<%BANNER%>






PRIVATE ITEM
Digitization of this item is currently in progress.
Star (Roseau, Dominica). December 21, 1979.
ALL ISSUES CITATION THUMBNAILS PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00072476/00718
 Material Information
Title: Star (Roseau, Dominica). December 21, 1979.
Uniform Title: Star (Roseau, Dominica).
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publication Date: 06-23-1971
 Subjects
Genre: newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: Dominica -- Caribbean
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: sobekcm - UF00072476_00718
System ID: UF00072476:00718

Full Text

Mrs. Jane Lowenthai,,
librarian,
Seserch'I titute for
thie Stody o' ian,-[
J162 East 78-Street,-i,
hew York 10021, 1.Y.,
'S. er ( London.on) Ltd. "
OS/5 .aftesbury Ave, W, .
VIV wn t.. n .!


vtrtut T'Tac otC "oruta
Vidraut DUci Gomrilt Torduna


Edlior-PHYLLIS SHAND ALLFREY


Friday, Jane 23. 1972


Q:^! IirDtfa&ora who would miake
'-'- _vS- asalves
:.,, 3 s- gake laws that this ca1s b
YoK 21, *Bt there still rematis e
SEr i 7' ryay of hope
As lon as the PRESS if,
Tan COan


I6PI~Tor C1PYit


"AFTER THE REVIUTON"
by Rupert Sorhaindo MSc..
There is a sense in which all the ideological
revolutions that have succeeded, since the
F'rench Revolution, have failed. They have
succeeded in overthrowing the established
social system and have failed ih their promise
that they would replace it with a regime of
freedom and justice.
At the bottom of the failure is the child-
like belief that mankind is divided into two
species. the good people and the bad peo-
ple. If there are great shortcomings and
vils in the social system under which we
live, that is because it is ruled by-the
wicked species. If the virtuous species, to
which we belong, were in ch large, these evils
* o1rl not exist.
It follows from this view that the alienated
revolutionaries can concentrate on the destruc-
tion of the existing regime without concerning
themselves about the successor regime. The
r. t that they, the virtuous, will replace the
Sicked in the seats of government is enough.











i *. .*-. .

Rupert Sorbaindo, wife and son

The young Karl Marx was too highly edu-
cated to believe in the simplistic fallacy of the
two distinct "species". In his early writings,
he gave an account ofthe single human na-
mre that all men share, repmrsentng the con-
fit between good and. evil as an INNER
conflict that goes on within everyone. Oee pr)


Victory for the Press
An air of freedom now settls over Antngu
S the presses of the AntiSgua ~Tar and the
Workers' Voie begs to roll onca morm. We
mr tulatf the Times for its coage to See to
it tt freedom of expression is presvd in the
island;
The decision of the Court has clearly put th.
Anti= Government in a vry sad ght add
despite all the almightythiags they had to justify
the legislation. The result of this cae can be no
encouragement to any West Indisa Govxerm nt
to pursue a course of stifling the Pres.
ERSKINE WARD REPORT c"~a
THE NATIVE ANTMLLA

They c ll me "Caraibel
They forget IPm the Antilfl IMib
Degpadingly, iausul
They forget West Hist~i
Oh! Tell me whyl
And tell to satisfy,
With good explanation
Why am I a born Andtiln?
I came here first;
But now I am the last.
Treating M e to second cdass cdtiesr
They shout Black Power ideology.
Satirically, they call Whitman "MuaSal"
And forget Black Headman Seller in Africa.
Obsessively, they hate the Whiteman.
But, Lord,. d they suppress the Native AntiUeani
Let's see Black People, Carlibe and Mau
In perspective as we really amrI
I'm caught in treble crossre::
Save me from comic satire! -: Ift 4 rU..


,-,. -5 ~ Hy


Guest Speakers
coming on the


FAITH IN ACTION BROAD
26th June Ronald Trotman
3rd July Horace John Lewis
5-15 p.m.
VERY MONDAY RADIO DC
Write to us at:
Box 108, Roseau, Domniica.


AST



MINICA,

4rr.,t


I I "~-~'c


- -----------


9 I II II


* /


B






gTH STr 23 12


THAT SPECIES CALLED "THE WEST INDIAN"
.by Androcles

He is a strange creature, indeed. His latest stunt is to ascribe
all his lacks, faults and weaknesses to slavery. All of which makes
an extremely puzzling picture.
(1) Some time around the end of last year, the Roseau Town Council,
registered proprietor of the land at Laings Lane upon which a market
was being built by the Government, decided to hold its inauguration
of a recently-elected Council on that site and without in any way
disturbing the.structure being erected. The Premier went on the air
to tell supposedly intelligent people that they would be committing
an illegal act of trespass if, in response to invitation from the
Town Council, they attended this inauguration ceremony. The invitees
for the most part stayed away. Next day, the Premier in a Release,
stated that if forced to, he would pay for the land being occupied
by the Government in the market-building -- a clear admission that
the site belongs to the Roseau Town Council.
Recently, the market was completed. The Roseau Town Council again
served notice that it would take the matter of compensation for use
and occupation of the Laings Land to Court, since it holds an inde-
feasible Title Certificate to those lands. Thus it was clearly esta-
blished that the land belonged to the R.T.C. Yet, the same persons
who turned down the R.T.C's invitation to a function on the Council's
own land, accepted in large numbers to attend a Government function
.on the Roseau Town Council's land. What are we to make of this type
of -nind?
(1-1) We move to Barbados. The Anglican Bishop of Barbados resigned
the See about a year ago. At the appointed time, the clergy and
nominated laity met in solemn Assembly to choose a successor. West
Indians constitute the greater percentage of the clergy of the Church
in Barbados. A number.of ballots was taken, with inconclusive results,
none receiving the two-thirds vote necessary for election,
A second Assembly was arranged and took place some months later.
Again, no candidate could be found from among the ranks of the Barbados
clergy to receive the necessary two-thirds after a total of eight
ballots in all. The number of Barbadian votes could have secured this.
Consequently,- and according to the Rules of that Church, the matter
had to be referred to the Archbishop of the We.st Indies to name a
successor since it was clear that the voting clergy could not find
one of their number to become the new Bishop.
The Archbishop discharged this duty by choosing for the office a
coloured Bahamian priest who studied in Barbados and had married a
Bahamian wife. Then the storm broke. The Barbadians, including some
of the clergy who had taken.part in the inconclusive election, rose
up in arms at the idea that at that time in the country's develop-
ment, a non-national could be selected to fll the office of Bishop
of Barbados. It was seriously suggested in some quarters that the
Government should take steps to quash the appointment. Others pro-
posed that the Bishop-elect should be made to obtain a work permit'
which, of course, it was suggested the Government should not grant.
It was in such an atmosphere of bewildered puzzlement that the Bishop-
elect arrived in Barbados recently for his consecration on June 24th.
The West Indian mind in action.
(111) Here in Dominica we are being told from certain quarters that
a lot of the evil and nonsense taking place around us is due to young
West Indians seeking an identity or working out their frustrations
(why don't we hear of these explanations and apologia when it is a
question of the humbler classes in trouble with the law?).
(Concluded on p.4)


THE S.T A.R


Pa 0= Twao


-Friday. June 93, 1972






f-idy iuu 23.1972-~- T1--E STAR PaE* ThreeQC-


Black e df

Black stud
A growing number of Black:educators
are opposed to Black studies and.
becoming more vocal and. active in
colleges and high schools to block black
studies programs, reveals a survey by
Sepia, leading black monthly magazine.
In an article, "What's, Wrong With
Black Studies," Sepia reveals that even
some of the most ardent supporters pf
Black studies find the programs not only
do not achieve their stated goals but also
are sidetracking Black students from get-
ting a good education.
James Turner, head of Cornell Univer-
sity's Black studies department, one of the
.first set up in the nation, concedes that the
programs "have fizzled due to either inep-
titude. confusion about what Black studies
is supposed to be, internal., political
convicts or sheer resistance from white
administrators and faculty."
More Jim Crow
Even more outspoken is Dr. Maceo T.
Bowie, Black president of Chicago's Ken-
nedy-King College,'.' who says in tht Sepia
arti le: "There is no need for Black'
studies as a separate discipline.'' Dr. Ken-
neth Clark, one of the nation's top Black
scholars, indicts Black studies as "contin-
uatioi of the Jim Crow approach to higher
education, tragically compounded by the
acquiescence of Blacks themselves."
Summing up the arguments against

To all our Friends
WE WI1 BE
FOR STOC'-
-The 29th & 3oth
S. P. CK. BO(
47 Field's Lane, ai seau -
DOMINICA EEtCTRtI
wishes to inform all ele
that a s from Monday
business will be transa
Monday Wednesda

Thursday & Friday,

APARTMENT
suitable for Office, 5 Hi
(above Messrs. W. B. 1
Apply: Gifford Dim
,472-p .i 7 Turkey L


Sucators


ies N. Y. AMSTERDAM NEI
Black studies, Sepia magazine's Doris
Black states the negative aspects as
"Black studies by and iarge do not qualify
Black students for the needs of the aca-
demic world and the professions, business
and commerce after graduation ..
Black studies stress rather than diminish
racist concepts . .Black studies do not
have qualified teachers."
Sepia quotes a Black Harvard govern-
ment professor, Dr. Martin Kilson, as de-
nouncing Black studies because of "its
contribution to the rise of double stan-
dards, treating Negro students and faculty
by standards inferior to those applied to
white students and faculty."
Another Black professor, who follows
this thinking, is Dr. Thomas Sowell of
UCLA who bitterly states that many in-
competents are in the field. "Black people
in general have had enough experience
with inferior education not to want any
more of it," Sowell says.
Yet Sepia magazine's survey finds that
Black studies "are gaining id acceptance
if not in direction and competence." Some
85 per cent of all non-black junior colleges
now offer Black studies courses and in the
state of California alone 61 colleges offer
such classes.
Popularity of the courses have grown,
too. In New York's City University the
courses now have 1400 students compared
to 180 three years ago. Of the students
taking the courses 40 per cent are white,

& Customers
CLOSED

uINe ON972
June, 1972
SHOPP
Tel. 37o.
CITY.SERVICES
:ctricity consumers O
19th June, 1972, 1
nted as follows:
ys: 9am Ipm .
2pm 3.3opm
s. 9am ipm 4
Zpm 3.oopm
FOR IENT C
ilsborough Street
Hitchinson & Co)
dier, %<
ane, Roseau


:f



t
7





/


oppose


. Page Three


Friday, June 23.1972


THE STAR









THAT SPECIES CALLED "THE WEST INDIANJ" by Androcles
(from p.2)
These would include insulting tourists and resident white people on
our streets; attempting to set fire at St.Mary's Academy; bringing
about the closure of that school.
I should like to know what explanation these starry-eyed people
have for the following extracts taken from a Black Power publication
entitled "Black Cry" Vol. 1, No.5, and embodied in an article under
the title "Know Who Your Enemy Is -- (1) The Church" on pages 4-5.
(a) "One of the worst enemies of the black man -- the Church"
(b) "Christianity is made to dehumanize us".
(c) "Recent incidents have exposed the parasitic existence
of the Church in Dominica, e.g. the maladministration of the Convent,
St.artin's and S.M.A."
(d) "Even the native-born brothers, nuns and priests of Dominina
are guilty of crimes against our people. They live in luxury with
the most modern cars".
S() "Brothers and sisters,'prepare thyself for killing",
(f) "Death to our enemies".
(g) Sneering and contemptuous references to Our Lord's teachings
(i) "the poor shall inherit the earth"; (ii) "love your neighbour
as yourself".
(h) Another article in that paper refers to the .Bishop of
Roseau as "HIS LORD-SHEEP 'the Bishop".
I call all this Communism, but I am asking those starry-eyed
soul who regard the writers of the foregoing stuff as perturbed
angels to explain and. justify the extracts or forever after hold
their peace. Because, it seems to me that there is no posturing
beyond the capacity of the West Indian mind.
P.S. Much of the extracts have a familiar ring of the voice of
the Premier.

VILLAGE CRICKET TOURNAMENT CHAMPIONS
Beach Rovers Sports Club of St.Joseph are the 1972 Village Cricket
Tournament Champions. This was the outcome of the final match held
at Emerald Park, Mero on Sunday when Beach Rovers beat Police Sports
Club by 30 runs to win the Championship for the second time,
Batting first, Beach Rovers scored 136 all out (C.Scotland, 32;
E&John 6 for 59) to which Police replied with 89 (He Rabess, 23;
J.Brown 5 for 16). In their second innings, Beach Rovers were all
out for 54 (R.Prosper, 16; EoJohn, 6 for '23, J.Pierre 4 for 9) which
left Police with 102 runs to make in the last 20 overs to avoid de-
feat. They were all out for 73 (J.Brown 4 for 15).
The Tournament which is run by Royston Ellis (recently elected a
member of M.C.C.) under the auspices of the Dominica Amateur Sports
Association and sponsored by Emerald Hil side Estates, attracted 12
teams from all over the state. Each team played three matches with
Beach Rovers and Police both getting 30 points out of a maximum of
36 to qualify for the final, Rosalie United gained 24 points while
Emerald Hillside (winners in 1968 and 1969/70), Pioneers of Salis-
bury and Professionals of Morne Rachette gained 18 points each,
DOUBLE QUOTE: T,, -Wd----- -
SThe West Indian, in searching for an identity, is
expressing one." C.L.R. James. -"The quest is a lifetime't
.occupation." -- David Lowenthal, in WEST INDIAN SOCIETIES. *******


THE STAR


Friday, June 23, 1972


Page Four





F4&ai. June, 23.A972 THE STAR


FOR T/ E rEST OOS
AT TMlE LOWEST PRICE
CALL AT

(FORMERLY ST. AGNES SHOP)
6 CROSS STREET
JUST:RECEIVED
A WIDE ASSORTMENT OF CHILDREN'S BOOKS
COOKERY AND HOME MANAGEMENT BOOKS.
SPORTS CRICKET, FOOTBALL, TENNIS, ETC.
COMING 80014
BOOKS BY ANGELA DAVIS, ELDRIDGE CLEA.
VER, GEORGE JACKSON (SOLEDAD BROT-
".HER)ET AL" A!


VAUXHALL
TE PERFORMERS


NOTI CE
The Roseau Town Council wishes to
inform owners of properties within the
Municipality that the Arrears list of Mun-
icipal and Land and House Taxes for the
years 1970 and 1971 has been forwarded
to the Provost Marshal for collection and
Persons who are in arrears for those per.
iods will vow have to pay heir taxes at
the Registry.
Owners of properties ar e advised to
have their taxes paid as soon as possible
as properties in arrears will be put up for
sale for recovery of Taxes.
Scuy S. Lestrade
TOWN CLERK.

CARS FOR SALE
DOMINICA TRACTOR & EQUIPMENT
CO. LTD. tAWLE LANE, GOODWILL
Offers for sale on behalf of The Receiver of
Dom-Can Timbers Ltd., the following vehicles
which are in good running condition and h a ve
been repainted:
Ford Pickup Truck Reg.# 2905 $5,ooo.oa
Ford Pickup Truck Reg. 290o6 $5,ooo.oo
Ford Bronco Reg. 306z -5,ooo.oo
Ford Bronco Reg. $ S95: $,2).oo
The vehicles may be inspected at the Company's
Office between the hours of 7.30 a.m. to 4.30 po
daily Monday to Friday. e- a


A.C. SHILLINGFOBD & CO.
CAR ACCRS. DEPT.
ROSEAU


HAVING DIFFICULTY FALLING
ASLEEP AT NIGHT? ,


SIE ST A will alter that.


p.


I


One or two tablets before retiring
will induce, sound ratfd, relaxed
sleep.
S I E S T A also helps relieve nervous-
ness during the day.
$T.8o per box of x8 Tablets.
THE DOMINICA DISPFSA Y
466/ -;V


DATHNCE GUNMAN


July Sat, Ist $ 2.o0
July Sat. 15th $2.00
Aug Sat. 5th 2.50
MUSIC RY E POPULAR A
---------*-* '


{I


~C~P;-Ls~lC~,~~,-----~~


Pa^-" I'^f,-


li~BBILY. a~(PIIO, Z~.~a$7%


THE STAR


The Viva went through far more than the
usual testing that goes into a new car.
Because it was test-proved at 'Punishment
Park'-Vauxhall's unique 700 acre proving
ground at Millbrook in Bedfordshire.
Test-proved for strength, safety,
reliability and protection.








Fiction: The Birds ...M A T I T I N E by Cynthia Watt

Well now Roseau was like a sprouting Eden. Everywhere as far as
the eye could see there was that fresh eye-cooling greenness. The
trees had really grown fast! Each morning people awoke to beautiful
bird choruses, and it was sheer delight to see them flitting and
twittering from tree to tree.
Old time folKs said that rare birds (such as tropiales and ruby-
breasted hummers) had long-ago disappeared, were nesting in the town
again. Genelia formed a society to protect them, and her bedroom had
a large box full of confiscated catapults.
"Ah'" sighed Ma Titine with satisfaction,,"jus whar I dee want.
De people so please wid dere trees: If Quvment try to cut dem down
it will have one big daybah."
"But" Genelia protested slyly "when dose tree grow big,big, Roseau
will like a jungle'"
Ma Titine snorted, "jungle me eye. Where you ever heah jungle
have house? Look at all dose plain lickle house among. dose nice trees.
Gal, dis is Paradise."
While Genelia and Ma Titine were happily engrossed discussing their
day-by-day advances and listing up the birds they saw, the Ministers
were getting itchy heads. Bird-song woke them up so early after hectic
nights'
"Well" said one "what are we going to do about those trees and
birds? We can't allow this thing to spread like that."
"But" said another "there's no more spreading. Everything seems
to be well contained."
"PINE you must surely be joking What about when more seeds drop and
more trees spring up, and more birds make nests."
"O.K' O.Kl" PNE replied "but to tell you the honest truth, I enjoy
seeing those trees! alnd what a relief on a hot day to belax in their
shade."
"That's so true,' said the Minister of Defence, "You remember my
cocktail-party last week? All the overseas visitors said that they
heard of beautiful Dominica,' but they had never realized Roseau was
as beautiful as that' Why we actually had to beg one of them to come
indoors to sleep hut would he' No sir-e-eel He slept right there.
'Just leave me a bottle of rum and some coconut water and cigarettes!
I'll be fine.' Can you imagine that."
A few days later when the postman dropped Ma Titine her letters
there was one from Washington.
"Maybe something happen to Garge'" she exclaimed, But it was from
the President of a Bird Preservation Society asking Ma Titine to
nominate 'a member of her Splendid Group' for an Audobon medal and
return fare to the U.S. was promised.
She looked at Baby and Genelia. "Baby, I tink is Genelia really
earn dat medal..." She said generously.
Details of the TEACHERS TRAINING COLLEGE, Bath Estate (p.3)
Contract of construction was signed on 13th June by the Minister
of Education & Health (Mr. Christian) & Mr. R.Read, Chief Executive
on the Board of A.C.Shillingford & Co.Ltd. Construction starts July 10.
Completion date May 10, 1973; contract amount $325,000. The Architect
is Geoffrey Maclean; Consulting Engineers Partnership Engineers;
Quantity Surveyors Ferdinand Hart & Leonard. *** There are two
blocks in the building (1) Admin/Staff Offices (Ground floor) and
Canteens for staff/students (First floor). In block (2) there is a
science lab, cooking and home econ. lecture room, M & i toilets (on
Ground floor); three lecture rooms convertible to auditorium
Library and Art Lecture room on First floor. The building is set
against Goodwill Cliffs and River Bank on Bath Estate.
QUOTE OF WEEK: Every reform was once a private opinion.- Emerson.


Friday, June 23, 1972


T T-I ~ S TAR


5Pa( e Six








FridayJun 23 l97~ TE SAR agevI


"AFTER THE REVOLUTION" by

Marx'sprime purpose, however,was
to over, throw established society
and to this end he had to develop a doc-
trine that would appeal'to the masses.
The doctrine he developed was, in-
qvitably, based on the fallacy of the
two "species" of man. This meant the
sacrifice of truth, and no one makes
this sacrifice without at last becom-
ing a victim himself. lven though
he does not say what he' believes, he
ends by believing what he' aays. I see
no reason to doubt that Marx, Engels,
and Lenin fell into the habit of as-
suming without question that there
really was a-wicked species called
the bourgeoisie (haves) and a good one
called the proletariat (have-nots).
Surely this explains Lenin's curi-
ously naif belief, as late as the sum-
mer of 1917, that when the proletariat
took power, politics would disappear
from the conduct of Govornnent. He
never seemed to have doubted that petty
considerations of self-interest would
be alien to the representatives of the
proletariat, who would show themselves
perfect in wisdom and judgement.
What- prevented the fulfillnont of
Lenin's Marxist faith, after the coup
of October 1917,, was huian nature. The
fulfillment of the Bolshevik'Revolution
required that Lenin maintain, by what-
ever m-eans necessary, his owin'personal
potter. That required, in turn, that the
Bolshevik Party retain its rule ever
the Russian Empire. Therefore, having
held fre.eelections for a Constituent
Assembly, he broke that Assembly up by
armed force when it transpired that
the Bolsheviks were in a minority.
At every turning, after that, the re-
quirement of the retention of power
over rode ideological principles. When
exhausted by the political struggle,
Lenin began to lose his own power,
others in the party leadership conspired
to achieve more power for themselves or
simply to hold what they had.
In this context, not the man who was
the most dedicated to the iarxist pro-
gramme, but the man who was the most
adept and unscrupulous came out on top
and established his personal dictator-
ship. His name was Stalin.
The commitment of revolutionaries to
destruction is irresponsible in so far
as it is indifferent to what may follow*
The destruction of the Ueimiar Republic
was followed by Hitler's totalitarian
State. ..1ex C .)
a------ --- -----


_ _


Rupert Sorhaindo M.Sc. (frepl)

The "end" of British colonial rule
in Dominica saw the beginning of a
new colonial agel'
Students who have participated in
the student revolutionary movement
have described how exalted they felt
as they marched shoulder-to-shoulder
with their fellow students against
the barricades'and into the tear gas.
For the moment, they were living
the authentic life. They were iepcr-
iencing escape from loneliness and
weakness, ijoving and shouting in
unison with the mob, they felt them-
selves part of an invincible moral
re titude that was realizing itself
with irresistible power.
I do not doubt that the "youth
brigadec" of Iitler's- Germany,
marching past th6 Fuhrer, with arms
raised in salute, enjoyed the sane
exhilaration. For them, too, the
authentic life was being realized.
In the one case no less than in the
other, howyevr, one must azsk whether
the therapeutic benefits are worth
the consequences;
Is it too much, then, to ask our
new generation of revolutionaries to
address themselves with sober
realism to what is a central question,
AFTER. TIE PEVOLUTION,WHAT?

TIME KEEPITG: last week this article--
was badly printed. It is now repeated:
You can tell a nan by the company he
keeps. You can also judge him by his
time-keepig..'If he is habitually
late for uork, seldom keeps his appoint-
ments1, and puts off for tomorrow what
he should have done today, you can be
sure he won'.t.rate high as an achieve,..
Such a man will.always be ,in"a muddle,
will never, know where to find things
and will have trouble meeting deadlines.
The minimum mark of efficiency is
punctuality, By being regular and punc-
tual in attendance aj work, employes
show that they have a due appreciation
of their jobs and of the importance of
time.
Unpunctuality, when it becomes
widespread, can also serve to tarnish
the reputation of the whole community.
Thus the.first principle in good time-
keeping;i: s to refrain f~m frittering
time aw:ay; and this is achieved by
concei trating on 9ne job at a time
until' it is done.'
( final paragraph on page 10)

*


Page' S6ven


THE STAR'


Friday, June 23, 19'7;







Fia Jn TAIim- ,


BEAT THE HIGH COST OF
: TODAY AND FOR THE NEXT FEW DAYS ONLY


LtV iN-G-'


.Get Your Bargains with the best Service
at .


D"


HTr
Hbre


SHILLINGFORD' S


STORE


are just some of these Bargains".


MEN'S BATH SUITS as low as
BOYS'. BATH SUITS as low as.
SUi'GLASSES as low as
BOYS' WHITE SHORTS as low as
BOYS' WRANGLERS .as low as
GIRLS" PYJAMAS as low. as
BOYS' SHIRTS as low as
MEN'S SHIRTS as low as
WOMEN'-S NIGHTIES: as low as
LADIES' DUSTERS .as .low as.
BOYS' TERYLENE SHIRTS ad low as
'RAIN COATS as low as
PLASTIC WARDROBES as low as
CHILDREN'S DRESSES as low as
CHILDREN'S JERSEYS ... as low as
_:CHILDRE ,'S SUITS as low as'
LADES LONG PANTS .as; low .as
LADIES SHORT PAWTS as! low as
LADIES BLOUSES as low as
CLOTHS (once $%5O- -)' now priced 0
......AND .THERE ARE
at


$4.00
2. ,90
1.75
$1.50
$1.75
3.50 '
2S, 50
$5.00
$5,90
$4.90
$3,80
$2,75
$5,25
$6.75
$1. 50
$4,00

$.375.
S'$2.00
from $6.00 t.o .90.
'MANY .OTHER ITEMS
."


SHILLINGFORID _2 STORE


,. I.E. ERSKI R-E WARD REPO.R : .Ward i's no Ombudsmanx:i
Despite, hisumuclsa-Ee aslaes In open sessions, Commissioner Erslaine Ward"
came down heavily oh'"the side of:Goviernment" anhd armed authority in the 2nd
'final.' version of his report on. the disturbancess of Dec.16, 1972. The pub-
lic will soon be'able to obtain.this 12-para*. foolscap pages document.
What is alar~in.g is that most of those who took' pat in these iunlavwul .
proceedings glory in'the fact of their participation,"' Mr. War Atates.j Yes,
Sir they still do '*- On Market Lands: "tthe probl em--whic. remairis un-
solved and' apparently insoluble''". Ward has' this t ., 'ay: "Preserve 'the
Town Council and assis-c it :with an annual 'subveztion.".. ."The .Towi Coun-
cil had no right to enter on the land as it did... its tights .are limited
to a claia" fo6 compensation." Compromise amount of 675, o0 suggested by
the Comiissioner. (But our .earned legal adviser -:oes not agree: cases in
Dominica on'-that' point have been decided otherwise.) '* Ward recommended
that riot equipment be brought 'near at hand' to deal with possible other
situations. "he earlier part of the report. dealt with what Freedom-
lovers had descr~3bed as provocative laws (severely telescoped); then the
section on police and defence- force roles in the disturbances; finally the
sayngs and actions of those '"contributing tb the breakdown-of-law & order".
(Concluded on page 10)


per yd.


T. .. D.


Page Eight


Friday, June.. 8.. 1972


T HE S' T. A R,


...;..







FiyJn2,1,TSTPa w


R E A D E R'S


V I E .V ,S


THE BELLE MAIEPJ, INDIAN PLUS TARD, PLUS TRISTE
by R. Didier Dear Hadam,
.Plaase.allow me space in your
He is a lad of about 28, 5ft 7in in people's paper to air my views on a
height.IHE's from Belle Mani'e're and sings few topics now rampant in Dominica.
patois songs. One thing however about First I would like to congratulate
him is that he likes to be given things Miss Celia Piper for her very wonderful'
rather than to give, and intelligent talk some two weeks ag:.
One evening when a group of us were barring oe of our star pupils (Miss
asleep he came in'at about midnight Newman of the C,H.S, pride of her
crying 0 Mama Oui, 0 llama Gui, Iy 1Mama generation) no: other pupil had been
Undoubtedly it must have been the strain able to conm up with such fluent,
stress, and pressure of life which was well-spoken, intelligent and correct
upon himy, replies. Celia did not'lie, it was
Oh myi He likes smoking a lot and the truth and absolute truth. Her
begging too, yet poor bearded lad he replies so floored Alvin that he had
hIas so much to do, at times to6rush to the record'for
He is still alive though infected support. Too many badly spoken, untrue
with a deep cough; his head was tied and stupid student radicals have been
with a kerchief that night. He left us put. n these teonage-.specialsa
singing Hind of Hope and Glory Mother Secondly: Since the student of last
of the Free.- week's teenage special knows so .very
Hail Laddie.- "Belle Maniere" be with ^much about the recommendations and .
youl report of the alleged 'shoe stooges'
S FROM T -......1 of ,the history-manking A enquiry.
The day Father Felx, 'taes over, we
New publications just released by the who support and help the SMA will be
Department'of Extra Mural Studies at the there no more, The Govt after t'Jd-ing
University of the West-Indies include ,a major part.:in encouraging'discord
"Caribbean Quarterly" (a double issue and breakdown of discipline, .have no
titled "Caribbean Definitions"); and money to rent tlie premises o .'the once-
"Ci'il Service Associations and Unions famous St.iary's Academy and want.a
in the Commonwealth Caribbean" by Dr. ., Catholic School run by the Catholic
Joseph Rajbansee. The author is a member Church .
of the. Department of Government at the The Si-A% was run by Christian
. The firstcompte Brothers helped with Canadian dollars
The first complete systematic ac-
count of the flowering plants of Jamaica from their Mother house in anda
has now been published, The author is Dr. trifle from the GOvernment to keep
C.D. Adams, reader in Botany at the Mona down tuition fees. ad mind yOu the
Campus of the U.W.I. (848. page reference Govt probablyhelped because it was.
book),' About more than 300 species of election year and lastly by the so-
ativ naturalized and coonly cuti- hated Mother's Club who raised.funds
native, naturalized and commonly culti-
vated flowering plants. Two areas of by havin supper dances and jumble
research at the University of the West sales for'repairs to the new toilet,
Indies are to benefit from grants from lab improvements,, and painiig of the
the Ford Foundation. The Institute of. school.
Social and Economic Research has .received Let Govt flood their red school.
a grant of US$140,000 and the Language with red' graduates, 'and' see. if .these
Development Programnei has received a will teach thbiW sisters and brothers.
grant of US $125,000, The Institute for under $300 monthly as was paid
undertakes research on SEocal and econo' the decreed Brothers. Those sisters --
mic problems in the Caribbean area and who were selling souse -and stone cakes-
has received grants from the Ford to rent premises for a creche for -
Foundation in the past to undertake this their smaller black children (who are:
research,, The Caribbean Language Re .not even' supported by oursocialistic
search Programne- aims to study various Brothers, .:are left to the mercy of
aspects of the language structure in the help front the SistePs of the Social'
territories including creole or patois. Centre)& .ale already forgotten, .So,
tOU, t'ne I'rea racuates from "tie universities of the'oorrupt~lmWI who.seem to'
preach only hatred and disorder will forget those well defended students."o'f ;
the closed St. Mary's Academy ,whose graduates got scholarships -to UWI. .
**,* ** *********:::******:,*** ::*****- -!'PLUS TAhRD PLUS 3-TRISTE'. -Rosea. ...
.Roseau,@,.


Friday, June. 23.5, 1972


THE S T A.R


Page line


r




1







Pae TenTAy


S*T*A*R*S P*O**R*T*S by Hlorchriston
CRICKET:
Some fine middle-order and
spirited tail batting helped England
reach the modest total of :272.
Winning the toss and batting first
England found themselves in serious
trouble because with only 28 on the
board. they had lost 3 Wickets. However
a first stand of 63 by Smith and D'
Olivera and another of 93 by Greig
and Knott plus 61 between IllingWorth
and Snow enabled England to reach
some respectability.
Top scorer for England was Greig
who made 54 his third half century
in three test innings. Knott 43, Snow
37, Smith 34,. D'Olivera 32, Illing-
worth 30, Bowling f6r Australia
Mtssey playing in his maiden test got
8/84 and Lillee 2/94. These'two were
the only successful bowlers.
At lunch Australia in reply to
Englands272 are '43/2. I.Chappel -29n.o.
and G,Chappel 9.
Australia two started disast'3ously
FFancis was bowled 1'y Snow for 0 and
Stacole was caught by Gifford off
price for 5. The spore at that time
I / a A tL. 1,l i`FriCdafy 1the


FREEDOM OF MOVEMENT
Grenada, St.Lucia and St.Vincent have
agreed on steps towards unification
of the three island States, accorCing
to an annotncemient from the Premier of
St.~incent, I-lr.itchell. Under the
agxpsaat there .3,ll be complete
Frec lom of I-ovehient among those islands
for Nationals and permanent residents
of the throo States and for accepted
visitors;
Nationals wiill be permitted to uork
and to hold land without restriction
in any of the .- States.

BUILDERS GROUP SEMINAR (D.E.F.)
The Builders Group of the Employers
Federation will hold its first
Seminar in the use of the Critical
Path Method of Planning and Sched-
uling on Monday, the 26th of June
at 7,00 p.m. -The Seminar will be
held at the Newtown office'of A.C.-
Shillingford & Co. Mr. E. Menon
the U.N, Budget adviser to the Min-
istry of Finance will conduct the
Seminar assisted by Mr. T.Caldwell
of A.C. Shillingford & Co.


score was _. ERSKINE WARD REPORT (fr.p.8)
score- was : A '
138 for four Australia batting. Not only well-known Freedom
activists but outsiders moved by
DOMI(ICA AMATEUR SPORTS ASSOCIATION the indignation of the time have
N. 0 T I C E. to FOOTBALLERS their sayings recorded in this
The Annual General Meeting report: while nothing is said of
of Footballers will take place on the many impassioned accounts giv-
Saturday July 1st 1972, commencing en to the Commissioner of the mis-
at .600 p.m. at rule which goaded citizens to pro-
THE DOMINICA GRAMMAR SOHOOL. test with their voices and their
CRICKET whole beings. The citizens stopped
..LOCAL LEAGUE the passage of One bad Act blood-
Just about this time in lessly, dispersed equably; yet the
previous. ears the: league -sually word 'revolutionary keeps cropping
folded up prematurely. It seems, this. up. The judgments in the Magistrate's
year is no exception because there Court on Dec.16 matters seem to
was no cricket at the Gardens last us faiier than this version.
weekend. $ he Domifioa team. which Louis Benoit is quoted at length
toured St.Thomas last weekend were and Star Lestrade is one of those
victorious in the two matches they who gets the word-lash. But where-
alaved. ever..green is .worn they are heroes.


CARIB ELECTION 0 SOON
On July 5-'elections. Will be held in
the Carib-Reserve for a 5-man Carib
-Council, out of which the C'aribs will
choose their Chief. Of the 17 candi-
dates, two are artists .- Has Clem
Frederick and his cousin Faustulus
Frederick; wVith their associates
Jerome JohnGerald Sandf6rdMayil
Nicholls and Renix Auguiste. ******


=TI. =tKEEPNG '(from p.. 7)


Absenteeilsmwhen it is due to ematic
living habits or the abuse of sick
leave privileges is a fraud 6n the em-
ployer and, in a wider senael on the
country, beariqinin mind the' high in-
cidence of'unemployment and under-
employment.
Printed.& Published by the Proprietor,
R.E.Allfrey of Copt Hall Mill House,at
86 Bath Road, Roseau, Dominica, W.I.


I I


THE STAR


Friday, June 23, 1972


Page Ten