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 Florida Chief Justice to speak...
 Career Services
 Events and opportunities
 People, scholarship and activi...
 Child advocates gather for UF law...
 Calendar


UF UFLAW



Fla law newsletter of the University of Florida College of Law
ALL VOLUMES CITATION SEARCH THUMBNAILS PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00072281/00170
 Material Information
Title: Fla law newsletter of the University of Florida College of Law
Portion of title: Flalaw
Physical Description: Serial
Creator: Levin College of Law
Publisher: s.n.
Place of Publication: <Gainesville FL> College of Law Communications Office 1997-
Creation Date: April 17, 2006
Frequency: weekly
completely irregular
 Subjects
Genre: periodical   ( marcgt )
serial   ( sobekcm )
 Notes
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol.1, no. 1 (Oct. 6, 1997)-
General Note: Weekly during the school year with a biweekly insert, numbered separately called: The Docket.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved, Board of Trustees of the University of Florida
Resource Identifier: aleph - 002311766
notis - ALR5129
System ID: UF00072281:00170

Table of Contents
    Florida Chief Justice to speak at graduation
        Page 1
    Career Services
        Page 2
        Page 3
    Events and opportunities
        Page 4
        Page 5
        Page 6
        Page 7
        Page 8
    People, scholarship and activities
        Page 9
    Child advocates gather for UF law conference
        Page 10
    Calendar
        Page 10
Full Text



















Florida Chief Justice to Speak at Graduation


The Spring 2006 graduation
ceremony at the Levin College
of Law will be a special moment
for both the college and its dis-
tinguished graduation speaker.
Chief Justice Barbara Pariente,
who has headed the Florida
Supreme Court for the past two
years, will deliver the keynote
address at the ceremony. She will
also be present as her son, Joshua
Koehler, accepts his law degree.
Pariente holds the highest
position in Florida's judicial sys-
tem, but that is only part of her
story. She began her law career
in the mid-1970s, when women
were still something of a rarity in
law in Florida, and she has spent


her career breaking through glass
ceilings. She excelled as a per-
sonal injury lawyer at the firm
Cone Wagner & Nugent, mak-
ing partner before she turned
30. Six years later, she formed
her own firm with partner Louis
Silber. In 1993, then-Gov. Law-
ton Chiles appointed her to the
Fourth District Court ofAppeal:
in 1997, Chiles appointed her to
the Florida Supreme Court.
She is only the second woman
to serve as chief justice of the
Florida Supreme Court. Pariente
said she is proud to speak at
the alma mater of Rosemary
Barkett, Florida's first female
chief justice.


rdllUIhIt
"(Barkett) is a product of this
law school, reaching its bench
after a groundbreaking career
that paved the way for women


to enter the mainstream and the
Continued on Page 10

Four to Receive Law School's Highest Honor


by ASHLEY PINDER
One of the first women to
graduate from the University
of Florida Levin College of
Law also is the first woman to
be inducted into the school's
Heritage of Leadership Recog-
nition Society, which honors
the school's most distinguished
alumni. She is joined in the
2006 group by two Florida Bar
presidents and a Tampa busi-


ness executive.
"Recognition by this society
is the law school's highest mark
of distinction for preeminent
graduates," said Dean Robert
Jerry. "It is a privilege to honor
these outstanding alumni who
have distinguished themselves
both nationally and interna-
tionally in remarkable ways."
The families of the four
inductees will be recognized at


an April 21 banquet. The Class
of 2006 inductees are:
Chester H. Ferguson, JD
30, who is credited with paving
the way for Tampa's growth,
including downtown revital-
ization and the positioning of
Tampa as a major shipping
and financial center. He was a
partner at the firm later known
as MacFarlane Ferguson &
McMullen, and was an initial
Continued on Page 8


VOL. 9, NO. 29 APRIL 17, 2006

Hurst Named
Professor of the Year;
Burres, Kent Named
Students of the Year
Samuel T. Dell Research Scholar
Thomas Hurst has been elected
Professor of the
Year by law stu-
dents participating
in annual elections
sponsored by the
John Marshall Bar
Association. Hurst
Students who nominated Hurst
for the honor cited his support
for students and his keen mind.
One student described Hurst as
the legal equivalent of Nobel-win-
ning physicist Richard Feynman.
"Tommy Hurst is a magician of
the highest calibre," the student
wrote.
Two students tied for the title
of Student of the Year. Jennifer
Kent, immediate past president of
the Law Association for Women,
and Steve Burres, president of
the John Marshall Bar Associa-
tion and a member of the Justice
Campbell Thornal Moot Court
Team, shared the honor.
Other finalists included Christine
Garcia, Brian Frankel and Victoria
Sheppard. The winners were
announced at the JMBA Bar-
risters Ball April 7.


INSIDE THIS ISSUE
2 Career Services
4 Events & Opportunities
10 Calendar


Students Win
International
Award


!


Volunteers
Honored
at Gala


N


1 1 1











CAREER SERVICES
SHints to help you in the legal profession


Law School Cookout
Thursday
The deans of the law school
will make and serve lunch to
students, faculty and staff
in the Last Day of Classes
Cookout, to be held Thursday,
April 20, at noon in the Marcia
Whitney Schott Courtyard.
Food is free and everyone is
encouraged to come out and
enjoy good food and good con-
versation. The event is jointly
sponsored by the Law College
Council and UF alumni Gene K.
and Elaine Glasser.












Equal Justice Works &
Skadden Fellowships
Equal Justice Works and the
Skadden Fellowship Founda-
tion offer great opportunities
for those interested in starting
or exploring a public interest
career. Both organizations offer
fellowships for a two-year term
in areas such as immigration,
family preservation, health
care access, prisoner re-entry,
community economic develop-
ment and domestic violence.
For more information on how to
design and implement a project,
schedule an appointment with
Jessie Howell Wallace in Career
Services. For more information
on these and other fellowships,
visit www.pslawnet.org, create
a user profile, and start search-
ing the Fellowship Corner.


2 FLA LAW


Get Paid to Serve
the Public Interest
Interested in spending your third
year getting paid for much-needed
public interest work? Apply by
noon Tuesday, April 18, to become
a Public Interest Law Fellow.
What is the fellowship
program?
The Public Interest Law Fel-
lowship Program is funded by
the Florida Bar Foundation Law
Student Assistance Grant Program.
The program pays as many as 10
fellows (depending on funding) to
work in non profit or government
organizations in the community
Each fellow receives a stipend of
$3,500.
How long is the fellowship
commitment?
Fellows work from August
through May of their third year of
law school.
What does a fellow do?
Fellows work with lawyers in
the Guardian ad Litem Program,
Public Defender's Office, Florida
Institutional Legal Services, Three
Rivers Legal Services and Southern
Legal Counsel. Some placements
involve intensive research and
writing; some include working with
clients. Duties differ depending on
the agency Every effort is made to
take fellows' aptitudes and interests
into account in assigning place-
ments.
Fellows also each write an article
for The Docket or FlaLaw on some
issue relating to serving the under-
represented, and they organize
projects to promote awareness of
poverty issues and public interest
law among the law school com-
munity
Fellows must take a three-credit
course in poverty law in the fall or
spring semester. (If you have already


Public Interest Law Fellow Steckley Lee is presented a Student of the Year award
by Associate Dean for Student Affairs Gail Sasnett at the Volunteer Awards Gala
April 13. If you would like to become a Public Interest Law Fellow, you must
apply by noon Tuesday, April 18, in the Center for Career Services.


taken this course, you are of course
excused from the requirement.)
How many hours of work will
a fellowship require?
Fellows work an average of ten
to fifteen hours per week at their
placement. In addition, they devote
time to the course on poverty law
and to the group projectss, attend-
ing required fellowship meetings
approximately biweekly.
How are fellows selected?
Applicants must have completed
four semesters by the end of Sum-
mer 2006 (a summer term counts
as a semester) and have a GPA of
2.0 or above after Fall 2005.
Applicants will be interviewed
by Jessie Howell Wallace and Tim
McLendon, co-directors of the
Public Service Law Fellowship
Program. Every applicant will be
interviewed unless the number of
applicants is so large that this is not
feasible.
Applicants will be evaluated
based on relevant experiences and
activities, demonstrated commit-
ment to pro bono or public interest
activities, demonstrated academic
ability, writing ability and interest


in public service law.
How do I apply?
Complete the application form,
available in the Center for Govern-
mental Responsibility, 230 Bruton
Geer Hall, or the Center for Career
Services, 244 Bruton Geer Hall.
Completed applications must be
submitted by noon Tuesday, April
18, to Lenny Kennedy in the CGR
office, who will schedule your
interview.

Last Day to Apply for
Inn of Court
Today is your last day to apply
for admission to the Chester Bedell
Inn of Court in Jacksonville. Forms
are available in the Center for
Career Services. Highly-qualified
students are urged to apply if they:
* can commit to faithfully at-
tending a dinner and a meeting
one evening per month from
September through March in
Jacksonville
* have a demonstrated interest in
litigation and the Jacksonville area
* will not be graduating before
May 2007.















1L Shadow Program
Is practicing law really like what
we see on TV? Find out this sum-
mer through the law school's 1L
Shadow Program. Now in its sixth
year, the program is designed for
first-year law students who have
not had the experience of being in
a law firm, courthouse, or other
legal environment. Space in this
program is limited and assign-
ments are done on a lottery basis.
At 4 p.m. Thursday, April 20,
Career Services will hold a lottery
for the program. Sign up sheets
are posted on the board outside
Career Services. Winners must
be present at the drawing with a
copy of their resume. Questions?
E-mail smithdexter@law.ufl.edu.

Career Services Exit
Interviews
If you are graduating this May,
you should sign up for a 15-
minute, strictly confidential exit
interview with a Career Services
counselor. Exit interviews can be
scheduled for any time between
Thursday, April 20, and gradu-
ation. These meetings will help
you and the law school by
providing accurate graduation
statistics to be reported to the
American Bar Association, the
National Association for Law
Placement and both current and
prospective students. If you have
not yet decided on your post-
graduation plans, there is even
more reason to come in and talk
with a counselor to help you
make a decision or craft a plan.
Come in and schedule your ap-
pointment today.


Graduation Regalia
Available May 1
Spring 2006 graduates will be
able to pick up their regalia in
Career Services beginning May 1.
Don't forget to stop in and pick up
your cap and gown.

Important Fall
OCI Info
Bidding for Fall On-Campus
Interviews begins in mid-July. This
includes bidding for both summer
2007 and permanent positions. In
order to participate in Fall OCI, all
students must complete an updated
OCI Policies and Procedures Form.


Resume Workshop for
Spring 1Ls
Because a number of career-
related deadlines are coming up
early this year (job fair applications
on May 31, OCI in mid-July, etc.),
the Center for Career Services is
offering a resume-writing workshop
geared especially to the needs of
first-semester students. Come learn
how to transform your pre-law
school resume into a document
that will help you find legal jobs.
The workshop will be held May
19 at noon at a location to be
determined. Additional details will
be available via the Career Services
Hotline listserve.


Changes Ahead for Stafford Loans
Under the Reconciliation Bill passed by Congress earlier this year,
interest rates for newly-issued federal Stafford loans will change July
1. The loans are now issued at a variable _
rate capped at 8.25 percent. On July 1 and
beyond, loans will be offered at a fixed rate
of 6.8 percent. In addition, after July 1, /
students will no longer be able to consolidate -f /-
student loans while still in school. .
If you have Stafford loans, you may want
to consider consolidating them before the deadline to lock in a fixed
rate. The current in-school interest rate is 4.7 percent and this rate
is expected to rise after July 1. If you act before June 30, you can
consolidate any current loans taken out since 1998 and lock in a 4.75
interest rate for the life of the loan. You may also be eligible to receive
.25 percent off for automatic payment.
If you are graduating in May and wish to consolidate your loans (through
Direct Lending) you will need to consolidate before May 5 to be eligible
for your six-month grace period.
More information can be found on the direct loan consolidation website
at www.loanconsolidation.ed.gov or by telephone at 1 (800) 557-7392.
If all your Stafford loans are Direct Stafford Subsidized or Unsubsidized
Loans, you may be able to start the process with just a phone call. If you
have federal loans with other lenders than Direct Loans, check NSLDS
(National Student Loan Data System) for a detailed listing at www.nslds.
ed.gov. You will need your Federal PIN to access the information.


DRI Offers Diversity
Scholarship
DRI, the national organization
for defense trial lawyers and
corporate counsel, offers two
scholarships of $10,000 each to
female law students and students
of color who are enrolled in their
second year of law school at the
time of their application for the
scholarship.
The deadline to apply for the
scholarship is Aug. 1. Winners will
be announced in September, and
are invited to appear at the award
luncheon at DRI's annual meeting
in San Francisco in October. For
details, go to www.dri.org or
contact Karen Holland at Khol-
land2@dri.org.

















Career Fair for Job-
Seekers with
Disabilities
The IMPACT Job Fair for law
students and attorneys with dis-
abilities will be held in Arlington,
Va., Sept. 15. Anyone graduat-
ing in 2008 or earlier is eligible
to participate. The deadline to
register online is July 21. For
more information and to register,
go to http://www.law.arizona.
edu/Career/IMPACT/studentregis-
trationintro.cfm.


FLA LAW 3











EVENTS & OPPORTUNITIES


Art on Display in
Library
Original artwork by UF law
students, faculty and staff
is on display in the Lawton
Chiles Legal Information Center
through April 19. Stop by and
appreciate the talents of your
friends and classmates.


















Fall Financial
Aid Renewal
Reminder

If you haven't already done
so, now is the time to apply
for aid for the 2006-2007
academic year. Students are
encouraged to apply electroni-
cally using FAFSA/Renewal
FAFSA on the web, which can
save you processing time and
has a built-in editing format to
reduce errors. Go to FAFSA/
Renewal FAFSA on the web
at: http://www.FAFSA.ed.gov
and follow the instructions
on the site. You can check
the status of your applica-
tion and/or make corrections
online. You will need to use
your Federal Access Code
(PIN) to complete the renewal
electronically.


4 FLA LAW


Meetings
* The Estates, Trusts and Elder
Law Society (ETELS) will
hold its final meeting of the
semester today, April 17, at
4 p.m. in the faculty dining
room. The group will hold
elections for 2006-2007 of-
ficers, and refreshments will be
served. For more information,
visit: grove.ufl.edu/ etels.
* The Association for Public
Interest Law will meet Tues-
day, April 18, at noon in room
345. The group will elect new
board members. Free pizza
will be provided. Contact
Dina Finkel at dfinkel@ufl.
edu for more information.

Final Yoga Class
Tuesday
Resource Counselor Nicole
Stern will hold the final yoga
class of the Spring 2006 se-
mester at 5 p.m. Tuesday, April
18, in room 355D. If you are
interested in seeing yoga classes
continued into the next school
year, contact Stern at stern@
law.ufl.edu.

Professor to Address
'America's Colony'
Professor Pedro Malavet will
deliver an address on "America's
Colony: the Political and
Cultural Conflict between the
United States and Puerto Rico,"
at a meeting of UEPA, a Puerto
Rican student group, on Wednes-
day, April 19, from 7-8:30 p.m.
in room 285B.

MS Walk Saturday
Law students, faculty and
staff are invited to participate
in the MS Walk, an annual 5K
run/walk to raise money for


A Different Kind of Pre-Test Pressure
Students took a brief break from end-of-semester studying to enjoy free
massages in the Marcia Whitney Schott Courtyard April 11. The service was
sponsored by Westlaw.


Multiple Sclerosis research, to
be held Saturday, April 22, in
Haile Plantation. Donations
can be made online, and walk-
ing the course can be a great
study break. If you're interested
in either, go on the web to:
https://www.nationalmssociety.
org//FLN/personal/my_team.
asp?pa=54068311&pd=FLNOE
WLK20060422GVL.

JLPPWelcomes New
Editors
The Journal of Law e Public
Policy welcomes the follow-
ing newly-elected Fall 2006
editorial board members:
Editor-in-Chief Jessica DiBi-
anchi; Executive Editor Xavier
Balderas; Research Executive
Editors Heather French, Julia
Kim and Jonathan Schwartz;
Articles Executive Editors
Rebecca Marci Brown, Court-
ney Barclay and Jon Wallace;
Student Works Executive Editor
Sean Lebowitz; Assistant Edi-
tor-in-Chief Tiffany Cummins;
Assistant Managing Editor


Vlad Bulkin; Assistant Research
Editors Aaron Droller, Lindsay
Lawton and Christina Locke;
Assistant Articles Editors Henry
Bolz, Gregory Cutler and Leslie
Trauger; Assistant Student
Works Editor Shawn Jewell;
Notes Chair Elizabeth Kenney;
Interdisciplinary Chair Meghan
Hoskinson; Policy Chair Gina
Civin; Bylaws Senior Scott
Bowman; and Production Se-
nior Drew Bagley.

JLSA Welcomes
New Officers
The Jewish Law Student
Association would like to
extend congratulations to
its newly elected 2006-2007
executive board. New officers
include President Ilan Kaufer,
Vice President of Community
Service Nessa Manten, Vice
President of Outreach/Social
Chair Gerard Kardonsky,
Vice President of Israel Af-
fairs Lauren Marks, Treasurer
Lindsay Roshkind, Secretary
Lori Lustrin and Lunch and















Learn Chair Ian Alperstein. The
new board would also like to
thank outgoing President Lisa
Kanarek for her outstanding
work and contributions to the
organization.

Law Students Awarded
Latin American Grants
UF law students Jesus Suarez
and Valeria Guerrero are headed
to Latin America this sum-
mer to earn course credit while
working with NGOs. Suarez's
externship will take him to
Santiago, Chile, to work on
regional judicial moderniza-
tion and reform projects with
the Justice Studies Center of
the Americas (CEJA). Guererro
will be stationed in Lima, Peru,
working at the Legal Defense
Institute (IDL). Her externship
will focus on citizen security,
human rights, defense poli-
cies and justice reform. Both
students have been awarded
Coca-Cola World Citizenship
Program funding, which pro-
vides for travel to and from the
site, as well as a stipend to cover
a percentage of living expenses.

Thornal Moot Court
Team Has New Board
The Justice Campbell Thornal
Moot Court Team congratulates
its new executive board members:
President Elizabeth Paulk, Vice
President Natalia Medina, Inter-
mural Chair Allisa Luga, Publici-
ty Chair Oshia Gainer, Education
Chair Jason Hawkins, Intramural
Chair Stephanie Smith, Intramu-
ral Vice Chair Elizabeth Frock,
Special Events Chair Matt Crist
and Special Events Vice Chair
Nava Ben-Avraham.


Impressions of
Alachua County

Legal Information Center Director
Mary Kathleen Price looks on as
artist Lee Ann Dodson paints a
landscape at the Artists Alliance
of North Florida Paint Out in Cross
Creek April 11. Price and other
volunteers worked at the event in
which artists gather to capture an
area's landscapes on canvas to
help the law school prepare for a
similar event scheduled for the UF
campus in the next school year.


New Board for
Technology Law
Journal
The Journal of Technology Law
and Policy welcomes its newly-
elected executive board for Fall
2006. Board members include:
Editor-in-Chief Ashley Richard-
son, Assistant Editor-in-Chief
Joseph Walz, Research Editor
Alexandra Wilson, Research
Editor Nate Quick, Assistant
Research Editor Brett Bietz,
Assistant Research Editor Jason
Smith, Galleys Editor Kimberly
Lopez, Galleys Editor Keisha
Hilton-Rodic, Articles Editor


A.J. Horowitz, Communica-
tions Executive Anthony Man-
ganiello, Student Works Editor
Joe Sozzani, Web Editor Dave
Magana and Managing Editor
Aaron Cook.

New Jessup Moot
Court Team Members
Congratulations to the new
members of the Jessup Moot
Court Team: Steven Adamczyk,
Melanie King, Brian Aungst,
Andrei Boyarshinov, Laura Loth-
man, Alexandra Lumpkin, Jill
Davis, Justin Duff, Vanessa Perez,
Scott Fusaro, Jonathan Simon,
Sara Smith, Salvatore Taillefer,
Michael Hooi, Joshua Walker
and Jessica Jackson.

ILS Election Results
The International Law Society
held its annual elections April
11. The group welcomes its new
officers for 2006-2007: President
Kristin Snyder, Vice President
Brian Frankel, Secretary Melanie
King, Treasurer Steven Adam-
czyk, International Breakfast
Series Chair Chris Budzban,
Ethnic Dining Chair Brian Eves,
Membership Chair Mildred Go-
mez, Special Events Chair Jessica
Jackson, Social Chair Sally Peng,
Charity & Fundraising Chair
Jay Rothrock, Exchange Student
Liaison David Sams, Sports and
Recreation Chair Chris Buzdban
and Educational Panel Co-Chairs
Ashley Feasley and Erin McFann.


-009-01
Lafla


Contribute to
'Buzz Book'
The Levin College of Law has
agreed to participate in this
year's Vault Law School Survey.
The information from this survey
may be included in the next
edition of the Vault Law School
Buzz Book, an annual guide to
the nation's law schools.
Vault is seeking input from
students for the book. Go on the
Web to www.vault.com/grad-
degreesurvey.jsp?referer= 15 to
submit your responses to Vault's
student survey. All responses
are anonymous. Some may be
quoted, in full or in part, in the
Buzz Book. Send your survey
response by May 22.
















FlaLaw Ceases
Publication for
Summer
This is the final Spring 2006 is-
sue of Flalaw, the law school's
weekly newsletter. Flalaw will
resume publication on Aug. 28.
Until then, stay on top of cam-
pus events through the alumni
magazine UFLAW, the e-mail
newsletter UF Law E-News,
or the law school's website at
www.law.ufl.edu.


FLA LAW 5












Seniors: Enjoy Free Food at Class Gift Table


Law School Welcomes
New Staff
The Levin College of Law is
pleased to welcome two new
staff members.
Tina Bolton (left), the new
office assistant in the Dean's
Office, comes to UF after
15 years doing payroll at
West Farms, a locally-owned
landscaping firm. She can be
contacted at 273-0606 or
BoltonT@law.ufl.edu.
Lynn Fowler (right), the new
registrar, comes to the law
school after seven years as a
student affairs coordinator at
the College of Pharmacy and
the College of Nursing. If you
need a graduation check or
help with registration contact
Fowler at 273-0627 or
FowlerL@law.ufl.edu.










Exam Conflict
Forms Available
The spring 2006 exam conflict
web link has been activated at
http://www.law.ufl.edu/stu-
dents/forms apps/examexcep-
tions.shtml.
If you have two or more exams
scheduled on the same day,
please fill out a form online or
pick one up at the Office of
Student Affairs. Student
Affairs will contact you
with the adjustment if one is
approved on or before Friday,
April 21, which is also the
deadline for filing forms.


6 FLA LAW


Enjoy free food and leave your
mark on the Levin College of Law
- by stopping by the Class Gift
Committee's table in the courtyard
Tuesday, April 18, from 10 am. to 2
p.m. The Class Gift Committee will
be serving chips, salsa and lemonade
for Spring 2006 graduates and ask-
ing for pledges to the Class Gift.
The committee is already well
on its way to its fundraising goal;
through the generosity of current
seniors, the committee has raised
$44,000 of the $75,000 the group
hopes to bring in. Still, graduation
is a little less than a month away,
and the committee needs your help


Student Group
It's one r.., 1-i; .i, r organiza-
tions on the law school campus. It
has grown from two dozen members
to more than 130 in the space of
a single year. And it hosts speakers
from around the world, who address
topics of historic importance.
Now UF's branch of the In-
ternational Law Society has been
recognized as the most outstanding
of the group's 200 chapters world-
wide. The UF chapter also won the
group's award for Best Speaker and
Best International Event.
Dedicated to helping students
explore issues and careers in interna-
tional law, ILS has historically had a
small but devoted following at UE
The group had roughly two dozen
members when President Brian Fran-
kel and the rest of the group's current
officers took over last year. The new
officers saw room for growth.
"Students are seeking to under-
stand the world as relates to the UN,
NAFTA, WTO, ICC (the Inter-
national Criminal Court), the war
on terror, China, the EU, the world
wide web, and global forces that were
almost non-existant 15 years ago,"


raising the remaining funds. Only 25
percent of the graduating class has
given so far, which means that there
are many generous seniors who have
yet to find time to make a pledge.
Your contribution to the class gift
helps future students and the college
itself by giving the law school discre-
tionary funds to spend as it pursues
its goal of climbing through the ranks
of the nation's colleges. Your gift can
also be earmarked for a specific fund,
including all co-curricular activities
and most extracurriculars. As your
alma mater grows in prestige, the
value of your diploma increases so a
9Jtr i I.. -an investment in your own


future.
Giving is painless. Gifts of more
than $125 can be spread out over
a period of five years. The first
payment on your pledge is not due
until June 2007. The average student
pledge is $1,000, which amounts to
$200 per year, or roughly one billable
hour of work
If you can't make it to the Class
Gift table on the concourse this
week, you can make a pledge online
at http://www.law.ufl.edu/students/
resources/classgift.shtml. For more
information, contact Dayna Duncan
at dgaff@law.ufl.edu.


Wins International Award


A core group ot committed otti-
cers helped the International Law
Society grow from two dozen
members to more than 130.

Frankel said.
Frankel and his colleagues swelled
the group's ranks to more than 130
over the course of the school year
thanks to a carefully laid out plan.
First, they committed to sponsoring
at least one substantial on-campus
event per week to keep members
interested. Second, they established
incentives for joining: some of the
best ILS events are open to members


only. Third, they made joining and
participating in the group easy.
"We hold members-only events,
but we make it clear that you can
join when you show up," Frankel
said. Once people have joined, Fran-
kel said, they are asked to participate
as much as they can.
The group has also been helped by
professors and administrators, who
have been quick to suggest possible
ILS speakers among overseas visitors
to UE That assistance has allowed
the group to attract a global cast of
speakers while spending very little
on travel.
One recent speaker Jorge
Santistevan, the human rights activ-
ist who became the first person to
hold the position of Human Rights
Ombudman to the government of
Peru was named Best Speaker in
the ILS international competition.
His speech was part of the group's In-
ternational Breakfast Series, a weekly
brunch and lecture that won the Best
International Event award.
The awards were announced at
ILSAs national convention in Wash-
ington, D.C. March 30-April 1.












Volunteers Honored at Awards Gala


Throughout the school year, they
took time out of their busy sched-
ules to help their fellow citizens. Last
week, dozens of UF law students
were honored for their commitment
to pro bono and public service work.
Honorees, their fellow students,
faculty and staff gathered in the
Chesterfield Smith Ceremonial
Classroom for the Volunteer Awards
Gala, which recognizes those who
donate their time to help the com-
munity.
The Event of the Year Award
went to two organizations. The
Restoration of Civil Rights Project
was honored for recruiting law
students to help ex-felons through
the complex process of appealing
to have their voting rights restored.
The Silent Auction sponsored by the
Law Association for Women and the
Association for Law and Business
was recognized for raising $5,000
for Peaceful Paths Domestic Abuse
Network and the Red Cross.
There were also two winners in
the Student Organization of the
Year category The Law School
Mentoring Program was honored
for pairing law student mentors
with students at Caring and Shar-
ing Learning School, a Gainesville
charter school. Volunteer Income
Tax Assistance was recognized for
its many years of helping students


and low-income Alachua County
residents file their tax returns.
An individual student from each
class was honored as Student Vol-
unteer of the Year. Andre Hammel
(1L) was one of the organizers of the
Law School Mentoring Program.
Rebecca Brown (2L) organized a
number ofAlzheimers advocacy,


awareness, and fundraising events on
and off campus. Steckley Lee (3L)
has been involved in many public
service projects throughout her three
years at the law school, working
most recently with the Restoration
of Rights Project and helping find
housing for students displaced by
Hurricane Katrina.


Pro Bono/Community Service Honorees
More than 70 law students were recognized with Pro Bono or Public Service
Certificates for putting in 35 hours or more in pro bono work or volunteer
work in the community. Honorees included:


Cathy Ambersley
Dana Arak
Yoav Attias
Yelizaveta Batres
Sandra Biszantz
Edward Blaisdell
Kari Boston
Andrei Boyarshinov
Abby Bourgeois
Andrew Brajcich
Suzanne Brown
Steven Burres
Emily Cacioppo
Pauline Cheung
Charles Cray
Natasha Crespo
Brian Coursey
Tiffany Cummins
Jamie D'Aguiar
Ginamarie D'Amelia
Kristin Della Penna
Sara Denny
Datan Dorot
David Duncan
Kenneth Farmer


Matthew Gale
Sergiu Gherman
Daniel Glassman
Brandy Grant
John Eric Hope
Elizabeth Baird Illsley
Dana Israel
James Jones Jr.
David Kay
Elizabeth Kenney
Jamara Kinberg
Marek Kochanski
Jay Kubica
Kate Leber
Serena Bruni Lee
Kimberly Low
Alissa Lugo
Brian Malec
Latasha Marshall-Scott
Queen Meheux
Tineshia Morris
Luke Napodano
Amy Nath
Michal Niznik
Beejal Patel


Darshna Patel
Eviana Payne-Petrova
Nate Quirk
Jose Quintero
Yesenia Ramirez
Michelle Reiss
Carlos Sandoval
Jonathan Schwartz
Shannon Seltner
Yekaterina (Kate)
Shonina
Mary Jo Smith
Kevin Sobel
Steven K. Sorenson
Corinne Stashuk
Sarah Stoddard
Brianne Strohsahl
Florence Taylor
Brikena Tomasic
Schnelle Tonge
Leslie Trauger
Jeffrey Troiano
Alonso S. Vega
Jessica Zimmer


The law school's award-winning volunteers pose for a group photo at a reception in the faculty dining room follow-
ing the Volunteer Awards Gala April 13. More than 70 students were honored for their participation in a wide range
volunteer and pro bono activities, from hurricane relief to Alzheimer's advocacy.


Book Awards
Ceremony Friday
The Spring 2006 Book Award
Ceremony recognizing the
top-performing students in
classes during the Fall 2005
term will be held Friday, April
21, at 3 p.m. in the Chesterfield
Smith Ceremonial Classroom.
If you are on the list of
recipients for this honor, and
have not RSVP'ed, there is still
time to do so. Contact Jen-
nifer Keopfinger at 273-0640
to reserve your place at the
ceremony.






















APIL Scholarship
Could Fund Your
Public Service
Are you planning to work in an
unpaid public interest internship
this semester? Apply for an
Association for Public Interest
Law summer fellowship stipend
to defray your cost of living.
Applications are due at noon
today, April 17, in the Center for
Career Services. Contact Jessie
Howell Wallace at howellje@
law.ufl.edu with any questions.


FLA LAW 7

















Diversity Committee
Formed, Seeking
Input

It is my pleasure to announce
the creation of our Community
Relations/Diversity Committee.
This committee was created to
serve in an advisory capacity to
the Dean and the entire Levin
College of Law Community.
This committee will act as
a vehicle for systematic and
periodic assessment of the
quality of life of the law school
community as a whole and for
our minority groups within the
community.
Some of the issues we will
be addressing are, but are not
limited to, drafting a policy on
community/classroom climate,
reviewing our mission and
vision statement, making
recommendations regarding the
need for educational programs,
and evaluating any other areas
of related concern.
The committee is composed of
four faculty members: Alyson
Flournoy, Pedro Malavet, Tracy
Rambo and Katheryn Rus-
sell-Brown; seven students:
Scott Catey, Adrian Chandler,
Suzette Maylor, Pedro Pavon,
Majid Vasigh, Jennifer Young,
and Matt Scott; and two staff:
Melissa Bamba and Patti Wil-
liams. The dean has asked me
to chair the committee.
If there are issues of con-
cern that you feel could be
addressed by the committee,
please forward them to me at
JonesA@law.ufl.edu.
- Adrian Jones
Assistant Dean for Diversity
and Community Relations


8 FLA LAW


Heritage from Page 1

member of the State University
System Board of Regents, where
he served for 14 years, including
three as chairman.
Ferguson was the chairman
of the board and chief execu-

Lykes Bros.,
with interests
in shipping,
cattle, packing
and process-
ing, banking,
real estate and Ferguson
energy. He was also the chairman
and chief executive officer of First
Florida Banks. He was a Fellow
of the American College of Trial
Lawyers and the American Col-
lege of Probate Counsel.
Clara Backus Floyd Gehan,
JD 33, was among the first four
women to
graduate from
the UF College
of Law. She
began her own
practice in
Gainesville in h
1963 with a fo- Gehan
cus on real property and probate
law. Gehan was devoted to com-
munity service, and as a mem-
ber of the Gainesville Advisory
Bi-Racial Committee she helped
to desegregate local Gainesville
businesses. She helped establish
the Storefront Legal Aid Service,
the predecessor to Three Rivers
Legal Services, a Gainesville legal
clinic providing service to low
income residents.
Gehan was the president of
the Eighth Judicial Circuit Bar
Association and was awarded the
Florida Bar Pro Bono Award by
the Supreme Court of Florida
and the Florida Supreme Court
Pro Bono Publico Award.


William O.E. Henry, JD 52,
was president of The Florida Bar
in 1983, and
served for
six years as a
member of
the board of
governors and
chaired several
Bar commit- Henry
tees. He also was president of
The Florida Bar Foundation and
trustee of The Florida Bar Founda-
tion Endowment Trust. He was
the first Floridian in 50 years to
serve on the council of the Section
of Business Law for the American
Bar Association.
A loyal alumnus to his alma ma-
ter, Henry served as president of
the University of Florida National
Alumni Association. His awards
included the Medal of Honor by
The Florida Bar Foundation and
the Outstanding Tax Attorney
in the State of Florida by the Tax
Section of the Bar. He practiced
law in Lakeland with the firm that
became Holland & Knight.
John T. Wigginton, LLB 32,
was the first president of the inte-
grated Florida
Bar in 1951.
Wigginton
played an active
role in the gu-
bernatorial elec-
tions of Millard
Caldwell, Spes- Wigginton
sard Holland and Leroy Collins,


and was the executive assistant to
Caldwell as governor. He was a
partner in the Tallahassee law firm
Caldwell, Foster & Wigginton.
In 1957, Wigginton become
judge of the inaugural bench of
the First District Court of Ap-
peals. He served on the court,
including one term as chiefjudge,
until his retirement in 1974. He
continued his public service by
serving as the first executive direc-
tor of the Florida Judicial Qualifi-
cations Commission. Wigginton
was well known for his leadership
of the Fabisinski committee that
drafted the first set of Florida's
civil procedure laws from com-
mon law practices.
The Heritage of Leadership Rec-
ognition Society was officially ac-
tivated in 2003 with the induction
of 12 men, who collectively served
as five chief justices, two gover-
nors, two Florida Bar presidents,
two U.S. senators, two university
presidents, two law school deans
and one U.S. district court judge.
"The Heritage of Leadership
Recognition Society is a testament
to the college's rich tradition of
educating men and women who
demonstrate a lifelong commit-
ment to education, civic, chari-
table and cultural causes," Jerry
said. "Through their careers, these
alumni have brought distinc-
tion to their families and our law
school."


Nominations Now Being Accepted
Nominations are now being accepted for 2007 inductees. Nominees must meet
several criteria, including being a graduate of the UF College of Law or having direct
involvement with the college in a very significant way. The Heritage of Leadership
Committee is currently only accepting nominations for posthumous awards.
Nominations should be sent to Scott Hawkins, who can be contacted at (561)
626-4356 or shawkins@jones-foster.com; or to Kelley Frohlich, at (352) 273-0640,
frohlich@law.ufl.edu.












PEOPLE


SCHOLARSHIP
& ACTIVITIES


Scholarship & Activities
Thomas T. Ankersen
Director, Conservation Clinic
* Published "Tierra y Libertad: the
Social Function Doctrine of Land
Reform in Latin America," 19 Tul.
Envtl. L.J. 69 (2006). Co-au-
thored with Thomas Ruppert
* Published "Defending the Poly-
gon: the Emerging Human Right
to Communal Property," Vol. 59,
No. 3, Fall 2006 of Oklahoma Law
Review.
Michael W. Gordon
John H. And Mary Lou Dasburg
Professor
* Created and moderated two panels
on Fundamentals of International
Business for the opening of the
ABA Section of International Law
Spring Meeting in New York City
April 5-8. This was his fifth year
in this role at the event, which
alternates between New York City
and Washington, D.C.
Jerold Israel
Ed Rood Eminent Scholar in Trial
Advocacy and Procedure
* Speaker, Harvard Law School sym-
posium celebrating the publication
of Foundation Press' Criminal Pro-
cedure Stories, April 21. Will discuss
Duncan v. Louisiana.
Sharon Rush
Irving Cypen Professor; Associate
Director, Center on Children and
Families
* Published Huck Finn's 'Hidden'Les-
sons: Teaching and Learning Across
the Color Line. The book analyzes
how racism functions in the book
Huckleberry Finn as well as the
classroom.
Christopher Slobogin
Stephen C. O'Connell Professor
* Speaker, Harvard Law School sym-
posium celebrating the publication of
Foundation Press' Criminal Procedure
Stories, April 21. Will discuss Terry
v. Ohio.
Barbara Woodhouse
David H. Levin Chair in Family
Law; Professor; Director, Center
on Children and Families
* Presented "The Courage of In-


Exposing a Man-Made Disaster
Fordham University Law Professor Sheila Foster discusses the public policies
and social disparities that led to disaster for black and low-income New
Orleans neighborhoods in Hurricane Katrina in the Spring Lecture sponsored
by the Center for the Study of Race and Race Relations. The lecture was
covered in the April 9 edition of The Gainesville Sun, on WUFT-FM April 10,
and on WCJB-TV April 11.


nocence: Children's Rights and
American Values," a lecture based
on her forthcoming book, at
the Graduate Center of the City
University of New York April 6.
The lecture and the book on which
it is based are part of a Princeton
University Press series called The
Public Square, which features
"public intellectuals writing about
social justice issues."
In the News
Joan Flocks
Director, Social Policy Division,
Center for Governmental Responsi-
bility; Associate Director, Center on
Children and Families
* WUFT-FM, April 12. Quoted in news
story about immigration law reform.
Juan Perea
Cone Wagner Nugent Johnson
Hazouri and Roth Professor
* WUFT-TV April 10. Quoted in news
story on immigration law reform.
Christopher Slobogin
Stephen C. O'Connell Professor
* ABAJournal March 30. Commented
on Clark v. Arizona, in which the
Supreme Court will consider whether
defendants have a constitutional right


to the insanity defense.
Michael Allan Wolf
Richard E. Nelson Professor of Lo-
cal Government Law
* Miami Heral April 12. Quoted in
an article on an attempt by the City
of Dania Beach to force adult busi-
nesses to relocate.


Keep Library
Clean
As test time approaches, the
staff of the Lawton Chiles
Legal Information Center are
asking students to help make
the library a "water-only" zone.
The new library is one of
the law school's proudest
achievements, and it serves as
a welcome center for visiting
dignitaries as well as a second
home for students preparing
for finals. One spill of a sugary
drink can permanently stain the
library's new carpet or furni-
ture. Food and drink discarded
in the library's trash cans
can emit an unpleasant odor,
particularly on the weekends,
when the trash is not taken
out.
Library staff ask that you bring
no food into the library, and no
drinks other than water un-
less the drink is in a non-dispos-
able sport bottle. You can also
help by courteously reminding
people of the water-only policy
when they bring in food or drink
- and make studying for finals
a more pleasant experience for
everyone.


FLA LAW 9








Final Spring Issue
Flalaw is published each week
school is in session during Spring
and Fall semesters by the Levin
College of Law Communica-
tions Office. The newsletter
will cease publication over the
summer. For updates on campus
news, go to the Levin College
of Law website at www.law.
ufl.edu.
* Tim Lockette, Editor
* Kristen Hines, Photographer



College of Law
Administration
* Robert H. Jerry, II, Dean
* George L. Dawson,
Associate Dean for
Academic Affairs
* J. Patrick Shannon,
Associate Dean for
Administrative Affairs
* Lyrissa Barnett Lidsky,
Associate Dean for
Faculty Development
* Michael K. Friel,
Associate Dean & Director,
Graduate Tax Program
* Stuart R. Cohn,
Associate Dean for
International Studies
* M. Kathleen "Kathie" Price,
Associate Dean for Library
and Technology
* Gail E. Sasnett,
Associate Dean for
Students, Professionalism
and Community Relations
* J. Michael Patrick,
Assistant Dean for Admissions
* Linda Calvert Hanson,
Assistant Dean for
Career Services
* Adrian Jones,
Assistant Dean for Diversity
and Community Relations
* Jennifer Cope, Interim
Assistant Dean for Students
* Debra D. Amirin,
Director of Communications
* Donald J. Hale,
Senior Director of Development
and Alumni Affairs



UNIVERSITY OF
FLORIDA


Child Advocates Gather for UF Law Conference


The Center on Children and
Families co-hosted two back-to-
back conferences between March
30 and April 1. The first, co-hosted
with UF's Askew Institute March
30-31, brought together about 75
academics, professionals and public
servants from around the state to
discuss "Building Partnerships to
Meet Children's Needs" in systems
dealing with child maltreatment.
Florida Supreme Court Chief
Justice Barbara Pariente served as
convenor and a report on the work-
ing sessions' recommendations will
be issued by Askew Institute.
A second conference, "Bridges to
Excellence: Building and Sustaining
Multidisciplinary Collaboratives
for Children," co-sponsored by The
Center on Children and Families
and First Star, convened on March
31 and ended on April 1. The two-
day conference consisted of various
working sessions geared toward
developing curriculum for the


Pariente from Page 1
highest ranks of our profession,"
Pariente said. "As I give my
speech on May 12, I am sure I
will be looking into a class that
also will send some of its own
to the state Supreme Court to
make their own similar historic
impact on Florida and its legal
system."
Pariente has served on the
Court through some of the most


Center on Children and Families Director Barbara Bennett Woodhouse
and Associate Director Nancy Dowd make a presentation at the
"Bridges to Excellence" Conference.


training of child advocates, as well
as working with other colleges to
promote multidisciplinary learning.
More than 50 professors affiliated
with child advocacy centers brain-
stormed ideas to create educational
programs for students, attorneys
and judges. They also discussed
ways to establish a multidisciplinary


important moments in its his-
tory, including the presidential
election challenge in 2000, the
move toward a Unified Family
Court and the decision in the
Terry Schiavo case.
"Chief Justice Pariente is not
only the head of our state's court
system, but she is also both an
outstanding lawyer and an out-
standing jurist. Her advocacy for


curriculum in which people from
other disciplines, such as medicine
and education, become involved
with the law school in child
advocacy.
Also in attendance were UF's
Children's Fellows, who assisted
with the coordination of the con-
ference.


professionalism sets an example
for all of us, and she has dis-
played great courage both inside
and outside the courtroom," said
Dean Robert Jerry. "It will be an
honor and a pleasure to welcome
her to this year's graduation.
The ceremony will be held at
2 p.m. May 12 in the Stephen
C. O'Connell Center.


April
17 ETELS Meeting, 4 p.m.,
faculty dining room
18 APIL Meeting, noon, room
345
Yoga Class, 5 p.m., room
355D
19 America's Colony: the Politi-
cal and Cultural Conflict Be-
tween the United States and
Puerto Rico, 7 p.m., 285B
20 Spring Classes End


Last Day of Classes Cook-
out, noon, courtyard
1L Shadow Program Lot-
tery, 4 p.m., room BG244
21 Reading/Final Exam Period
Begins
Book Award Ceremony,
3 p.m., Chesterfield Smith
Ceremonial Classroom

May
5 Reading/Final Exam Period Ends


12 Spring 2006 Graduation, 2
p.m., Stephen C. O'Connell
Center

More Dates
Available Online
More information on upcoming
meetings and events is avail-
able through the Levin College
of Law's online calendars at:
www.law.ufl.edu/calendars/.


10 FLA LAW


CALENDAR








Final Spring Issue
Flalaw is published each week
school is in session during Spring
and Fall semesters by the Levin
College of Law Communica-
tions Office. The newsletter
will cease publication over the
summer. For updates on campus
news, go to the Levin College
of Law website at www.law.
ufl.edu.
* Tim Lockette, Editor
* Kristen Hines, Photographer



College of Law
Administration
* Robert H. Jerry, II, Dean
* George L. Dawson,
Associate Dean for
Academic Affairs
* J. Patrick Shannon,
Associate Dean for
Administrative Affairs
* Lyrissa Barnett Lidsky,
Associate Dean for
Faculty Development
* Michael K. Friel,
Associate Dean & Director,
Graduate Tax Program
* Stuart R. Cohn,
Associate Dean for
International Studies
* M. Kathleen "Kathie" Price,
Associate Dean for Library
and Technology
* Gail E. Sasnett,
Associate Dean for
Students, Professionalism
and Community Relations
* J. Michael Patrick,
Assistant Dean for Admissions
* Linda Calvert Hanson,
Assistant Dean for
Career Services
* Adrian Jones,
Assistant Dean for Diversity
and Community Relations
* Jennifer Cope, Interim
Assistant Dean for Students
* Debra D. Amirin,
Director of Communications
* Donald J. Hale,
Senior Director of Development
and Alumni Affairs



UNIVERSITY OF
FLORIDA


Child Advocates Gather for UF Law Conference


The Center on Children and
Families co-hosted two back-to-
back conferences between March
30 and April 1. The first, co-hosted
with UF's Askew Institute March
30-31, brought together about 75
academics, professionals and public
servants from around the state to
discuss "Building Partnerships to
Meet Children's Needs" in systems
dealing with child maltreatment.
Florida Supreme Court Chief
Justice Barbara Pariente served as
convenor and a report on the work-
ing sessions' recommendations will
be issued by Askew Institute.
A second conference, "Bridges to
Excellence: Building and Sustaining
Multidisciplinary Collaboratives
for Children," co-sponsored by The
Center on Children and Families
and First Star, convened on March
31 and ended on April 1. The two-
day conference consisted of various
working sessions geared toward
developing curriculum for the


Pariente from Page 1
highest ranks of our profession,"
Pariente said. "As I give my
speech on May 12, I am sure I
will be looking into a class that
also will send some of its own
to the state Supreme Court to
make their own similar historic
impact on Florida and its legal
system."
Pariente has served on the
Court through some of the most


Center on Children and Families Director Barbara Bennett Woodhouse
and Associate Director Nancy Dowd make a presentation at the
"Bridges to Excellence" Conference.


training of child advocates, as well
as working with other colleges to
promote multidisciplinary learning.
More than 50 professors affiliated
with child advocacy centers brain-
stormed ideas to create educational
programs for students, attorneys
and judges. They also discussed
ways to establish a multidisciplinary


important moments in its his-
tory, including the presidential
election challenge in 2000, the
move toward a Unified Family
Court and the decision in the
Terry Schiavo case.
"Chief Justice Pariente is not
only the head of our state's court
system, but she is also both an
outstanding lawyer and an out-
standing jurist. Her advocacy for


curriculum in which people from
other disciplines, such as medicine
and education, become involved
with the law school in child
advocacy.
Also in attendance were UF's
Children's Fellows, who assisted
with the coordination of the con-
ference.


professionalism sets an example
for all of us, and she has dis-
played great courage both inside
and outside the courtroom," said
Dean Robert Jerry. "It will be an
honor and a pleasure to welcome
her to this year's graduation.
The ceremony will be held at
2 p.m. May 12 in the Stephen
C. O'Connell Center.


April
17 ETELS Meeting, 4 p.m.,
faculty dining room
18 APIL Meeting, noon, room
345
Yoga Class, 5 p.m., room
355D
19 America's Colony: the Politi-
cal and Cultural Conflict Be-
tween the United States and
Puerto Rico, 7 p.m., 285B
20 Spring Classes End


Last Day of Classes Cook-
out, noon, courtyard
1L Shadow Program Lot-
tery, 4 p.m., room BG244
21 Reading/Final Exam Period
Begins
Book Award Ceremony,
3 p.m., Chesterfield Smith
Ceremonial Classroom

May
5 Reading/Final Exam Period Ends


12 Spring 2006 Graduation, 2
p.m., Stephen C. O'Connell
Center

More Dates
Available Online
More information on upcoming
meetings and events is avail-
able through the Levin College
of Law's online calendars at:
www.law.ufl.edu/calendars/.


10 FLA LAW


CALENDAR