Title: Grow a row of vegetables in Florida
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00072531/00007
 Material Information
Title: Grow a row of vegetables in Florida
Series Title: Circular
Alternate Title: Grow a row of ... in Florida
Physical Description: 12 leaflets in folder : ill. ; 31 cm.
Language: English
Creator: Carter, Lawrence
Stephens, James M
Florida Cooperative Extension Service
Publisher: Florida Cooperative Extension Service, Florida A & M University, University of Florida
Place of Publication: Gainesville?
Publication Date: 198-?
 Subjects
Subject: Vegetable gardening -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Genre: government publication (state, provincial, terriorial, dependent)   ( marcgt )
non-fiction   ( marcgt )
 Notes
Statement of Responsibility: prepared by Lawrence Carter and James M. Stephens.
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00072531
Volume ID: VID00007
Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 46344649

Full Text



Circular 463
Leaflet 6


Grow A Row

/ of I


Eggplants





Grow a row of eggplants for a nutritional addition to your family's diet. Eggplants
are easily grown and may be prepared by the housewife in several different ways.
Usually six plants will produce all the fruits needed by a family of five. Just follow
this simple step-by-step guide.


VARIETIES TO PLANT:


Florida Market and Black Beauty


WHEN TO PLANT:


North Florida
Feb-March
July


Central Florida
Jan-March
Aug-Sept


South Florida
Dec-Feb
Aug-Oct


STEP 1. SITE SELECTION
Select a warm, sunny spot away from
trees and bushes. Make sure there is a good
water supply nearby. Eggplants do best on
a fertile soil, and in warm seasons, includ-
ing the summer in Florida.


STEP 2. SOIL PREPARATION
Start preparing soil two or three weeks
before intended planting date. First, remove
all trash, roots and weeds with a hoe and
rake. Then, loosen the soil to a depth of
about 6 inches. Use a rototiller if available
or work the soil with a spade, shovel or hoe.
Rake once more and level the ground.


Florida Cooperative Extension Service/Florida A&M University, University of Florida
























STEP 3. LIMING
Test your soil to see if lime is needed. If a
small amount is required, use dolomite.
Apply 3 weeks or longer before planting.
Spread it over the row area and thoroughly
mix into the soil. Usually, about 1 quart per
25 feet of row length will be adequate when
the soil is acid.


#-. ir- A


STEP 5. BEDDING
After applying fertilizer, prepare a firm
raised seedbed to keep heavy rains from
drowning the roots. Use a rake or hoe to
mound up the soil along the row. Make the
bed about 6 inches high and 24 inches wide.


STEP 4. FERTILIZING
Fertilize eggplants regularly with a
common garden fertilizer such as 6-6-6,
S6-8-8 or 8-8-8. At planting use about a
quart of fertilizer per 25 feet of row. Spread
it on top of the row area, then mix it into
the soil with a hoe or rake. Apply another
quart beside the rows every 2 or 3 weeks.
Keep the soil moist by watering as needed,
especially after fertilizing.
Use compost or animal manure where
available. Apply 10 gallons per 25 feet of
row. Work into the soil with a hoe or rake
at least 3 weeks before planting. Regular
fertilizer may be used along with the ma-
nure.


STEP 6. GOOD PLANTS
Start your eggplants by using healthy
plants. Obtain good strong disease free
plants that are 4 to 6 inches tall. Those
growing in planting pots are highly recom-
mended, but other bare-rooted plants may
be used. Do not disturb the roots anymore
than is necessary. Keep them watered to
help them off to a good start.
























STEP 7. STAKING PLANTS
Allow sufficient space for each plant to
grow and spread. Drive a 6-foot stake into
the soil 3 to 4 inches beside each plant. Use
a cord string to tie the plant to the stake 4
to 6 times during the season. Staking sup-
ports the branches when the heavy
eggplant forms.


STEP 9. CULTIVATION
Keep weeds pulled out of the eggplants.
Hoe the row area once a week to keep out
all weeds and to loosen soil around plants.
Hoe shallow, just below the soil surface to
prevent cutting or disturbing the eggplant
roots. Use a mulch to keep weeds under
control.


STEP 8. TRANSPLANTING
To properly set an eggplant, first measure
correct spacing of 36 to 48 inches apart
down the center of the row. Then dig a
three-inch deep hole with your hand or
trowel. Pour in about a pint of water to wet
the soil. Place the plant roots in the hole
and cover (while lightly packing the soil) to
a half inch above the roots. Do not disturb
plant roots after transplanting. Water
again to settle soil around all plants.


STEP 10. INSECT AND
DISEASE CONTROL
Spray or dust your eggplants when neces-
sary after transplanting to control serious
insect or disease damage. Eggplants may be
attacked by small insects shortly after
planting. When first signs of insect damage
appears, apply malathion, diazinon, or
sevin insecticide. Spray once a week with
maneb or zineb if diseases become a prob-
lem.
























STEP 11. CHECKING GROWTH
Inspect the eggplants as they grow. Stop
insect or other problems from getting too
far along by spotting them early. When
eggplants start to form, check daily for
those with a dark purple color. These are
mature and ready to pick for home use.


STEP 12. HARVESTING
Eggplants are ready to pick when they
reach a dark purple color. Do not allow
them to remain on the bush even though
you might not have use for them. Eggplants
store well with refrigeration for a reason-
able length of time.
Eggplants are delicious and nutritious, so
check many recipes and find ways to use
them.


For More Information
If you need to know more about growing your eggplants,
contact your County Extension Service office.


PREPARED BY
Lawrence Carter
Extension Rural Development Specialist
and
James M. Stephens
Extension Vegetable Crops Specialist
The Cooperative Extension Service of Florida A&M University and University of Florida offers
educational programs, materials and assistance to all people without regard to race, color, or
national origin.


AN EQUAL OPPORTUNITY EMPLOYER

COOPERATIVE EXTENSION WORK IN AGRICULTURE AND HOME ECONOMICS
Acts of May 8 and June 30, 1914
Cooperative Extension Service, IFAS, Florida A&M University, University
of Florida and United States Department of Agriculture, Cooperating
K. R. Tefertiller, Director


This publication was promulgated at a cost of $2688.00, or $.04 per copy, to provide Florida home gardeners with
information on the planting care of egg plants.


Florida Cooperative Extension Service/Florida A&M University, University of Florida




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