Title: Grow a row of vegetables in Florida
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00072531/00012
 Material Information
Title: Grow a row of vegetables in Florida
Series Title: Circular
Alternate Title: Grow a row of ... in Florida
Physical Description: 12 leaflets in folder : ill. ; 31 cm.
Language: English
Creator: Carter, Lawrence
Stephens, James M
Florida Cooperative Extension Service
Publisher: Florida Cooperative Extension Service, Florida A & M University, University of Florida
Place of Publication: Gainesville?
Publication Date: 198-?
 Subjects
Subject: Vegetable gardening -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Genre: government publication (state, provincial, terriorial, dependent)   ( marcgt )
non-fiction   ( marcgt )
 Notes
Statement of Responsibility: prepared by Lawrence Carter and James M. Stephens.
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00072531
Volume ID: VID00012
Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 46344649

Full Text



Circular 463
Leaflet 11


Grow A R

(I of

Onions


Grow a row of onions to add more variety to your garden and meals. Onions are
easily grown if planted at the right time of year. They may be grown for bulbs or
just for their leafy green tops. Just follow this simple step-by-step guide.


VARIETIES TO PLANT:


Bulbing: Excel, Texas Grano, Granex, White Granex, Tropicana Red
Green Onions: White Portugal, Evergreen, Shallots (Multipliers)


WHEN TO PLANT:
(Bulbing)
(Green)


North Florida
Aug-Nov
Aug-Mar


Central Florida
Aug-Nov
Aug-Mar


South Florida
Sept-Nov
Sept-Mar


STEP 1. SITE SELECTION
Select a warm, sunny spot away from
trees and bushes. Make sure a good water
supply is available. Onions do well in any
type of soil, but it must be fertile and moist.
They grow well in the fall, winter, and
spring.


STEP 2. SOIL PREPARATION
Prepare the soil two or three weeks before
intended planting date. First remove all
trash, roots and weeds with a hoe or rake.
Then, loosen the soil to a depth of about 4 to
6 inches. Use a roto-tiller if available or
work the soil with a spade, shovel or hoe.
Rake once more to remove all clods and
level the ground.


Florida Cooperative Extension Service/Florida A&M University, University of Florida



















2_ '-


STEP 3. LIMING
Have your soil tested to see if lime is
needed. If required, use dolomite. Apply 3
weeks or longer before planting. Spread the
lime over the row area and thoroughly mix
it into the soil. One quart or 2 lbs. per 25
feet of row length usually will be sufficient.


STEP 5. BEDDING
After applying fertilizer, prepare a firm
raised seedbed to keep heavy rains from ex-
posing bulbs or rotting roots. Use a rake or
hoe to mound up the soil along the row.
Make the bed about 6 inches high and 24
inches wide.


STEP 4. FERTILIZING
Fertilize onions regularly with a common
garden fertilizer such as 6-8-8 or 8-8-8. At
planting use about 1 quart of fertilizer per
25 feet of row. Spread it on top of the row
area, then mix it into the soil with a hoe or
rake. Apply another quart beside the plants
every three weeks. Keep the soil moist by
watering as needed.
When available, use compost or animal
manure. Apply at least 10 gallons or 15 lbs.
per 25 feet of row area. Mix it thoroughly
into the soil with a hoe or rake at least 3
weeks before planting.


STEP 6. PLANTING ONIONS
Bulbing Onions-Use seeds or trans-
plants to start onions for bulbing. Sow seeds
/2 inch deep in a furrow. Thin plants to
stand 3 inches apart. If transplants are
used, set them 3 inches apart in the row.
Pencil-sized transplants are best.
Green Bunching Onions-Start with good
"sets". Space them 1 inch apart in the row.
Seeds or transplants may be used.

























STEP 7. CULTIVATION
Keep weeds pulled out of the onions. Hoe
the row area once a week to keep out all
weeds and to loosen the soil around plants.
Hoe shallow, just below the soil surface to
prevent disturbing onion roots.


STEP 9. INSECT AND
DISEASE CONTROL
Thrips are tiny insects which sometimes
feed on the onion tops. Watch for them and
spray with diazinon if needed. If fungus dis-
eases attack the plants, use a garden fun-
gicide.


STEP 8. WATERING
Onions should be watered often. During
early spring the soil should be kept moist.
Water thoroughly at least once a week
when the weather is extremely hot.


STEP 10. CHECKING GROWTH
Do not be disturbed if you do not see
much swelling of the bulbs until warm
spring weather. Onions planted for bulbs
must be started in early fall (Sept-Oct) to
produce large bulbs in the spring. Those
planted in early spring will be leafy and
produce small bulbs.


























STEP 11. HARVESTING
Green bunching onions will be ready to
pull just 50 to 60 days after planting. How-
ever, most onions are ready to harvest in
the leafy green stage. They should be eaten
within a few days after harvest while still
fresh and tender. Bulbing onions require
four months or longer growing time to
reach full size. Bulbs need to be thoroughly
dried (cured) before storing. To cure for
storage, hang them up in a hot dry airy
place.




For More Information
If you need to know more about growing your onions,
contact your County Extension Service office.

PREPARED BY
Lawrence Carter
Extension Rural Development Specialist
and
James M. Stephens
Extension Vegetable Crops Specialist
The Cooperative Extension Service of Florida A&M University and University of Florida offers
educational programs, materials and assistance to all people without regard to race, color, or
national origin.


AN EQUAL OPPORTUNITY EMPLOYER


COOPERATIVE EXTENSION WORK IN AGRICULTURE AND HOME ECONOMICS
Acts of May 8 and June 30, 1914
Cooperative Extension Service, IFAS, Florida A&M University, University
of Florida and United States Department of Agriculture, Cooperating
K. R. Tefertiller, Director


This publication was promulgated at a cost of $2688.00, or $.04 per copy, to provide Florida home gardeners with
information on the planting care of onions.


Florida Cooperative Extension Service/Florida A&M University, University of Florida




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