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 Law students take FBK in new...
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UF UFLAW



Fla law newsletter of the University of Florida College of Law
ALL VOLUMES CITATION SEARCH THUMBNAILS PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00072281/00168
 Material Information
Title: Fla law newsletter of the University of Florida College of Law
Portion of title: Flalaw
Physical Description: Serial
Creator: Levin College of Law
Publisher: s.n.
Place of Publication: <Gainesville FL> College of Law Communications Office 1997-
Creation Date: April 3, 2006
Frequency: weekly
completely irregular
 Subjects
Genre: periodical   ( marcgt )
serial   ( sobekcm )
 Notes
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol.1, no. 1 (Oct. 6, 1997)-
General Note: Weekly during the school year with a biweekly insert, numbered separately called: The Docket.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved, Board of Trustees of the University of Florida
Resource Identifier: aleph - 002311766
notis - ALR5129
System ID: UF00072281:00168

Table of Contents
    Law students take FBK in new direction
        Page 1
    Career Services
        Page 2
        Page 3
    Events and opportunities
        Page 4
        Page 5
        Page 6
    Finding balance a lifelong task, panel says
        Page 7
    People, scholarship and activities
        Page 8
    Calendar
        Page 8
Full Text




















Law Students Take FBK in New Direction


Law students are taking
the reins at Florida Blue Key
- but that's nothing new.
When FBK President
Lauren Fackender and Vice
President Stuart Barks were
elected March 23,
they joined a long
line of law students
to hold high posi-
tions in the organi-
zation including
FBK Treasurer Josh
Webb, elected late
last year.
What is new is
the direction Fack-
ender, Barks and
Webb want Florida
Blue Key to take.
FBK's newly-elected
leaders say they Law stut
plan to branch out Key. Shc
dent Stu
from the organi- Lauren F
Lauren F
zation's traditional
role organizing
homecoming and focus on
training their members to be-
come Florida's next generation
of political and social leaders.
"We're in danger of becom-
ing a 'leadership graveyard,"'
said Fackender, whose term
begins at the end of the se-
mester. "People work so hard



INSIDE THIS ISSUE


Career Services
Events & Opportunities
Calendar


to get into this organization
that once they've gotten in,
they feel like they've 'arrived.'
Florida Blue Key needs to be
the start of a life of leadership,
not the end."


dents once again hold the reins at Florida Blue
iwn here are (from left) newly-elected Vice Presi-
art Barks, Treasurer Josh Webb and President
ackender.


Founded in 1923, Florida
Blue Key bills itself as "Flor-
ida's most prestigious leader-
ship honorary." With promi-
nent people such as former
Sen. Bob Graham and the late
Gov. Lawton Chiles among
the group's alumni, few would
dispute the claim. Since the


Bill McBride
Speaks


!


organization's beginning, law
students have figured promi-
nently in FBK's leadership;
more than 85 percent of FBK
presidents have been law
students.


The organize
has also history
been a proving
ground for fut
leaders in stat
politics. But t]
days, the path
political prom
nence contain
more twists an
turns than it c
in past decade
Fackender wai
to make sure
members knov
how to naviga
that path.
"We're going
refocus our efi


on training ou
members to be leaders in
world beyond UF," she sa
"We plan to hold leaders]
workshops to train them
only in leadership techni
but on some of the larger
problems affecting the st
Florida."
FBK's newly-elected vi
Continued on I



Finding
Balance


ation
ically
g
ure
e
these
to
i-
s
Id
lid
s.
nts


VOL. 9, NO. 27 APRIL 3, 2006


Wershow Lecture to
Address 'Biopiracy'

University of Minnesota Law Pro-
fessor Jim Chen will deliver this
year's Wershow
Distinguished
Lecture at 4 p.m.
Thursday, April 6,
in the Chesterfield
Smith Memorial Chen
Classroom. Chen
will address "biopiracy," which,
according to Chen, is the notion of
"northern exploitation of biological
wealth and ethnobiological knowl-
edge from the global south." For
more information, contact Michael
Olexa at olexa@ufl.edu.


'BK Greenberg Traurig
te CEO to Speak
te
UF alumnus Cesar Alvarez,
president and CEO of the firm
g to
7orts Greenberg Traurig, 1
will speak at 4 p.m.
ir
S Wednesday, April 5,
ed. in the Chesterfield
Smith Ceremonial
hip Classroom. Alva- Alvarez
not rez has headed the
ques, firm for the past nine years, dur-
ing which time Greenberg Traurig
ate of has grown from 325 lawyers in
eight offices to 1,500 attorneys in
ce 32 locations worldwide. The firm
'age 6 has been recognized as one of the
fastest-growing in America, and
is the eighth largest firm in the
country. The speech is sponsored
by the Association for Law and
Business.











CAREER SERVICES
SHints to help you in the legal profession


Environmental Law
Students Gather on
Santa Fe River
Environmental and Land Use Law
Program faculty and students
past, present and future cel-
ebrated the cool spring weather,
the successful 12th Annual
Public Interest Environmental
Conference and the beginning of
the end of the semester with the
second annual "float and bloat"
down the spring-fed Santa Fe
River in March. Recent program
alumnus Alan Hawkins owns
family land on the river and
hosted a "grillfest" for partici-
pants in the event.
























1L Career Services
Open House Today
First-year students should stop
by the Center for Career Services
today, April 3, to meet the staff
of career professionals, enjoy
some refreshments and pick up
handouts and materials. The open
house lasts from 10 a.m.-2 p.m.


2 FLA LAW


Hiring Market on the
Rebound?
The legal hiring market is con-
tinuing its upward trend of the past
few years, according to information
on Fall 2005 recruiting provided
by members of the National As-
sociation of Law Placement. NALP
reports annually on the level of em-
ployer activity on campus, employer
and law school participation in job
fairs and the outcome of summer
programs and fall recruiting. Ac-
cording to the most recent report,
the market has not regained the
strength of the late 1990s, but the
average size of summer programs
was the largest since 2001, and the
average number of offers made
by employers to 2Ls for summer
positions rose for the fourth year in
a row.
Based on the responses of 115
law schools, NALP reports that
about half the law schools reported
an increase of 5 percent or more
in the number of employers on
campus in Fall 2005. Almost one-
third of schools reported an increase
of more than 10 percent. Assistant
Dean Linda Calvert Hanson reports
that the Levin College of Law
witnessed a 7 percent increase in on-
campus employers and a 51 percent
increase in the number of resume
collections from Fall 2004 to Fall
2005. She also noted that many
schools responding to the survey
do not offer spring On-Campus
Interviews. To date this spring, 56
employers are registered to recruit
at UE That brings to 209 the total
number of employers who will have
recruited here this school year.
Nationally, almost two thirds
of schools participated in five or
more job fairs and over one third
participated in eight or more. More
than 40 percent of schools reported


One Quick Question
Stop by the Career Services table
in the courtyard from 9:45-11:15
a.m. Thursday, April 6, to ask your
questions about externships, mock
interviews, resumes, cover letters,
career development suggestions
and more.

an increase in job fair participation
compared to the previous year.
UF law students participate in 18
different job fairs across the nation.
Some of these recruiting events
are regional, and some are practice
specific such as patent law or public
defenders, while others seek to pro-
vide a more diverse applicant pool.
This also is an increase in participa-
tion from last year for UF

Important Note on
Fall 2006 OCI
To participate in Fall On-Cam-
pus Interviews, all students will be
required to sign (whether you have
signed one previously or not) an
updated OCI Policies and Proce-
dures form. Additional information
on how to complete the forms will
be available in coming weeks. Re-
member, the Early Interview Week
for Fall OCI will be Aug. 22-25 and


bids will open during mid July for
this phase.

Mandatory Summer
Externship
Orientation
If you plan to do a summer
extemship, you must attend the
Summer Extemship Orientation
Wednesday, April 5, at 5 p.m. in
the Chesterfield Smith Ceremonial
Classroom. Attending this meet-
ing is one of the requirements for a
passing grade in an extemship, but
please note that your externship site
may have an additional, site-based
orientation for you as well.

Attention Student
Organizations
As your organization holds elec-
tions in the next few weeks, keep
in mind that the Center for Career
Services wants to work with you.
Your group and CCS can comple-
ment each other by teaming up
to co-sponsor programs, speak-
ers and other events benefitting
students, the law school and each
other. If your student organization
is considering bringing speakers to
campus in the fall term, let Career
Services help you with publicity (on
and off campus), parking passes and
other details. Anyone interested in
co-sponsoring a program this fall
should contact Dexter Smith at
smithdexter@law.ufl.edu as Career
Services is currently planning the
fall programming schedule.

Be a Do-Gooder
Pro bono work is an extremely
valuable and rewarding way to get
work experience on your resume
and help out your community.
There are many opportunities to do
pro bono this summer and through-
out the academic year, both in















Gainesville and in your hometown.
Everyone currently enrolled as of
this summer is eligible to participate
in the UF Pro Bono Project, and
Career Services strongly recom-
mends that you consider earning a
Pro Bono Certificate. To earn this
certificate, you have to perform only
35 hours of pro bono service at a
pre-approved agency, supervised by
an attorney. You could accomplish
that in a single week and still have
time to bask in the sun this sum-
mer. Pro bono projects can provide
experience in a variety of fields,
including children's law, family law,
criminal law, consumer law, housing
law, dependency and prisoner's
rights. You might also want to
consider participating in the law
school's new Community Service
Project, which provides opportuni-
ties to network with community
leaders. Thirty-five hours of non-
legal volunteer work will earn you
a Community Service certificate
and satisfy the need for immediate
gratification: you can prepare meals
at St. Francis House, join in and
help Habitat for Humanities on a
weekend or volunteer with the local
pet rescue agency of your choice.

Other Ways to Gain
Experience in Summer
Pro bono projects aren't the only
way to be hands-on and enhance
your network of contacts this
summer. The Center for Career
Services has a few other tips on how
to maximize your time during the
break. Among them:
* Go to court and observe the
proceedings; talk to the attor-
neys during breaks.
* Attend a CLE Seminar to learn
about a new substantive area of
law and meet the professionals
who practice in the field.


* Begin your bar prep: review the
sections for courses you have
already taken or check out a
tape from PMBR or BarBri.
* Check the Career Services
bookshelves for notable titles,
such as What Color Is Your Para-
chute, America' Greatest Places
to Work with a Law Degree, and
Objection Overruled: Overcom-
ing Obstacles in the Lawyer Job
Search.
* Prepare or update your bar ap-
plication.
* Prepare your resume and cover
letter for fall recruiting for sum-
mer 2007 positions.

Preparing for the
Final Mile
Career Services staff will hold a
workshop on bar application con-
version and the bar exam Tuesday,
April 4, at noon in the faculty
dining room. All 3Ls are welcome.

Don't Miss Job Fair
Deadlines
Looking for a job outside Florida?
On-Campus Interviews not your
cup of tea? Come to the Job Fair
Orientation Program Wednesday,
April 5, at noon in the faculty din-
ing room to learn how to participate
in the many job fairs the law school


sponsors. Many job fairs require
that students submit materials over
the summer, and these deadlines are
not negotiable.

The Successful
Summer Associate
Join Robert Bulloch and Mat-
thew Zipay of the firm Quarles &
Brady at 10 a.m. Friday, April 7, in
the faculty dining room for tips on
how to make your summer associate
position a positive, career-build-
ing experience. Don't miss this
opportunity to obtain invaluable
information on what to expect dur-
ing summer employment. Quarles
and Brady LLP the co-sponsor of
the event, is a national law firm
with offices in Chicago, Madison,
Milwaukee, Naples, Phoenix and
Tucson.

LGBT Issues from a
Legal Perspective
Everyone is welcome to join in
a reception and discussion about
discrimination and sexual orien-
tation issues and their legal and
sociological implications at 6 p.m.
Friday, April 7, in the faculty dining
room. Speakers will include practic-
ing attorneys, professors and LGBT
activists.


Meet the Alums
A large percentage of jobs in the legal field
are acquired through an individual student's
personal network. Don't have one? Need to
expand yours? Alumni receptions are the
perfect place to meet attorneys in the com-
munity. This summer, several opportunities will be available for students
to attend. For example, the law school will host an alumni reception at the
Florida Bar's Annual Meeting in Boca Raton June 22 from 6:30-8 p.m. If you
intend to practice in South Florida, or will be clerking there this summer, and
would like to attend the reception, RSVP to Careers@law.ufl.edu. A separate
registration is required to attend the Bar's Annual Meeting.


Send Nominations
for Student of Year
Today is your last day to
submit nominations for Student
of the Year. Send your nomina-
tions, including name, e-mail
and semester of your nominee,
plus a 250-word summary of
why they deserve the honor,
to annika18@ufl.edu by 5 p.m.
today, April 3. The winner will
be chosen on the basis of cam-
pus involvement, community
service, co-curricular activities,
academics and leadership.
(Shown above is last year's
winner, Paul Vicary, receiving
the award.)
The winner will be announced
April 13 at the Volunteer
Awards Gala.









Black Prosecutors
Job Fair
The National Black Prosecutors
Association will host its annual job
fair July 11 at the Hilton Houston
Post Oak in Houston, Texas. Agen-
cies from the following states are
participating: California, Arizona,
Colorado, Washington, Minnesota,
Illinois, Ohio, Pennsylvania, New
York, New Jersey and Maryland.
Federal agencies participating
include the Department of Justice,
the Office of the U.S. Attorney
and the Securities & Exchange
Commission. Full details are avail-
able at the Job Fair Orientation
held at noon Wednesday, April 5,
in the faculty dining room.


FLA LAW 3











EVENT


S & OPPORTUNITIES


VITA Helps Student
Tax Filers

Need help filing your taxes?
Free help is available through
the law school's Volunteer
Income Tax Assistance
program, which helps students
and low-income Alachua
County residents file their
paperwork with the IRS. Vol-
unteers are also able to help
international students with the
complexities of filing a return
in a new country. Every year,
VITA files hundreds of returns,
saving students and local resi-
dents tens of thousands of dol-
lars. To get help, come to the
student organization offices
near the cafeteria between 5
p.m. and 9 p.m. any Tuesday,
Wednesday or Thursday until
the April 15 deadline.






Donate a Day to
Promote Public
Interest Law
The Association for Public
Interest Law (APIL) encourages
students who have accepted
paid summer or permanent
positions to make a tax-deduct-
ible donation of the equivalent
of one day's salary to APIL's
Summer Fellowship Program.
The program allows UF law
students to spend their sum-
mers volunteering for nonprofit
legal organizations without the
added burden of summer loans.
To participate in the Donate-A-
Day Fundraiser, come to APIL's
table in the courtyard April 3-7
or send an e-mail to halterh@
ufl.edu.


4 FLA LAW


Meetings
* The St. Thomas More Society
will meet Tuesday, April 4, at
noon in room 284 to elect officers
for the next year.
* The Intellectual Property and
Technology Law Association
will meet Thursday, April 6, at 5
p.m., location TBA.

Republicans to
Hold Elections
The Law School Republicans
will elect new officers Tuesday,
April 4, at noon in room 345. Free
lunch will be provided. If you are
interested in running for a position,
contact Jacqueline Johnson at
uflawgop@hotmail.com.

JLSA Elections April 3
The Jewish Law Students Asso-
ciation will hold officer elections at
noon today, April 3, in the Bailey
Courtroom. For more information,
contact Lisa Kanarek at lkanarek@
ufl.edu.

Tide Exam Workshop
David Mesnekoff of the At-
torneys' Title Insurance Fund
will present a Title Examination
Workshop at noon Friday, April 7,
in room 285B.

Environmental Moot
Court Tryouts this
Week and Next
UF's Environmental Moot Court
team has a winning record and
provides students an opportunity
to hone their oral advocacy skills
on a complex environmental law
case. Team members will travel to a
national competition in New York
next February.
The deadline to submit an
application to participate in the


Yin Addresses Tax Reform
"The prospects for tax reform in America are dim."
So says George K. Yin, former chief of staff of the U.S. Congress's
Joint Committee on Taxation and University of Virginia law professor.
Yin (shown at right, with Florida Law Review Editor-in-Chief
Charlie Douglas and Symposium Editor Amanda Harrison) discussed
obstacles to tax reform during Florida Law Review's annual Dunwody
Lecture March 24. Yin said the current tax system is in need of reform
- but reform efforts, he claims, have been hindered by the diminishing
quality of the legislative process.
Yin said members of Congress are too worried about raising cam-
paign money to take time to understand and reform the tax code. He
laid out the conditions under which major changes to the tax code
could happen. First, he said, the executive and legislative branches
would have to be the in the hands of opposing parties as they have
been every time meaningful tax reform has passed. Second, he said,
reform would have to have significant public support. And finally,
reform proponents would have to address the concerns of major lob-
bying groups before beginning their push for a change to the tax code.


Environmental Moot Court Team
next year is this Wednesday, April 5.
All you need to submit are a resume
and the argument portion of your
Appellate Advocacy brief. These
should be delivered to Lena Hinson
in Room 319 Holland Hall, where
you will sign up for an oral argu-
ment tryout time. E-mail Hinson at
elulp@law.ufl.edu for more detailed
application instructions and to
receive the materials for the oral
argument tryout. Oral argument
tryouts will be held Thursday, April


6, and Monday, April 10. If you
have questions. contact Professor
Alyson Flournoy at flournoy@law.
ufl.edu.

Free Food at
CaribLaw Social
The Caribbean Law Students
Association will hold an end-
of-year social at Reggae Shack
Jamaican Restaurant Sunday, April
9, time TBA. Free Caribbean food
will be served.















Chilean Official
to Speak
Mauricio Duce, advisor to
Chile's Minister of Justice,
Professor at the Diego Portales
University School of Law and
director of training for the
Justice Studies Center of the
Americas, will speak on "Crimi-
nal Justice Reform in Chile: A
Radical Transformation from an
Inquisitorial to an Adversarial
System" April 11 at 1:30 p.m. in
the faculty dining room. Duce
was one of the drafters of Chile's
new Criminal Procedure Code,
and has been involved in the
reform process since its begin-
ning. His speech is sponsored by
the International Law Society
and the Law and Policy in the
Americas Program.

Help Needed for
Paint Out
The law school's Art Commit-
tee is seeking volunteers to assist
with the Evinston-Cross Creek
Paint Out, which begins Friday,
April 7, to gain experience for
the law school's Paint Out next
school year. To help, contact
j9Paty@aol.com or awpais@aol.
com.

New LCC Officers
The Law College Council, the
student government for the law
school, has elected a new slate of
officers.
In polling March 28, stu-
dents elected President Andre
T Hammell; Vice President
Brian Frankel; Treasurer Regina
St. Cyr; Secretary Dina Finkel;
at large representatives Roni
Beasley, Alexandra Brzostowicki,
Richard Cole III, Aaron Cook,
Craig Dawson, Kyle Jacobs, Lisa


I '. g, r',...lr .1 II L h I


Law Students Tour County Jail

Deputies for the Alachua County Sheriff's Office explain the initial booking
process for law students on a tour of the Alachua County Jail last month.
Students observed several individuals being fingerprinted and booked,
and looked at the holding cells where individuals wait for processing or
their opportunity for first appearance. While most of the holding cells
were empty on the day of the tour, deputies report that Gator football
game days are the busiest days of the year, with anywhere from 70 to 80
individuals crowded into the small holding cells.

The Criminal Law Association hosts tours of the jail and Florida State
Prison at least once every school year. The group also brings well-known
figures in criminal law to campus to discuss issues important to students
seeking criminal law careers. For more information on the organization,
e-mail chick4uf@ufl.edu or bryon322@ufl.edu.


Kanarek, Joseph Lisska, Laura
Momol, Michael Schuster and
Jennifer Young; and organiza-
tion representatives Katharyn I.
Christian (APIL), Christine Gar-
cia (LAW), Ilan Kaufer (JLSA),
Joe Manzo (Federalist Society),
Tineshia Morris (CLSA), Mi-
chael Pangia (MLSA), Nathan
A. Skop (LSR), Kristin Snyder
(ILS) and Christopher Spence
(NLG).

Get Ready to Reserve
Football Tickets
Basketball mania is coming to
a close. Time to start thinking
about whether you'll watch the
football season from the stadium
or from your living room. Reg-
istration for the 2006 football


ticket lottery will be held April
10-19. Anyone who wants
tickets or who wants to join
JMBA's "law block" should
register by calling the GATORS
phone system at 384-3262 (or
(877) 428-6747 if you're out of
town).
When you call, you must have
your 8-digit UF ID number
and your credit card informa-
tion handy. If you are married
and would like a spouse ticket,
you must provide a copy of
your marriage certificate to the
Ticket Office by Friday, April 7.
For more information, e-mail
jfurst@ufl.edu or go to http://
www.gatorzone.com/tickets/
?tsport= football&student= 1.


- m ms


FLA LAW 5


Lecture to Focus on
Hurricane Katrina
Sheila Foster, professor of law
at Fordham University, will
discuss the role race, place and
class played in the aftermath
of Hurricane Katrina in "The
Racial Ecology of a Natural
Disaster," this year's Spring
Lecture sponsored by the Center
for the Study of Race and Race
Relations. Everyone is invited to
attend the lecture, which will
be held April 11 at noon in room
285B.










ICAM Team to
Travel to Vienna
The International Commercial
Arbitration Moot Court Team
will travel to Vienna, Austria,
April 5-15 to compete against
teams from across the globe in
the World Finals. The current
traveling team is composed of
David Lane, Trisha Low, Justin
Luna and Paul McAdoo.
Over the March 18-19 week-
end, team members Justin Luna
and Trisha Low reached the fi-
nal round at the Second Annual
Florida International Arbitration
Moot in Orlando.
The team is coached by Profes-
sors Thomas Hurst and Jeffrey
Harrison and is sponsored by
the law firm of Rivero, Palmer
& Mestre, LLP. If you are
interested in participating in
ICAM in the fall, sign up for the
ICAM class and contact Trisha
Low at tlow@ufl.edu.












Make a Difference with Class Gift


Blood Drive
Wednesday
Phi Delta Phi is sponsoring
a blood drive with LifeSouth
Community Blood Centers
Wednesday, April 5, from 10
a.m. to 4 p.m. in the faculty
parking lot on the west side of
campus. All students and fac-
ulty are encouraged to donate
blood and save lives.









Three Elected to
Hall of Fame
Three law students Pedro
Allende, Brian Roof and Will
Sexton have been selected for
the UF Hall of Fame. Since 1921,
outstanding student leaders at
UF have been recognized for their
contributions to the campus and
community for their scholarship,
leadership and service through
the UF Hall of Fame, the highest
recognition the university gives to
student leaders.










Law School Artists'
Work on Display
The original artwork of 18 law
students, faculty and staff will
be on display in the law library
through April 19. Please stop
by and view the artistic talents
of your friends and classmates.


6 FLA LAW


Did you go to law school to
make a difference in the world?
You can start before you even
graduate by giving to the Spring
2006 Class Gift.
Giving is easy. Just go to
/www.law.ufl.edu/students/re-
sources/classgift.shtml and fill
out an online form, or sign up
at one of a number of events
to be held at the law school
between now and graduation.
Chances are, you can afford
to give. While most students
leave law school with student


Florida Blue Key from Page 1
president hopes to renew the
organization's ties with its
prominent alumni. Stuart Barks
says he is focused on planning
and running the Stephen C.
O'Connell Society a new
group named for the UF law
alumnus and former UF presi-
dent that would bring alumni
and current FBK students
together throughout the year.
Barks says the society would
help FBK build on its successes
during Homecoming 2005.
"Gator Growl was a hit with
alumni this year," he said.
"They liked Wayne Brady,
whose act was very family-
friendly. They also liked the
changes we made to the Home-
coming banquet. Instead of a
sit-down dinner, we planned it
as more of a cocktail party, so
people could move around and
meet each other."
Of course, it takes money
to make all these things hap-
pen. That's where Webb, the
organization's treasurer, comes
in. A member of FBK since his
undergraduate days in 2003,
Webb came to the job after


loans to pay off, many contrib-
ute to the class gift. All gifts
over $125 can be distributed
over a five-year period so the
average gift of $1,000 amounts
to just $200 per year. You can
give as much or as little as you
feel you can afford.
Your gift will help future law
students and aid the Levin Col-
lege of Law in its climb through
the ranks of the nation's top
law schools. As UF's reputation
grows, your degree becomes
more valuable.


a semester as assistant trea-
surer under Fackender, then the
organization's treasurer.
"I'm excited about the direc-
tion the chapter is taking," he


Gifts can go to the general
college fund, which the dean
can use at his discretion to meet
the needs of the law school, or
they can be restricted to a par-
ticular fund, such as a co-cur-
ricular organization.
With your help, the Class
Gift Committee can meet its
goal of raising $75,000 this
year, with participation from
the entire graduating class. For
more information, contact Class
Gift Committee Chair Dayna
Duncan at dgaff@ufl.edu.


said. "Florida Blue Key has
produced many of the state's
leaders, and their experience is
something we can use to help
train the next generation."


Advice from a Pro
UF law alumnus Bill McBride, a former gubernatorial candidate and now
partner in the firm Barnett, Bolt, Kirkwood, Long & McBride, spoke to
current law students in an informal gathering organized by the Association
for Law and Business March 28. McBride, shown here with law students
(from left) Lacey Diggs, Darin Jones, Scott Kennelly and Jared Hernandez,
spoke about ethics, politics, the business of law and the importance of
maintaining relationships with your classmates.
"Your law school classmates will turn up in all kinds of places throughout
your life," he said. "Make sure you maintain a good relationship with
them. If you develop a reputation for bad character and unreliability in law
school, you'll carry it with you for the rest of your life."












Finding Balance a Lifelong Task, Panel Says


If you're like most people who
come to law school, you know
what it's like to be the smartest
person in the room. Maybe you
were at the head of the class in
high school. In undergraduate
study, you were probably the
one who spoke up in even the
most intimidating
classroom.
Yet despite their
smarts, many law
school graduates
spend their whole
lives struggling with
a simple question:
how to balance work
and home life.
That was the
sobering mes-
sage offered by Professo
law professors and panel dis
practicing lawyers at fession. "
the final session of Cohen sa
Legal Ease, the law onto fore


school's open-panel
discussion series on quality-of-life
issues in the legal profession, held
March 28.
"Usually when I go and speak
somewhere, I feel like an expert
on my topic," said Professor
Jonathan Cohen, one of the pan-
elists in the discussion. "I know
I'm not an expert on this, and
I'm not sure anybody is."
Cohen and others on the panel
said balancing work and life is a
task many lawyers never master.
Those who do quickly learn that
there's no simple trick to a bal-
anced life.
"Finding balance isn't like find-
ing some treasure," Cohen said.
"It's not something you can dig
up and hold onto forever. It's a
process that goes on all the time."
Living a balanced life may be
particularly hard if you plan to
work at a major firm, said As-


sistant Professor Lee-Ford Tritt,
who worked in estates and trusts
at the New York firms Davis,
Polk & Wardwell and Milbank,
Tweed, Hadley & McCloy.
Junior associates are expected
to put work first in their life,
Tritt said, and while companies


r Jonathan Cohen talks to students in a Marc
cussion on balancing life and work in the legal
'Finding balance isn't like finding some treasi
id. "It's not something you can dig up and hol
ver. It's a process that goes on all the time."


may offer leave, young lawyers
aren't expected to take more than
perhaps a single holiday in the
course of a year.
"As an associate, you're well
aware of who, in the office, is
taking time off," he said.
If you're single and working
for a large firm, Tritt said, don't
plan to have a lot of time for dat-
ing. But the law firm life can be
rewarding if you love your work
and if your colleagues pass the
"late night pizza test."
"They don't have to be your
best buddies, but they should be
people who won't drive you crazy
when you're working late into the
night," he said.
Recent UF law graduate Brent
Gordon, who now works for the
Alachua County State Attorney's
office, painted a rosier picture
of life as a prosecutor. After an


initial period of very hard work,
Gordon says he now is able to
put in slightly more than 40
hours per week at the office, with
a bit of work to bring home every
night. Still, he sometimes misses
the fluid schedule he had during
his law school years.
"It's definitely differ-
ent from law school,
where you have lots to
do, but you can custom-
ize your schedule around
your needs," he said.
Another difference
between law school
and the real world, said
Lexis/Nexis Academic
Attorney Bonita Young,
is that in school, one can
leave on break with a
h 28
al pro- sense of having complet-
ure," ed one's assignments.
d "(At work) the in-box
is never empty," she said.
"The work won't stop
until you wind up in the hospital
or have some other situation
where you absolutely can't work."
Young advised taking "mini-
vacations" anything from
a three-day trip overseas to a
simple afternoon at the museum
- to relieve stress. Everyone on
the panel said that when you do
take a vacation, you should take
it out-of-state and away from the
cell phone and Blackberry.
In the end, panelists said, only
one person can tell you when
you've struck the right balance
you.
"Checking in with yourself
is very important," said Nicole
Nicolaisen Stern, the law school's
resource counselor. "If something
inside of you is not feeling right,
pay attention to that, and do
something about it."


LIC News
If you are planning to clerk this
summer, preparation is key. Of
course, you want to make a
good impression, so knowing
where to look for information
is very important. The Legal
Information Center is offering a
Pre-Clerking Workshop Thurs-
day, April 6, at 2 p.m. that will
focus on free and low-cost
legal resources available on
the Internet, in addition to tips
on cost-effective searching on
Lexis and Westlaw. Remember,
the bottom line is to get the
answers and to get them as
quickly and as inexpensively as
possible. The workshop meets
at the library's reference desk.


'What were they thinking?'
Legislative intent is a key
part of the practice of law.
The Legal Information Center
will hold a workshop on how
to determine a legislature's
intent this Wednesday, April
5, at 2 p.m. in the library. The
workshop will show you what
documents to look for and
where to look for them, with
a focus on federal and Florida
materials.


FLA LAW 7








Send Us Your News
Flalaw is published each week
school is in session by the Levin
College of Law Communications
Office. Submit news of interest
to the law school community by
10 a.m. Tuesday for the follow-
ing Monday's issue to FlaLaw@
law.ufl.edu or 273-0650.
E-mail FlaLaw@law.ufl.edu to be
e-mailed a weekly early release
pdf of FlaLaw.

* Tim Lockette, Editor
* Kristen Hines, Photographer



College of Law
Administration
* Robert H. Jerry, II, Dean
* George L. Dawson,
Associate Dean for
Academic Affairs
* J. Patrick Shannon,
Associate Dean for
Administrative Affairs
* Lyrissa Barnett Lidsky,
Associate Dean for
Faculty Development
* Michael K. Friel,
Associate Dean & Director,
Graduate Tax Program
* Stuart R. Cohn,
Associate Dean for
International Studies
* M. Kathleen "Kathie" Price,
Associate Dean for Library
and Technology
* Gail E. Sasnett,
Associate Dean for
Students, Professionalism
and Community Relations
* J. Michael Patrick,
Assistant Dean for Admissions
* Linda Calvert Hanson,
Assistant Dean for
Career Services
* Adrian Jones,
Assistant Dean for Diversity
and Community Relations
* Jennifer Cope, Interim
Assistant Dean for Students
* Debra D. Amirin,
Director of Communications
* Donald J. Hale,
Senior Director of Development
and Alumni Affairs

UNIVERSITY OF
FLORIDA


PEOPLE

Scholarship & Activities


Nancy Dowd
Chesterfield Smith Professor; Co-
Director, Center on Children and
Families
* Presented "Multiple Fathers" and
"Supporting Nurturing Fathers,"
March 24-25 at the Oregon Child
Advocacy Project at University of
Oregon School of Law.
Alison Gerencser
Associate Director, Institute for Dis-
pute Resolution; Associate Director,
Center on Children and Families;
Senior Legal Skills Professor
* Presented, with her students, a
presentation on Edward DeBono's
"Six Thinking Hats," to a group of
mediators from Alachua County
courts March 24.

In the News
Scott Fusaro
Law Student
* Gainesville Sun, March 23. Covered
the speech by George Parnham, de-
fense attorney for Andrea Yates, in
the Chesterfield Smith Ceremonial
Classroom, for the newspaper.
Kristen Hines
Law School Photographer/Graphic
Designer
* Gainesville Sun, March 9. Her


SCHOLARSHIP
& ACTIVITIES


State Rep. Jeffrey Kottkamp (center) and Raquel Rodriguez (right),
general counsel for the Office of the Governor, speak at the Florida Bar
Young Lawyers Division Governmental Affairs Symposium March 24 at
the law school. Richard E. Nelson Professor Michael Allan Wolf (left,)
moderated the symposium, which focused on the roles of Florida's
three branches of government.


photo of Robert E Kennedy, Jr., at
the opening speech for the Public
Interest Environmental Conference
appeared in the newspaper.
* Gainesville Sun, March 23. Her
photos of the speech by George
Parnham appeared in the news-
paper.
Christopher Peterson
Assistant Professor
* Bradenton Herald March 26.
Quoted in a story on the difficulties
Spanish-speaking immigrants have
in obtaining credit reports which


are typically available only in Eng-
lish. The story also ran in the Biloxi
(Miss.) Sun-Herald.
Katheryn Russell-Brown
Professor; Director, Center for the
Study of Race and Race Relations
SGainesville Sun, March 24. Fea-
tured in a story about her book
Protecting Our Own: Race Crime
and African-Americans, which
examines the role of "black pro-
tectionism" in public scandals and
high-profile crimes. The story was
reprinted in the March 29 edition
of The Gainesville Guardian.
Michael Allan Wolf
Richard E. Nelson Professor
SSt. Petersburg Times, March 18.
Quoted in an article on the
reluctance of local governments to
take advantage of eminent domain
powers granted them under Kelo.


CALENDAR


April
3 Open House, 10 a.m.-2 p.m.,
Center for Career Services
JLSA Officer Elections, noon,
Bailey Courtroom
4 St. Thomas More Society
Elections, noon, room 284
Preparing for the Final Mile,
noon, faculty dining room
Law School Republicans Elec-
tions, noon, room 345
5 LifeSouth Blood Drive, 10 a.m.-


4 p.m., faculty parking lot
Job Fair Orientation, noon,
faculty dining room
Cesar Alvarez, 4 p.m., room 180
Summer Externship Orienta-
tion, 5 p.m., room 180
6 Pre-ClerkingWorkshop, 2 p.m.,
library
Wershow Lecture, 4 p.m., room 180
IPTLA Meeting, 5 p.m., TBA
7 The Successful Summer Associ-
ate, 10 a.m., faculty dining room


LGBT Issues from the Legal
Perspective, 6 p.m., faculty dining
room
Title Examination Workshop,
noon, 285B

More information on upcoming
meetings and events is avail-
able through the Levin College
of Law's online calendars at:
www.law.ufl.edu/calendars/.


8 FLA LAW








Send Us Your News
Flalaw is published each week
school is in session by the Levin
College of Law Communications
Office. Submit news of interest
to the law school community by
10 a.m. Tuesday for the follow-
ing Monday's issue to FlaLaw@
law.ufl.edu or 273-0650.
E-mail FlaLaw@law.ufl.edu to be
e-mailed a weekly early release
pdf of FlaLaw.

* Tim Lockette, Editor
* Kristen Hines, Photographer



College of Law
Administration
* Robert H. Jerry, II, Dean
* George L. Dawson,
Associate Dean for
Academic Affairs
* J. Patrick Shannon,
Associate Dean for
Administrative Affairs
* Lyrissa Barnett Lidsky,
Associate Dean for
Faculty Development
* Michael K. Friel,
Associate Dean & Director,
Graduate Tax Program
* Stuart R. Cohn,
Associate Dean for
International Studies
* M. Kathleen "Kathie" Price,
Associate Dean for Library
and Technology
* Gail E. Sasnett,
Associate Dean for
Students, Professionalism
and Community Relations
* J. Michael Patrick,
Assistant Dean for Admissions
* Linda Calvert Hanson,
Assistant Dean for
Career Services
* Adrian Jones,
Assistant Dean for Diversity
and Community Relations
* Jennifer Cope, Interim
Assistant Dean for Students
* Debra D. Amirin,
Director of Communications
* Donald J. Hale,
Senior Director of Development
and Alumni Affairs

UNIVERSITY OF
FLORIDA


PEOPLE

Scholarship & Activities


Nancy Dowd
Chesterfield Smith Professor; Co-
Director, Center on Children and
Families
* Presented "Multiple Fathers" and
"Supporting Nurturing Fathers,"
March 24-25 at the Oregon Child
Advocacy Project at University of
Oregon School of Law.
Alison Gerencser
Associate Director, Institute for Dis-
pute Resolution; Associate Director,
Center on Children and Families;
Senior Legal Skills Professor
* Presented, with her students, a
presentation on Edward DeBono's
"Six Thinking Hats," to a group of
mediators from Alachua County
courts March 24.

In the News
Scott Fusaro
Law Student
* Gainesville Sun, March 23. Covered
the speech by George Parnham, de-
fense attorney for Andrea Yates, in
the Chesterfield Smith Ceremonial
Classroom, for the newspaper.
Kristen Hines
Law School Photographer/Graphic
Designer
* Gainesville Sun, March 9. Her


SCHOLARSHIP
& ACTIVITIES


State Rep. Jeffrey Kottkamp (center) and Raquel Rodriguez (right),
general counsel for the Office of the Governor, speak at the Florida Bar
Young Lawyers Division Governmental Affairs Symposium March 24 at
the law school. Richard E. Nelson Professor Michael Allan Wolf (left,)
moderated the symposium, which focused on the roles of Florida's
three branches of government.


photo of Robert E Kennedy, Jr., at
the opening speech for the Public
Interest Environmental Conference
appeared in the newspaper.
* Gainesville Sun, March 23. Her
photos of the speech by George
Parnham appeared in the news-
paper.
Christopher Peterson
Assistant Professor
* Bradenton Herald March 26.
Quoted in a story on the difficulties
Spanish-speaking immigrants have
in obtaining credit reports which


are typically available only in Eng-
lish. The story also ran in the Biloxi
(Miss.) Sun-Herald.
Katheryn Russell-Brown
Professor; Director, Center for the
Study of Race and Race Relations
SGainesville Sun, March 24. Fea-
tured in a story about her book
Protecting Our Own: Race Crime
and African-Americans, which
examines the role of "black pro-
tectionism" in public scandals and
high-profile crimes. The story was
reprinted in the March 29 edition
of The Gainesville Guardian.
Michael Allan Wolf
Richard E. Nelson Professor
SSt. Petersburg Times, March 18.
Quoted in an article on the
reluctance of local governments to
take advantage of eminent domain
powers granted them under Kelo.


CALENDAR


April
3 Open House, 10 a.m.-2 p.m.,
Center for Career Services
JLSA Officer Elections, noon,
Bailey Courtroom
4 St. Thomas More Society
Elections, noon, room 284
Preparing for the Final Mile,
noon, faculty dining room
Law School Republicans Elec-
tions, noon, room 345
5 LifeSouth Blood Drive, 10 a.m.-


4 p.m., faculty parking lot
Job Fair Orientation, noon,
faculty dining room
Cesar Alvarez, 4 p.m., room 180
Summer Externship Orienta-
tion, 5 p.m., room 180
6 Pre-ClerkingWorkshop, 2 p.m.,
library
Wershow Lecture, 4 p.m., room 180
IPTLA Meeting, 5 p.m., TBA
7 The Successful Summer Associ-
ate, 10 a.m., faculty dining room


LGBT Issues from the Legal
Perspective, 6 p.m., faculty dining
room
Title Examination Workshop,
noon, 285B

More information on upcoming
meetings and events is avail-
able through the Levin College
of Law's online calendars at:
www.law.ufl.edu/calendars/.


8 FLA LAW