Group Title: Star (Roseau, Dominica)
Title: Star (Roseau, Dominica). September 1, 1978.
ALL ISSUES CITATION THUMBNAILS ZOOMABLE PAGE IMAGE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00072476/00605
 Material Information
Title: Star (Roseau, Dominica). September 1, 1978.
Uniform Title: Star (Roseau, Dominica).
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publication Date: September 1, 1978
 Subjects
Spatial Coverage: Dominica -- Caribbean
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00072476
Volume ID: VID00605
Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.

Full Text
LIBRARY
BB'R CH INSTITUTE
I HE STUDY OF MAT'
S2 EAST 78 STREET
or Ott AORK
. o.m: 1-9 Dominicat1 .. pae
rn,-L aII, LoTn '"": --least and
-iry vH E gives the most
.n--nn Virute Mae ft ..FrtuP


VcolXYVTT~ !'1o 93


_Edft'c' -Phy1lishan d Alfrey
'Rr~av, .9en~ca~t~1 -1 1C17R


ELECTIONS DT DOMIFICA FAIR ?
Our readers are advised to read very
C;.refully the feature article on
wiat should have been our pages 3-A&.
We must apologise to our featured
lettered writers for not having the
s?,,ce to put in their contributions
this week. This alro applies to,
ai the many (mostly Bewcomers) who
wrote us letters stating that they
bhd heard that Mr. Fred Degazon ,C
wl- chosen by the present Governpnt
at the first President of DotinaW .
T..ey objected. We cannot possibly
fu"nt their objections in full, but,
%ill give extract next maeek. -.. 4
r1IrPENDn CS FLAG :ON. DISPLAY it HQ
It really sounds like a folk-ballad:
Ten lime-green stars
One holy cross
One sisserou
8ed a background of verdant green'
V haven't seen the flag yet, but
'. is a modification of Alwin Bullys
-:. _gn.
V 'IO 'M OF TH PRESS: meeting in
)' lsmi,Florida, early in Oc0C. 1978.
!"j TtNICA FREEDOf.-PARTY M3TVINGS:
Sunday Se t 3: WSLEY 11 a.m,
i WOODFORD HILL 3 p.m.
Monday Sept 4: ROSEAi -DTIT HALL at
8.30 pm.
Tuesday 5: lAHAUT Campbell
..Rd. at 7.30 p.m.
--,DTAYSep T JOSEPH 9.30Pm
Dics: F rg, ac In D/ca
.1 ,zs. 4: We.
I... .R~DE DI ETORY Ulhi~eid _
it.-fed States Marr b adveirt
Kite otty Ma 632.
wislewooa 1 li *


. .. . w


CIVIL SERVICE ASSOCIATION
Special Programme: Saturday Sept 2:
Anniversary Dance at the Creen Grotto
SSa'-y;SSpt 3: Thanksgiving Mass -
Romai's-T7holic Cathedral at 7 pm.
sM&____ __ ____"i


FOR SALE
FO R S A LSF
Lot 27 Canefield containing 8820O
Square Feet.
Apply: M.E. Charles
Old Street
Roseau, Dominica.
.. 379-,/z


~.LiA.~ Ffrt.eP-n cei-rt~n


*I-YYX L --IT TT nn q---- ~ ~ ._Y L -Y ~~- Y I--U --


I II


,T v E E 'P OPP E
Tie is modest and charitable. He is
a wise man and a saint, say those
who know John-Paul the First, re-
cently Cardinal and'4atriarch of
Venice; and he is 65, young for a
present-day Pope. His election,
says our Rome correspondent,came
as the result of two factions sup-
porting popular candidates.. Pope
John-Pahl was an outsider. He won.
Albinrtuciani was the son of a
poor ss listt worker, once a r intr
but :aitit-Communist. He reused, the
.elaborate crpwking ceremonies. In"
an interview with journalists., pope
4J9i-fPaul 8Sa p #A H :pristwho became cardinal and Pope,
I would have liked to become. a
journalist." He also declared: "I
shall be a travelling Pope.".

TUIV~RSAL CHTLDREF'S DAV CELEBRAIT(S
'Tniversal Children's Day will be
observed in Dominica in 1978 on Oct.
2nd. A week of activities from Sept.
24th is being organised. This years
theme is "THE RIGHTS OF THE: CHILD".
Next year will be International Year
of the Child; working groups #re to
be set up.







Friday, September T H E S T A x
STATS OF DOMIkNlixA- Schea= .wkending Aug26th cld.
TITLE .Y REGISTRATION ACT ?qtquest da- Veronica Request for
Schedule of Application for Certi- ted 24th Agatha the issue of
ficate of Title and Noting thereon August 1977 Payne as a First Cer-
or Caveat for week ending August Presented personal tificate of
9th 198. .... 23rd August represen- Title inres-
Date of Person Nature of Re- 19.78, at tative f pect' of a
equt enting quest whether 11.50 a.m. Joseph portion of
or a Certificate of Title or Not i by her Solicitor land at Grar
IgM thereon or. Caveat., ._ _g enia Charles Portsmouth in


Request da- Phillip Request.,for the
ted 6th 0O? Defoe issue of aFirst
ober 1973 by his Certificate of
Presented Solici- Title in res-
17th Aug- tors pect of a por-
ust 1978at Armour, tion of land
2,20 p.m. Armour known as a lot
& Harris at Berricoa,
Grand Bay in the par sh of St.Pat-
rick containing 2710 square feet and
bounded as follows:- North-East:land
of Walter Henderson; SouthtEast:Land
of Walter Hendersen; South-WesttLand
of Phillip Stuart; North-West: Lands
of Mary Baron anfd Toussaint Fountain


s9edule r week ending A 26t
Request da- Hiram Request for the
ted 2nd J Moses issue of aFirst
July 1976 Paul by Certificate of
Presented his Sol- Title in res-.
22nd.Aug- icitors pect of a por-
uat 1978et Armour, tion of land
2,20 p.m. Armour known as a lot
& Harris at Beljmnier in
the aish of St. Andrew containing
31904 square feet and bounded as
follows:- North: A Public Road;
North-East: Land of Camelia Eugene;
South-Easts A Public Road separating
it from land of Armour W.I. Ltd.;
South: A Public Road separating it
from Land of Armour W.I. Ltd.; Wests
Land of Claude Joseph.
BReest da- Matyoiaint IRequest for
ted 26th Yvonne the issue of
April 1978 Defoe by a First Cert-
Presented her S1i.- ificate of
2nnd Aug- citor Title in res-
ust 1978at Cilma A. pect of a pbr-
10.30 a.m. MUpI2 y tion of land
at Bagatelle in the Parish of St.
Patrick in the State of Dominica,
containing 6,900 square feet and
bounded as follows:-.North b/ lands
of Gifford Defoe,Geraldinf Fontaine
nae Defoe and Fariane Francis;East _


te Parish of Sa:in 'Jbhn containing
3.92 acres and bounded 'as follows:-
North,' A Public Road. and land of Dr.
Bernard Sorhainde; North-Easts Land
of Beatrice Desbonnes; East: South:
A River separating it from land of
Robert Alexander Garraway; West:Land
of Robert Alexander Garraway.


Request da- Thomaine Request fo
ted 27th. Ulcare the issue of
JU3p 1977 by her a First Cert-
piej~ented Solicitor ificate of
42_a Ag- M.Eugenia Title in res-
ust 1978 at ai&rles pect of a Por-
12 06: p.m. ____ tio' of land
.at Layou in the Parish of .St.Joseph
containing 1288 square feet.and
boOnded as'followis- North-Easts
Public Road to St. Joseph; North-
West Lands of Myra Adams;South-West:
Lands of Hue Cabee & Penrice Etienne)
South-East: Land of Methodist Church.


REGISTRAR'S OFFICE, ROSEAU
Ephraim FGeorges, Registrar of
Titles.'
NOTE: Any person who desires to
object to the issuing' of a Certi-
ficate of Title on the abxve a3p-
lications may enter a Caveat in
the above office within six weeks
from the date of the first appear-
ance of these Schedules in the
Star news paper published in this
State or from the Cate when t:.
notice prescribed by law wnAs ;..-t
served on any occupant of adj .iing
lands in respect of which the&e
applications were made.

(Other applications on paIg ,)
by a part of nagatelle EsaT'e a
rated by a Public Road; E:rh by
lands of Avan Defoe and Skff-lgon
Fontaine; West by Bagatelle Estate.


_____


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ELECTIONS IN DCTJINICA Pair?

Persohs in Dominica who listen to Radio St Lucia will testify
to the fact that the electors in that island are being
beseeched to see that their names are on the list of electors.
They are being given the information daily as to the method
by which this can be done.
Radio DBS is silent on the point.
We are supposed to have a system of constant
registration meaning that you can go in at any time of day
to have your name put on the list. But this is only in theory.
To begin with to be able to register you must know
who is the official registering officer. This you can find
only in the Gazette when the officials take the trouble to
put it in the Gazette. How many people in Dominica have
access to the gazette? The law provides that there should
be other means of publication used and one would have
thought that that would mean the newspapers, posters, the
radio etc. None of these are mnde use of to the benefit of
the public.
In the past few weeks application to persons who
have been gazetted as t-c3gi'Esting officers are m et' iti the
information that such a per.,pn no longer lives at that
address and has not so lived there for a long time; or that
the person so gazetted has ceased for a long time to be
registering officer.
Secondly yo miusrt obtain a certain form to make
your application to be registered. Application for forms
from registering officers or the Chief Elections Office are
often met with the reply that there are none or that they
are locked Lp and not available.
,Thirdly you must have a witness tc your signature
on the application form and that witness mus'; be on the list
for the pulling division for which you are making application.
So you must have a list av,--i~l~s so that you.can see which
of your neighbours has beon- I.-sted- An application to see
such a list is often denied ,*y the words: the lists are
locked up or there are no lists for that division available
in the area where you live.
The lav provides fer identification a cards to be
issued to registered eJrctors and their numl er on the list






must be inserted on the card. This presumes that once
registered the elector will remain registered with the same
number. That is not the case; each time the list is
printed the numbers are apt to change. Identification Cards
have never been issued.
Coneerned citizens have been aware that the
manipulation of the preparation of electors' lists lends
itself to preventing fair elections and much correspondence
has taken place with the authorities. Most times no reply is
received to such letters and a face to face approach is met
with the request to put it in writing or a shrug of the
shoulders. No one- ears that his duty should be carried out
in the letter of the law.
In fact one is considered a nuisance if one makes
more than one application to the authorities. Recently the
Leader of the Opposition went to the Electoral Office in
Roseau,to obtain some information from the Chief Elections
Officer which she could not get from the staff in that office;
she was ,told,that the Officer was busy and she sat awaiting
-..his availability and in to tiSme at all thre-e policemen
followed by an Inspector of Police came down to the Office.
They had been summoned by the Chief Elections Officer who
said that "help was needed that there was trouble in the
office." The policemen were the most amazed persons when
they arrived to find a completely quiet office.
In their presence the Chief Elections Officer was
asked why the lists had not been put at the Public Library
in accordance with the law and he said "I don't know about
that."
But in fact the Legislation makes it his duty to
place such lists on the 30th-September and 30th November of
each year at the Public Library so that they can be examined
there. He has never done so.
Why the secrecy? Why the deliberate attempt to
leave the public in ignorance? The Governor is the person
who is in charge of elections and the preparation of the lists
in accordance with the legislation and he must do this in
accordance with our Constitution "in his own deliberate
judgment'i.e.wiinhout interference from the Premier or the Party
who made him Governor.


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1 Pt...T-._____ H S TAR SH ?-A Septerber 1, 1978.-
THE PRICE OC BLO IF The drop in trade is all the
by Aster Hughes mare alairming to America because
Aiter eHughe competitors have capitalised
In spite of declared stands for on the vacuum created by the bUan
protection of' human rights, Western Frances West Germany and Japan all
industrialized nations prove that had substantial tr .d increases
they consider money more precious with South Africa~, The Un.ited King-
than blood.' Their opposition to dom has had her -.hare. also, and
oppression depends on how many' del- that includes the order secured by
lars that opposition costs, and a the British firm of International
glaring example of this is the tUnit- Computers ltd for the computer to
ed States varying policy towards keep track of Blacks who break the
South Africa. pass Laws.
Last February, President Jimmy Becise of the US trade loss, the
Carter issued a Directive to his top United States Government is taking
officials. '"It shall be a major ob- another look at its policy towards
jective of J.S. fcreOgn policy to South Africa. American companies
promote human rights throughout the operating .in that country have been
world'", the Directive said. And,the told that consideration is being
President's declaration was backed given to softenirg the ban. a corn-
with action. -- promise is being sought and permiss-
About the same time Mr. Carter.' ion may be granted to export cerlin
instructions went out, .the US ban- "non-strategi1 good ti the South
ned exports of all goods and tecdni- African armed forces and police,


cal data Uo Soutn Arrlca' armeO
forces and police.-
ect protest against
human rights polilee
ster Vorster's Go:


! PIJWWW


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T HE S T AR Frida., Setember._ 1 978


ST'ATE OF DOLID: r"
TITTI E BY 1FffB'iT3.TrI-ATi $CT
S>'1ueof App-24'attan f&r' Certi-'
f '; orf Tit:L, ad- Voting thereon
o0. 1, a fGor wCllie eIridirng 9th JUly.


Rr~nll~ -:~~f qC, e s t whe 44.lihe r
11 1 of Title or Not-

Ec: da-10j., -for I :~-T~3S tfI t~n
x&2. j ye -fa aFvt
i 'a& 1977 b-Ihs Certificate Of

uly t rl, C> Jul altat P

r. .. to'ol, as a Res-
i>.yc <'kTiY ntial- lot
~n t0ce r&.n rin'the parish
of St. 17orge CI n 1,000
square feet and' bou-i4A; as' follows-
I c rnth:ig By Kennedy +Avenus'; Easr-,o, By
%c=th Road; SOU-t4c Ey Endr' 4f' rlf le
Moses an FatcndE:i s Et: -
Rig rt of+ Vlay, a,-,rat'j .,g it-from -Jarld


*S* T*.*.* S* R* .:- S* -MIorchristqp
FOOTB&ATL: K e:.*hcro ugh/Haplem in
o .....-n ..ay: Sunday, Sept 3
is the long-awaited day w1en Kens-
borough Upited (defenairT league
cha&m7pcns) come up a.ai nst ta i.de#t
asat&ii:g DCPHarlem Brs.'jF. at th|
Vin'i;,or Park. Kensbor orgli U, hal
a 100% .recoi- so far th:s sjras- ,cn .
which incli:aes 15 goals from theit
4 matches played. Harlem on the
otIhr.hand has had to endure twq
draws, which when added mean a
loss of two points in four r~tches
played. This match unless won by
Harlem can only see Kensborough
consolidate their grip on this years
championship* In matches played
in recent times, Kensborough United
endured a minor scare when Coca Cola
Saints took the lead some 20 m).:--
u-.es into the first half 'en t.'.e
teiAms met earlier this week as
Idce again Michael "Bobete'' Fr o-
mran displayed his goal-g: abi 5.:grc
prowessi Roy Murphy however l, rel
ugh just-befo*'e the


,resumed after the
mL+- nay> *y~+ 17c-in


Pge Six __~




racist anti-
w of Prime Mini-
t6- 4It was'
artheid but it had
t on American busi-

,.two US companies,-
d Sperry Univac, had'
supply the South African
oh a computer.' This equip-
cially designed to keep
Blacks who break the Pass
is estimated to cost over ene,
half million USa dollars, but,
cause of the ban' Burroughs and
Speiry had to withdraw their.tenders
However, that was a small loss
in the c~verall. picture. The impact
of the ban rn US business was much-
greater. Trade figures published re-
cently by, the South African Govern-
ment show that, for the. first four
months of -this year, American ex-
ports to South Africa dropped by
some 20% compared with the same
period last year. That represents a
trade loss of nearly a hundred mil-
lion US dollars and tlh, United Sttes
Comn rce Department has become
gancerned.


ted',States foreign policy is to~iit
credibility, there can be no back-'
peddling when bold talk about pre-
serving human rights is found to "
cost money. If there is sincerity
in president Carter's stand for
human rights the sufferings, depr;v-
ations and deaths of South African
Blacks cannot be measured against
collars.
This criticism does not apply to
the Un#ited States only nor is it
limited to the supply of guns and
other "strategic" goods and techno-
logy to South Africats armed forces
and police. To trade with South
*Africa Is to trade the human rights
;f Blacks for money, and every na-
tion. doing business with South AfriA '
-*a in "strategic" or "non-strateg W
goods and services shares the guilt
of the South African Government.
The blood oDf .oppressed people
stains tho, profits of those Wih
draw dividends from the network of
banks, lending agencies, manufactur-
ers, oil companies and the entire
commercial and industrial complex
which keens Mr. Vorster and his
Whites in business and in power.
St, Georges,
Grenada.


m




Request da- i rllsqust -for ed for I 1Kensbo
ted 19th e:..E a~:. d the issueCf interval.
May 19.78 Glady Del- a Fir st Cez. vWhen the mat
Presented 'sol yrti:_" tificate of break, Cecil Elw
14th June Solicitors Title in borough ahead, to be
1978 at. Alleyne & resp et of idated as Murphy once
11.40 am. Co.per all that por KEnborculgh,now in fu~
S' -. A t'ion pf.-land the cc.-e to 4-1 as GQif
a' GLIE o out re in the Parish got hi3; goal. Freeman' gb6
of St. Mark, containing 897 square goCl toW make the score 4--
fa 't arnd bourhexid ea follow-'- Then the die had been cast-
NorIth: By a Road;- East:, y land of Hurtxault got Kensborough's
Howell John Jies; SouthiC by- land *DCP ftarmel Bomblers suffered
of Howell 'John Jules; Vest: By the t carS as they defeated Potter.
Puo-lic Road. i___ted:;, in their encounter oGo
"-- -----:;.- r^-- F--, e scores were'g.A 11.ilfred "Fox"
1^-. 5- &1----^- Dontfraid ard Hr o anuel and
a Po.t-ers defence Uunder. *****Over the past weekend,'D-bi 1 aT*ss ,s
found them.selvy3e in engagements against visiting teams frop t'e- .
beon. On Fri.25th, Cable & Wireless Youth Soccer champs Dominica los'
0-2 to an Arinma Youth Team from Trinidad. Lackadaisical goalkeeping
during the first half Eaw Dominica trailing 0-2 by half time; they never
recovered. *** Sat,226t-h was Harlem Bombers' turn this time playing
Mouulien, a tens from Guadeloupe .A lbng-rangc shot from "F. x" Dontf.~ id
cleared the French goalkeeper's head to put Harlem into the e ad. l:-:c. huf.
MHEmanuel's bomb lac'7.hed fi-om his left boot had the French goalkes eo
grabbing air in a vain attempt to keep the ball from his goal./d h alf
the rest of the game .laked sparkle. Solomon (Harlem goalkeeper) let. a
bgll pass urner his body Moulien 's sole goal. `"ensborou:U U nmet Moulisn
.Qr; Su-;day and took a 2...il l.aA to the interval. No goals 2nd half.
CRICKET EnI, "' tri, -ro .I:. Ne Zeal..and 3.-nil: third successive test win!
BartThfl. eziu..od e o. o e11+-rey of C 0E-TT .,.
Batfh Rd. Roseau, .Domnica, *esti.idie.2







Page Six T H E S T A R Friday, Seembexr 1, 1.978 .
STATE OF E .i":C **,T,*,*R.S*I i*R*: i -;.Iorchristn.
TrITE BY REGIS'RATION ACT FOOTBATJ: K: ho-u iugh/H~a em in
S': e "le of Applicatifon for Certi-- TJ o..n : a: Sunday, Sept73
0 f TL ig thereon is the long-aaited day *n Kens-
;7or r r t y borough Upiteo (defenairg le ague
ata cfP:.r.s on Nu-e of Re- champ&cns) comfl up a ..:st the .aev-
R:.e r -...r ouast whet her atat*.i.-r DCP,Harlem EBc,.:I. a,.t thI
: re ,C c i- of Title or Not- .lin.r Park. Kensbor otl U. has
...,. .. ., .. a 100% .recoid. so far this sefa.:-c,
-*-- -- which includes 15 goals from ;-hsi
" t da. ..uo -stt for t. 4 matches played..,Harlem on the
t d 24Th I~..~cu.e of a Ftste 7f other.hana has had to endure twq
.aen 197-7 by ,. i-s C"rtifi cate of draws, which when added meant a
'.seted tS*,r '- 1 !e 'in re loss of two points in four rMtches
J y t cof -ll t played. This match unless won by
~ t ,,A?-.-: ,tion of lard Harlem can only see Kensborough
.--- kto', n as a Res- consolidate their grip on this year's
S.. .- ... i~ ntia'l- lot championship.* In. matches played
Si c;.n t ioau in the parish En recent times, Kensborough United
Sof St. George, .c<. :I.ira~ ... 1000 idureed -a minor scare when Coe- Cola
square feet and' .ouL a as fo.lows- laei s took the lead some 20 mrrir-
NcrthS By Kennedy Avenus; Ea,' ^ By es .. into the ir st half *wen t..e
oah .Road; Soui.: By .lnds' of UriXlle teums met earlier this week as
Moses anE F' l,:n,-Spi-f' est: By-a'- ~xie again Michael "Bobett.e" Freo-
Right of Way aep ratig it from and man displayed his goal-g:ab'Si:r
f' Ur1ie-.3_ e ,,. row'css. Roy Murphy however I le .
Request da-. "'Bit.ll.] -,'- qu-V., for ?edl-o Kensbo6rugh just -L.efoe the
ted 19th ).. ,^ ..'d 'the issue ct interval. '
May 1.', G~alt Dc- 'a. F.Pr st Cei.- Whven the match ,resumed after the
Presented eIo ,th.tiy tificate of' break, Cecil Elwfh-.then put Kas,-
14th Junt Solici to rs Title in borough ahead, to be\further c nsoI-
1978' at. Alleyr & respect of idated as Murphy onc-e again scored.
11.40 am. Co.per alltbhatpox- Kenborcugh, now in full cry1took
'-.-"-r-yi'~ et'iv-e ion Opf-.lnd the ecce to 4-1 as Gifford Walsh
r-oSre ir n the Parish got hl,, goal, Freeman' go~ his 2nd
of St4: ~ar, c Lontainign 897 -square goal to make' the score 4.--2 but by
feaot aind bouhiPd as followa- hen the die had been cast as Dna--
North: By a Road;- East:.; By land of Hurtault got- Kensborough's 5th goal
Howell .John Jfies; Souths by land *DCP AIsmel Bormbers suffered'no
of Howell 'John Jules; Vest: By the scar as they defeated Potters Un-
Pumxic Road. ied _in their encount.er,,Gool
.,...--- -~-~~F scores Wee' '.ilfred "Fox"
: '- .-- Dontfraid. anrd le e anuel and
a Po0tters defense tiunrder. *****Over the past weekendxD omxinc: ?s
found themselves in engagements against visiting team frop th-.C!,'.
bean. On Fri.25tb, Cable & Wireless Youth :Soccer champs Dominica lost .
0-2 to an Arima Youth Team from Trinidad, Lackadaisical goalkeeping
during the first half saw Dominica trailing 0-2 by half time;,they never
recovered. *** Sat 26th was Harlem Bomb~es' turn this time playing
Mo.ulien, a team from Guadeloupe .A Ibn--rangc shot from "F. x" Dont ...d
cleared the French goalkeeper's .head to put Harlem into the Iead,1s rf:L
HFEmanuel's borob la: v.-ed firom his left boot had the French goalkeep.e-
grabbing air in a vain attempt to keep the -ball from his goa.,2i.. t.lf',
the rest of the qame .rlaked sparkle. Solomon (Harlem goalkeeper). let a
ball pass ur-er his body Moulien's sole goal. Aensborovu U U jmet Moulien
gri, Su--day and tcok a 2..hil le.a to the irnterval No goals 2nd half.
CRICKET- En"''r; Trou- --f e New ZeaJland 3-n.1il third successive teos wipn
PrBaInt Td Roeauh iomilnca fe ,,rey o tH11t
Bath BR Roseau Ylomlnica, *estirdies.








iP n_ TA H ,STg
THE PRICE OF BJ q Q
by Alister Hughes
In spite of declared stands for
protection of' human rights, Western
industrialised nations prove that
they consider money more precious
than blood,' Their opposition to
oppression depends on how many' del-
lars that opposition costs, and a
glaring example of this is the tUnit.
ed States' varying policy towards
South Africa.
Last February, President Jimmy
Carter issued a Directive to his top
officials. '"it shall be a major *b-
jective of U.S. ftcrgn policy to
promote human rights throughout the
world", the Directive said. And,the
President's declaration was backed
with action. ..
About the same time Mr. Carter-'s
instructions went out, .the US ban-
ned exports of all goods and tedchni-
cal data to South Africa' armed
Forces and police Tlhi-wray--de--
ect protest against the racist anti-
human rights policies of prime Mini-
ster Vorster's Gov~rTnmet-. -It was'
a blow against apartheid but it had
a serious effect on American busi-
ness. .-
For instahbe,..two US companies,.
Burroughs and Sperry Univac had
tendered to supply the South African
Police with a computer' This equip-
ment, specially designed to keep
track of Blacks who break the pass
Laws,. is estimated to cost over one.
and,& half million US dollars, but,
because of the, ban' Burroughs and
Sperry had to withdraw their tenders
However, that was a small loss
in the overall picture. The impact
*f the ban fn US business was much
greater. Trade figures published re-
cently by, the South African Govern-
ment show that, for th.- first four
months of -this year, American ex-
ports t- South Africa dropped by
some 20% compared with the same
period last year. That represents a
trade loss of nearly a hundred mil-
lion US dollars and thj United SMtes
Comnmrce Department has become
concerned.


A R q' Septerber 1, 1978
] The drop in trade is all the
inmre ala mizng to America because
her competitors have capitalized
on the vacuum created by the ban.
France, West Germaniy and Japan all
had substantial trade increases
with South Africa. The Unvited King-
dom has had her ai&-arl also, and
that includes the order secured by
the British, firm of International
Computers td for the computer to
keep track of Blacks who break the
Pass Laws.
Becis e of the US trade loss, the
United states Government is taking
another look at its policy towards
South Africa. American companies
ope rating in that country have been
told that ._onsideration is being
given to softening the ban. a osm-
promise is being sought and permiss-
ion may be granted to export certain
"non-strateg goods to the South
African armed forces and policea ,
Deaths '

ted States foreign policy is tohave
credibility, there can be no back-
peddling when bold talk about pre-
serving human rights is found to
cost money. If there is sincerity
in President Carter's stand for
human rights the sufferings, deprkr-
ati3ns and deaths of South African
Blacks cannot be measured against
collars.
-This, criticism doe s not apply to
the United States only nor is it
limited to the supply of guns and
other "strategic" goods and techno-
logy to South Africa's armed forces
and police. To trade with South
*Africa is to trade the human rights
if Blacks for money, and every na-
tion. doing business with South Afr-K
"Ca in "strategic" or "non-strategic
goods and services shares the guilt
of the South African Government.
SThe, blood cDf oppressed people
stains tho. profits of those fhi
draw dividends Orom the network of
banks, lending agencies, manufactur-
ers, oil companies and the entire
commercial and industrial complex
which keeps Mr. Vorster and his
Whites in business and in power. .
St, George,
Grenada.


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