
always place great emphasis on foster-
ing current relationships with clients.
"We talk with many alumni
regarding use of technology and how
they can improve services to clients,"
added Adkins, who annually makes
30-40 presentations to regional and
state bar associations and national
legal technology conferences.


"We talk with

many alumni

regarding use of

technology and

how they can

improve services

to clients."


For information: www.law.ufl.edulltil or 352.392.2278.


UFLAW 25


ALUMNI






























Politics on


Campus

D democratic gubernatorial candidate Bill McBride (D 75), former managing partner
of Holland & Knight, met with attorneys and law school faculty and students at a
Gainesville breakfast sponsored by Salter Feiber Yenser Murphy and Hutson, PA in April.
Governor jeb Bush attended a UFLaw Student Republicans tailgate and spoke with Law
School Republicans President Travis Horn prior to the Miami game in September, while
Janet Reno defeated later that month by McBride in the gubernatorial primary -
visited a "Dignity in Law" display the same day showcasing the college's Center on
Children and the Law, directed by David H. Levin Chair Barbara Bennett Woodhouse.
McBride, who was defeated by Bush in the November election, entered UFLaw in
1968, but interrupted his studies to serve in the Vietnam War, where he graduated
first in class from Army Ranger School and was awarded the Bronze Star for combat
duty. He returned to law school, was a member of Florida Law Review, and graduated
with honors in 1975. After graduation, he joined his mentor, former ABA President
Chesterfield Smith (JD 48), at the firm of Holland & Knight, working in Barrow,
Lakeland, Tallahassee, Bradenton and Tampa. He was elected managing partner by
1992, and resigned in 2001. (Also see "Leadership Legacy," page 5.)


& Getzen, was board certified in appellate
practice by the Florida Bar Board of Legal
Specialization and Education. Wallace con-
centrates in civil litigation, appeals in both
state and federal courts, and health law.

1987
State Sen. John H. "Buddy" Dyer Jr. of
Orlando won the Democratic nomination for
attorney general and ran against Republican
Charlie Crist in November.

The Florida Chamber of Commerce named
State Rep. Jeff Kottkamp a "Top 20 Quick
Starter Legislator," and Professional
Opticians of Florida chose him as
"Legislator of the Year." Kottkamp serves as


vice-chair of the Judicial Oversight
Committee. He is a shareholder in
Henderson Franklin Starnes & Holt in Ft.
Myers and heads its Appellate Division.

Ruden McClosky Smith Schuster & Russell
PA recently appointed Jeffrey Shear a part-
ner in its Tampa office. He concentrates in
real estate work, including transactions,
commercial lending and commercial leas-
ing. Shear formerly served as an assistant
city attorney with the city of Tampa.

David G. Tucker joined the Pensacola
office of Miller Canfield Paddock and Stone
PLC as of counsel in the Public Law Group.
He previously was county attorney for


Escambia County, and serves as president of
the Florida Association of County
Attorneys. The Second Judicial Circuit
Guardian ad Litem Program honored him
for "Outstanding Contributions in Civil
Court," and he received The Florida Bar
President's Award for Pro Bono Service.

1988
Southern Methodist University in Dallas
named College of Law Professor
Christopher H. Hanna as one of four
Distinguished Teaching Professors. Hanna
served 1999-2000 as a tax advisor to the
presidential campaign of George W. Bush.
In 2001, he received the Excellence in
Teaching Award for the fourth time and is
author of numerous publications, including
Comparative Income Tax Deferral: The
United States and Japan (Kluwer Law
International 2000), and he helped author a
three-volume Study of the Overall State of
the Federal Tax System in 2001 after serving
as advisor to the U.S. Congressional Joint
Committee on Taxation. His presentation at
the University of Hong Kong, Peking
University (on its 100th anniversary) and
bank of Thailand was published in 2001 in
A New Financial Architecture: A Viable
Approach?

Mark A. Lewis has been appointed to his
third four-year term as a magistrate judge in
Gwinnett County, Ga., in metropolitan
Atlanta. The Gwinnett County Superior
Court uses magistrates for judicial assis-
tance, and approximately 90 percent of his
bench time is spent in that manner. He also
was appointed to a second term as munici-
pal court judge in the city of Suwannee.

1989
Mark E. Stein, shareholder
with Lott & Friedland PA in
Cor a4Coral Gables, spoke at the
International Anti-
S Counterfeiting Coalition
S (IACC) fall meeting in Las
Vegas on the role of the
civil intellectual property
attorney in criminal trademark counterfeit-
ing use. Stein's firm specializes in patent,
trademark, copyright, interest and entertain-
ment law. He represents a client in a high
profile case defending against a lawsuit by
Chicago's Sara Lee Corporation regarding
the right to use the Mark Cross trademarks.


26 UFLAW


ALU^^MN











1990
Andrea McMillan with Ricci Leopold
Farmer & McAfee PA was elected 2001-
02 president of the Board of Arc of Palm
Beach County (formerly Association for
Retarded Citizens). She has served nine
years as a board member with Arc, and
recently became a board member of The
Women's Caucus of The Academy of
Florida Trial Lawyers.

Tom Pennekamp Jr. was selected presi-
dent of the 4,000-plus member Dade
County Bar Association. He is a volun-
teer special assistant state attorney in
Dade County and lives in Coral Gables.

Edwin A. Steinmeyer,
shareholder with Lewis
Longman & Walker PA
in Tallahassee, present-
Sa iied "The Relationship
Between the ESA and
the CWA: Protection,
Property Rights and
Preemption" at an Endangered Species
Act/Habitat Conservation Planning con-
ference in Orlando. He focuses on natu-
ral resources, environmental, land use,
and administrative law and litigation.

1991
Michael Scott Budwick, bankruptcy
attorney and principal shareholder of
Michael S. Budwick PA, was engaged
in 2001 to Sharon Elizabeth Price.

Keith Scott Grossman is vice president
of communications for the Fort Myers
Chapter, American Society for Training
and Development. A member of the
Cape Coral Toastmasters, he recently
won the Toastmasters Area 10 Humorous
Speech contest. He is an attorney in Fort
Myers and a trainer/coach on leadership
and communication skills.

Heather C. Keith,
partner in the Fort
Lauderdale office of
Holland & Knight LLP,
has been appointed to
the Broward County
Marine Advisory
Committee. She previ-
ously served on the City


of Fort Lauderdale Marine Advisory
Board for six years and was its elected
chair the past three years. Keith concen-
trates in litigation defense, focusing on
construction, insurance coverage, con-
tracts and product liability.

Edwin A. Scales III of Edwin A. Scales
III PA in Key West was appointed by
Governor Jeb Bush to the Federal
Judicial Nominating Commission and
was elected to the Key West City
Commission. He serves as general coun-
sel to the Historic Tours of America,
Inc., the nation's largest privately owned
tour company, and hosts a weekly radio
show. Scales' primary areas of practice
include general litigation, real estate,
government relations and mediation.

1992
Morgan R. Bentley, member of
Williams Parker Harrison Dietz &
Getzen in Sarasota, was re-elected to the
Florida Bar Board of Governors for the
Young Lawyers Division for a second
two-year term in June representing the
12th Judicial Circuit (including Sarasota,
Manatee and DeSoto counties). He con-
tinues as vice chair of the Bylaws
Committee, vice chair and 12th Circuit
coordinator for judicial directory com-
mittees, member of the Local Bar
Affiliate Outreach and Practicing With
Professionalism oversight committees,
and as the board's representative to The
Florida Bar Council of Sections. Bentley
practices in litigation involving business
and real estate disputes.

D. Bruce Hoffman is associate director
of the Federal Trade Commission's
Bureau of Competition, which adminis-
ters and enforces antitrust law under the
Federal Trade Commission Act. He prac-
tices in antitrust/mergers and acquisi-
tions, and litigation in Washington.

Madison McClellan, who works with
partner Willie Gary in Stuart, represent-
ed the family of Roger Maris in its case
against Anheuser-Busch. He has helped
the family win nearly $140 million in
those proceedings.


BLSA Awards Recognize
Diversity Leadership

lachua County judge Phyllis
Kotey (JD 85, top) and UFLaw
Samuel Dell Research Scholar
Professor Winston Nagan were
honored by the college's Black Law
Students Association (BLSA) for their
diversity leadership. Kotey was
named BLSA Alumnus of the Year,
and Nagan received the 2002 Rahim
Reed Service Award for his assistance
to minority students.
Honors were announced as part of the student
organization's 13th annual Virgil Hawkins Celebra-
tion, named for the civil rights pioneer honored by
UF in 2001 with a posthumous degree for his
efforts to desegregate the law school in the late
1950s.
Kotey has been an Alachua County judge since
1996. She is a trial team coach and adjunct
instructor of trial practice at the College of Law,
associate dean at the Florida judicial College, and
on the faculties of Florida College of Advanced
judicial Studies and National judicial College. She
has lectured nationally in the areas of domestic
violence, ethics, criminal law and trial procedure.
"This award proves the things we do in terms
of going back and giving to our schools mean
something," said Kotey.
Last year's BLSA alumnus of the year was
judge Stephan Mickle, a federal judge in Gainesville.
A 27-year veteran of the UFLaw faculty, Nagan
is an internationally renowned human rights
activist and a fellow of the Braslow College of Law
at Oxford University, his alma mater. He helped
develop the law school's summer study abroad
program in South Africa, and worked to increase
Florida's trade with South African businesses.
Other honorees included Gerald Sohn Scholar
Professor Stuart Cohn and law students Bradley
Harper and Estruleder Anita Moreland. Cohn, coor-
dinator of the law school's international programs,
was honored for his efforts to ensure Hawkins be
conferred an honorary degree.
Harper was named W. George Allen Black
Male Law Student of the Year, and Moreland,
who spearheaded BLSA's Black History Month
presentation, was named Hazel Land Black Female
Law Student of the Year. The awards honor the
college's first black graduates.


UFLAW 27


ALUMNI











Christopher Schulte has formed Burton
Schulte Weekley Hoeler & Robbins PA in
Tampa. Members practice in medical
malpractice defense, products liability, com-
mercial litigation, professional malpractice
defense and general civil trial practice. He
and his wife, Jamie, celebrated the birth of a
daughter, Jilian Knight, in April 2001.

1993
Seanna M. Bodholt (LLMT) was made a
partner with Paine Hamblen Coffin Brooke
& Miller LLP in Spokane, Wa. Bodholt has
been with the firm nine years, and focuses
on taxation, estate planning, probate and
trust administration, and business matters.

Heather Brock became a shareholder with
Fowler White Boggs Banker in Tampa. She
is a member of the firm's Labor and
Employment Law Department and repre-
sents management in employment matters.

Frank S. Goldstein and Gregory P.
Hengber have formed Hengber &
Goldstein, PA, with civil trial lawyers con-
centrating in defense of first and third party
insurance with emphasis on personal injury
protection, uninsured motorist, bodily injury
and suspect claims.

Foley & Lardner named Matthew McAfee
a partner in Jacksonville. McAfee practices
in real estate and banking law and is a
licensed real estate agent.


Dani Smith was elected partner of
Strasburger & Price LLP in Dallas. Smith is
a member of the firm's Taxes & Estates
Planning Practice and is board certified in
Estate Planning & Probate Law by the Texas
State Board of Legal Specialization. She
counsels on estate planning and administra-
tion, trust and guardianship administration,
estate and inheritance tax return preparation
and audits, and charitable planning.

1994
Robert Fellman was guest lecturer at
Washington University's Olin School of
Business on strategic public health chal-
lenges entailed in administering prison
health care programs around the nation.

Andrew Klymenko joined Vaka Larson &
Johnson PL as an associate in Tampa.

Jeffrey A. Maine (LLMT) was appointed
associate dean for academic affairs and
operations at Texas Wesleyan University
School of Law in Fort Worth. Maine also
continues as a professor of law specializing
in taxation of intellectual property and busi-
ness tax. He is working on two books.

J. Hugh Middlebrooks, shareholder with
the Sarasota firm of Williams Parker
Harrison Dietz & Getzen, has been appoint-
ed to the board of directors of the Sarasota
County Committee for Economic
Development. Middlebrooks, a member of
the firm's business & tax department, prac-


tices banking and tax-exempt finance,
healthcare, mergers and acquisitions, securi-
ties and general business law. He is immedi-
ate past president of the Young Lawyers'
Division of the Sarasota County Bar
Association.

Paul J. Scheck has joined
Shutts & Bowen in Orlando
as a partner in its Labor &
S Employment Practice
Group, where he represents
management in labor and
employment matters. He is
on The Florida Bar's Young
Lawyers' Division Board of Governors, and
is immediate past president of the Orange
County Bar Association's Young Lawyers'
Section.

Miguel A. Silva has been named partner
with Holland & Knight LLP in Miami. He
is a certified public accountant and concen-
trates in international tax and corporate law.

Ruden McClosky Smith Schuster & Russell
PA recently appointed Bryan J. Stanley as
a partner in Tampa. Stanley has experience
in commercial litigation, with a diverse trial
and appellate background.

1995
Governor Jeb Bush appoint-
ed Daniel T. O'Keefe, part-
ner with Shutts & Bowen
LLP in Orlando, as a mem-
ber of the East Central
Florida Regional Planning
S Council, which oversees
Brevard, Lake, Orange,
Osceola, Seminole and Volusia counties. He
focuses on commercial real estate transac-
tions, including large scale multi-use proj-
ects and development, retail development
and representation of financial institutions.

Steele T. Williams, partner with Groner
Schieb & Williams in Bradenton, is a repub-
lican candidate for the Florida House of
Representatives, District 67. He concentrates
on investment and commercial litigation and
maintains licenses to practice law in Florida,
New York, New Jersey, Georgia and
Washington D.C.

Kevin Yamamoto (LLMT) received tenure
from South Texas College of Law. He spe-
cializes in tax law -federal income, corpo-
rate and federal estate and gift tax.


28 UFLAW


ALUMNI










1996
Daniel F. Visoiu is 2001-02 co-chair of the
American Bar Association's "Central
European Law Committee." He is an associ-
ate with the European international firm of
BBLP Moquet Borde & Associates,
Szecskay and practices in Budapest,
Hungary, where he concentrates on intera-
tional commercial, corporate and arbitration
matters.

1997
Christina Bohannan has been named an
assistant professor at University of Iowa
College of Law.

James W. Pimentel was recalled to active
duty as a Navy lieutenant commander fol-
lowing September 11. He was mobilized for
Homeland Defense duties, including defense
of ballistic missile submarines stationed at
Kings Bay Submarine Base in Georgia.
Prior to his recall, Pimentel was serving as
Clay County State Attorney's Office prose-
cutor against sex crimes, child abuse and
traffic homicide, Fourth Judicial Circuit.

Elliott Wilcox, assistant
state attorney with the
Office of the State Attorney,
Ninth Judicial Circuit in
Orlando, recently taught
legal education courses to
the Orlando State Attorney's
Office and DUI Trial
Advocacy School. He also gave presenta-
tions on public speaking at Planet
Toastmasters training workshops in Orlando
and Tampa, and Florida Association of
Medical Transcriptionists.

1998
Robert Barna (LLMT) recently completed
a rotation with KPMG, LLP, in its national
tax practice in Washington D.C., and then
accepted a position with the firm in
Stamford, Conn. Bara is primarily respon-
sible for the GE capital account and for
implementing federal tax strategies.

Derek Bruce (JD/MBA),
with GrayHarris, was
selected one of the Orlando
Business Journal's 25 "Up
& Comers" metro
Orlando's rising stars in the
business community. He
practices in state and local


government, business litigation and land use
law.

Scott B. Copeland joined the national firm
of Hinshaw & Culbertson as an associate in
Jacksonville. Copeland defends clients in
medical malpractice, products liability,
appeals and workers' compensation.

Santiago A. Cueto joined Marshall
Dennehey Warner Coleman & Goggin as an
associate in Ft. Lauderdale in the firm's
Professional Liability Practice Group.

Amy M. Dukes, an associate in West Palm
Beach of Lewis Longman & Walker PA,
was appointed to the Lawyers for Literacy
Committee of the Palm Beach County Bar
Association. Dukes practices in environmen-
tal, local government, administrative and
land use law.

William J. Romanos III opened the Law
Offices of William J. Romanos III in Palm
Beach Gardens, providing tax planning and
corporate and securities law advice.

1999
Melissa M. Gross-Arnold, associate in
Jacksonville of Lewis Longman & Walker
PA, is chair of the Business Climate &
Economic Trends Forum Study organized
by the Jacksonville Community Council,
Inc. Gross-Arold recently won the
Arlington Toastmasters' Club evaluation
contest and was runner-up in the area con-
test in 2001. She practices in environmental,
natural resources, administrative and land
use law.

2000
Governor Jeb Bush commended Brandon
Biederman, aide to State Senator Ron
Klein, for work related to the Florida
Technology Development Act. The legisla-
tion passed during the 2002 Legislative ses-
sion and will create Centers of Excellence at
Florida's universities dedicated to conduct-
ing high tech research and building technol-
ogy centers.

Jody L. Brooks, associate
with Lewis Longman &
Walker PA in its
Jacksonville office, recently
< Z7 helped in a community
clean up of the St. Johns
S River.


Grady J. Leupold joined
Lane Powell Spears
Lubersky LLP as an associ-
ate in Seattle. His practice
focuses on labor and
employment law.


Walter C. Little joined
Nason Yeager Gerson
White & Lioce PA in West
Palm Beach as an associate
in its real estate practice
group.


Michael Stanton joined James, Hoyer,
Newcomer & Smiljanich PA in Tampa. The
firm focuses on consumer fraud,
product liability and whistleblower cases.

2001
Scott L. Hall (left) and
Robert C. Okon joined
S Roberts & Reynolds PA as
associates in West Palm
Beach. They both practice
in civil litigation, general
negligence, government lia-
bility, product liability and
worker's compensation.

Jesse M. Tilden has joined the litigation
department of the firm of Abel Band Russell
Collier Pitchford & Gordon in Sarasota. He
will focus on commercial litigation.

2002
Stephanie R. Haug (LLMT) joined Paine
Hamblen Coffin Brooke & Miller LLP as an
associate with its Tax Practice Group. U


UFLAW 29


ALUMNI




































Thanks to representatives of
the University of Florida
Levin College of Law, more
than 400 current and future
Polish attorneys are now
trained practitioners in a legal
system that just 13 years ago was alien to
Communist officials then ruling their
country. One hundred of those 400
graduated this summer from the Center
for American Law Studies at Warsaw
University, a prestigious joint program
begun in 1998 and taught by UFLaw
professors.
"Most students who go through the
program end up in the largest law firms in
Warsaw, including a number of American


and international firms," said Dean Jon
Mills.
The American studies are directed by
UF's Center for Governmental
Responsibility (CGR), and operated
through a mutual agreement between
UF's law school and the law faculty of
Warsaw University. Participants learn
about the United States' legal system
through classes such as American law,
theory of contracts and sales transaction,
legal writing, constitutional law, securities
regulation, taxation, intellectual property
and alternative dispute resolution.
One key to success of the program,
Mills said, is that it takes traditional
American law school practices and imple-
ments them in the Polish classroom.
Classes are taught in English and help
prepare participants for work as attorneys
in the U.S., Poland and European Union.
"It is much more intense than the
courses we are used to," said Tomasz
Wlostowski, a Polish student who com-
pleted the program and now studies at the
UF law school in Gainesville.
"In Polish law school you don't have
to read material daily for class, and the
professor just lectures. But in this pro-
gram you are expected to participate in
class, and in a foreign language. We are


not used to being put on the spot in front
of the whole class. It is very difficult."
Funded in part by White & Case, a
New York-based international law firm
with offices in Warsaw, the program also
was sponsored this year by international
law firms Weil Gotshal & Manges and
Baker & McKenzie. The firms are pleased
with the benefits they have experienced
through this partnership.
"First of all, we have direct contact
with young people and professors who
come to Warsaw University at the invita-
tion of the center," said Witold Jurcewicz,
one of the firm's Warsaw attorneys. "The
latter are often guest speakers at our inter-
nal seminars organized for our junior
associates. The lectures given by invited
professors are of great value for our junior
associates, who also can attend the cen-
ter's classes. In turn, some of the center's
graduates become employees of the firm,
where the knowledge they received from
the center's educational programs are of
great value."
Jurcewicz also sees benefits for the
students, another reason for his firm's
involvement.
"When the Center for American Law
Studies began, it was very new and need-
ed in Poland," he said. "We believed the


30 UFLAW










opportunities created by this coop-
eration would allow students to
increase their legal knowledge and
provide opportunities for Polish law
students to learn about the
American legal system first-hand.
That was why White & Case was
one of three firms to support the
center from the very beginning."
The program benefits profes-
sors at UF's law school, too, thanks
in part to Ewa Gmurzynska, a grad-
uate of both Warsaw University and


the legal practices characteristic
until now only in American law.
Gmurzynska said in addition to
coming from the ranks of Warsaw
University students, applicants now
come from Polish law firms trying
to enroll their attorneys in the one-
year program. Due to limited
enrollment, the center must turn
away applicants each year.
At graduation each summer, a
noted American lawyer is asked to
speak. This year's commencement


"The practice of law in our times has truly become
transnational. My experience as a foreign student at
the Levin College of Law has been outstanding."
Tomasz Bartosz (2L), UFLaw Alumni Council member


the master's program in compara-
tive law at UF. She is now staff
attorney for CGR and director of
the American Law Studies program.
"Our success is a direct result
of the high educational and profes-
sional standards set by the UF fac-
ulty who take part," Gmurzynska
said. "And also because of increas-
ing competition in the market and
growing interest in American law.
International Programs
Coordinator Professor Stuart Cohn
said that while participating in the
program entails some sacrifice for
faculty, the experience is well
worth it.
"Our faculty members are
uprooted for two weeks to teach
there," he said. "We have to prepare
a syllabus, give a final exam and
grade it.
"In addition, faculty have to
make up the classes they miss at
UF during the two weeks, and they
receive no extra financial incentive.
Yet, we have had 29 professors -
half our faculty participate so
far."
European Union countries are
introducing into their laws many of


speaker was Michael Papantonio of
Levin Papantonio & Partners in
Pensacola, Fla., and previous hon-
orees include Martha Barnett (JD
73), then-president of the American
Bar Association; Ben Overton
(LLB 52), former Florida Supreme
Court chief justice; and W. Dexter
Douglass (JD 49) of Tallahassee,
member of the Sen. Al Gore legal
team during the contested 2000
presidential election.
Thanks to a recent agreement
between the Warsaw and Florida
universities, the program will be
expanded to include reciprocal par-
ticipation by UFLaw students in the
School of Polish and European
Union at Warsaw enabling
American students to specialize in
that aspect of foreign law.
Mills believes the Levin
College of Law has a responsibility
in Poland.
"Service is an obligation for
any law school or public body," he
said. "This is something that we do
that benefits not only the United
States, but a major country in east-
ern central Europe as well." U


UFLAW 31




































ne of A then U e of F l o Afoatio I.a g a n ity ipo d mor Development and Alumni Affairs Senior
se bk Uo wthile tgey r inDirector Donald Hale (left) and Associate
S4 pl bo the tmont you pe itof alnt i an w m ten yo u ma Directors Denise Stobbie and Kelley Wood
SCa e tion e ac te on ton dcti or Aa p n t cat recently welcomed new Assistant Director
in ves a tyhe s dlegdutKerrie Mitchell (right). Mitchell will assist
ST advmenta infome Ifou it a nit wit c rt of Be ai in t w be with the Law Alumni Council, Grand Guard
esu ng to me taxsthe freim fil be orin o i. aand other reunions, and sponsorships for
ha v ae, nealy 60 iix to addetrei n e th li o dorns the Book Award program and outreach
events.















GIFT ANNUITIES BENEFIT YOU AND UFLAW AREA OF YOUR CHOICE

As of April, the University of Florida Foundation, Inc.'s gift annuity pool held more than $20 million. Many UF alumni and
friends recognize the benefits of giving through charitable gift annuities, which allow donors to make a significant gift for future
use by UF while they retain life income payments. Other benefits to donors include:
* Unlimited contributions Federal law typically limits the amount you can contribute to tax-deferred retirement programs such as IRAs, 403(b),
or 401(k) plans, but not the amount you place into a charitable 1 ........i which means you may build as large a retirement plan as you wish.
* Charitable deduction You receive a charitable contribution deduction for a portion of the assets (cash or publicly listed stocks and bonds) placed
in the annuity. This deduction helps offset taxes due on current income earned.
* Tax advantaged income If you fund the annuity with cash, part of each payment to you will be considered return of principal and, as such, not
subject to income tax. The remainder will be ordinary income to you. If you fund the annuity with appreciated assets, a portion of the capital gain
will be completely forgiven and you may be eligible to prorate the remaining capital gains over your life expectancy. This !1 .I........r may also
have tax-free income (due to return of principal) and ordinary income.
* Payments you cannot outlive The charitable ,i !l .II........ pays you a fixed dollar annual amount as long as you live, thereby transferring any
investment risk to the Foundation, which will pay you the amount regardless of how long you live.

To learn more, call the UFLaw Development and Alumni Affairs Office (352.392.9296).


















'Moving Toward the Top 10' ARCHITECTS NAMED;
GROUNDBREAKING IN APRIL
UFLaw Kicks Off Expansion with Celebration Ceremony A UF task force has selected
A UF task force has selected
Ponikvar & Associates, Inc., based in
hundreds of alumni, friends, faculty Gainesville, as lead project architect, with
and staff gathered in September to Tsoi/Kobus & Associates of Cambridge,
honor contributors to UFLaw's MA., to assist with design aspects. Formal
recent successful $25 million expansion groundbreaking is expected April I1-12.
campaign, and announce selection of archi- "Our selection committee started
tects (see sidebar) to design major facilities with 20 of the finest architectural firms
for the nation's 1 th largest law school. I in the country," Dean Jon Mills said, "and
UF President Charles Young and Dean selected the team that will give us quali-
Jon Mills headlined the dinner event at ty facilities very much needed if we
Gainesville's Savannah Grande. Among those gathering in September are to join the nation's top 10 public law
"This is an occasion to celebrate the to honor contributors were Fredric Levin schools to match the college's quality
imminent reality of the Lawton Chiles (left), who earlier helped create a $20 students and faculty."
Legal Information Center and a new million endowment at the law school and Aside from Mills, other members
Student/ Faculty Academic Center," was a major campaign contributor: Dean of the UF selection committee were
Mills said, "and of most importance to this on Mills architect David Owens (see Professor Jo Hassell, College of Design,
community, a new and impressive western sidebar); W.C. Gentry, chair of the Construction and Planning; D. Jeff Blair,
front door for our university."Building Campaign Committee and engineer, Physical Plant; and Carol
Building Campaign Committee, and
W.C. Gentry (JD 71) of Jacksonville hundreds o alumni and acuty. Walker, director, and Howie Ferguson,
hundreds of alumni and faculty.
headed a seven-month 2001 effort that coordinator and project manager, at
raised $6.3 million from alumni, faculty, staff, friends and students throughout the Facilities Planning and Construction.
country. Those funds were matched by state monies and added to $12.6 million from Ponikvar & Associates (P&A) was
UF to finance the new academic center and library expansion (with the resulting new founded in 1978, and in the last 10 years
building to be named in honor of law school grad and former Florida Governor and has specialized in college, university and
U.S. Senator C' lnlei Pledges for the facilities were able to be included in funds quali- institutional projects. Two major P&A
fying for matching dollars, thanks to a unique collaboration with Northern Trust Bank facilities just completed at UF are
in Sarasota, headed by President Philip A. Delaney Jr. Emerson Alumni Hall and The Residence
Mills praised Board of Trustees Chair Marybeth McDonald and past Chair College at Hume Hall. P&A also designed
Richard M. "Robie" Robinson, both of Orlando, for their support. He said the the UF Digital Arts and Sciences Virtual
200-member Law Alumni Council, headed by Bruce Harris of Orlando, helped secure Reality Theater and Production Studio,
gifts from classmates and colleagues throughout Florida and the U.S. now under construction.
The dean said enlarging and upgrading teaching facilities and the library, built in Tsoi/Kobus & Associates (TK&A)
the late 1960's, is critical for retention of American Bar Association accreditation. He recently completed work for such aca-
said the expansion will place the center among the top 20 of more than 180 academic demic clients as Harvard Medical and
law libraries in the country in terms of space. Business schools, Washington University,
Mills reminded those attending that a fund-raising effort due to end this December Boston College and the Mount Sinai
is seeking to raise another $1.3 million to help make possible an anticipated $5 million School of Medicine. TK&A also is recog-
in renovations to the existing Holland Law Center (seepage 37). The center is a class- nized for its work on the new 293,000-
room and faculty office building completed in 1969 and named after former Florida square-foot Suffolk University Law School,
Governor and U.S. Senator Spessard Holland (JD 16). one of the most technologically advanced
institutions in the nation.



U FLAW 33


















'Moving Toward the Top 10' ARCHITECTS NAMED;
GROUNDBREAKING IN APRIL
UFLaw Kicks Off Expansion with Celebration Ceremony A UF task force has selected
A UF task force has selected
Ponikvar & Associates, Inc., based in
hundreds of alumni, friends, faculty Gainesville, as lead project architect, with
and staff gathered in September to Tsoi/Kobus & Associates of Cambridge,
honor contributors to UFLaw's MA., to assist with design aspects. Formal
recent successful $25 million expansion groundbreaking is expected April I1-12.
campaign, and announce selection of archi- "Our selection committee started
tects (see sidebar) to design major facilities with 20 of the finest architectural firms
for the nation's 1 th largest law school. I in the country," Dean Jon Mills said, "and
UF President Charles Young and Dean selected the team that will give us quali-
Jon Mills headlined the dinner event at ty facilities very much needed if we
Gainesville's Savannah Grande. Among those gathering in September are to join the nation's top 10 public law
"This is an occasion to celebrate the to honor contributors were Fredric Levin schools to match the college's quality
imminent reality of the Lawton Chiles (left), who earlier helped create a $20 students and faculty."
Legal Information Center and a new million endowment at the law school and Aside from Mills, other members
Student/ Faculty Academic Center," was a major campaign contributor: Dean of the UF selection committee were
Mills said, "and of most importance to this on Mills architect David Owens (see Professor Jo Hassell, College of Design,
community, a new and impressive western sidebar); W.C. Gentry, chair of the Construction and Planning; D. Jeff Blair,
front door for our university."Building Campaign Committee and engineer, Physical Plant; and Carol
Building Campaign Committee, and
W.C. Gentry (JD 71) of Jacksonville hundreds o alumni and acuty. Walker, director, and Howie Ferguson,
hundreds of alumni and faculty.
headed a seven-month 2001 effort that coordinator and project manager, at
raised $6.3 million from alumni, faculty, staff, friends and students throughout the Facilities Planning and Construction.
country. Those funds were matched by state monies and added to $12.6 million from Ponikvar & Associates (P&A) was
UF to finance the new academic center and library expansion (with the resulting new founded in 1978, and in the last 10 years
building to be named in honor of law school grad and former Florida Governor and has specialized in college, university and
U.S. Senator C' lnlei Pledges for the facilities were able to be included in funds quali- institutional projects. Two major P&A
fying for matching dollars, thanks to a unique collaboration with Northern Trust Bank facilities just completed at UF are
in Sarasota, headed by President Philip A. Delaney Jr. Emerson Alumni Hall and The Residence
Mills praised Board of Trustees Chair Marybeth McDonald and past Chair College at Hume Hall. P&A also designed
Richard M. "Robie" Robinson, both of Orlando, for their support. He said the the UF Digital Arts and Sciences Virtual
200-member Law Alumni Council, headed by Bruce Harris of Orlando, helped secure Reality Theater and Production Studio,
gifts from classmates and colleagues throughout Florida and the U.S. now under construction.
The dean said enlarging and upgrading teaching facilities and the library, built in Tsoi/Kobus & Associates (TK&A)
the late 1960's, is critical for retention of American Bar Association accreditation. He recently completed work for such aca-
said the expansion will place the center among the top 20 of more than 180 academic demic clients as Harvard Medical and
law libraries in the country in terms of space. Business schools, Washington University,
Mills reminded those attending that a fund-raising effort due to end this December Boston College and the Mount Sinai
is seeking to raise another $1.3 million to help make possible an anticipated $5 million School of Medicine. TK&A also is recog-
in renovations to the existing Holland Law Center (seepage 37). The center is a class- nized for its work on the new 293,000-
room and faculty office building completed in 1969 and named after former Florida square-foot Suffolk University Law School,
Governor and U.S. Senator Spessard Holland (JD 16). one of the most technologically advanced
institutions in the nation.



U FLAW 33





























Council Seeks Alumni Participation

Inducts New Members, Elects Officers


launched an ambitious campaign
to increase alumni participation in
supporting students, faculty,
programs and services. After reviewing
programs at other law schools includ-
ing Duke and Virginia the council
implemented or restructured support pro-
grams, and added third-year student mem-
bers and "class chairs" to help recruit and
coordinate efforts of representatives from
each graduating class.


A record 70 members attended the
council meeting in September, where the
gavel was passed from 2001-02 President
Bruce Harris (JD 93, right) of Orlando to
2002-03 President Ken Johnson (JD 81) of
Naples. Plans for this year include:
*Renewed Law Firm Giving Program
Firms with "multiple Gators" achieving 100
percent participation during the fiscal year will
be recognized on a display in the Career
Services lobby and in publications.


* Restructured Reunion Program
With emphasis on increased attendance, alumni
celebrating 5th, 10th and 25th reunions will be
invited to return to campus April I 1-12 for a
weekend of social and educational activities
(see page 36). Information will be mailed soon
to 1998, 1993 and 1978 classes.
* Faculty Visibility
The council will assist in promoting the col-
lege's CLE offerings, conferences, and faculty
speaking engagements to help increase visibility
of the law school and faculty.
* Graduating Class Gifts
Coordinated by the council's third-year student
members, this revived tradition presents a
combined Class Gift at commencement.
Students may give or pledge to any area of the
law school or to any student organization.
* Book Award Sponsorships
Emphasis on increasing JD and LLMT course
sponsorships to provide essential operating
funds; also recognizes sponsors and rewards
outstanding academic achievement.
"Our objective is to help our school
continue to improve," Johnson said. "We
need to increase interaction and involve-
ment among alumni, law faculty, students
and administration. We have wonderful
human resources that, when properly
tapped and channeled, will allow us to
offer an even more outstanding education-
al experience."
The council (founded in 1983) and
Law Center Association Inc. Board of
Trustees (1960) are the primary support
and advisory boards for the law school
and assist with raising private funds to
cover expenses not met through state
support, tuition or endowment income.


joining the council are Fall 2002/Spring 2003 graduating
students Debra Geiger (left), Susan Mikolaitis, Tomasz
Bartosz, Nicole Kibert (2003 class chair), Elaine Parris,
Brian Koch, Leslie Press, Julian Smothers, Rhonda Chung-
De Cambre (2002 class chair) and Robert Thornburg.
(New members Dolina Lordeus, Brian Mencher, Frederick
Dauley, Todd Herberghs, Kelly Daoud, Gisela Then-
Caceres and Sherri Stinson not shown.)


In 2001-02, the council played an
important role in the successful campaign
for a $25 million facilities expansion and
renovation project (seepage 33). In addi-
tion, through mail and phone campaigns,
the council encourages alumni to partici-
pate in the Annual Fund, which provides
unrestricted and restricted support for law
students and student organizations, facul-
ty, and academic programs. Class repre-
sentatives also serve as reunion co-chairs.
For information: Associate Director
of Development & Alumni Affairs Denise
Stobbie, PO Box 117623, Gainesville FL
32611-7623 (352.392.9296,
.,,/I/,I.. ..t /.lI hll.../h I 0


2002-03 EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE

Kenneth Johnson (JD 81), Naples
President
Bruce M. Harris (JD 93), Orlando
Immediate Past President
Oscar Sanchez (JD 82), Miami
President-Elect
George Vaka (JD 83), Tampa
Secretary
At-Large Members
Heather Brock (JD 93). Tampa
Leon Brush (ID 62), Sarasota
Tim Cerio (JD 95). Tampa
Patrick Cousins (JD 89), West Palm Beach
Barry Davidson (JD 67), Miami
Mayanne Downs (JD 87). Orlando
Adam Hall (JD 96), Miami
Lawrence Keefe (JD 86), Fort Walton Beach
Mark W. Klingensmith (JD 85),
West Palm Beach
Paul Linder (JD 82), Orlando
Rahul Patel (ID 97), Atlanta
Barry Silber (JD 75). Pensacola
Bonita Young (JD 97). Gainesville
Ex-Officio
Dean Jon Mills (JD 72)
Professor Christopher Slobogin
Alumni Affairs Associate
Director Denise Stobbie
For complete listing of Alumni Council Class
Representatives, go to www.law.uflfalumnm.


34 UFLAW


PARTNER












David H


Levin


Leaves Legacy for Legal Excellence (1929-2002)


When David H. Levin (JD 52) died
in January at 73, the University
of Florida's law school lost one
of its greatest benefactors and successful
and prominent alumni.
The oldest brother of Fredric G.
Levin, namesake of UF's law school,
David built an impressive career in law
after graduating second in his UFLaw
class. A lifelong supporter of the college,
he donated more than $1 million over his
lifetime and left a large portion of his
estate to his alma mater.
"Other than his family, the University
of Florida was his main love," says his
brother Fredric. "He lived and breathed
Gator."
Three years after graduating, David
co-founded the Pensacola firm now called
Levin Papantonio Thomas Mitchell
Eshsner & Proctor. His best friend and
founding partner, Ruebin Askew, went on
to become governor of the state.
"He was a very warm and caring man
who was my closest friend for 45 years,"
Askew says. "He was an exceptionally
bright lawyer and had tremendous integri-
ty and professional competence. He had a
great sense of humor and cared about
people."
Levin graduated from high school
when he was 16, and received his bache-
lor's degree at Duke University. But his
heart was in Florida.
"I never did feel at home there," he
told Levin family biographer John
Appleyard, who wrote An American
Dream: The Levin Fi..il ( i, .,,,, I. \
"Duke was a rich man's school."
He graduated in 1949 and enrolled
at UF, where he felt comfortable.
"What a difference that campus
made!" he told Appleyard. I could hard-
ly believe what was happening to me...
To me, Florida was all a university should
be, while Duke had seemed almost like a
prison. I loved Florida!"


He graduated with honors and joined
prosecutor John Lewis Reese, the
Escambia County solicitor responsible for
prosecuting all non-capital criminal cases
in the county. Levin was drafted two
months later and joined the Air Force,
where his legal training came in handy.
"I was a full-fledged lawyer, and the
Judge Advocates Service needed attor-
neys," he said. "I was made an officer, a
first lieutenant." Levin was shipped to
Korea in November 1952 and spent a
year there during the war.
When he returned to the states and
was discharged, he joined the firm of
Robinson Roark & Hopkins, and a year
later, opened his own practice specializing
in family law. His first cases included
military court martials, civil cases and
jury trials in DUI, murder and rape.
In 1958, he took Askew on as a
partner.
"David was a solo practitioner, then
we went in together and began the firm,"
Askew says. "He leaves a legacy of an
exceptionally good law firm, but more
than that, David was a lawyer's lawyer
and enjoyed great respect among his
peers. We all miss him."
The same year, Levin married Joyce
Lindy, a Mobile, Ala., kindergarten
teacher he met on a blind date. Their
daughter Lisa was born soon after with a
defect in a heart valve that required
immediate surgery at Shands Hospital in
Gainesville. Lisa pulled through, and
Levin's allegiance to UF was cemented
even more strongly.
In 1971, Askew was elected governor
of Florida, a position he held for eight
years. During his terms, Levin served as
his personal attorney and legal advisor
and state director of pollution control.
Levin was inducted into the UF
Athletic Hall of Fame in recognition for
his efforts on the behalf of the football
team, and became a Bull Gator.


"He got involved in recruiting and
had more than a little to do with Emmitt
Smith playing at UF," said Askew.
"I think from his standpoint, as he
got older, the University of Florida
became everything to him, even more so
than his practice of law," said Fredric.
"He even learned how to use the comput-
er just to get the Internet to read about the
university. It became his everything."
Professor Barbara Bennett
Woodhouse, who holds the David H.
Levin Chair in Family Law, said, "David
Levin created a lasting legacy by endow-
ing a chair in family law. His gift provid-
ed the catalyst for UF to develop its fami-
ly law and policy resources. Creation of
the Center on Children and the Law and
the Certificate Program in Family Law,
made possible by his generosity, puts UF
into the top tier for the study of family
law. But his most valuable legacy is the
new generation of family advocates,
judges and scholars we will produce."
Away from UF, Levin chaired the
United Jewish Appeal and served as
president of the American Cancer Society.
Town & Country magazine recognized
him as one of the best lawyers in the
country.
Levin is survived by two children,
Lisa and Richard. U


UFLAW 35


PARTNER











Reunions Bring Alums to Campus

April 2003 Events to Help Graduates Network, Stay Updated and in Touch

U FLaw reunions enable alumni to network and reminisce
with fellow alumni, celebrate the "Gator spirit" and
even earn Continuing Legal Education (CLE) credit at
some events.
The 2003 Reunion Weekend (April 11-12) will include
groundbreaking for the Lawton Chiles Legal Information
Center, class dinners and receptions, CLE courses, campus-
wide reunion activities and Gator football. The weekend will
honor the classes of 1978, 1993 and 1998.
Reunion classes also participate in a Class Gift Program. .
If your reunion is coming up, please make a special commit-
ment to support your college. Contact UFLaw Development
and Alumni Affairs (352.392.9296) for information.


'Zzi






IP W



~4


2002 REUNION WEEKEND
Alumni from the Classes of '56, '57, '61, '62, '71, '72,
'76, '77, '81 '82, '86, '87, '91 and '92 gathered in Gainesville
April 26-27 for Spring Reunion Weekend. Graduates mixed,
mingled and networked at a variety of events including a
barbeque before the Orange and Blue game (top), reception
and dinner (middle) and faculty and alumni panel discussion
(above).


36 UFLAW


PARTNERS














Spessard L. Holland Law Center A Legacy Revitalized

he UFLaw Law Center Association Board of Trustees is
helping raise an additional $1.3 million by year-end toward
a $5 million renovation of the existing Holland Hall Law Center.
The funding will be used to update the classroom and faculty
office building, built in 1969 and named after former Florida
Governor and U.S. Senator Spessard Holland (JD 16).
"We have a window of opportunity to turn $1.3 million in
private funding into an additional $3.7 million to take care of
our needs to revitalize a legacy," Mills said. "The Holland
Law Center was the cornerstone more than 30 years ago of the
university's initial effort to begin building one of the 'Top 10'
public law schools in this country."
The $1.3 million needed by December 31 will be used
to apply for matching state funds and combined with $2 million
from UF's budget for interior equipment and furnishings to
result in the $5 million required to upgrade the center to current
building and technology standards. (Seepage 33 for story on
new and expanded College ofLawfacilities).
For information or to participate, contact UFLaw
Development and Alumni Affairs (352.392.9296).


UFLAW 37


PARTNERS












Dispute











INNOVATIVE UFLAW PROGRAM TRIES TO KEEP ATTORNEYS OUT OF COURT


1"1.11 I',.: eall _50el 1) .l 4 ,11 lehe. lli
1 i"d ,,'ii .11 1e~1 c'12: 1,1. :1i bhut il'
iminportint ilrendl i n thIe le,.'l I plr.:.fe;--

tuime in the c''ulnr'.:.'io in te.-il .:.f

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Dn Peter.s i !-.olh diiectci .:,f the co:.l-
le'.le ItiII[lli e f.:i D Ipute Re_, lutIt-nl
Ii DRi .-ind I tiitee Reseilchl Fell.:'.
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dIipute let.,,lutr,.l e .'')elele ce 1tl01._ul2
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the\ c,-m le!p!eent b..:.t|i lult_< ,-rnd chil-
diel n CI lentl S ltudelntl- p.'IAnicip.'ill' In
Ithe iTledili ,ii. clmnicil C.:uure receive .-i
qu,-lit I A I Ai c11, C 1|1" Co '! 'lent ,1.'."1 I eil1d
b\ the FlorlSii)i Suieimle C,:ut
"\Ve kni,\v. :*:i |!1A of cl.i. .'ioom
i.illinll' '_ ntei.ictio!' \. ith pli:. ticin ;.11 ,iit :.r-
Ine\ _- ,i'lnl in-the-fe l i_ _'!ie 1 i, ll _!enf ie ,li ,i k-
in ei\ 'v.e!ll t,: i'Iep.-le LI.,ilu ilte for. !l'L!
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i!l.',iu e leoluilo, ." Peter_ .til
)(f tIle ,-ippio ilm ite!\ 13.3 ,1 i\\ _. u-
de!nti e *..':'.lu .-te \le.i !\ V. !i.i\ Ae t iken
IDR coul,.,e. :l:out ','5 petce!nt' of thlem
\V. II :i.-ictice in FPlot i.I:.l Peter..; s.- l "A\e
,aIle l',ep.- l il t!ei ri oI: cl!-.li. ..e Al- eA. l\
t.ikin. I'lif, e in h!o,li. !.-i%\ i l -iNActi ced 1eie.


.l1l t I i'Lu_ the\ le f: Ii ellei l lle!i)Iled hIt
iev.oIle i.__tle_. for their client If Lhotl
ha i tI ,, i, r!.Il
._ e .-;imple_ of iDR ;, e\p,.in icr.n inl
.cce t.-ince Peter., cite'.

jUVENILE MEDIATION C LINIC
i-nde! diiecti.,on of IDR As_,oci,-ie
Diiectit Atli-.on c Geenc'ieti io left in
l:iare 3 pho!lt, ,, s.tu,,lents. |:erfo:m miiedi .-i-
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I l.lute Ie_-:,hlu I.I i Skil toI., i1nc.-1icei.-ited
Slutellle. The Nti ..t.: ('il Councitl len (t ime
.-oi l Deliniquenc\ honieied thIe clliIc 1t
F2i.i 1 ioi AE IL L oiUk

ALACHUA COUNTY
ME D IATION CLINIC
.A\ill conite ted smit!-c!.iim's cAid-es

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DIIptuiteN IICltidle th!,Se Iehl.eel nei.e l-
1.,! eel:l,],! cied tlo, s. !.infiloi,',! tenrl,-!nt
.in l i1nir1..:i c.O-.nitructon,, c.is;e

FLORI I) A A G RIC ULTUI R A L
M EDIIATION SERVICE
F.ilne s \ t! dtli'utes u \V tI h i_I S
Dep.--I1!!ent ofI A' !ic.tultue ,:fo en tin!M c !on-
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.'inti -.ii1il.ii 155'ue-. .'e 1meitl ti'i il


38 UFLAW

















INT ER NAITIO AL I N I TIA I VI' ES
IDR I'i.:.i\ ltie- dlieput te Ie.i.:lu.:. help
.ni .i1 In tet n.-,'ici.-in 1 I. .:i! ,i Repiesenritt'i\e
ti:.)m ui C% int te- inc!Ilin'2 .li Ut.ii 2. IJ -. iil..
P.:.) Irnl H .1-i- l Ainle .1 eilh.-i le.-I rn dI.i ',nute
te ,.:*ILutI t ,:n ii tlie C( .li i .es t ille c.e -Ii eu .it. ii
fr,.:,m iF \ iitinl I.-w. fn:ullt\
"\Ve ieceiitl\ IihCtedl tlhlee ieplesent.t-
tit\es fr.ni i_i ,,i-;in ,li. Peteirs s. l "The\
\,.ele .i iNtice *:f tFhe Hiitu. ( 1un1r tihe
i.-i :,'ciite ilirect..:i .:'f the Le ...il A id ('lnic.
irnd tile direcroi .:.f the L -iv. De\ el,:.',pimer' i
entire e v. hio is .1 ilii.-ftipei .:.n f' : thie
li.J .i n l.i P.irl. i.iienit '

.i ii:q irin Fi .'\ed. I .iD i. lie.'tl .:,
the O!l.-mindo-..-Ied Ft.-\ed.-li Aedlii.-.:.n
Fi-r1i .ri'tee itledi.-iu ih.:'n I' iii e lienlNI.-
kil! tl .-. i ..'! .-tu. es F _.t\ed.- ,i i",:,-
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.iD tMn6 to nlIel C tlCuI1 Jm.l.e .i.:.h .
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(Oenl.:n J.iED 52 irtined the fiTi fTe il
'teppin' ; do\ i fi\ i:, til e Florirl.di Su.|',ieme'
C'..tlll In 10'''


DISPUTE RESOLUTION
"IF I LEAD, WILL YOU FOLLOW?"
One of the more unique specialties
taught in UF's IDR classes is reconcilia-
tion. Professor Jonathan Cohen (center,
leading students through a dispute
resolution exercise), a nationally
known expert on dispute resolution,
says the concept is as basic as the
"golden rule" that is, do unto
others as you would have them do to
you until it comes to trying to
make it fit in the legal system.
"If one person injures another
in some way, an apology should be
a common practice simply out of
morality or at least good manners,"
Cohen said. "Yet because of liability
issues, people have become afraid to
apologize."
But Cohen, who earned his law
degree and a doctorate in economics
at Harvard University, says studies
show in most cases, apologies would
help settle disputes rather than
escalate them.
"A 2001 Florida law excludes from
admission in court any expressions of
sympathy after accidents," Cohen said,
noting that many states now are look-
ing at drafting similar laws allowing
people to apologize without creating a
legal liability for those who do so.


UFLAW 39









'SEEO S I


'Artichokes and Lobsters'

The Tale of a UFLaw Professor's Dedication to Students


Thanks to the interest, concern and
understanding of a UFLaw faculty
member more than 30 years ago, an
important new book When Race
Becomes Real by one of the first
African-American women to attend the
University of Florida is dedicated to him.
Distinguished Professor of Law and
Stephen C. O'Connell Chair Walter
Weyrauch (seepage 41) is honored by
Bernestine Singley (JD 74, above), in her
new book published by Lawrence Hill
Books with a shared dedication to
Odessa Roberts Singley (her mother).
"This is a tremendous honor," said
Weyrauch. "I have read the book, and the
work is quite stunning."
When Race Becomes Real is a mov-
ing collection of personal stories from
well-known African-American and white
authors about their experiences with race
relations in the U.S.
Why the dedication to Weyrauch?
Singley speaks of him with fondness
and admiration: "Walter [is] what we in
the law call 'sui generis,' one of a kind.
He always was somebody who thought
outside the box."
Singley said Weyrauch affirmed she
had the right idea about herself and about
challenging preconceptions.
"Maybe it is because he is German,"


Singley explains, "and came to the U.S. as
an outsider, so he thought as an outsider
and was able to relate to black students
and racial tensions as well as gender and
class issues."
Singley took several courses from
Weyrauch. He remembers her as a top
student, one of only three or four African-
American females to attend UFLaw at the
time, and relates she was a controversial
activist against racial segregation with a
"piercing, far reaching intellect."
Weyrauch provided strong endorse-
ment to help Singley get into Harvard,
where she obtained a second law degree.
None of the other law faculty had the
same impact on Singley as Weyrauch.
"There were several others who were
'helpful,' but not in ways that I was able
to identify as 'helpful' back then....."
The faculty, Singley adds, "provided
multiple examples of how entrenched race
and gender oppression were and made me
even more determined to not just over-
come as an individual, but to document
what I learned for blacks, whites and
others who are committed to toppling
race, gender and class hierarchies."
Weyrauch joined the law faculty in
1957. He was born in Germany, receiving
law degrees there before coming to the
U.S. to obtain his LLB from Georgetown
University, his LLM from Harvard, and a
JSD from Yale University. He still teaches
in the areas of business organizations, and
comparative and family law.
Singley began her career "as the
racial integration person," as she describes
herself, during her early school years.


After graduating from a racially segregat-
ed high school in C'i.i lo:rr in 1967,
Singley attended the almost entirely
white Lawrence University in Appleton,
Wisconsin. She followed that with UF law
school, where Singley says, "I mastered
white male talk, white male power and
white male entitlement."
After Harvard, she served as an assis-
tant attorney general in Massachusetts and
Texas. She worked as a mediator and con-
sultant and is a full-time writer.
Weyrauch and Singley have main-
tained steady correspondence. She stayed
in his home when visiting Gainesville,
and has a standing invitation to stay
whenever she returns. She is more than
just a former student for Weyrauch, "she
is a good friend."
One example of Weyrauch's under-
standing, according to Singley, of what
African-American law students would
face from the establishment of the times:
"He knew students would face dis-
crimination when interviewing for jobs
after graduation, and said one way law
firm recruiters weeded out applicants was
by taking them to dinner and ordering
artichokes (and/or lobsters, he told others)
to see if they knew how to eat them.
"It was as much about class as about
race, because white applicants were being
judged and found wanting as well. So
Walter invited us to his home and served
artichokes and that's where I learned to
eat them. Walter's brilliance was that he
didn't just do the analysis, he intervened
in a way that allowed me to shift the bal-
ance of power." U


40 UFLAW









'SEEO S I


'Artichokes and Lobsters'

The Tale of a UFLaw Professor's Dedication to Students


Thanks to the interest, concern and
understanding of a UFLaw faculty
member more than 30 years ago, an
important new book When Race
Becomes Real by one of the first
African-American women to attend the
University of Florida is dedicated to him.
Distinguished Professor of Law and
Stephen C. O'Connell Chair Walter
Weyrauch (seepage 41) is honored by
Bernestine Singley (JD 74, above), in her
new book published by Lawrence Hill
Books with a shared dedication to
Odessa Roberts Singley (her mother).
"This is a tremendous honor," said
Weyrauch. "I have read the book, and the
work is quite stunning."
When Race Becomes Real is a mov-
ing collection of personal stories from
well-known African-American and white
authors about their experiences with race
relations in the U.S.
Why the dedication to Weyrauch?
Singley speaks of him with fondness
and admiration: "Walter [is] what we in
the law call 'sui generis,' one of a kind.
He always was somebody who thought
outside the box."
Singley said Weyrauch affirmed she
had the right idea about herself and about
challenging preconceptions.
"Maybe it is because he is German,"


Singley explains, "and came to the U.S. as
an outsider, so he thought as an outsider
and was able to relate to black students
and racial tensions as well as gender and
class issues."
Singley took several courses from
Weyrauch. He remembers her as a top
student, one of only three or four African-
American females to attend UFLaw at the
time, and relates she was a controversial
activist against racial segregation with a
"piercing, far reaching intellect."
Weyrauch provided strong endorse-
ment to help Singley get into Harvard,
where she obtained a second law degree.
None of the other law faculty had the
same impact on Singley as Weyrauch.
"There were several others who were
'helpful,' but not in ways that I was able
to identify as 'helpful' back then....."
The faculty, Singley adds, "provided
multiple examples of how entrenched race
and gender oppression were and made me
even more determined to not just over-
come as an individual, but to document
what I learned for blacks, whites and
others who are committed to toppling
race, gender and class hierarchies."
Weyrauch joined the law faculty in
1957. He was born in Germany, receiving
law degrees there before coming to the
U.S. to obtain his LLB from Georgetown
University, his LLM from Harvard, and a
JSD from Yale University. He still teaches
in the areas of business organizations, and
comparative and family law.
Singley began her career "as the
racial integration person," as she describes
herself, during her early school years.


After graduating from a racially segregat-
ed high school in C'i.i lo:rr in 1967,
Singley attended the almost entirely
white Lawrence University in Appleton,
Wisconsin. She followed that with UF law
school, where Singley says, "I mastered
white male talk, white male power and
white male entitlement."
After Harvard, she served as an assis-
tant attorney general in Massachusetts and
Texas. She worked as a mediator and con-
sultant and is a full-time writer.
Weyrauch and Singley have main-
tained steady correspondence. She stayed
in his home when visiting Gainesville,
and has a standing invitation to stay
whenever she returns. She is more than
just a former student for Weyrauch, "she
is a good friend."
One example of Weyrauch's under-
standing, according to Singley, of what
African-American law students would
face from the establishment of the times:
"He knew students would face dis-
crimination when interviewing for jobs
after graduation, and said one way law
firm recruiters weeded out applicants was
by taking them to dinner and ordering
artichokes (and/or lobsters, he told others)
to see if they knew how to eat them.
"It was as much about class as about
race, because white applicants were being
judged and found wanting as well. So
Walter invited us to his home and served
artichokes and that's where I learned to
eat them. Walter's brilliance was that he
didn't just do the analysis, he intervened
in a way that allowed me to shift the bal-
ance of power." U


40 UFLAW









* FACULTY VIEWS


'Citizenship by Choice'
Ewccrpis t l'm 3 speti h b -.iephcr. C OConnell Chair Di'.hlnpliihed
Pr.'lfe'or Waller 0 Wer.anich lai podium)l ., new cilizen at
nalirlizaiicn iecremr n.n in M a\ a tIhe U S Circuil CoIirihLou e


S1 .1 cern:.n .11 en Le \ou h.\ e .an a.d\ m-
S.-Le ,\ei Amei c.1n citizens v.\ho v. ere
Siborn here N\.:,u '. ill be citizens 1\
choice. You came heie bec.iiLiSe \out
hintede d to Ibe here
I camie fit:omn Gerinatn in 195i and
\x.iS niattii.lized 11-1 l';S bhefoie the s.mne
UInited States Disnitit Co(un I x.-I AlireadlI
a protfess-i .t the C('lleue of Lax,.. x hlete I
hliae .tamihlit ft -1 5 x\ent
I\ ch..ice tI become :in Ameic.an
citizen \-i's dictated Il\ 1. ciIcinI.itaice_.
\\ hen the N.zis came to, p..:.\er in 1933. i
\.is !3 I spent the .I ar \ e.ts heini .ab:,le
I.:' studr \ :eca.is.e pioI he.aIlth pre\enited me
fr.m bemin: 'a sldier At tile end of the
\.ii. l x\ Ais .1 \ .nllg \ et in ie thie finil
itlees of in\ edlic.Iti'nr. After the Geiman.
uic,'COrindltio1nal surrendei there '\\.is no
food anld '. water. nr:i electrcit\ ..:.r ti.tns-
'lO:rt.,tion. The prisonisI had beetin O'pienei'l b\
letie.tini-, German tio .:ps..nd I11itrdle ers-
iand thiexes- ranimed the stieeti Eei\ ine
x\\is concerned x lth inimedi.ate suit ix iil
TIIliuIh t not \et admnitttedl t the nat. I
\\ is di.ifted ti: the nev.\ .:.i ariizeil cit\
police int Fi.tnkfrt. NM\ t.i-ak \\.iS .:. intel-
\ e\\ l..:.\\er .iank Nazi leadleis ,icleredl
.1i1ested Lb\ the America:n miliit.ir\ ,_i x ern-
ment The\ filled prisons to c.ip.icin itd
dil sp'.,sIti.n h:inl It.:. be mna.cle v. bhetlier the\
cOuld be released ,t %\ heiliet\ thlie\ pI)se-dl a
ian.et it:, Allied forces C':ncerns- at tihe
time \\ere militat\ either th.-an politic.il
In the process t:if mi\ \.,ifk. le.t ne>cl
about :i large Gestapo caid file that ha.d
esca.iped delstructin 1I i\\x .i. asked I.: ex t iu-
ate the content Man\ \ears later. the
re-sultis .ere publiiheicl. Ib:'.h in the Li.S
andl Germ.ian Thie Gesitapl' had recei\edl
11i intifonii:ltion frrrnim suiices one \\.:.ild
le.Ist Luspect f..:.reitners II\ iI' iIn
Ge ml .ini l and peitsons \\ l1' x'.ele oppo-l
nenits i \ victims of the ieuime These c...l-
l.vboratr i lecel\eil ni: mone. Their c. im-
penris.tioln x 1'.. a i chance .11 r\it i\ .11


When the c. 'iLIns reopened. I '. is :in
ass-.:ci ate in .1 FrAmkfurn JexMih l.1\ firm.
\\ which ha.tinlle1 thouil.m'ild n '..f resttitutionl
cases. .:f per. on.s \\ I.. hadi. been pei secure I
for i.acial lel0 ious 01 p0.I)litic.1l le.a-onsS
I had to relixe the \eau s of the Nazi
past. often in gtiues.,me detail People h:iid
been deplledl of ci\ Il rihlits' nd citizen-
Ship. fi:,ce'd It: sitrerndler pi:,lp'ei\ andi
IbNisminesse. t,' flee the coMintr\ o be c.a-
ried a\ ti c.on centra.tion c.i.mlips nd
piob:.l:le dleat Ii :c. ild lii e \\ oikedl on
cases morlie related t1.: ci\ il and criminal
maiiiet bmIit 1 '. :iniedl 1t help .undo some
o.f the d.amace that lhadl been cldone.

"It is a unique country

because the Founding Fathers

built a nation around ideals."

I ,and .t fe'. othei Getm('n lrl'.\ ei
x\ere inltedl in 1952 bi the 11 S.
Depa.inent of State t'.: \.iit \\ aIlinion.
D C. Aftel mll lettlrn t : Gerinmn\ I
Applied for immii'igraition. and in llilmmel
1053 immiI .itiion x\.is sraniteid .-i'le
fioin elaties in Florirla. I hadl no coinnec-
ton. artnd couldil nI.1 ti.l-sftei money \ NI
p.inllier enc'.:'i.mitiedlme i .: tO '
I mn.ide Im\ choice I \\as .:1 esta.b-
lishecl lI\'. er in Germnim\Y. .3. facing .an
tnceil.all future inl the iI S Econo:micncll\.
I \\.is better o.:.ff in Gei rm.nin anld x'.oulM be
exen nr0o\\. But 1 \\inted t1, be in tihe Ui S
it is .Ai unique counMt\ bec.aise the
Foi-n'li!,2 F.ithers bill .1 na.l:.Oin 1iiounl
ideals No\\ here haIs this been better
exiessedl tha.1n in the openilu lines of the
Decl.it.tion of independence Thete is no
other nli!.:,!in flIirnded on1 pton'llounIcemienlits
of such s\\ eep t in pAit,'.elt
Thihs does not me.in these ideals haixe
.11\\ s been e.ealized \\ lien the
Declara.ition \ as a.ildop'tedl in I --1 sl.\ el\
\\. lea.l .1 and v'.omen h Iad no equal rights.


When I came t UiF in C15. it \\.is I.
i.alciAll\ se-regated as the rest ...f the
South I had .Ialmosi nio xxomen ri l Nlentll
\\e still cleal '. ith the \esities if this his-
ton Much of the Iav. I le.irnell and I.iLithi
in the Li S h:is ldeiAlt \ itlh the conintmnuir
strupil!e fot equal arncl cA i il riulhts
F.i months .,iei mi\ Immni,il.t.ion 1
could riot find a iob. A. : (GeI Ger.tn l.\\ \ei.
1 x\..s either ox\eiquali fiecl for .oidin.arn
Jobs or 1urmdlerquialifiedl foi firmin monilt!\
ate potatoes. .ipples. b:re.:il .iinl some
sau.LIsA'e Fiomnl 1953-5 sti iiled li\'.
:I. aciLIn. a icqi !ii' r lix'. de r.!eeS fric.'
GeorLet,.\\ mi a.nnd H:ir\ aid1 at1d e\lenita.llx Ai
second d'octi:.rite :it Y'a.le 1 liled in SmLhb-
StJ.Ild.JId. Io.iacI-in-fe-ted 10looms .id. o.:f
c.:it se. couIld inot affoid .1 car. But I ha1Il
milade mi\ choice. A:nl the qtOeSt.:.n n f
leturninrig to erm.anm ne\er came tup i
.a11 heie hecau.ie 1 \\.anted ti, be heie
NI\ choice resulted in leV'. birds beyond
e\'.pect.ition A. smtnificalnt inumler of
ludi.ies .irnd I .i\ \ers practicint.r in Floridi
hi:x e ieeni 1 m\ istlents As: le.Ial 'chl.:.la
I 2.A.ined inli'ghts in nriumer.: -.i' \\.A\ s. I
lihi:e learned the impon.ince of f.ict .inid
th.it neither factsi- nor illeones c.in be full\
ttlIsttedl. conitrx eisi es ha; e multip.le ar>,u-
111meniS: ,icl solutions". and finlAl shotion!.
ate noti ,il\i\ s. Satisfactory. Nluch :. f 1m\
ieacl'hitiL- .111nd x' 11111 'ui x' oudM Inoi hL.ile
t:cciiedl hadl i sta \edi in Geiirm.m On the
other hani. some of m\ pubLlic.tionsi
V'.,oulI lia\e n'e\ ei occmitied to me if mi
b.icklroLutid ha.d l been purel\ Amet ic.n.
..u \L. ill fint'd in \ 0.'I r:.\\ ,n experience
th.t \ out life \\ ill be entichell in nunme -
:'LI. \'.\ s hlM:'l tio preldic Ycou '. ill h.ale
pl'Iporltinlties bI'.seo d i1on \\ hat \u le.rIneil
anti e\peierinced itn thle past .111t \'. hitl \o ,
\,ill learn an:d e\lperience in the future. 1.:.
the benefit .o:f us all ( Coinraitilt- ion :,ni
\ .:.ur iat.it liz.111 11ion I \ ish \ LI luck. U


UFLAW -11












Scholarship & Activities


Andrew Z. Adkins III
Director, Legal Technology
Institute/International Center
for Automated Information
Research
m Spoke in April at ABA
Government and Public
Sector Lawyers Division
Conference in San Antonio on "Technology in
the Public Law Office." Also spoke at UFLaw
reunion on -.. "'s Technology Tomorrow's
Future," and the Oklahoma Bar Association Solo
& Small Firm Conference.

W. Scott Van Alstyne Jr.
Professor of Law Emeritus
Inducted as a Fellow of the
Wisconsin Law Foundation.
Fellows are nominated for
outstanding attainment in the
practice of law, contributions
to the welfare of their commu-
nities, and service in the advancement of the
legal profession in Wisconsin.

Thomas T. Ankersen
Director, CGR Conservation
Clinic and Costa Rica Law
Summer Study Program
Presented paper with UF
Geomatics Professor Grenville
Barnes, "Inside the Polygon:
Land and Resource Tenure in
Common Property Regimes in Latin America,"
at the UF/IFAS international conference,
"Working Forests in the Tropics" in Gainesville
in February.

Fletcher N. Baldwin Jr.
Chesterfield Professor of Law;
Director, UF Center for
SInternational Financial Crimes
Studies; Honorary Fellow,
Society for Advanced Legal
Studies, University of London
Spoke at Latin America
Conference put on by UFLaw Center for
Governmental Responsibility in April.


Bill F. Chamberlin
Joseph L. Brechner Eminent Scholar
of Mass Communications & Affiliate
Professor of Law
* Published "Freedom of
Information Act" and "Media
and the Law" in The Oxford
Companion to American Law.


Jonathan R. Cohen
Associate Professor of Law
* Published "The Ethics of
Respect in Negotiation," 18
Negotiation Journal 115-120
(April 2002). m Spoke in
Orlando on "Apologies in
(Continues page 44)


42 UFLAW


FACULTY


FACULTY RESEARCH


Practical Applications









Z FACULTY SPOTLIGHT


'Skeletons in the Classroom'
'D.T.' Retiring After 35 Years of Educating, Entertaining


At first glance, UFLaw Professor
David "D.T." Smith's dead-pan
expression and crisp New England
accent suggest an "old-schooler" similar
to straitlaced Professor Kingsfield in The
Paper ( h. i,. movie and television show.
That perception is wrong, as sitting
through one of his classes demonstrates.
"He's absolutely hilarious," said
David Chopin (lL). "His personal and
historical anecdotes make class really
interesting."
Smith says "humor keeps students'
attention. I can find something funny in
almost any current event, and don't mind
poking fun at myself either."
Students would be surprised to learn
Smith once was shy. Only after beginning
to teach did he come out of his shell, to
the delight of thousands of students
through the years.
Among his most memorable class-
room attention grabbers is "Trixie the
Testatrix," an old science-class skeleton
that has made guest appearances in
Smith's Estates & Trusts classes for more
than 10 years. He puts pencils in Trixie's
eye sockets to demonstrate the proper line
of vision (exactly straight ahead) for wit-
nessing a will-signing. His students agree
- Trixie and the pencils are an effective
and riveting method for fixing this point
of law firmly in their minds.
Smith earned his BA in history at
Yale, and JD cum laude at Boston


University. Before coming to UF in 1968,
he taught at Indiana, Duquesne and Case
Western Reserve universities. He is an
authority on probate law and author of the
Florida Probate Code Manual. The book
he is most proud of is The Fi,..ili and
Inheritance, first published in 1970.
After 35 years behind the podium,
Smith will retire in June 2003. "I've been
here so long I've taught some students'
parents," he said. "Like the Heekin family
from Jacksonville. I've taught fathers and
sons, uncles and nephews during the last
30 years."
Fellow Professor Jeffrey Harrison
notes that, "you will not find a person
with greater loyalty to this law school."
Others share this appreciation for
Smith, as evidenced by plaques on his
office wall, such as the ones from Florida
Law Review and Blue Key naming him an
honorary member and from the Institute
of Cuban Lawyers recognizing his pio-
neering efforts in helping exiled lawyers
meet Florida Bar qualifications. He
served many years on the UF Faculty
Senate and chaired several of its most
vital committees. He has served UFLaw
well on the Admissions Committee, on
which he first began work in 1995 and
chaired since 1999.
"D.T.'s personality, his concern for
students and the school, and his leader-
ship make him an excellent member of
this team," notes Assistant Dean for
Admissions Michael Patrick. "He has
been instrumental in our historical selec-
tion of top quality students, and played a
significant role in helping us successfully
plan for and implement One Florida as it
impacted almost overnight the way state
universities look at and select applicants."
As one of Smith's current students,
Hollie Noblick (1L), expresses it, "D.T.
Smith is just plain awesome."
Though Smith did not attend UF, he
soon adopted the Gators and has a partic-
ular fondness for football. In addition to


his love of Gator sports, he enjoys salt-
water fishing and pleasure reading.
Smith's immediate family has a total
of nine degrees from UF. Wife Sandy,
whom he met at Yale as an undergraduate
and married during his second year of law
school, earned her JD from UF. Their
three sons also garnered UF degrees -
David Jr. is an MD, and Douglas and
Daniel are attorneys.
"The chain will be broken when my
oldest grandson enters FSU in Fall 2003,"
Smith said.
During retirement, Smith plans to
continue updating the Florida Probate
Code Manual and would like to teach
occasional classes. "I'm not yet burned
out," Smith said. "I still love teaching."
"For more than 34 years, D.T. Smith
has been one of the most ebullient and
outspoken members of the faculty," said
close friend Professor Joe Little.
"Students have cheered while the faculty
sometimes cringed.
"But behind this bravado is a teach-
ing giant: a man committed to his sub-
jects, to his students and to the well-being
of this institution of which he has been
such a prominent feature," Little contin-
ued. D.T.'s retirement will punch a huge
hole in this faculty in many more ways
than one." :


U FLAW 43


FAC U LTY










(Continued from page 42)
Law and Mediation" at the 11th Annual
Florida Dispute Resolution Conference for
Mediators and Arbitrators August 23rd.
* Promoted to associate professor of law.
* Spoke at Marquette Law School on new
apology legislation in February. m Serving as
vice chair, Negotiation Committee, American
Bar Association Section on Dispute
Resolution.


Stuart R. Cohn
Professor of Law & Gerald A.
Sohn Scholar, International
Programs Coordinator, Directc
of International and
Comparative Law Certificate
Program
* Appointed senior special
fellow of United Nations
Institute for Training and
Research and entitled to a
Laissez-Passer from U.N.

Charles W. Collier
Professor of Law & Affiliate
Professor of Philosophy
m Published essay on 9/11 ter
rorist attacks and moral rela-
tivism in the Community
Network's Summer 2002
quarterly journal, The
Responsive Community.


Jeffrey Davis
Professor of Law & Gerald A.
Sohn Scholar, Trustee
Research Fellow
Published "Fixing
Florida's Execution Lien
Law, Part Two: Florida's
New Judgment Lien on
Personal Property;' in the Florida Law
Review. m Spoke to Orlando Bankruptcy Bar
on "Recent Mishaps and Other Developments
Under Florida's New Judgment Lien Law" in
August.
ir
Patricia E. Dilley
Professor of Law
Republished "Breaking the
Glass Slipper: Reflections
on the Self-Employment
Tax" in GP Solo Magazine 's
issue
featuring "The Best Articles
Published by the ABA."

Nancy E. Dowd
Chesterfield Smith
Professor of Law
r Published "Gender and
Law," in The Oxford
Companion to American
Law. m Helped write a
"Statement of Principles on



HOMAS F. COTTER
ofessor of Law,
rector of Intellectual Property Law Program


n Published "SLant I labili-' .ind l its
\Iterriatli% s 1i PaItcrt L.4."' I l" B r &,
II hnfrIvy Laii lJ,,,nal "V-.45 ( 21l-12 I w th
R)gcr D Blan I. Pu lll 'shl d "Irltrllucl tion t. -
ithe I.P SlynilSticuri." 14 Flridi i Jurn l' .'



[lunm.u1 RiLghi Svnip,1nlunm hel at f l l [ .a\ iI
NM.rch 2 (1il1 ReptIAhIeI 'I] rtile It-luII
PIh'opelt) alrdl tIhe ] i c enll l I[ictll I .rLinr e'
in 'Iinhlme [\V .1 a In t'i-'iv liie I .'Lst iutled Fi
F i.-rint.l .- / h I.' te!i 1 tual l l'.r J r|.t 1 "-21i' tuth 10'1 %' & Rudt Idi .-L-li,.Iuil ds. I.h ar I
l iu [ld. 2(1112 t .rtcle i in.n.Ill pubhll- ed ii -l 4 -.ilI r.ust BullU i, 21 I1-2* ['I 9 1 I
* Pul1 h'lI eI "'- \rrc Settl nentl ,'I Pe.Int DIpl.1i [l Cleg.l Per Sc Ili th .ll .tii s.0 BullT t;.,
120021, I. -w11h R.oge 13,luu i PiubulIeoI "Retllinking Ptient I)arn.ges" Il Uthe 1 'a.%
Itl!e t al Jn.,p,, r.t Law I.,urP'al IlIh Roger Blair 0. Spoke at C'ard.',/. [.aI SLha,,l
. I mpIsitInL ,n ". \c,,'mnn ,de.it i.g tle n I In. ii' .n -I 11. t (opyrighlLedL WOrks t.r
R]1eh21 ,i Putp. s'sL I tiicer the l.ir I T-c% I L<.tiri .ini *-' lnght .\ t SL t'L otI 1111(3" in
\',ril m Pese ticdI a papt:r. strict I lahtbl n .iul d tLitrlle ilid[ c il PdRaIll I .jv..'" .t fit:
BFIrkcIlt- f-.riter fOr [ .i &. l, hniigi ', PaLciit Reloin f.oierencc thbilcd Is- iiltudigii
'ILc-1LitIon, b'y "mile -d t1 hne bghtecst pAteit sLihlars i thft counLtir '


Family Responsibilities and Academic
Work," adopted by AAUP Council (at
www.aaup.org) in November. m Joined
Genetic Ties Project (multidisciplinary proj-
ect focusing on implications of DNA testing
and paternity) as a result of her work on
fatherhood i r.. k .. .-... Fatherhood, pub-
lished by NYU Press 2000). The project is
centered at the Institute for Bioethics, Health
Policy and Law, School of Medicine,
University of Louisville.

Mark A. Fenster
Assistant Professor of Law
His paper, "The Symbols
of Governance: Thurman
Illl' Arnold and the Cultural
S.". Study of Law," was accepted
for presentation at the
Columbia, USC, and
Georgetown "Law and
Humanities Interdisciplinary
Junior Scholar Workshop."

Alyson Craig Flournoy
Professor of Law & Director,
Environmental and Land Use
Law Program
SPresented "Unearthing
Environmental Ethics" at
International Conference on
Ethics Across the
Curriculum at UF in February. m Presented
overview of the Endangered Species Act for
CLE conference on "Habitat Conservation
Planning and the Endangered Species Act" in
Orlando in March. m Elected to the Executive
Committee of the AALS Environmental Law
Section in January. m Appointed to President
Young's Sustainability Task Force, which is
focusing on ways to make UF a global leader
in sustainability. m Appointed by Dean Mills
to chair the Self Study Committee for the law
school in preparation for the 2003 ABA and
AALS sabbatical inspection.

Alison Eckles Gerencser
Associate Director, Institute for
Dispute Resolution; Legal Skills
Professor
m Conducted panel presenta-
S tion on "Changing the Legal
Culture of Divorces: Policy
Making, Program
Development and Challenges for the Future" at
the AFCC conference at Waikoloa, Hawaii.


FA T










Michael W. Gordon
Chesterfield Smith
Professor of Law
m Published "Legal
Cultures of Latin
America and the
United States:
Conflict or
Merger?,' Proceedings of the 2001
Annual LatCrit Conference. m Gave
address, "Thinking About Cuba
Post Castro Cuba Began a Decade
Ago" at legal program sponsored by
the Cuban Legal Forum, Union
Nacional de Juristas de Cuba and
Universidad de La Habana. Also rep-
resented the ABA to arrange a 2003
trip to Cuba by ABA officers.
* Lectured on "NAFTA and
Agriculture," at American Farm
Federation Annual Conference,
American Agricultural Economic
Association, in Chicago, and on
NAFTA and dispute resolution at
Universidad Iberoamericana in
Mexico City. m Spoke on "E-
Commerce: Issues of Privacy," at
ABA International Law Section fall
meeting in Monterrey, Mexico, and
on "Fundamentals of International
Business Transactions," at ABA
International Law Section spring
meeting in New York. m Participated
in ABA ILEX program in
Guatemala and Costa Rica to meet
with the presidents, members of
Constitutional and Supreme Courts,
senior legislators and leading aca-
demics and members of the bar.
* Served on two NAFTA Chapter 19
panels, in one acting in place of a
Mexican federal district court judge
applying Mexican law, and in the
second acting in place of a U.S. fed-
eral district court judge applying
U.S. law. m Consulted on cases
involving Guatemala, Mexico,
Colombia, France and Spain and for
officials in Guatemala and Costa
Rica with regard to proposed United
States-Central America Free Trade
Agreement. m Elected to honorary
membership in Academia Mexicana
de Derecho Internacional Privado y
Comparado (Mexican Academy of
Private International and
Comparative Law) and Guatemalan
Bar Association. m Appointed co-


chair of ABA International Law
Section's International Transactions
Committee, and put on
"Fundamentals of International
Business Law" panel at ABA
International Law Section spring
meeting. m Served in Mexico City
on NAFTA panel involving urea
imports from Russia and U.S. Was
appointed arbitrator in Miami in a
dispute between entities in Canada
and Venezuela.

Jeffrey L. Harrison
Stephen C.
O'Connell Professor
of Law
m Published first
edition of case-
book, Law and
Economics:
Cases, Materials and Behavioral
Perspectives (Westgroup). m
Published "Online Music: Antitrust
and Copyright Perspectives" in
Antitrust Bulletin.

Berta Esperanza
Hernandez-Truyol
Levin Mabie & Levin
Professor of Law
Published
"Latinas, Culture
and Human Rights:
A Model for
Making Change, Saving Soul,"
Rutgers Women's Rts L. Rep.
m Published "Crossing Borderlands
of Inequality with International
Legal Methodologies -The
Promise of Multiple Feminisms," in
the German Yearbook of
International Law. m Published "Out
of the Shadows: Traversing the
Imaginary of Sameness, Difference
and Relationalism Human Rights
Proposal," Wisconsin Women's Law
Journal. m Published "On Becoming
the Other: Cubans, Castro and
Elian," Denv. U. L. Rev. m Published
"Moral Imperialism: A Critical
S.11.i..h. '-." advertised for
summer/fall publication by NYU
press. m Attended the U.S./Cuba
Legal Forum in Havana, Cuba, and
presented a comparative study on
Cuban women on the island and in
exile. m Presented papers on interna-


.U.


SYNOPSIS SPOTLIGHTS
PROFESSOR QUALITY, PRODUCTIVITY

mong information prepared by Associate Dean for Faculty
Development Christopher Slobogin in preparation for 2003
accreditation visits by representatives of the American Bar
Association and Association of American Law Schools is this synop-
sis of quality, diversity and accomplishments of UFLaw faculty:
* UFLaw's 56 tenured/tenure-track faculty includes 16 (29%)
women, and eight (14%) minorities (four African-Americans and
four Latinos/as) the largest numbers/percentages of women
and minority professors in school history. In addition, about 40
adjuncts teach trial practice, trial team, sections of Criminal
Clinic and specialty courses such as patent law, admiralty and
agricultural law.
* Most faculty members graduated from outstanding law schools
at or near the top of the class and were editors or members of
their respective law reviews. More than 20 clerked at the appel-
late level (roughly half in federal court), over 35 were associates
or partners at law firms (15 for five years or more), 10 earned
LLM degrees, and seven received Fulbright awards.
* Student evaluations reflect high satisfaction with professors
(overall rating of 4.20, with five denoting "excellent").
* The faculty publishes books at a high rate 61 treatises, case-
books or similar major books in the past seven years. The per
capital rate for 2000-01 was .45, representing 25 books pub-
lished by 13 different faculty. Since 1996, the faculty also has
authored 264 articles in law reviews and specialty journals pub-
lished by law schools, compared to 141 such articles in the pre-
vious self study period almost a 90% increase. Placement
also has improved, with 73 articles appearing in reviews pub-
lished at the top 50 schools in U.S. News & World Report
rankings (compared to 32 in previous self-study period, an
increase of 130%). Twenty-two appeared in reviews published
by the top 25 law schools in U.S. News rankings (compared to
16 in previous study period, an increase of 27%).
* Faculty have been heavily involved, pro bono, in scores of inter-
national, national, state and local endeavors including the
American Bar Association and Association of American Law
Schools. Since 1996, faculty have served as chairs of the ABA
Committee on Teaching Taxation (Tax Section), Antitrust
Committee (Administrative Law Section) and Ad Hoc Committee
on Law School Outreach (Criminal justice Section): and co- or
vice chair of the International Law Section, Food & Drug Law
Committee (Administrative Law & Regulation Practice Section)
and Committee on Negotiation (Section on Dispute Resolution):
and as members of many other committees and task forces.
Faculty chaired AALS sections on Criminal justice; Jewish Law:
Property: Socioeconomics and the Law: and Tax: and served on
a number of others.


UFLAW 45


FAC U LTY











tional law, feminist jurisprudence, future
economic relations with Cuba, and chil-
dren and human rights at bar association
meetings, law schools and conferences
at UF and in Germany.

Richard H. Hiers
Professor of Religion &
Affiliate Professor of Law
Published "Biblical
Social Welfare
Legislation: Protected
Classes and Provisions
for Persons in Need," 17
Journal of Law and Religion 49-96
(2002). m Published "Sexual Harassment:
Title VII and Title IX Protections and
Prohibitions -the Current State of the
Law," 19 Annual of the Society of
Christian Ethics 391-406 (1999).
* Published online article, "Reverence for
Life and Environmental Ethics in Biblical
Law and Covenant," part of a forum on
religion and ecology (http://environment.
harvard edu/religion/research/
chris hiers.htm) in 2001.

Thomas R. Hurst
Professor of Law & Sam T.
Dell Research Scholar
m Published
Unincorporated Business
Associations: Agency,
Partnership and Limited
Liability Companies
(Westgroup, 2d ed.).

jerold H. Israel
Ed Rood Eminent Scholar
in Trial Advocacy &
Procedure
m Published "Grand
Jury," in Encyclopedia of
Crime and Justice
(2d ed., 2, pp.737-745)
(J. Dressler ed.). m Published Criminal
Procedure and the Constitution,
(Westgroup 2002) (with Yale Kamisar and
Wayne LaFave). m Published Modern
Criminal Procedure (Westgroup, 10th ed.
2002) (with Yale Kamisar, Wayne LaFave
and Nancy King).


Lyrissa Barnett Lidsky
Professor of Law;
UF Research Foundation
Professor
m Testified before House
Energy and Commerce
Committee in hearing on
"Oath Taking, Truth
Telling, and Remedies in
the Business World."

Paul Magnarella
Professor of Anthropology;
Affiliate Professor of Law
m Published chapter,
"Recent Developments in
the International Law of
Genocide," in
Annihilating ': i.. .. ,
The I. .. .. i of Genocide (Univ. of
California Press 2002) (A. Hinton ed.)
m Published "Explaining Rwanda's 1994
Genocide," in the Journal Human Rights
and Human if .... ( 2, No. 1, 2002).
m Published "The Evolving Right of Self-
Determination of Indigenous Peoples," in
St. Thomas Law Review. m Lectured on
"Explaining Human Calamity: The Cases
ofYugoslavia and Rwanda" at Georgia
College, and "The Place of Human Rights
in the Liberal Arts Curriculum" at Georgia
State University. m Joined the editorial
board of Human Rights and Human
I .. a journal produced by the Center
On Rights Development at Denver
University's Graduate School of
International Studies. (Journal at:
w w .... ..., ., .'I 1 .)

Diane H. Mazur
Professor of Law
a Published "Rehnquist's
Vietnam: Constitutional
Separatism and the
Stealth Advance of
Martial Law," 77
Indiana Law Journal
(July 2002). She also presented the article
at the Biennial International Conference
of the Inter-University Seminar on Armed
Forces and Society, and chaired a confer-
ence panel on "Law and the Armed
Forces." u Spoke on "The
Republicanization of the American
Military" at the UFLaw symposium on
the "Legal Implications of the Attack on


46 UFLAW


FAC U LTY











America" in September. m Spoke on "The
Downside of Advocacy: The Making of Don't
Ask, Don't Tell" at the University of
California, Hastings College of Law in
September. m Appointed to Advisory Board
of National Institute of Military Justice.

SElizabeth McCulloch
Director of Social Policy,
Center for Governmental
Responsibility
m Recognized in March as a
2002 Alachua/Bradford
County "Woman of
Distinction" for her work with and on behalf
of low-income people in the community (see
page 52). u She is conducting training work-
shops for social service providers and wel-
fare recipients on Florida's welfare program,
and working with a community group to
establish a residence for homeless teenagers
and with the local homeless coalition to
prepare the county's grant application for
federal homeless funding.

Martin J. McMahon Jr.
Clarence J. TeSelle Professor
of Law
m Published Federal Income
Taxation of individuals,
(Warren, Gorham & Lamont,
3d ed., 2002) (with Boris
Bittker & Lawrence A.
Zelenak). m Published 2002 revised editions
of the Study Problems and Teachers' Manual
for Federal Income Taxation of Partnerships
and S Corporations, (Foundation Press, 3d
ed., 1999) (with P McDaniel & D.
Simmons), Federal Income Taxation of
Corporations, (Foundation Press, 2d ed.)
(with P McDaniel & D. Simmons) and
Federal Income Taxation of Business
Organizations, (Foundation Press, 3d ed.,
1999) (with P McDaniel & D. Simmons),
and 2002 supplements for these three books
plus Federal Income Taxation, Cases and
Materials, (Foundation Press, 4th ed., 1998)
(with P McDaniel, H. Ault & D. Simmons)
and Bittker & McMahon 's Federal Income
Taxation of Individuals, (Warren, Gorham &
Lamont, 2d ed.) m Published "A Whirlwind
Tour of the Internal Revenue Code's At-Risk
and Passive Activity Loss Rules," 36 Real
Property Probate & Trust Journal 673 (2002)
(with Boris I. Bittker and Lawrence A.
Zelenak). m Published "Economic Substance,
Purposive Activity, and Corporate Tax


Shelters," 94 Tax Notes 1017 (February 25,
2002). m Published "Recent Developments in
Federal Income Taxation: The Year 2001," 6
Florida Tax Review 627 (2002) (with Ira B.
Shepard). m Presented CLE seminars with Ira
Shepard on recent federal income tax devel-
opments at the University of Texas School of
Law, 37th Annual Southern Federal Tax
Institute and 52nd Tulane Tax Institute.
m Spoke on "Recent Developments in Federal
Income Taxation" at the University of
Virginia School of Law, 54th Annual Virginia
Conference on Federal Taxation, in June.
m Spoke on "Business Purpose, Economic
Substance, and Purpose Activity" as part of a
panel on "Defining Administrative Objectives
in Complex Corporate Cases" at the ABA


Tax Section midyear meeting in New Orleans
in January. He also gave, with Professor Ira
Shepard, an afternoon-long presentation on
"Recent Income Tax Developments" in
February. m Presented CLE seminars on tax
issues and developments, some with Ira B.
Shepard, at meetings of the American Bar
Association, South Carolina Bar Association,
Lewis & Clark Tax Institute, the Fifty-First
Tulane Tax Institute, the University of North
Carolina School of Law and the University
of Virginia School of Law. m Appointed to
ABA Tax Section Committee on Committees
and is serving on the Academic Advisory
Board, The Theodore Tannenwald Jr.
Foundation for Excellence in Tax
Scholarship.


U FLAW 47


Staff Receive Productivity Honors

WOLFE, WILLIAMS, WARE, HARRISON & URBACH EARN TOP UF AWARDS
ive UFLaw staff members recently won top awards for their work. Former UF
President John Lombardi (back) presented three Legal Information Center staff
with 2001 Davis Productivity Awards for contributions to the state and UF: Marie
Wolfe (center), Janet Williams (right) and Melissa Ware (second from left, who
has since taken another job at UF). Also at the awards presentation were Legal
information Center Director Betty Taylor (left), and Assistant Director, Technical
Services, Mae Clarke (second from right). Davis Productivity Awards honor inno-
vation, creativity and smart work that measurably increase performance and
productivity in the delivery of state services and products.
Assistant Dean of the Center for Career Services Kathy Urbach (top right)
and Student Affairs Program Assistant/Office Manager Sherry Harrison (bottom,
with Assistant Dean Patrick Shannon) received Superior Accomplishment Awards
in April. Urbach received a Division Three Award (Administrative and Professional)
for helping Career Services increase job placements and offer additional services
to UFLaw students, while Harrison, a Student Affairs staff member since 1989,
was honored for her capable handling of additional responsibilities. Superior
Accomplishment Awards recognize efforts that "go the extra mile."


FAC U LTY











Jon L. Mills
Dean; Professor of Law; &
Director, Center for
Governmental Responsibility
Published "Florida on
Trial Federalism in the
2000 Presidential Election;'
...i ... ./ Journal of Law &
Public Policy. m Published i), I ..1I in Law
Schools: Where Are We Headed in the
Twenty-First Century?" in the University of
Toledo Law Review. m Moderated session
titled "Currents in Higher Education and
Legal Education: Is This a Transitional
Period?" at the Southeastern Conference of
the Association of American Law Schools
(SEAALS) in South Carolina this summer.

Robert C.L. Moffat
Professor of Law & Affiliate
Professor of Philosophy
Moderated session titled
"Young Scholars'
Workshop" at the
Southeastern Conference of
the Association of American
Law Schools (SEAALS) in South Carolina
this summer.

Winston P. Nagan
Professor of Law & Samuel T.
Dell Research Scholar
Published chapter on
"Post-Conflict Governance:
Preventing Future Conflict
and Ensuring Development"
in the book, ( .' ..". a New
Course: Globalization, African Recovery and
the New Africa Initiative. m Published
"Conflict Resolution and Democratic
Transformation: Confronting the Shameful
Past -Prescribing a Humane Future," in the
South African Law Journal (with Lucie
Atkins). m Published an opinion/editorial,
"Even Snitches Have A Stake in Our
Security," in Newsday.

Barbara Noah
Assistant Instructor, Law,
SHealth Law and Policy,
Center for Governmental
Responsibility
Published "The Invisible
Patient," in the Illinois Law
Review. m Participated as a


panelist in the UF College of Medicine's
annual Bioethics Forum. Her presentation
focused on human research ethics, including
informed consent and clinical trial design
issues.

Lars Noah
UF Research
Foundation Professor
Published Law, Medicine,
and Medical Technology:
Cases and Materials
(Foundation Press, 2002)
(with Barbara A. Noah,
assistant instructor, health law and policy,
Center for Governmental Responsibility).
m Published "Medicine's Epistemology:
Mapping the Haphazard Diffusion of
Knowledge in the Biomedical Community,"
44 Arizona Law Review (2002). m Published
"Civil Jury Nullification;' 86 Iowa Law
Review 1601 (2001). u Published "A
Miscarriage in the Drug Approval Process?:
Mifeprex Embroils FDA in Abortion
Politics;' 36 Wake Forest Law Review 571
(2001). m Published "Ashcroft's Hypocrisy,"
346 New England Journal of Medicine (May
2002) (letter). m Published "Inverting the
Products Liability Preemption Defense,"
Health Law News 6 (September 2001).
m Presented paper in March on regulating
pain management technologies at workshop
at the St. Louis University School of Law co-
sponsored by the American Society of Law,
Medicine & Ethics. m Spoke on panel about
biotechnology innovation and access at
AALS meeting in New Orleans in January.
* Named UF Research Foundation Professor.
* Contributed "Products Liability and the
Misuse of OxyContin" for new website
devoted to pain management issues spon-
sored by the American Society of Law
Medicine & Ethics. m Selected as finalist by
Robert Wood Johnson Foundation for
Investigator Award in Health Policy
Research.

William H. Page
Marshall M. Criser Eminent
Scholar in Electronic
SCommunications and
S Administrative Law & Associate
Dean of Faculty Development
(starting January 2003)
m Published "AT & T
Litigation," in The Oxford


48 UFLAW


FAC U LTY











Companion to American Law. m Published
"The Price of Unanimity: The D.C. Circuit's
Incoherent Opinion in Microsoft," in the
ABA online publication, The Antitrust
Source, (www.abanet.org/antitrust/source),
(with John Lopatka). Article was reprinted in
. '. ..... Antitrust, and the New Economy:
Selected Essays (David S. Evans, ed., Kluwer
2002), and in May 2002 issue of Computer
Law Reporter. u Published "Who Suffered
Antitrust Injury in the Microsoft Case?," in the
George Washington Law Review (with John
Lopatka).

Juan F. Perea
Cone Wagner Nugent Johnson
Hazouri & Roth Professor of
Law
Taught at Harvard Law
School as a visiting profes-
sor last spring. He made pre-
sentations at the Kennedy
School of Government, participated in the
Latino Law and Public Policy Conference at
Harvard, and gave a presentation on develop-
ing a Latino agenda in higher education at
the annual conference of the American
Association of Higher Education.

Don C. Peters
Professor of Law, Director of
Institute for Dispute
Resolution, Trustee Research
Fellow
m Co-presented mediation
skills workshop at ABA's
Dispute Resolution Section's
conference in Seattle.

Stephen J. Powell
Director, International Trade
Law Program, Center for
Governmental Responsibility
m Appointed affiliate program
director and lecturer in the
UF/IFAS Department of Food
and Resource Economics. He
'.11.,ll presented a paper at IFAS's first
International Agricultural Trade & Policy
Conference on how restriction of trade in geneti-
cally modified crops would be viewed in light of
global trade rules.


Teresa J. Rambo
Assistant Director, Legal Skills
Professor
Included in 2002 edition of
Who's Who AmongAmerica's
Teachers.



Sharon E. Rush
Irving Cypen Professor of Law
Spoke at the Gainesville
Commission on the Status of
Women in May, and UFLaw
conference on race and race
relations in February and chil-
dren's conference in
December. m Presented, "Emotional Segregation
in Public Schools," at conference on Children
and Education at Cornell Law School. m Working
with the Institute for Healing Racism in
Muskegon, Michigan, to develop a program for
educating prospective adoptive and foster parents
on issues related to interracial adoptions. m
Taught in UFLaw's Mexico City Program at
Escuela Libre de Derecho.


Gail E. Sasnett
Associate Dean for Students,
Professionalism & Community
Relations
m Initiated as an honorary
member of Florida Blue Key
UF's oldest and most presti-
gious leadership honorary.

Peggy F. Schrieber
Legal Skills Professor
Serving on The Florida Bar's
Family Law Rules Committee,
which is .,ii.,iili1 considering
significant changes to the
Family Rules, including rules
relating to pro se litigants in
family court. m Served on Panel of
Evaluators for 2002 Public Speaking Forum
at UF sponsored by the William and Grace
Dial Center for Written & Oral
Communication and by McGraw-Hill, Inc.
* Secretary of the Alachua County Domestic
Violence Task Force.


U FLAW 49


FAC U LTY


JMAPoesr fteYa











Christopher Slobogin
Associate Dean of Faculty
Development & Stephen C.
O'Connell Professor of Law
Published Regulation of
Police Investigation: Legal,
Historical, Empirical and
Comparative Materials (3rd
ed., 2002). m Published "Peeping Techno-
Toms and the Fourth Amendment: Seeing
Through Kyllo's Rules Governing
Technological Surveillance," 86 Minnesota
Law Review 1393-1437 (2002). Also spoke
on topic at symposium on "The Effect of
Technology on Fourth Amendment Analysis
and Individual Rights," at Mississippi Law
School in April. m Published "The Hartman
Hotz Lecture -Race-Based Defenses: The
Insights of Traditional Analysis," 54
Arkansas Law Review 739-776 (2002). Also
spoke on topic at Arkansas Law School in
November 2001. m Published "Police
Procedures," in The Oxford Companion to
American Law 614-619 (2002) (Kermit Hall
ed.). m Published i i.li- ,.ii.. Identification,"
in The Encyclopedia of Crime and Justice
661-664 (2002) (Joshua Dressler ed.).
* In August spoke on "The Role of the Legal
System -Outpatient Commitment: Who
Decides When Treatment is Necessary or
Effective?," at the American Psychological
Association annual meeting in Chicago;
"Proposal for Criminal Justice Section
Fellowship," before council of the ABA's
Criminal Justice Section in Washington,
D.C.; and i'.: I.-.l--. i .I Issues in Criminal
Law," a CLE/CME in Augusta, Maine.
* Spoke on "Legal Scholarship and Law


Review Publishing," and served on a panel at
the Southeastern Conference of the
Association of American Law Schools
(SEAALS) in South Carolina in July.
m Spoke on "A Jurisprudence of
Dangerousness," at the American
Psychology-Law Society biennial meeting in
Austin in March. m Spoke in February on
"Technological Surveillance of the Home',
at a symposium entitled "Moder Privacy
Studies" at Minnesota Law School and on
i' .l I.._...I. Issues in Criminal Cases',
at the American Academy of Forensic
Psychology in San Diego.

David T. Smith
Professor of Law
Published supplements/
revisions to Florida Probate
Code Manual (LEXIS/
Matthew Bender, 4 vols,
November/ December 2001
and February/April 2002).
m Moderated session titled "Restitution:
Restatement Revisions and Other
Developments" at the Southeastern
Conference of the Association of American
Law Schools (SEAALS) in South Carolina in
July.

Mary Poe Twitchell
Professor of Law
Published "Why We Keep
Doing Business with Doing-
Business Jurisdiction'" in
University of C. ... Legal
Forum.


William Wagner
Adjunct Professor & Federal Magistrate Judge
* Traveled with former director of the law
school's Center of Professionalism John
Berry to Nigeria for Justice Department
Commission on Corruption.
(Continues page 52)


WEYRAUCH RECEIVES 'GOLDEN JD,'
WRITES ON GYPSY CULTURE

Distinguished Professor and
Stephen C. O'Connell Chair Walter
Weyrauch (left) received a 'Golden JD'
from the Faculty
of Law of Johann
Wolfgang Goethe-
University in
Frankfurt,
Germany, where
he holds a faculty
appointment.
"This certifi-
cate is given at the 50th, or 'Golden
jubilee,' of the recipient's jD, and
renews the diploma," said Visiting
Professor Albrecht Cordes (right), who
presented the award on behalf of
Dean Helmut Kohl.
"Professor Weyrauch is a
renowned expert on many fundamen-
tal questions of law and its social
structure, and is probably the world's
best expert in the field of Gypsy
Law," said Cordes.
Weyrauch edited a book pub-
lished earlier this year, Gypsy Law:
Romani Legal Traditions and Culture.
He also recently published "The Law
of the Roma and Sinti: An Example of
Autonomous Lawmaking (Das Recht
der Roma und Sinti: Ein Beispiel
Autonomer Rechtschopfung)," Vol.
154 of the Studies on European Legal
History published by Vittorio
Krostermann Publishers, Germany,
and a chapter on legal education in
Germany during the war in Festschrift
fur Klaus Luderssen (Nomos
Verlagsgesellschaft Baden-Baden).


50 UFLAW


FAC U LTY









* CONFERENCES, SYMPOSIA & CLE

EFFICIENT, ECONOMICAL AND PROFITABLE WAYS TO STAY IN TOUCH AND UP-TO-DATE


efficient/economical way to
add to legal knowledge, earn
Florida Bar-approved CLE
credits, network with peers, renew
relationships and discuss trends with
academicians, scout quality students
for job openings, make contact with
U.S./international specialty professionals
and prestigious speakers/ executives for
personal/firm follow-up.

Thanks to UFLaw faculty, staff and
administrators, solving this seemingly
impossible objective becomes doable up
to 30 times each year. With a plethora of
timely and engaging programs featuring
national and international law experts,
UF is providing an easy, enriching and
entertaining way for attorneys to meet,
network, learn and earn CLE credits.
"We're gaining a reputation for put-
ting on informative, educational and time-
ly conferences," said UFLaw Director of
Conference Planning and Special Projects
Barbara DeVoe. "Increased attendance at
conferences shows the college is meeting
a need."
"Conferences provide an excellent
opportunity for practitioners, faculty and
students to broaden legal horizons, and
also to receive first-hand information on
major, current legal issues," said David
Saliwanchik of Saliwanchik Lloyd &
Saliwanchik of Orlando and Gainesville.
His firm provided a substantial five-year
gift supporting lectures, internships, con-
ferences and UF's Intellectual Property
Law Certificate Program.
Just two weeks after the September
11 attacks, the law school hosted a public
forum entitled "Legal Implications of the
Attack on America," which featured
Christopher Weeramantry of Sri Lanka,
immediate past vice president of the
International Court of Justice at The
Hague. In November 2002, the Asian and
Pacific American Law Students


Association presented "Afghan Women
Under the Taliban." In March, former
Congressman Bill McCollum presented
"Terrorism and 9/11," and Cheire! tiel!,l
Smith Professor of Law Fletcher Baldwin
Jr., director of the UF Center for
International Financial Crimes Studies,
was a featured speaker in Miami at a
"Terrorism and the Money Trail"
conference.
Also featured earlier this year were
"Defending Childhood: Developing a
Child-Centered Policy," organized by the
law school's Center on Children and the
Law, and "The Convergence of the
International Law of Human Rights and
the Environment: The Case of Pan
Columbia," organized by the Conservation
Clinic of the Center for Governmental
Responsibility (CGR).
A law and technology conference,
"Leveraging Technology for Extraordinary
Business Growth," took place at UF, with
Bill Hamilton of Holland & Knight as
keynoter, as did "Legal and Policy Issues
in the Americas," conducted annually by
CGR.
Conferences also draw prestigious
speakers. The "Race and Race Relations:
Perspective and Recommendations" con-
ference in March featured author Randall
Robinson and former Jamaican cabinet
minister Dudley Thompson. Jaap Doek,
chairman of the U.N. Committee on
Rights of the Child, was a featured
attendee of the conference on children.
"Our conference organizers get
national and international experts and
schedule programs to boost professional-
ism of the attorneys and provide continu-
ing legal education," DeVoe said. "It's an
excellent opportunity for the exchange of
ideas among practitioners."
For information about upcoming
events or to suggest a speaker or sponsor a
conference, contact DeVoe (352.392.8070
or .. / ......t /.to ii l... lll H


* Oceana 2003 Anti-Money
Laundering Conference, Feb. 26-28,
Miami. Speakers include
Chesterfield Smith Professor of Law
Fletcher Baldwin on impact of the
Patriot Act on financial institutions
and corporations.
* Second Annual Law & Technology
Conference, Feb. 28, Orlando.
* Conference on Estates and Trusts,
March, Gainesville.
* Conference on "Children, Culture
and Violence," March 20-2 I, Harn
Museum & Sheraton, Gainesville.

Sponsored by Center on Children
and the Law and UF Department
of English. Will feature nationally
known speakers and experts, and
performances and artwork by
children's groups.
* Center for Study of Race and Race
Relations fourth annual conference,
"Race, Rhyme, Rhythm and
Rhetoric," March 21-22. Explores
influence and effect of language,
literature, music and other forms
of expression on race relations.
* Fourth annual conference on Legal
& Policy Issues in the Americas:
Rule of Law in the Americas, April
13-14, UF Doubletree Hotel and
Conference Center. Topics include
sustainable development, criminal
law, civil justice reform, compara-
tive constitutional approaches and
human rights in context of rule of
law throughout the Americas.


UFLAW 51










(Continued from page 50)
Steven j. Willis
Professor of Law
m Published "Show Me the
Numbers...Please;' in Tax
Notes. m Co-chair of
Cybertax Committee of
Florida Bar Tax Section.
Webmaster/designer of Tax
Section website (ww .. ... .,,., Ii .. .
org), and member of Executive Council.
m Received annual Special Merit Award
Florida Bar Tax Section chair for
"Outstanding Service." u Spoke on Family
Law Tax Issues at January meeting of The
Florida Bar in Miami. m Spoke at Florida
Bar's "All Attorneys" Tax CLE Program.

Barbara Bennett
Woodhouse
David H. Levin Chair in Family
Law & Director, Center on
Children and the Law
Published "Making Poor
Mothers Fungible: The
Privatization of Foster Care,"
in Child Care & Inequality: Rethinking
Careworkfor Children & Youth. m Published
"Youthful Indiscretions: Culture, Class, Status,
and the Passage to Adulthood" in DePaul Law
Review. m Published "Horton Looks at the ALI
Principles," in Journal of Law & Family
Studies. m Published "Child-Centered,
Vertically Structured, and Interdisciplinary: An
Integrative Approach to Children' s Policy,
Practice and Research," in Family Court


tX


Review (with Annie Steinberg and Alyssa
Cowan). m Presented panel with Clinical
Associate Professor Claudia Wright, Gator
TeamChild supervising .i.l i 1-1I. at 10th World
Conference of International Society of Family
Law in Oslo, Norway, and was re-elected to a
three-year term on society's Executive
Council. u Delivered keynote address on
"Generational Conflict: Education and the
Tensions between Parents and Children" at
Cornell Law School at symposium on Children
and Education. m Spoke to Judicial Conference
of the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania on
Relocation and Child Custody. m Presented
paper on "The Rights of Children in Foster
Care" at conference on Children's Relationship
Rights sponsored by Institute for Bill of Rights
Law at William and Mary's Wythe School of
Law in Williamsburg.

Danaya C. Wright
Associate Professor of Law
Chosen to present paper,
"Domestic Relations in Mid-
Century: A History of the
First Nine Years of the
Divorce and Matrimonial
Causes Court (1858-1866),"
at the third annual Stanford/Yale Faculty
Forum for the Family Law Panel. (This is her
second paper so selected.) She also presented
the paper at Washington & Lee School of Law
and at New York University School of Law. E


ENVIRONMENTAL LAW CONTESTANTS REACH TOP
UFLaw student Kevin Regan (3L, seated, with Associate in
Law Richard Hamann on a mountaintop during a Costa Rica
Summer Program field trip) placed first with "Protecting
Florida's Rare Plants From Extinction: The Need For A
Comprehensive Approach," in the Dean Frank E. Maloney
Writing Contest sponsored by The Florida Bar Environmental
and Land Use Law Section. Winning second and third places
were Miguel Collazo III (3L) for "When Two Worlds Collide:
Solving The Puzzle Of Interjurisdictional Land Use Conflicts,"
and Amanda Bagni (JD 01) for "Water-Efficient Landscaping In
Florida: The Role For Courts And Local Governments."
"For Florida students to do so well in the competition is
a tribute to former Dean Maloney's legacy and the strength of
our environmental and land use law program," said Hamman.


Women of the Year


lizabeth "Liz" McCulloch (seated),
director of social policy at the Center
for Governmental Responsibility, and
Carol Velasques, Faculty Support Center
secretary, were named AlachualBradford
County Women of Distinction in recogni-
tion of their involvement and service to
their communities.
McCulloch, who has worked at the law
school since 1980, teaches Poverty Law
and Policy, and directs The Florida Bar
Foundation Public Service Law Fellows
program. Her longstanding and numerous
activities include chairing the Board of
Directors of the domestic violence shelter
"Peaceful Paths," and serving on a county
task force on indigent health care. She
recently wrote a layperson's guide to
Florida's welfare program for the benefit
of low income people and social service
providers.
Velasques, in addition to working full-
time at the law school since 1990, is in
her eighth year as general manager of
Gainesville's Acrosstown Repertory Theater,
where she has directed numerous plays
over the last 20 years, and is noted for
her production of compelling black the-
ater. She is immediate past chair of the
Gainesville/Alachua County Cultural Affairs
Board, an instructor for the Gainesville
Association for the Creative Arts, and has
her own theater company. She frequently
speaks at area schools on the history of
African-Americans in American theater.


52 UFLAW


FAC U LTY









* LEGAL WRITING

FACULTY COMMENT ON COMMUNICATING EFFECTIVELY


66WE'RE DEBATING METAPHORS. One colleague maintains they're
comparisons without the words 'like' or 'as.' I maintain a metaphor
is any comparison to an unlikely subject. WHO'S RIGHT?"
Florida Bar Member


UFLaw Legal Research and Writing
Director Henry Wihnyk and Lecturer
Emeritus Gertrude Block respond:

G ertrude: You both are. The
narrow definition is what your
friend maintains is correct. Thus, "The
stock market is a roller coaster" is a
metaphor; "The stock market is like a
roller coaster" is a simile.
However, in the broader sense, a
metaphor includes any figurative
language. Metaphors can be effective,
tired, mixed or mangled.
Effective metaphors strike with
force. My all-time favorites include:
* "A pregnant woman is like a ship in full
sail," by Benjamin Franklin.
* "Russia is a riddle wrapped in a
mystery inside an enigma," Winston
Churchill.
* "[This codicil] creates a teasing illusion
like a munificent bequest in a pauper's
will," Supreme Court Justice Robert H.
Jackson.
Metaphors once brilliant -
become stale through overuse. Endless
repetition has weakened:
* "The bottom line is ..."
* "The road to hell is paved with good
intentions."
* "... hit the nail on the head."
You can no doubt add to the list.
The word 'stonewall' was originally
used in cricket, meaning to play defen-
sively, but Richard Nixon's metaphor of
March 1973, ("I want you to stonewall
it, let them plead the Fifth Amend-
ment,") has become so common it is
now listed as standard English. Linguists
have said, with some hyperbole but
a grain of truth, that dictionaries are
merely repositories of dead metaphors.


The consequence of mixing
metaphors (unintentionally combining
two) is sometimes absurdity. Former first
lady Betty Ford combined "a leopard
cannot change its spots" and "you can't
teach an old dog new tricks" into "An
old dog cannot change its spots."
Another mixture of two ("pull the rug
out from under" and "put the skids on")
in a newspaper resulted in, "Business
news helped pull the skids from under
the stock market."
A mangled metaphor, on the other
hand, uses one inappropriate and some-
times ridiculous metaphor. Judge
Wapner, in "The People's Court,"
commented, "The fender dents weren't
visible unless you were looking at them
with a fine-tooth comb, so to speak."
Even the Supreme Court sometimes
mangle metaphors: In Griswold v.
Connecticut, Justice Harlan said, "The
Due Process Clause of the Fourteenth
Amendment stands, in my opinion, on
its own bottom."
Lawyers and journalists often use
metaphors to great effect. But review its
use carefully to ensure it doesn't come
back to haunt you.

Henry: There is no question a
skillfully phrased metaphor can add
eloquence. As Gertrude points out, how-
ever, using metaphors can take the writer
through a minefield (I couldn't resist) of
problems.
In legal writing where the goal
is to persuade these problems can
distract from the message and diminish
the document's impact. Metaphors
should be used carefully and sparingly.
Unfortunately, those used most often
in legal writing tend to be stale. Lawyers
too often warn courts of "opening the
floodgates of litigation," and of argu-


ments that "take the case down a slip-
pery slope." Even worse, they refer to
opponents' arguments as "dogs that
don't hunt" or as "red herrings." (Early
in my legal career, an opponent charac-
terized my arguments as red herrings.
Too impressed with my own writing
ability, I responded that "the only red
herrings are those swimming among
[my opponent's] contentions."
Thankfully, the senior partner caught
and redlined this monstrosity.)
Such stale cliches no longer convey
the sense of novelty so important to
effective use of metaphorical language,
make little sense to the reader and add
nothing to the document's persuasive-
ness (Ed Walters, "Terms of Art: Not-
So-Bright Lines," Green Bag Fall 1999).
Even more harmful than stale
metaphors are mixed and mangled ones.
At their worst, these make the writer
appear foolish. At best, they lead to
unintentional humor. Either way, it's
unlikely the reader will get the message
or respect the messenger.
When using metaphors in legal
writing, be careful not to cross the line
between eloquence and purple prose. A
well-placed, skillfully crafted metaphor
can ignite the reader's imagination. It
resonates with the reader, conveying a
point that otherwise defies simple
description. On the other-hand, an over-
wrought metaphor distracts the reader's
attention from the document's message
to the writer's style. Fight the temptation
to call attention to yourself. Keep in
mind it's not your goal for the judge to
say, "Wow, what a wonderful writer you
are." You want to hear, "You win."
In legal writing, it takes a really
good metaphor to be better than no
metaphor at all. U


UFLAW 53










Wanted:

Mentors


PRACTITIONERS MAKE A DIFFERENCE
The Center for Career Services' mentor program
matches law students and attorneys with similar
interests. Students are eager to meet practicing
lawyers and learn about the law outside the academic
setting, and mentors help students transition from
law school to practice. The number of mentors
available to UFLaw students has nearly doubled in
the past year though many more are needed -
and the center is now making a special effort to
recruit minority mentors.
If you are interested in participating, fill out the
online form at www.law.ufl.edu (click on "Career
Services") and e-mail it to urbach@law.ufl.edu or
fax it to 352.392.4640. For information, call Career
Services (352.392.0499).


WYV magazine
!m alumni and I
College of Law (Ul
Director of Comm
Associate Director
Publications Coorc
Contributors: J&
Kristin Harmel,
Scott, Elizabel


Wli:by the Levin '
s Office.
Kenin
& Debra Amirin, APR
ik
i tt (Photography),
apples, Kimberly


BOARD OF TRUSTEES
y"W7.14.111 Ily
Chair Marybeth t'i
McDonald and Chair-
Elect Michael J.
McNerney will lead
the Board of Trustees
in 2003.



Executive Committee Pedro A. Martin OD 78)
Marybeth McDonald OD 82) Margaret D. Mathews OD 82)
Chairman Robert W. Mead Jr. OD 69)
Michael J. McNerney OD 73) Howell W. Melton Jr. OD 75)
Chair-Elect Robert G. Merkel OD 74)
Dennis A. Calfee OD 75) George R. Moraitis OD 66)
Treasurer John B. Morgan OD 82)
E.L. Roy Hunt Stanley R. Morris OD 71)
Secretary Mark A. Nouss OD 85)
Charles P. Pillans III OD 66)
Active Members Edwin Thom Rumberger
Charles Wayne Alford OD 61) OD 61)
Charles Abbott OD 53) Johnson S. Savary OD 56)
W. George Allen OD 63) John J. Schickel Sr. OD 72)
C. DuBose Ausley OD 62) George E. Schulz Jr. OD 73)
David S. Band Lawrence E. Sellers Jr. OD 79)
Bruce H. Bokor OD 72) Terrance A. SmiIjanich OD 72)
Bill Bone OD 84) Garland Thomas Smith OD 66)
jeanelle G. Bronson OD 78) Rodney W. Smith OD 75)
Joseph P. Carolan III OD 74) Glenn W. Sturm OD 85)
Thomas C. Cobb OD 68) John J. Upchurch OD 68)
Charles Commander III jean Eddy Wilson OD 82)
OD 65) Evan J. Yegelwel OD 80)
Patricia C. Fawsett OD 73) Gwynne Alice Young OD 74)
Michael Ferguson OD 89) Peter W. Zinober OD 69)
Allan T. Geiger OD 67)
W. C. Gentry OD 71) Ex-Officio
John Dudley Goodlette OD 72) Bruce M. Harris OD 93)
Andrew C. Hall OD 68) LAC President
Scott G. Hawkins OD 83) Jon Mills OD 72)
Jeffrey A. Hirsch OD 7S) Dean
Corinne C. Hodak OD 89) Paul A. Robell
Ellsworth William UF Vice President for
Hoppe Jr OD 67) Development & Alumni
Hal H. Kantor OD 72) Affairs
Malcolm R. Kirschenbaum Charles E. Young
OD 64) UF President
E. C. Deeno Kitchen OD 67)
Ronald C. LaFace OD 66) For complete list, including
Frederick Leonhardt OD 74) Emeriti Trustees, go to:
Peter M. MacNamara OD 77) www.law.up.edu/alumni.
Kevin A. Malone OD 76)


54 UFLAW












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