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 'Racial ecology' of Katrina is...
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 APIL helps students serve public...
 People, scholarship and activi...
 Mills honored for service as Speaker...
 Calendar


UF UFLAW



Fla law newsletter of the University of Florida College of Law
ALL VOLUMES CITATION SEARCH THUMBNAILS PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
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STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00072281/00169
 Material Information
Title: Fla law newsletter of the University of Florida College of Law
Portion of title: Flalaw
Physical Description: Serial
Creator: Levin College of Law
Publisher: s.n.
Place of Publication: <Gainesville FL> College of Law Communications Office 1997-
Creation Date: April 10, 2006
Frequency: weekly
completely irregular
 Subjects
Genre: periodical   ( marcgt )
serial   ( sobekcm )
 Notes
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol.1, no. 1 (Oct. 6, 1997)-
General Note: Weekly during the school year with a biweekly insert, numbered separately called: The Docket.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved, Board of Trustees of the University of Florida
Resource Identifier: aleph - 002311766
notis - ALR5129
System ID: UF00072281:00169

Table of Contents
    'Racial ecology' of Katrina is focus of lecture
        Page 1
    Career Services
        Page 2
        Page 3
    Events and opportunities
        Page 4
        Page 5
        Page 6
    APIL helps students serve public interest
        Page 7
        Page 8
    People, scholarship and activities
        Page 9
    Mills honored for service as Speaker of the House
        Page 10
    Calendar
        Page 10
Full Text



















'Racial Ecology' of Katrina Is Focus of Lecture


Hurricane Katrina killed
hundreds of people and
demolished much of New
Orleans, but environmental
policy expert Sheila Foster
says the disaster is just one
symptom of a much larger
problem.
Foster, a professor of law
at Fordham University, says
America's cities are shaped in
a way that divides people by
color and class and keeps
poor and non-white popula-
tions in areas vulnerable to
environmental threats. In this
year's Center for the Study
of Race and Race Relations
Spring Lecture, to be held
April 11 at noon in room
285B, Foster will explain how
these trends determined who
was most vulnerable to the
effects and aftermath of Hur-
ricane Katrina. Titled "The
Racial Ecology of a Natural
Disaster," the lecture is free
and open to the public.
"Hurricane Katrina was
more than a natural disaster,"
Foster said. "A number of
important decisions, from
the way government pursued
school integration to the




INSIDE THIS ISSUE
2 Career Services
4 Events & Opportunities
10 Calendar


sies over toxic waste dumps,
garbage incinerators and other
potentially hazardous land
uses proposed for low-income
or minority neighborhoods.
Foster says the coupling of
poverty and pollution is just
one way a community can be
placed at an environmental
disadvantage.
"In cities across the country,
you often find a built envi-
ronment that isolates certain
populations and restricts their
Foster access to opportunity," she
said. "You see poor com-
housing and infrastructure in- munities or communities of
vestment choices made by fed- color located in places that
eral and state governments, re- are flood-prone or otherwise
suited in spatially and socially ecologically vulnerable. And
segregated neighborhoods you see damage to environ-
and left the Ninth Ward more mental resources that protect
vulnerable to natural disaster these areas."
exposure than more privileged With its combination of
neighborhoods." already-damaged wetlands,
Foster has published widely flooded neighborhoods and
on the topic of environmen- stranded storm victims, Foster
tal justice, a growing field said, post-Katrina New Or-
of law that focuses on the leans offers an object lesson in
relationship between race, all these problems. The storm
class, environmental policy serves as a wake-up call that
and urban planning. The term may lead the country to take
"environmental justice" is on its problems with environ-
often invoked in controver- mental justice, she said.





Chief Justice The Business
to Speak at of Law
Graduation


VOL. 9, NO. 28 APRIL 10, 2006


Tax & Environmental
Law High in U.S.
News & World Report
Rankings
The Levin College of Law's Grad-
uate Tax Program has once again
been ranked second in the nation
- with only New
York University
ranking higher
- and the
Environ-
mental
and Land
Use Law
Program was
ranked 12th fifth among
public law schools in U.S. News
and World Report's annual rank-
ings of the nation's best graduate
schools released late last week.
UF's law school was ranked
No. 41 overall, and 18th among
publics.

Dean Robert Jerry said he was
pleased by the numbers, though
he feels the public places too
much emphasis on rankings as a
measure of institutional quality.

"We view rankings as just one of
many ways we can measure our
progress toward our becoming one
of the nation's top ten public law
schools," said Dean Jerry. "But
we are always pleased to see our
programs receive the recognition
they deserve. Our Graduate Tax
Program faculty have long ranked
at the very top in their specialty,
and I am very pleased to see our
Environmental and Land Use Law
Program faculty rated so highly."











SCAREERSERVICES
Hints to help you in the legal profession


Florida Chief
Justice to Speak at
Graduation
Florida Supreme Court Chief
Justice Barbara Pariente will be
the speaker at the law school's
Spring 2006 graduation, to be
held May 12 at 2 p.m in the
Stephen C. O'Connell Center.
For more information on Chief
Justice Pariente's visit and
graduation, see the next issue
of Flalaw.

Student, Faculty
Speakers Sought
for Graduation
The law school is seeking
nominations for a faculty and
student speaker at the Spring
2006 graduation ceremony.
To nominate a student speaker,
graduating students should e-
mail their choice to johnsons@
law.ufl.edu by 6 p.m. Tuesday,
April 11. (No self-nominations,
please.)
Students who are nominated
will be asked to submit a pack-
et including a resume, a release
of transcript and a personal
statement that addresses five
criteria: academics, campus
involvement, independent com-
munity service, co-curricular
activities and leadership.
To nominate a faculty speaker,
send a 100-word statement,
explaining why your nominee
should be chosen, to johnsons@
law.ufl.edu. Student Affairs
will send the statements to
every member of the graduat-
ing class, who will vote on the
speaker. Nominations are due
by 6 p.m. Tuesday, April 11.


2 FLA LAW


Inn of Court
Seeks Pupils
The Chester Bedell Inn of
Court in Jacksonville is seeking
well-qualified students to join
its ranks. The group is part of
the American Inns of Court, a
legal mentoring organization that
teams law students (pupils) with
new lawyers (associates), seasoned
practitioners (barristers) and
judges and senior trial lawyers
(Masters of the Bench).
Inns of Court carry on the
tradition of lawyers learning by
example through discussion and
social interaction to develop a
deeper sense of professionalism
and further the practice of law
with dignity and integrity.
The Chester Bedell Inn of
Court meets six to eight times
per year, with each meeting
consisting of a dinner with all
members present, followed by an
educational component in which
members discuss the techniques
and ethics of trial advocacy.
Well-qualified students are
selected by members of the Inn
on the basis of their application,
interest in litigation and interest
in practicing in the geographic
area of the inn. These students
will have the opportunity to
work with and observe the most
outstanding trial lawyers and
judges in the state and federal
courts. They also will have the
opportunity to meet and come
to know on a personal basis the
leaders of the bench and the
bar in Florida and learn trial
techniques and skills from true
masters of their craft.
Highly qualified students are
encouraged to apply if they:
* can commit to faithfully at-
tending a dinner and meeting


one evening per month from
September through March in
Jacksonville
* have a demonstrated interest
in litigation in the Jacksonville
area
* will not graduate before May
2007.
Applications are available in
the Center for Career Services.
The application deadline is
April 17.
Two other groups the James
C. Adkins, Jr. Inn of Court of
Gainesville and the D.R. Smith
Inn of Court of Ocala accept
applications in early September.
Questions regarding these inns
should be directed to Professor
Diane Tomlinson.


Career Services
Available Through
Summer
The Center for Career Services
maintains regular office hours
during the summer, with sched-
uled appointment availability,
judicial clerkship and externship
information, access to the Ca-


reer Services Resource Library,
and programming geared toward
preparing the newly entered
class for upcoming recruiting
opportunities. Drop by whenever
you need career help, Monday-Fri-
day from 8 a.m.-5 p.m.

Attention Judicial
Clerkship Applicants
The deadline for requesting
letters of recommendation from
your professors is Thursday,
April 14. Even if you have not
firmed up the list of judges to
whom you will be applying,
make sure you request your
letters of recommendation
by the deadline. Additions to
your list of potential judges
can be updated at a later date.
For more information on the
judicial clerkship application
process, come by the Center for
Career Services to pick up the
program handout or to schedule
an appointment. Also be sure to
subscribe to the judicial listserve
by e-mailing Carol Kuczora at
kuczora@law.ufl.edu for up-
dated positions and OSCAR
announcements.

Externship Reminders
If you are externing in Spring
2006, remember to submit your
final time logs and completed
student evaluation to Career
Services. You also will want to
confirm with your faculty super-
visor that you have completed
all of their stated requirements.
If you are interning in Sum-
mer 2006, you should fax,
e-mail or hand-deliver your
biweekly time logs to Career
Services (keeping a copy for
your records). You also will want
to maintain contact with your















faculty supervisor throughout
the summer.
If you are interning in Fall
2006, don't forget the manda-
tory fall externship orientation
Aug. 25. Sign up early for your
OCI interviews that day to
avoid time conflicts.


Exit Interviews &
Graduation Regalia
Students graduating this May
should sign up for a 15- min-
ute, strictly confidential exit
interview with a Career Services
counselor. Exit interviews can
be scheduled any time between
April 20 and graduation. These
meetings will help you, Career
Services and the law school as
a whole by providing accurate
graduation statistics to the ABA,
NALP, and both current and
prospective students. If you have
not yet decided on your post-
graduation plans, there is even
more reason to come in and talk
with a counselor, who can help
you make a decision or craft
a plan. Come in and schedule
your appointment today. Start-
ing May 1, you also can pick up
graduation regalia in the Center
for Career Services.


One Quick Question
Counselors from the Center
for Career Services will be on
hand to answer your questions
from 9:45-11:15 a.m. Thursday,
April 13, on the concourse in
this week's session of One Quick
Question.

Practical Researching
for the First Year/
Summer Associate
LEXIS and Career Services will
help you prepare for your legal
career and summer experience by
offering a refresher workshop on
cost-effective and area-of-law-spe-
cific research tips Tuesday, April
11, at noon in the faculty dining
room. Guest presenters Maryel-
len O'Brien and Bonita J. Young
will provide information on how
to begin your research, what
resources are most beneficial for
success and insider tips on the best


utilization of time. Bring ques-
tions and come prepared to learn
how to be a successful summer or
first-year associate.

Practical Writing for
the First Year/Summer
Associate
Prepare for your legal career and
summer experience by attend-
ing a refresher workshop on how
to write for the legal employer
Wednesday, April 12, at noon in
the faculty dining room. Guest
presenters Henry Winhyk and
Mary Vallandingham will provide
information on how to begin that
tough writing project, whether
it's a memo, brief or complaint.
This workshop will discuss which
resources are most beneficial for
your success and provide insider
tips on how to create an out-
standing document.


Summer Programming for Spring 1Ls
Resume Workshop
Due to the early deadlines for resume submittal (May 31 for job fairs, mid-
July for OCI, etc.), the Center for Career Services is hosting a resume writing
workshop geared especially to the special needs of first-semester students
who wish to transform their pre-law school resumes into legal resumes. The
workshop will be held May 19 at noon (location to be decided). Additional
details will be available in next week's FlaLaw and via e-mail alerts.
Friday Career Programs
Career Services has programs planned for you throughout this summer on
Friday at noon. Topics will include: "Using Symplicity and Participating
in OCI," "Gearing up for Next Summer," "Interviewing Workshop," "Mock
Interviews" and more.
1L Shadow Program
Is practicing law really like what we see on TV? Take a day this summer to
participate in the 1L Shadow Program and see the law in action first hand.
Attorneys in various practices have volunteered to allow a first-semester
student to "shadow" them during a typical day and experience the life of a
practicing attorney. Want to know more? E-mail Dexter Smith in the Center
for Career Services at smithdexter@law.ufl.edu.


BPI Polikoff-
Gautreaux
Fellowship
Business and Professional People
for the Public Interest (BPI)
offers a one-year (renewable for
a second year) fellowship at one
of the country's foremost public
interest law and policy centers
which seeks out and addresses
compelling issues of social justice
and quality of life in the Chicago
region. Currently, BPI works
to transform segregated public
housing, revitalize economically
disadvantaged communities, im-
prove public schools and increase
the availability of affordable
housing. Selected fellows receive
an attractive salary, benefits and
loan repayment assistance (based
on need). For more information,
visit www.bpichicago.org.






DRI Offers Diversity
Scholarship
DRI, the national organization
for defense trial lawyers and
corporate counsel, offers two
scholarships of $10,000 each to
female law students and students
of color who are enrolled in their
second year of law school at the
time of their application for the
scholarship.
The deadline to apply for the
scholarship is Aug. 1. Winners will
be announced in September, and
are invited to appear at the award
luncheon at DRI's annual meeting
in San Francisco in October. For
details, go to www.dri.org or
contact Karen Holland at Khol-
land2@dri.org.


FLA LAW 3
















Fall Financial
Aid Renewal
Reminder

If you haven't already done
so, now is the time to apply
for aid for the 2006-2007
academic year. Students are
encouraged to apply electroni-
cally using FAFSA/Renewal
FAFSA on the web, which can
save you processing time and
has a built-in editing format to
reduce errors. Go to FAFSA/
Renewal FAFSA on the web
at: http://www.FAFSA.ed.gov
and follow the instructions
on the site. You can check
the status of your applica-
tion and/or make corrections
online. You will need to use
your Federal Access Code
(PIN) to complete the renewal
electronically.


















Art on Display in
Library
Original artwork by UF law
students, faculty and staff
is on display in the Lawton
Chiles Legal Information Center
through April 19. Stop by and
appreciate the talents of your
friends and classmates.


4 FLA LAW


EVENT


New Business Law
Group to Meet
The Corporate and Securities
Litigation Group, a new student
organization, will hold it first
meeting Tuesday, April 11, at 5
p.m. in room 285C. The group
will hold elections for spring
and fall positions. There are no
prerequisites to join or to remain
a member. The group plans both
a publication and a litigation
competition.

UF Students Selected
as Bar Foundation
Summer Fellows
The Florida Bar Foundation
has selected six students from
the Levin College of Law for
its Summer Fellows program,
which allows students to work
on real-world cases at legal aid
organizations around the state.
Fellows include Rebecca
Brown (who will work with
the Legal Aid Society of Palm
Beach County), Katharyn
Christian (Legal Services of
North Florida), Elizabeth Illsley
(Florida Institutional Legal Ser-
vices), Losmin Jimenez (Dade
County Bar Association Legal
Aid Society), Barbara Serokee
(Three Rivers Legal Services)
and Olivia Zink (Seminole
County Bar Association).
Students from around the
country competed for the
scholarships, and only 26 were
awarded this year. The fellow-
ships which pay first-year
law students $4,500 and sec-
ond-year law students $5,500
- will allow the students to
work on issues ranging from
representing homeless im-


S & OPPORTUNITIES


View from the Bench
Judge Juan Vasquez, of U.S. Tax Court, discussed the role of a federal tax
judge in "Perspectives from the Bench," a speech at the Levin College of Law
March 31. The event was part of the Graduate Tax Program's Enrichment
Speaker Series.


migrants at administrative
hearings for supplemental se-
curity income to developing an
educational curriculum for fifth
graders on financial literacy and
predatory lending.

Volunteer to Help
Stop Children's Cancer
The International Law Society
is looking for individuals and
organizations to volunteer for
this year's Fantasy Event, one of
Gainesville's most prestigious
fundraisers. Held annually for
the past 25 years, the Fantasy
Event is a red-carpet affair that
has raised almost $2 million for
research into children's cancer.
Organizers need volunteers to
work as bartenders and bar-
backs and to do cleanup. If you
have questions, or need more
information, contact Brian
Frankel at brianjd@ufl.edu or
Jay Rothrock at jrock0l4@ufl.
edu, or visit www.stopchildren-
scancer.org. To volunteer, add


the "Stop Children's Cancer
- International Law Society"
course on TWEN and use the
signup sheets to select the posi-
tion and shift of your choice.

Chilean Official
to Speak
Mauricio Duce, advisor to
Chile's Minister of Justice,
Professor at the Diego Portales
University School of Law and
director of training for the
Justice Studies Center of the
Americas, will speak on "Crimi-
nal Justice Reform in Chile: A
Radical Transformation from an
Inquisitorial to an Adversarial
System" Tuesday, April 11, at
1:30 p.m. in the faculty dining
room. Duce was one of the
drafters of Chile's new Criminal
Procedure Code, and has been
involved in the reform process
since its beginning. His speech
is sponsored by the Internation-
al Law Society and the Law and
Policy in the Americas Program.















Reserve Football
Tickets Today
Registration for the 2006
football ticket lottery begins
today, April 10, and continues
through April 19. Anyone who
wants tickets or who wants
to join JMBA's "law block"
- should register by calling
the GATORS phone system at
384-3262 (or 877-428-6747 if
you're out of town).
When you call, you must
have your 8-digit UF ID
number and your credit card
information handy. If you
are married and would like a
spouse ticket, you can recieve
one only if you have already
shown a copy of your marriage
certificate to the Ticket Office.
For more information, e-mail
jfurst@ufl.edu or go to http://
www.gatorzone.com/tickets/
?tsport=football&student= 1.

Democrats Get
New Board
The Law School Democrats
have elected a new executive
board, including President
Sean Lebowitz, Vice President
Adam Spunberg, Treasurer Mi-
chael Morgan, Secretary Chris
Buzdban, Membership/Social
Director Laura dePaz and Web-
master Stephen Brown.

Trial Team Elects
New Members
The UF Trial Team extends
congratulations to its newly-
elected Fall 2006 executive
board. New officers include
President Cecily McLeod, Vice
President of Administration
Kemay Jackson; Vice President


of Intermurals Justin Mazzarra;
Vice President of Intramurals
Thomas Allison; Junior Vice
Presidents of Intramurals Hill-
ary Hussin and James Hollo-
way; Junior Vice Presidents of
Education Kelly Johnson and
Suzette Maylor; Vice President
of Alumni Affairs Jessica Ander-
son; Vice Presidents of Publicity
Tyler Cathey and Roni Beasley;
Vice President of Communica-
tions Jennifer Young and Office
Manager Shanese Rivera.

New Editorial
Board for FJIL
The Florida Journal ofIn-
ternational Law welcomes the
following new members to it
editorial board: Assistant Edi-
tor-in-Chief Paul Sharobeen;


Assistant Managing Editor
Gene Robinson; Assistant Re-
search Editors Andrea Camp-
bell, Kate Shonina, Craig Harris
and Jared Gardner; Assistant
Articles Editors Matt Ellish and
A.J. Horowitz; Assistant Stu-
dent Works Editor Ashley Feas-
ley; Assistant Advertising Editor
Brad Vialpendo; Assistant Notes
Editor Travis Vaughn; Executive
Proofs Editor Allison Imber;
Assistant Proofs Editor Scott
Fusaro and Policy Chair Jerry
Hanbery.


Ice Cream Social
Assistant Professor Lee-Ford Tritt (left) chats with students (from left)
Kelly Ziegler, Carl Lammers, Dan Cooper and Sheila Zolnoor during the law
school's Ice Cream Social held March 28 in the Marcia Schott Courtyard.
A regular event held to build and celebrate community on the law school
campus, the social was sponsored this semester by Tritt & Fanson, the
Jacksonville firm where Tritt's brother, Arnold Tritt, is a partner.


Last Chance for
Summer Study
Abroad
Maybe there's nothing you want
on the summer schedule. Or
maybe your summer job did not
work out. Whatever the reason,
if you're wondering what to do
this summer, consider attend-
ing one of UF's summer abroad
programs. You could spend your
summer in the spectacular south
of France or breathtaking Cape
Town, South Africa. This sum-
mer, UF students have three and
one-half months of break. This
long period will give you the flex-
ibility to work or volunteer part
of the summer and participate
in one of the summer abroad
programs. This summer you can
do it all. Summer study abroad
allows you to:
* Transfer up to 6 credit hours
as well as grades

* Have the best summer of
your life

* Pay just $2,300 for basic
cost of courses and admin-
istrative fees (if you're a
Florida resident) no matter
how many classes you take.

* Use your financial aid to
cover the cost.

Applications for either France or
Cape Town will be accepted un-
til Saturday, April 15. For more
information, contact Noemar
Castro at castro@law.ufl.edu.


FLA LAW 5











Take Charge of Your Career, Urges CEO of Major Firm


Satisfy Your Sweet
Tooth with Class
Gift Committee
Graduating seniors: come by
the Class Gift Committee's
table on the courtyard Tuesday,
April 11 from 10 a.m.to 2 p.m.
for free cookies and other con-
fections, while they last. And
while you're raiding the cookie
jar, sign up to help the Spring
2006 class raise a record gift
of $75,000. Gifts of more
than $125 are payable over
five years, so you can leave a
legacy without having to dig
deep into your pockets.
If you have any questions about
the gift, ask at the table or
e-mail Committee Chair Dayna
Duncan at dgaff@ufl.edu.




VITA Helps
Student Tax Filers

Need help filing your taxes?
Free help is available through
the law school's Volunteer
Income Tax Assistance pro-
gram, which helps students and
low-income Alachua County
residents file their paperwork
with the IRS.

Volunteers also are able to help
international students with the
complexities of filing a return
in a new country. Every year,
VITA files hundreds of returns,
saving students and local
residents tens of thousands of
dollars.

To get help, come to the
student organization offices
near the cafeteria between 5
p.m. and 9 p.m. any Tuesday,
Wednesday or Thursday.


6 FLA LAW


Most attorneys don't really
understand the business side of
practicing law, said the UF alumnus
who runs the nation's eighth-largest
law firm.
But an understanding of the
economics of law can help you take
charge of your career, said Cesar
Alvarez, president and CEO of
Greenberg Traurig, speaking at an
April 5 meeting of the Association
for Law and Business.
"You're going to a field that is a
profession, but is also a business,"
Alvarez told a crowd of about 100
students in the Chesterfield Smith
Ceremonial Classroom. "If you
understand the business side of law,
you can control your own destiny."
Alvarez, who has headed the firm
for the past nine years, explained
the strategies that helped Green-
berg Traurig expand from a single
office in South Florida to become
a worldwide business with 1,500
attorneys in 32 offices.
"In any consolidation in any
industry, you have two choices,"
he said. "Stay where you are and
become part of someone else, or
look for ways to expand. We were
too insecure to wait for someone
who wanted us."
Alvarez said the current trend
toward law firm consolidation
began in the 1980s, when the
decline in American manufacturing
led Midwestern firms to search for
new clients in cities with grow-
ing economies. Greenberg Traurig
followed the trend, expanding into
cities where overhead was low and
the economy was expanding.
New York is still the world's
best environment for lawyers,
Alvarez said, but you can do just
as well, or better, if you go where
the growth is.
No matter where you work,
Alvarez said, you should develop an


Greenberg-Traurig President and CEO Cesar Alvarez chats with law
students about the importance of honesty, good technical skills, and an
understanding of trhe business side of law in an April 5 event organized
by the Association for Law and Business.


"ownership mentality" rather than
an "employee mentality."
"At a firm we are all, in the end,
employees," he said. "But you own
yourself. While you're working, the
experience you gain is invaluable."
Lawyers should approach every job
as a chance to invest in contacts and
skills, he said.
Alvarez said a young attorney
should focus first on becoming a
great technical lawyer," developing
an extensive knowledge of his or
her field.
In today's fast-paced world, he
said, it is vital for lawyers to do
"pre-research" that enables them to
offer quick answers when a client
calls with a legal question.
"People cannot wait for an
answer," he said. "When I started
practicing, a client would send a
letter with a legal question and give
me a week to respond and I
thought I was under a lot of pres-
sure. It's not like that anymore."
With impeccable technical skills
and sound common sense, you can
earn the respect and trust of your
clients.
"Your clients shouldn't just look


to you as a lawyer, they should
think of you as an advisor," he said.
To maintain that respect, Alvarez
said, one should always be scrupu-
lously honest and that includes
resisting the urge to bend rules in
your client's favor. Trust, he said, is
"not a 99 percent concept."
"You might be tempted to say
to your client, 'I'm not supposed
to tell you this, but I will, because
you're special,'" he said. "You may
think you're ingratiating yourself
to the client but the client knows
that if you violated someone else's
confidence, you might violate
theirs. There's always someone
who's more special."
Self-critiques can also help you
be a better lawyer, Alvarez said. He
advised students to "listen to the
tape" that is, to record their side
of a telephone conversation with a
client, then listen to the recording
with a critical ear.
"Wait two days, then listen to
the tape and ask yourself, 'would I
pay $200 to $300 an hour for this
advice?'" he said. "If you answer yes,
then you're a great lawyer. If you need
to work on it, then work on it."











APIL Helps Students Serve Public Interest


By STECKLEY LEE
Public Interest Law Fellow

In 2003, the American Bar
Association released a report
about the impact of student
loans on the ability of new
lawyers to practice public inter-
est law. This report found that
the median law school debt was
$84,000 with average monthly
payments nearing $1,000. This
does not include undergraduate
student loans. Mortgage-size
debts, combined with rent and
other daily living expenses,
price even the most committed
proponents of public interest
law out of the field, where start-
ing salaries range from $24,000
to $40,000. Thus over the last
ten years, legal aid, state attor-
ney and public defenders offices
have increasingly seen talented
new lawyers forced to leave for
better paying jobs just to make
ends meet. Compounding the
debt incurred in law school
is the fact that many students
who take public interest legal
jobs in the summer must take
out additional private loans to
cover the cost of living while
they work.
Unlike private firms, most
public interest law firms, legal
aid offices and public defenders
offices are unable to pay their
summer clerks. Despite the
personal costs incurred, year
after year students commit-
ted to helping meet the legal
needs of the poor, children,
prisoners and victims of hu-
man rights abuse, forgo paid
summer internships to work for
non-profit groups that provide
much-needed public interest
legal services.
To help students afford to
take public interest jobs, each


spring members of the UF
Association of Public Interest
Law (APIL) begin fundrais-
ing efforts to provide fellow-
ships for students who secure
unpaid summer internships
with 501c(3) non-profit law
firms and organizations. APIL
organizes many fundraising
programs throughout the spring
semester, including LawLaw-
Palooza, "Donate-a-Day,"
and donation collection from
professors and law firms. It only
takes $2,000-$5000 to fund a
student committed to public
interest law working full-time
for an entire summer. "Do-
nate-a-Day" allows students to
directly help in the fundraising
effort. You can help by donat-
ing one day's salary from your
summer clerkship, or what ever
amount you feel comfortable
giving. All donations are tax-
deductible.
If you are a law student and
have secured an unpaid public


interest clerkship or internship
for the summer (this doesn't
include externships), you may
be eligible for the APIL fellow-
ship. For more information on
applying, e-mail howellje@law.
ufl.edu.Ifyou would like to
help raise funds for the fellow-
ship, contact Dina Finkel, APIL
President, at dfinkel@ufl.edu.
If you are interested in public
interest law, but have not been
able to find an opportunity
to work in the field, there are
many pro bono opportunities
in Gainesville. Law student
volunteers have contributed
to civil rights litigation at the
Southern Legal Counsel and
Florida Institutional Legal Ser-
vices, as well as direct represen-
tation of low-income clients at
Three Rivers Legal Services. For
more information about public
interest pro bono opportuni-
ties, talk to the staff at Career
Services. Your help is always
needed.


-UF LAW
I"'5..:... .. I i'.[ nn l o Io Ih
i D ; r MnI1TED STUDENT OPEN HOUSE
.*i..... *; : ::: 1 1



Taking a Break
Admitted law student Paul Darby, and his wife, Kelly, talk during a lull in
the activities during the Levin College of Law's Open House for admitted
students April 7. The program included a number of informational sessions
for admitted students and their families and a reception to meet the law
school's faculty and staff.


1Ls: Attend This
Class, Use Laptop
in Finals
If you are a first- or second-
semester student interested
in using your laptop computer
for the essay portion of your
final exams, you must attend
an ExamSoft orientation today,
April 10.
The orientation will explain
costs and payment instructions
and provide a demonstration of
ExamSoft for those who want
to review its features.
Be sure to bring your laptop
computer with you. You do not
have to commit to using the
software at the meeting. How-
ever, if you do not come to the
ExamSoft orientation meeting,
you cannot opt in at a later time.
The meeting will ensure your
laptop is capable of accepting
the software and will help you
decide whether this exam taking
option is right for you.
The ExamSoft orientation for
first-semester students will be
held at 11 a.m. today in the
Chesterfield Smith Ceremo-
nial Classroom. Orientation for
second-semester students will
be held at noon in the same
location.


FLA LAW 7
















Exam Conflict
Forms Available
The spring 2006 exam conflict
web link has been activated at
http://www.law.ufl.edu/stu-
dents/forms apps/examexcep-
tions.shtml.
If you have two or more exams
scheduled on the same day,
please fill out a form online or
pick one up at the Office of
Student Affairs. Student
Affairs will contact you with
the adjustment if one is ap-
proved on or before April 21,
which is also the deadline for
filing forms.









Become a Public
Interest Law
Fellow: Deadline
April 18
Would you like to make a dif-
ference in the world -- and get
paid for it. The Levin College
of Law is currently seeking
students for the Public Interest
Law Fellows Program, funded
by the Florida Bar Foundation.
Public Interest Law Fellows are
engaged in a number of public
service projects on campus (see
the stories on pages 7 and 8 of
Flalaw for examples).Applica-
tions are available in the Center
for Governmental Responsibility
and the Center for Career Ser-
vices. The application deadline
is noon April 18. For more
information, e-mail howellje@
law.ufl.edu.


Volunteers Needed to Restore Ex-Felons' Rights


8 FLA LAW


by KARA COGGINS
Public Interest Law Fellow
Florida is one of several states
that take away some of ex-fel-
ons' civil rights, including the
right to vote and to hold certain
types of occupational licenses.
The ban was enacted in Florida's
1868 constitution, retained in


Article 6 of the
1968 constitu-
tion, and upheld
by the 11th
Circuit in 2005.
The reality of
the law is that
ex-felons are
placed at a social
and economic
disadvantage
that impedes
the ability to
rehabilitate their
lives. Ex-felons
are unable to


rights restoration and how to
assist someone in filling out an
application. The second step is
to attend your first restoration-
of-rights workshop, where you
will pair up with an experienced
volunteer, meet your first client,
and assist them in navigating
the complex application process.


served their prison sentence,
completed probation, paid res-
titution and are endeavoring to
become full participants in the
community. The application pro-
cess for the restoration of rights
is lengthy, and an applicant can
wait years before receiving an
answer. Additionally, there is the


Locked Out for Life?
* Florida is one of three states that ban ex-
felons from voting for life.
* Ex-felons are also banned from holding
some occupational licenses that could
help them earn a living.
* Nine states have bans that prevent ex-felons from voting for several
years after their release.
* 600,000 Florida residents are disenfranchised due to the ban.
* Ex-felons can have their rights restored through a lengthy and compli-
cated application process. You can help ex-felons regain their rights.


play a role in shaping the com-
munity through voting or from
engaging in certain occupations,
even though they have complet-
ed all the terms and conditions
of their sentence.
According the American Civil
Liberties Union of Florida, the
Florida law currently affects
more than 600,000 Floridians
with past felony convictions.
The law disproportionately af-
fects African-Americans, with
nearly one in three African
American men unable to vote.
An application process exists
to restore civil rights lost after
felony sentencing. The applica-
tion is made to the governor
and the Clemency Board. This is
where your help as a volunteer is
needed. The first step in becom-
ing a volunteer is to sign up for
a training session, where you will
learn who qualifies to apply for


The goal of the workshop is to
empower clients to learn the
application process, so they can
then assist others similarly situ-
ated in their community.
I have learned a great deal
about the reality of the loss
of civil rights by working as a
volunteer. When I first began
I did not realize that ex-felons
lost their right to hold certain
occupational licenses. I recently
spoke with a man interested in
attending a workshop who is
a plumber by profession, but
cannot work as a plumber until
his civil rights are restored. The
reality of his situation is that he
is unable to adequately provide
for his family because he cannot
find employment in his chosen
profession.
There is great reward in assist-
ing at the restoration-of-rights
workshop. The clients have


possibility they
will have to
appear before
the governor
and the Clem-
ency Board
to argue their
case, where they
are subject to
having their
lives opened
up to scrutiny.
For many, this
is part of their


ongoing reha-
bilitation. As a
volunteer you get the benefit of
working closely with someone
endeavoring to make a positive
change in their life.
The restoration-of-rights
workshop provides an ongoing
opportunity to serve the com-
munity. If you are interested in
volunteering, please contact me,
Kara Coggins, at karasene@ufl.
edu. If you are aware of any-
one who is interested in having
their civil rights restored, please
spread the word.
The Restoration of Rights
Workshop is sponsored by The
Martin Luther King Commis-
sion and the Public Interest Law
Fellows.
The Public Interest Law
Fellows are sponsored by the
Florida Bar Foundation.












PEOPLE


SCHOLARSHIP
& ACTIVITIES


Scholarship & Activities
Mary Jane Angelo
Assistant Professor
SAwarded a $3,000 "Internationalizing
the Curriculum" grant from the UF
International Center for her envi-
ronmental dispute resolution course,
taught in Gainesville and Costa Rica.
The course features case studies and
simulations based on environmental
disputes in Latin America.
Gertrude Block
Lecturer Emeritus
* Presented "Did the English Language
Need Sex Surgery" at the annual meet-
ing of the American Association of
University Women April 8 in Yardley,
Penn.
Kathy Fleming
Associate Director of Communications
SJackonville Daily Record, April 3.
Featured in an item on her receipt of a
UF Superior Accomplishment Award
for producing a record three alumni
magazines and the Prospectus in her
first year at the law school.
Alyson Flournoy,
UF Research Foundation Professor;
Director Environmental and Land
Use Law Program
* Presented "Consideration is not
Enough: Information Deficits and
Incentives under Section 404 of the
Clean Water Act" at a symposium
titled "Missing Information: Environ-
mental Data Gaps in Conservation
and Chemical Regulation" at Indiana
University School of Law March 24.


* Was awarded a UF Research Founda-
tion Professorship. These professor-
ships recognize faculty who have
established a distinguished record
of research and scholarship that is
expected to lead to continuing distinc-
tion in their field.
Robert Horn
Facilities Manager
Jacksonville Daily Record April 3. Fea-
tured in an item on his receipt of a UF
Superior Accomplishment Award for
his tireless efforts during the renova-
tion of the law school's facilities.
Clifford Jones
Associate in Law Research
* Recipient, Fulbright Senior Scholar
Research Grant. Jones will travel to
Germany to carry out a research proj-
ect on the interface between European
Union competition law and intel-
lectual property law at the Max Planck
Institute for Intellectual Property,
Competition and Tax Law and the
Ludwig Maximilian University of Mu-
nich. This is Jones' second Fulbright
grant: in 1998, he traveled to Johannes
Gutenberg University of Mainz to
research media concentration law.
Martin McMahon
Clarence J. TeSelle Professor
* Published 'An Income Tax Is Superior
to a Wage or Consumption Tax," 110
TaxNotes 1353 (March 20, 2006).
Winston Nagan
Samuel T. Dell Research Scholar
* Made presentations on human rights
and health care, international patent
issues, biopiracy, issues in privacy law


and a wide range of other topics at the
2nd Annual USA/Brazil Law Seminar
held at the Federal University of Bahia
March 28-29.
Kenneth Nunn
Professor; Associate Director, Center
on Children and Families
* Presented "Race Relations and the
Law: Affirmative Actions in the
United States and Brazil" at the 2nd
USA/Brazil Law Seminar held at the
Federal University of Bahia March 30.

In the News
Joseph Little
Professor
* Miami Heral April 3. Quoted in an
article concerning the lack of enforce-
ment of a Hallandale Beach ordinance
which requires lobbyists to register
with the city. The ordinance does not
apply to developers, and Little said this
loophole circumvents the intent of the
ordinance.
Christopher Peterson
Assistant Professor
* NationalLawJournal March 20.
Quoted in a front-page article on the
differences between current usury laws
and the laws in place during much of
the 20th Century.
* Middle East, North Africa Financial
Network, March 20. The financial
news website, headquartered in Am-
man, Jordan, reprinted a U.S. newspa-
per story in which Peterson comments
on the unavailability of credit reports
in Spanish.
Continued on Page 10


'Water Only' in
Library
As test time approaches, the
staff of the Lawton Chiles
Legal Information Center are
asking students to help make
the library a "water-only" zone.
The new library is one of
the law school's proudest
achievements, and it serves as
a welcome center for visiting
dignitaries as well as a second
home for students preparing
for finals. One spill of a sugary
drink can permanently stain the
library's new carpet or furni-
ture. Food and drink discarded
in the library's trash cans
can emit an unpleasant odor,
particularly on the weekends,
when the trash is not taken
out.
Library staff ask that you bring
no food into the library, and no
drinks other than water un-
less the drink is in a non-dispos-
able sport bottle. You can also
help by courteously reminding
people of the water-only policy
when they bring in food or drink
- and make studying for finals
a more pleasant experience for
everyone.


FLA LAW 9








Send Us Your News
F/alaw is published each week
school is in session by the Levin
College of Law Communications
Office. Submit news of interest
to the law school community by
10 a.m. Tuesday for the follow-
ing Monday's issue to FlaLaw@
law.ufl.edu or 273-0650.
E-mail FlaLaw@law.ufl.edu to be
e-mailed a weekly early release
pdf of Flalaw.

* Tim Lockette, Editor
* Kristen Hines, Photographer



College of Law
Administration
* Robert H. Jerry, II, Dean
* George L. Dawson,
Associate Dean for
Academic Affairs
* J. Patrick Shannon,
Associate Dean for
Administrative Affairs
* Lyrissa Barnett Lidsky,
Associate Dean for
Faculty Development
* Michael K. Friel,
Associate Dean & Director,
Graduate Tax Program
* Stuart R. Cohn,
Associate Dean for
International Studies
* M. Kathleen "Kathie" Price,
Associate Dean for Library
and Technology
* Gail E. Sasnett,
Associate Dean for
Students, Professionalism
and Community Relations
* J. Michael Patrick,
Assistant Dean for Admissions
* Linda Calvert Hanson,
Assistant Dean for
Career Services
* Adrian Jones,
Assistant Dean for Diversity
and Community Relations
* Jennifer Cope, Interim
Assistant Dean for Students
* Debra D. Amirin,
Director of Communications
* Donald J. Hale,
Senior Director of Development
and Alumni Affairs

UNIVERSITY OF
FLORIDA


Mills Honored for Service as Speaker of the House


In this September 1987 photo,
then House speaker Jon Mills, D-
Gainesville, gavels in the Florida
House of Representatives to start
a special session of the Florida
Legislature.


People from Page 9
Katheryn Russell-Brown
Director, Center for the Study
of Race and Race Relations;
Professor
* WRUF-AM, March 30. In-
terviewed extensively on the
publication of her new book,
"Protecting Our Own: Race,
Crime, and African Americans".


Law Professor Jon Mills,
founder and director of the
Center for Governmental
Responsibility, was honored
recently for his service as
Speaker of the Florida House
of Representatives 20 years ago.
Former house members, staff
and lobbyists representing both
major parties assembled at the
Democratic Party headquarters
in Tallahassee to celebrate Mills'
legacy.
"The experience was very
gratifying; many who served
with me when I was speaker
were able to attend," said Mills.
In 1986, Mills presided not
only over many significant
pieces of legislation, but also


Christopher Vallandingham
Foreign and International Law
Librarian; Adjunct Professor
*Panelist, "Libraries and Privacy,"
at the Jacksonville Public Library
March 14.
Barbara Bennett Woodhouse
Director, Center on Children
and Families; Director, Fam-
ily Law Certificate Program;
David H. Levin Chair In Family
Law; Co-Director, University


over the first effort to produce a
video for the annual press skits.
Titled "The Legislative Shuffle,"
the video was a take-off of the
Chicago Bears' "The Super
Bowl Shuffle."
"It's still funny even after 20
years," said Mills.


Mills meets with presidential
candidate Michael Dukakis in
this 1987 photo.


of Florida Institute for Child
and Adolescent Research and
Evaluation
* Gainesville Sun, March 31.
Quoted in an article about the
rate of child abuse and neglect
in the state of Florida.


CALENDAR


April
10 ExamSoft Orientation for
First-Semester Students, 11
a.m., room 180
ExamSoft Orientation for
Second-Semester Students,
noon, room 180
11 CSRRR Spring Lecture
w/Prof. Sheila Foster, noon,
285B
Practical Research for the
First-Year/Summer As-
sociate, noon, faculty dining
room


Criminal Justice Reform in
Chile: From an Inquisitorial
to an Adversarial System,
1:30 p.m., faculty dining
room
Corporate and Securities
Law Group Meeting, 5
p.m., room 285C
12 Practical Writing for the
First-Year/Summer As-
sociate, noon, faculty dining
room
13 One Quick Question, 9:45-
11:15 a.m.,courtyard


More Dates
Available Online
More information on upcoming
meetings and events is avail-
able through the Levin College
of Law's online calendars at:
www.law.ufl.edu/calendars/.


10 FLA LAW








Send Us Your News
F/alaw is published each week
school is in session by the Levin
College of Law Communications
Office. Submit news of interest
to the law school community by
10 a.m. Tuesday for the follow-
ing Monday's issue to FlaLaw@
law.ufl.edu or 273-0650.
E-mail FlaLaw@law.ufl.edu to be
e-mailed a weekly early release
pdf of Flalaw.

* Tim Lockette, Editor
* Kristen Hines, Photographer



College of Law
Administration
* Robert H. Jerry, II, Dean
* George L. Dawson,
Associate Dean for
Academic Affairs
* J. Patrick Shannon,
Associate Dean for
Administrative Affairs
* Lyrissa Barnett Lidsky,
Associate Dean for
Faculty Development
* Michael K. Friel,
Associate Dean & Director,
Graduate Tax Program
* Stuart R. Cohn,
Associate Dean for
International Studies
* M. Kathleen "Kathie" Price,
Associate Dean for Library
and Technology
* Gail E. Sasnett,
Associate Dean for
Students, Professionalism
and Community Relations
* J. Michael Patrick,
Assistant Dean for Admissions
* Linda Calvert Hanson,
Assistant Dean for
Career Services
* Adrian Jones,
Assistant Dean for Diversity
and Community Relations
* Jennifer Cope, Interim
Assistant Dean for Students
* Debra D. Amirin,
Director of Communications
* Donald J. Hale,
Senior Director of Development
and Alumni Affairs

UNIVERSITY OF
FLORIDA


Mills Honored for Service as Speaker of the House


In this September 1987 photo,
then House speaker Jon Mills, D-
Gainesville, gavels in the Florida
House of Representatives to start
a special session of the Florida
Legislature.


People from Page 9
Katheryn Russell-Brown
Director, Center for the Study
of Race and Race Relations;
Professor
* WRUF-AM, March 30. In-
terviewed extensively on the
publication of her new book,
"Protecting Our Own: Race,
Crime, and African Americans".


Law Professor Jon Mills,
founder and director of the
Center for Governmental
Responsibility, was honored
recently for his service as
Speaker of the Florida House
of Representatives 20 years ago.
Former house members, staff
and lobbyists representing both
major parties assembled at the
Democratic Party headquarters
in Tallahassee to celebrate Mills'
legacy.
"The experience was very
gratifying; many who served
with me when I was speaker
were able to attend," said Mills.
In 1986, Mills presided not
only over many significant
pieces of legislation, but also


Christopher Vallandingham
Foreign and International Law
Librarian; Adjunct Professor
*Panelist, "Libraries and Privacy,"
at the Jacksonville Public Library
March 14.
Barbara Bennett Woodhouse
Director, Center on Children
and Families; Director, Fam-
ily Law Certificate Program;
David H. Levin Chair In Family
Law; Co-Director, University


over the first effort to produce a
video for the annual press skits.
Titled "The Legislative Shuffle,"
the video was a take-off of the
Chicago Bears' "The Super
Bowl Shuffle."
"It's still funny even after 20
years," said Mills.


Mills meets with presidential
candidate Michael Dukakis in
this 1987 photo.


of Florida Institute for Child
and Adolescent Research and
Evaluation
* Gainesville Sun, March 31.
Quoted in an article about the
rate of child abuse and neglect
in the state of Florida.


CALENDAR


April
10 ExamSoft Orientation for
First-Semester Students, 11
a.m., room 180
ExamSoft Orientation for
Second-Semester Students,
noon, room 180
11 CSRRR Spring Lecture
w/Prof. Sheila Foster, noon,
285B
Practical Research for the
First-Year/Summer As-
sociate, noon, faculty dining
room


Criminal Justice Reform in
Chile: From an Inquisitorial
to an Adversarial System,
1:30 p.m., faculty dining
room
Corporate and Securities
Law Group Meeting, 5
p.m., room 285C
12 Practical Writing for the
First-Year/Summer As-
sociate, noon, faculty dining
room
13 One Quick Question, 9:45-
11:15 a.m.,courtyard


More Dates
Available Online
More information on upcoming
meetings and events is avail-
able through the Levin College
of Law's online calendars at:
www.law.ufl.edu/calendars/.


10 FLA LAW