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UF UFLAW



Fla law newsletter of the University of Florida College of Law
ALL VOLUMES CITATION SEARCH THUMBNAILS PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00072281/00167
 Material Information
Title: Fla law newsletter of the University of Florida College of Law
Portion of title: Flalaw
Physical Description: Serial
Creator: Levin College of Law
Publisher: s.n.
Place of Publication: <Gainesville FL> College of Law Communications Office 1997-
Creation Date: March 27, 2006
Frequency: weekly
completely irregular
 Subjects
Genre: periodical   ( marcgt )
serial   ( sobekcm )
 Notes
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol.1, no. 1 (Oct. 6, 1997)-
General Note: Weekly during the school year with a biweekly insert, numbered separately called: The Docket.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved, Board of Trustees of the University of Florida
Resource Identifier: aleph - 002311766
notis - ALR5129
System ID: UF00072281:00167

Table of Contents
    Yates attorney: Fix mental health system
        Page 1
    Career Services
        Page 2
        Page 3
    Events and opportunities
        Page 4
        Page 5
        Page 6
    Students make PIEC in annual success
        Page 7
    People, scholarship and activities
        Page 8
    Calendar
        Page 8
Full Text



















Yates Attorney: Fix Mental Health System


People are rightly horrified by
the deaths ofAndrea Yates' five
children, says the man who is
defending Yates in court.
But if that horror leads to
beneficial changes in mental
health care and the justice sys-
tem, attorney George Parnham
said, the Yates children will not
have lived in vain.
"I told (Yates), 'Your kids
lived a short time on this earth,
but that doesn't mean they
can't have a fingerprint on this
society,'" Parnham told a crowd
of approximately 200 people in
the Chesterfield Smith Cer-
emonial Classroom March 22.
The speech, sponsored by the
Law Association for Women,
was intended to shed light on
women's health issues in the
law.
For almost five years,
Parnham has served as defense
attorney for Yates, the former
Houston housewife accused
of drowning her five children
in the family bathtub in June
2001. Yates was sentenced to
life in prison in 2002, but her
conviction was overturned
when key testimony from
a forensic psychologist was
proven to be false. Her retrial,


INSIDE THIS ISSUE


Career Services
Events & Opportunities
Calendar


George Parnham, attorney for Andrea Yates, pauses to reflect after
speaking about the Yates case March 22 in the Chesterfield Smith
Ceremonial Classroom. Parnham said the case illustrates the need for
a better system of mental health care.


originally scheduled to begin
last week, has been postponed
until June.
Parnham has never disputed
the fact that Yates killed her
children. He has pursued an
insanity defense, arguing that
Yates, suffering from an atypical
form of postpartum depression
and other mental illnesses, was
in a psychotic state at the time
of the killings. Influenced by
the teachings of a fundamental-
ist street preacher, Parnham
said, Yates believed that she was
Satan, that her influence was
corrupting her children, and


Class Gift
Questions
Answered


IW


that she must kill them in order
to save their souls.
Parnham said the killings
point out serious problems in
America's system of mental
health care, particularly as it
pertains to women. Yates, he
said, was misdiagnosed during
hospital stays prior to the mur-
ders. On at least one occasion,
he said, she was let out of a
hospital too soon because of in-
surance company formulas that
govern how long a person can
be hospitalized for a particular
illness. Also, he claims, Yates
was at one point treated by a
Continued on Page 6


Students Make
Conference a
Success


N


VOL. 9, NO. 26 MARCH 27, 2006


Tax Judge to Speak
Federal Judge Juan Vasquez of
U.S. Tax Court will offer "Perspec-
tives from the Bench" at 11 a.m.
Friday, March 31, in room 285B.
Everyone is invited to attend.

Bill McBride to
Speak at Law School
Bill McBride, former gubernatorial
candidate and former managing
partner at Holland and Knight,
will speak to students at 3 p.m.
Wednesday, March 29, in the
Chesterfield Smith Ceremonial
Classroom. He will talk about
business law, politics and firms'
expectations of young associ-
ates in Florida. The speech is
sponsored by the Association for
Law and Business.

Send Volunteer
Award Nominations
The law school will host a Vol-
unteer Awards Gala to celebrate
the inspiring members of our com-
munity who have done community
service work through out the year.
Recognition awards will be
presented to one student from
each class year, as well as two
student organizations. Recipients
will be honored at a special event
April 13.
The nomination deadline is 5 p.m.
Friday, March 31. Nomination
packets are available in the Office
of Student Affairs, or via e-mail
by contacting Noemar Castro,
castro@law.ufl.edu.











CAREERSERVICES
Hints to help you in the legal profession


Evaluating Law
Firm Diversity
Before you make the important
decision of where to begin your
legal career, you will likely try
to learn as much as you can
about the law firms that you
are considering. One important
consideration for many job
seekers is a firm's record on
diversity. The National As-
sociation for Law Placement's
Directory of Legal Employers
provides detailed demographic
information about a law firm's
attorneys, broken down by gen-
der, race, disability and sexual
orientation. It also specifies
whether a firm offers domestic
partner benefits and what,
if any, minority recruitment
efforts the firm is undertaking.
You can find this information
online at www.nalpdirectory.
com or look through the print
version in Career Services.
Career Services also has other
directories and resources to
help in your evaluation, includ-
ing the Vault/MCCA's 2006
Law Firm Diversity Programs
Directory, Directory of Minority
Judges, Minority Law Journal
magazine, and more.



Legal Diversity
Job Fair
Vault and the Minority Corpo-
rate Counsel Association are
sponsoring a Legal Diversity
Job Fair April 21-22 in New
York City. This is a national
event that encourages everyone
- particularly minority, female
and gay, lesbian, bisexual or
transgender students to
attend. Details are available at
www.vault.com/legaldiversity/.


2 FLA LAW


Federal Judicial
Clerkship Update
Federal jucidial clerkship ap-
plication procedures for 2006 were
announced in the Career Services
workshop on clerkship applications
last week (handouts are available
in Career Services). In case you
missed the workshop, here are a few
highlights.

Hiring Guidelines
Historically, federal judges
selected their judicial law clerks
during the students' second year of
law school but several years ago,
in response to concerns expressed
by many different groups, federal
courts (except the U.S. Supreme
Court) implemented a new plan.
Now, only third-year students and
law graduates are considered for
federal clerkships. The guidelines
also confine the application dates to
the fall.
Full details of the plan, along
with the timing guidelines, are avail-
able at http://www.cadc.uscourts.
gov/internet/lawclerk.nsf/. These
guidelines mandate that:
* Only 3Ls and alumni are eligible
to apply for postgraduate federal
clerkships.
* 3Ls only (not alumni) should
mail their clerkship applications
so that they arrive no earlier than
the Tuesday following Labor Day
(Sept. 5, 2006) This rule applies
to all clerkships except for mid-
term vacancies that must be filled
promptly.
* Student clerkship interviews
cannot begin before the second
Monday after Labor Day (Sept.
19, 2006). Scheduling for these
interviews will not begin until
Sept. 14.


Some Exceptions
Even though the Eleventh
Circuit Court of Appeals has
indicated its intent to follow the
hiring guidelines, some of these
judges publish application deadlines
as early as May 1 and make their
hiring decisions over the summer.
Other judges do not publish that
they accept early applications, but
communicate this information
more informally. Moreover, many
of the Florida Middle and Southern
District Court judges accept early
applications as well.
Last year Career Services called
the chambers of a majority of courts
to obtain application deadlines and
determine whether the judges had
vacancies and were accepting paper
applications. This information was
then communicated to interested
students and alums via the judicial
hotline. Career Services has started
this survey process again this year
and will disseminate the informa-
tion via the judicial hotline. To
subscribe to the judicial hotline,
send an e-mail to Carol Kuczora at
kuczora@law.ufl.edu.


Meet OSCAR
During late spring 2005, the
Online System for Clerkship Ap-
plication and Review (OSCAR) was
launched as a pilot project by the
federal courts. It is an internet-based
application (available at http://www.
dcd.uscourts.gov/OSCAR.html)
that permits a federal judge to opt
into the system. It then allows
applicants for federal clerkships to
designate the OSCAR-participat-
ing judges to whom they wish to
apply and file application materials
directly online. After the review
system opens the day after Labor
Day, OSCAR permits the judges
and chambers staff to sort, screen
and review applications on-screen.
The OSCAR pilot project has
just been renewed for 2006, and it
is anticipated that all federal judges
adhering to the federal timing
guidelines will adopt OSCAR by
the April 30 deadline. Judges who
request early applications will not
be able to view the electronic ap-
plications early, so the only means
for them to access early applica-
tions will be via traditional paper
applications. Last year, there were
a number of judges who requested
early applications and then also
listed themselves as OSCAR judges,
not realizing that they would be
unable to view the applications until
the day after Labor Day.

Assistance with
Clerkship Applications
Non-OSCAR federal judges have
expressed a strong preference for re-
ceiving only completed applications
with all letters of recommendation
for each applicant. Last year, the
Center for Career Services assisted
student applicants with the batch
processing of their application pack-
ets and recommendations for fed-


I















eral judicial clerkships for delivery
the day after Labor Day. OSCAR
has eliminated the need for batch
processing, but Career Services will
still act as a central repository for
student letters of recommendation
for non-OSCAR, "paper" judges.
After a student's paper letters of
recommendation are finalized, they
will be delivered to the Center for
Career Services in a sealed enve-
lope. In accordance with the hiring
guidelines, the law school will not
mail any letters of recommendation
before September 5. Student letters
will be available to the student,
however, as Career Services staff
recognizes that many of you will
not be in Gainesville when you will
need access to your sealed letters of
recommendation to include in the
application packets that you mail.

RequestingYour Letters
of Recommendation
To obtain a letter of recommen-
dation from a UF faculty member,
a 3L should meet with the faculty
member in question and provide
the faculty member with valid
contact information for the summer
along with a resume and other
materials that would be helpful to
the professor in distinguishing the
student and speaking to his/her
strengths. The student also will
provide each recommender with an
Excel spreadsheet list containing the
names and addresses of each judge
(one judge per row) for whom they
wish to apply, indicating whether
they are an OSCAR judge or a
"paper" judge, on a CD or floppy
disk, to facilitate the mail merge.
Students should be able to use the
FLCIS or OSCAR to download
names and addresses right into the
Excel spreadsheet. Students are
also asked to e-mail Carol Kuczora


(kuczora@law.ufl.edu) the list of
their recommenders and their list
of judges. The faculty support staff
has asked Career Services to impose
a deadline of April 14 to request let-
ters of recommendation for federal
clerkships. This enables the faculty
members to draft the letters before
they begin to grade final exams and
leave for the summer. Adjustments
can be made to the list of judges at
a later time, but the primary goal is
to get the letter drafted early in the
process.

State Court Clerkships
While the emphasis appears to
center on federal clerkships, please
be aware that a wider range of
state- and local-level judicial clerk-
ships also provide highly reward-
ing opportunities and may be less
competitive. Typically, the time
frame for these positions is less rigid.
For example, applications have


been accepted since January 2006
for two positions. One position is
with Florida Supreme Court Chief
Justice-Elect R. Fred Lewis (to begin
in August 2007) and the other is
with Justice Peggy A. Quince (to
begin October 2006). Full details
on these positions are available at
http://www.floridasupremecourt.
org/employment/index.shtml.
Additionally, numerous trial
court staff attorney positions and
clerkships with Florida's district
courts of appeal are regularly posted
under "employment" on the Florida
Courts site at www.flcourts.org/.
Students interested in judicial
clerkships in other states will want
to consult the 2006 Guide to State
Judicial Clerkships, compiled by
the Vermont Law School, available
in hardcopy in Career Services or
accessible online at vermontlaw.
edu/career. Contact Career Services
for the password.


Opportunities in the Florida Legislature
The Florida House of Representatives 2006-07
Legislative Intern Program gives law students
the opportunity to participate in the legislative
process and public policy-making. Participants ..
are assigned to House councils, committees,
and, on a limited basis, leadership offices under j .
the guidance of senior House staff. Assignments
may include research projects, bill drafting and
analysis, oversight investigations, and other
tasks relating to policy areas.
The program runs Sept. 1, 2006, through May 31, 2007. Interns are paid
$13 per hour. From September through January, interns work 20 hours
per week. During the legislative session (February through May) partici-
pants may work up to 40 hours per week to assist with the demanding
workload. The House will pay up to 24 hours of graduate tuition at Florida
in state rates during the three semesters of the internship.
To be eligible, applicants must be Florida residents, must be enrolled in
a Florida school at the time of application, and must have a bachelor's
degree prior to beginning the internship. To apply, visit www.myflorida-
house.gov, click on General Information, scroll down to Applications and
Opportunities, and select the Legislative Intern Program.


One Quick Question
The Center for Career Services
will be available to answer your
career questions and more at
the One Quick Question table on
the concourse Thursday, March
30, from 9:45-11:15 a.m.

Public Defender
Job Fair
The Florida Public Defender
Association Job Fair wil be held
in Orlando April 8. Application
materials must be submitted
directly to the appropriate
judicial circuit by noon March
31. Details are available at
http://www.flpda.org/pages/
jobfair.htm.
Turn In Pro Bono
& Community
Service Hours
Have you been dedicating your
time to an indigent popula-
tion through legal or non-legal
work? The law school will
honor students who have done
at least 35 hours of volunteer
and pro bono work in a celebra-
tion April 13.
Make sure you turn in your
hours, signed by your suprevi-
sor, to Career Services.
Prepare for the
Final Mile
Assistant Dean for Career Ser-
vices Linda Calvert Hanson will
cover everything you need to
know about admission to The
Florida Bar, from the applica-
tion process to the exam itself,
in "Preparing for the Final Mile,
Part 1," at noon Tuesday,
March 28, in the Bailey
Courtroom. This workshop is
primarily focused on the initial
bar application process, and is
co-sponsored by PMBR.


FLA LAW 3


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EVENTS & OPPORTUNITIES


Lecture to Focus
on Hurricane
Katrina
Sheila Foster, professor of
law at Fordham University,
will discuss the role race,
place and class played in
the aftermath of Hurricane
Katrina in "The Racial Ecol-
ogy of a Natural Disaster,"
this year's Spring Lecture
sponsored by the Center for
the Study of Race and Race
Relations. Everyone is invited
to attend the lecture, which
will be held April 11 at noon
in room 285B.

Find Balance in
Legal Ease
Interested in finding balance
between your career and the
rest of your life? Come to Legal
Ease's final open-panel discus-
sion of the semester at noon
Tuesday, March 28, in room
355C, and hear the perspectives
and experiences of qualified
individuals in the legal profes-
sion who have managed to find
a balance.

Wershow Lecture
to Address
'Biopiracy'

University of Minnesota
Law Professor Jim Chen will
deliver this year's Wershow
Distinguished Lecture April 6
at the law school. Chen will
address "biopiracy," which,
according to Chen, is the
notion of "northern exploita-
tion of biological wealth and
ethnobiological knowledge from
the global south." For more
information, contact Michael
Olexa at olexa@ufl.edu.


4 FLA LAW


Advisement for Second
Semester Students
There will be an academic
advisement session for Fall 2005
entering students at noon today,
March 27, in room 355C.

Haitian Relief
Concert Rescheduled
Due to basketball playoffs, he
Haitian Relief Concert originally
scheduled for March 24 has been
rescheduled. The concert will
be held at The Bank at 10 p.m.
Thursday, March 30. Proceeds
from the concert go Project Kay,
an effort to provide better housing
for families in Haiti. Tickets to
the event are $7, and ticketholders
will also be included in a drawing
to win a free weekend at a vaca-
tion home in Key Largo.

Bar Fingerprinting
March 29
The University Police Depart-
ment has purchased new finger-
printing equipment that elimi-
nates problems associated with
ink prints. The system will be in
use this week when UPD comes
to the law school to fingerprint
students for their bar applica-
tions. Look for the fingerprinting
table on the concourse Wednes-
day, March 29.


Learning Across the
Color Line
Irving Cypen Professor Sharon
Rush will discuss her new book,
Huck Finn' Hidden Lessons: Teach-
ing and Learning Across the Color
Line, at noon Wednesday, March
29, in room 345. The event is
sponsored by the American Con-
stitution Society.


In a First, UF Hosts Veterans Appeals Court
A panel from the U.S. Court of Ap-
peals for Veterans Claims heard argu-
ments in the Bailey Courtroom March
21 the first time the court has heard
arguments at a law school outside
the Washington, D.C. area. The panel
included three of the seven judges on
the court: Judge William A. Moorman,
Judge Alan Lance, and Judge Bruce
Kasold (a UF law alumnus.)
One of the nation's highest courts of
administrative law, the Court of Ap-
peals for Veterans Claims was created
in 1988 to hear appeals by veterans
whose claims for benefits have been
denied. Recently, the court has tried
to reach out to law students by holding hearings on campuses. Until now,
those hearings were held in or near the nation's capital.
"When the court decided to branch out to other parts of the country, UF was
one of the schools at the top of their list," said Henry Winhyk, director of the
legal research and writing program. "Judge Kasold is a UF law alumnus, and
a few of the court's clerks are undergraduate alumni, so they know the law
school's reputation."
Students and faculty were able to view proceedings in Vahey v. Nicholson, a
case involving the refunding of a veteran's legal fees under the Equal Access to
Justice Act.
"It was an honor for our college to have one of the nation's highest Article I
courts conduct a live proceeding in our courtroom," said Dean Robert Jerry.
"This was an excellent opportunity for our students to observe the practice
of veterans benefits law, an undercelebrated but rewarding field. With the
expected completion of our proposed new advocacy center in 2008, we expect
to host more proceedings of this nature in the future."


Environmental Moot
Court Tryouts
Interested in environmental
law? Want to hone your brief-
writing and appellate advocacy
skills? Third- and fourth-semes-
ter students can try out for two
positions on the Environmental
Moot Court team that will repre-
sent UF at the National Environ-
mental Moot Court Competi-
tion in February 2007 in White
Plains, New York. This year's


team competed in a field of 75
teams and reached the semi-finals
of this national competition.
The application process includes
a written submission (resume and
argument section of your brief
from Appellate Advocacy) and
an oral argument tryout. Written
submissions are due by 4 p.m.
April 5 in room 319. Oral argu-
ment tryouts will be held April
6-12. For complete details, e-mail
Lena Hinson at elulp@law.ufl.
edu.















Students Win Peru
Scholarships
Law students Justin Luna and
Losmin Jimenez will travel to
Lima, Peru, May 25-26 for the
Seventh Annual Conference on
Legal and Policy Issues in the
Americas. Luna and Jimenez are
winners of the Student Participa-
tion scholarship, which funds
travel to the conference and
$250 toward lodging and related
expenses. Meredith Fensom,
director of the Law and Policy in
the Americas Program, said a large
number of students applied for
the scholarships.
The conference, which will
focus on justice reform in Peru,
will be attended by Peruvian Presi-
dent Alejandro Toledo, the U.S.
ambassador to Peru and other
policymakers.

Course in Latin
American Law to Open
Professor Jon Mills and Law
and Policy in the Americas Pro-
gram Director Meredith Fensom
will teach the class, "Law and
Policy in the Americas Seminar,"
in the Spring 2007 Semester.
Mills and Fensom were awarded
a $3,000 Internationalizing the
Curriculum Grant, one of 20
distributed campus-wide by UF,
for the class.


ICAM Team to Travel
to Vienna
The International Commercial
Arbitration Moot Court Team
will travel to Vienna, Austria,
April 5-15 to compete against
teams from across the globe in
the World Finals. The current
traveling team is composed of
David Lane, Trisha Low, Justin


UF Law Staff Honored for
'Superior Accomplishments'
Levin College of Law staff members Kathy Fleming and Robert Horn
received 2005-06 Superior Accomplishment Awards March 20 for their ef-
forts on behalf of the law school and the University of Florida. The highly
coveted awards recognize "efforts that go the extra mile," and winners
receive $200 and a mug and plaque in honor of their dedication and hard
work. Competition was particularly keen this year, according to judges,
and only 24 recipients were chosen out of hundreds of nominations.
Associate Director of Communications Kathy Fleming produced a record-
breaking three alumni magazines two with annual reports inserted in
her first year at the law school, and helped the office produce an unprec-
edented number of high quality publications on time and under budget. Facili-
ties Manager Robert Horn's long hours and tireless efforts during renovation
of the law school's facilities, which included moving the library to an off-site
location and back again, played a major role in the college's successful


construction and remodeling project.


Luna and Paul McAdoo.
Over the March 18-19 week-
end, team members Justin Luna
and Trisha Low reached the final
round at the Second Annual
Florida International Arbitration
Moot in Orlando.
The team is coached by Profes-
sors Thomas Hurst and Jeffrey
Harrison and is sponsored by the
law firm of Rivero, Palmer and
Mestre, LLP. If you are interested
in participating in ICAM in the
fall, sign up for the ICAM class
and contact Trisha Low at tlow@
ufl.edu.


JLSA Elections April 3
The Jewish Law Students Asso-
ciation will hold officer elections
at noon April 3 in the Bailey
Courtroom. For more informa-
tion, contact Lisa Kanarek at
lkanarek@ufl.edu.

Title Exam Workshop
David Mesnekoff of the At-
torneys' Title Insurance Fund
will present a Title Examination
Workshop at noon April 7 in
room 285B. Anyone interested in
a career in real estate law should
plan to attend.


LIC News


If you are planning to clerk this
summer, preparation is key. Of
course, you want to make a
good impression, so knowing
where to look for information
is very important. The Legal
Information Center's new
Pre-Clerking Workshops, which
begin this week, focus on free
and low-cost legal resources
available on the Internet
and offer tips on cost-effec-
tive searching on Lexis and
Westlaw. Workshops convene
at the reference desk in the
library.

Pre-Clerking Workshops:
March 30 2-3:30 p.m.
April 6 2-3:30 p.m.
Wednesday
Workshops
Need help researching that
seminar paper?

Wednesday Workshops are
ongoing. Take the opportunity
to visit the reference desk to
sign up or offer your input into
what types of research instruc-
tion you would like the library
to provide.

Wednesday Workshops:
* Mar. 29 2 p.m. & 3 p.m.
Blue Book Workshop
* Apr. 5 2 p.m. & 3 p.m.
Legislative History Research
YLD Offers
Scholarships
Each year the Young Lawyers
Division (YLD) of the Florida
Bar awards 10 scholarships of
$2,000 to law students who
attend one of Florida's ABA-ac-
credited law schools. Applica-
tions are available at the front
desk in the Student Affairs
Office. The deadline is April 1.


FLA LAW 5
















Law School Art Show
Begins Today
The original artwork of 18 law
students, faculty and staff will
be on display in the law library
through April 19. Please stop
by and view the artistic talents
of your friends and classmates.
Everyone is invited to meet the
artists for an opening reception
March 30.


JMBA, LCC
Elections Tuesday
The John Marshall Bar As-
sociation and the Law College
Council will hold elections
Tuesday, March 28. Look for
polling places in the courtyard.


Professor of Year
Nominations Due
Students have until 5 p.m.
today, March 27, to nominate
their favorite faculty member
for Professor of the Year. Send
your nomination with an essay
of no more than 250 words
explaining why your nominee
should be selected to an-
nika18@ufl.edu.
The five professors with the
most nominees will be voted on
during JMBA's officer elections
in the courtyard March 28.


ABA Basketball
Tournament
The American Bar Association
Law Student Division will hold
its annual basketball tourna-
ment at noon Sunday, April 2,
at the Southwest Recreation
Center basketball court. Teams
of three can compete for a
$100 prize. For more informa-
tion, e-mail ashhop@ufl.edu.


6 FLA LAW


Spring 2006 Class Gift FAQ


Do you want to leave a legacy
when you graduate, but aren't
sure how to give to the Spring
2006 Class Gift? Want to make
an investment that will increase
the value of your degree, but
aren't sure how you can afford it?
Here are answers to some of the
most common questions about
the gift.
Q: How can I give when I just
paid lots of money to BarBri,
still have to pay for the bar
exam, and don't know how I'm
going to afford to buy a house
where I'm moving?
A: Your contribution is a
pledge of money over the next
five years, with the first payment
due by the end of the 2006-07
fiscal year (June 2007). By then
you may be a year into your


practice and ready to begin giving
back to the law school.
Q: What amount are others
pledging?
A_ The average pledge is $1,000
to be split over five years just
$200 per year (or, roughly one
billable hour of work). A number
of students have committed to
greater amounts such as $1,250,
$1,500, and even $2,000. Last
semester, a student generously
pledged $10,000 to the Class
Gift. Any pledge of $125 or
greater may be split over the five-
year period.
Q: IfI pledge money to the
Class Gift, I definitely want it
to help out my organization. Is
this possible?
A: There are several ways to
pledge to the Class Gift. An un-


restricted pledge goes into a fund
which the dean uses at his discre-
tion to meet the needs of the law
school. Alternatively, you may
restrict a portion or all of your
Class Gift pledge to a particular
fund, such as any extracurricular
organization or some co-cur-
riculars. The administration is
working to ensure these pledges
will be a supplement to those
organizations' operating budgets
in the future.
Please contact Class Gift Chair
Dayna Duncan (dgaff@ufl.
edu) or Co-Chairs Kelly Lyon
(kcl@ufl.edu) and Hugh Rowe
(hor8186@ufl.edu) to have your
questions answered or to make a
pledge.


Yatesfrom Page 1


male doctor who urged her to
"think happy thoughts."
"I have a real gender issue with
male doctors who treat postpar-
tum depression," he said.
Female mental health is-
sues are neglected in the U.S.
justice system, Parnham said. He
noted that in most industrialized
countries, women who commit
infanticide usually defined
as killing their own children
within 12 months of birth are
committed to the mental health
system, not sentenced to prison.
He also criticized Texas and other
states for setting the bar for the
insanity defense too high.
Stephen C. O'Connell Profes-
sor Christopher Slobogin, a co-
presenter at the event, said that
the trial of would-be presidential
assassin John Hinckley made the
American public more hostile


than ever to the use of the insan-
ity defense.
"The fear is that the floodgates
will open," he said. Slobogin
noted mental health commu-
nity now officially recognizes
more than 300 disorders, and
the public fears that any one of
them could be used in a criminal
defense.
Even so, he said, the insan-
ity defense is asserted in fewer
than one out of 100 felony cases,
and fails three times out of four.
In 70 to 90 percent of insanity
acquittals, Slobogin said, the
prosecution has also admitted the
defendant is insane.
Yates' original conviction
was overturned because of the
testimony of forensic psychiatrist
Park Deitz, who told jurors that
child-drowning mom was the
focus of an episode of the popu-


lar TV series "Law and Order,"
which aired a few weeks before
Yates killed her children. Andrea
and Rusty Yates were reputedly
fans of"Law and Order," but the
episode Deitz referred to never
existed.
Parnham said the testimony
came up unexpectedly when he
questioned Dietz.
"The cardinal rule is that you
never ask a question you don't
know the answer to," he said.
"Well, I do that all the time."
Whatever the result of the up-
coming trial, Parnham said, Yates
will probably never be a func-
tioning member of free society.
"I hope we will get the verdict
that we need and that Andrea's
condition demands: a life in
treatment," he said.


I












Students Make PIEC an Annual Success


By LINDSAY J. DYKSTRA
UF law student Christina Storz
didn't know the Public Inter-
est Environmental Conference
(PIEC) was organized entirely by
students in the Environmental
and Land Use Law Society until
she agreed to co-chair what has
become one of the college's larg-
est and most prestigious annual
events.
Now in its 12th year, the
March 2006 conference, "In
Fairness to Future Genera-
tions," drew hundreds of highly
respected environmental experts
from across the nation and
more than 1,700 to the keynote
address by Robert Kennedy, Jr.
The concept for the conference
originated during a summer
study abroad program in Costa
Rica, when Storz signed on to co-
chair the conference with fellow
law student Heather Halter and
the theme of inter-generational
equity emerged.
Their only prior experience
consisted of Halter chairing
a panel the previous year and
Storz's annual attendance at prior
PIECs.
"I had no idea how things
worked or what I was getting
myself into," Storz said.
Storz, Halter and second-time
finance chair Barbara Serokee
began planning for the conference
before fall classes began. They met
in August with the Florida Bar's
Environmental & Land Use Law
Section to brainstorm with mem-
bers of the Public Interest Com-
mittee on possible topics. Com-
mittee members were matched
with student volunteers to help
organize panels and provide expert
contacts. The law students made
the final decisions on the confer-
ence agenda, said Halter.


The logistics of planning a con-
ference of this magnitude went
far beyond what the co-chairs
anticipated. They describe the
last month leading up to the
conference as pure chaos.
"It was indescribable," Storz
recalled. "I don't even know how
many hours Heather, Barbara
and I spent in that tiny Conser-
vation Clinic. You get kind of
delirious, so we had a lot of good
times going crazy together."
This year, PIEC essentially
served as an umbrella confer-
ence for two other conferences
as well, the 16th annual confer-
ence of the National Association
of Environmental Law Societies
and UF's fifth annual Center for
Children's Literature & Culture
conference.
The merger resulted in in-
creased finances and the ability
to bring in big names and add a
few special touches. Tree saplings,
for example, were distributed
to compensate for the carbon
emitted by those who flew into
Gainesville.
Interdisciplinary participation
of the entire campus also marked
a first, said Serokee. "Dean Jerry
and President Machen were very


involved, and we had strong
university leadership."
True to tradition, participants
enjoyed a bonfire lit by the co-
chairs with a flame thrower to
close out the conference.
The event Halter described as
"exhausting, but great" is over,
leaving plenty of positive feed-
back in its wake. Co-chairs for
2007 have already been selected
and planning for next year is
underway.
Chaos and fatigue aside, Halter
said she would absolutely do it all
over again.
For details, go online to UF-
PIEC.org.


Richard Louv, recent publisher of
Last Child in the Woods: Saving Our
Children from Nature-Deficit Disorder,
speaks at the welcome reception.


Keynote Speaker Robert Kennedy, Jr. (left) with environmentalist and Hollywood
producer Laurie David and PIEC Finance Chair Barbara Serokee, Co-Chair Chris-
tina Storz and Leslie Utiger.


"We are living

today in a sci-

ence fiction

nightmare."

PIEC keynote speaker
Robert F. Kennedy, Jr. (above,
right with UF law student Kurt
Zaner.)

Kennedy Keynotes
Conference

Robert F. Kennedy, Jr., one of
TIME magazine's "Heroes for
the Planet" and chief prose-
cuting attorney for Riverkeeper,
delivered what he deemed a
non-partisan blow to current
environmental policies, charac-
terizing the Bush White House
as the worst environmental
administration in American
history, in the keynote address
for the 2006 Public interest
Environmental Conference (see
story at left).

The Phillips Center for the Per-
forming Arts was packed with
nearly 1,700 people, making
for a highly receptive audience
that enthusiastically applauded
Kennedy throughout his speech.
Lamenting the corrosive impact
of excessive corporate power
on democracy and an indolent
press, negligent as a result of
saturated ownership; Kennedy
called for a returned interest to
nature as the nation is in the
midst of an "environmentally
induced health epidemic."


FLA LAW 7








Send Us Your News
FlaLaw is published each week
school is in session by the Levin
College of Law Communications
Office. Submit news of interest
to the law school community by
10 a.m. Tuesday for the follow-
ing Monday's issue to flalaw@
law.ufl.edu or 273-0650.
E-mail FlaLaw@law.ufl.edu to be
e-mailed a weekly early release
pdf of FlaLaw.

* Tim Lockette, Editor
* Kristen Hines, Photographer



College of Law
Administration
* Robert H. Jerry, II, Dean
* George L. Dawson,
Associate Dean for
Academic Affairs
* J. Patrick Shannon,
Associate Dean for
Administrative Affairs
* Lyrissa Barnett Lidsky,
Associate Dean for
Faculty Development
* Michael K. Friel,
Associate Dean & Director,
Graduate Tax Program
* Stuart R. Cohn,
Associate Dean for
International Studies
* M. Kathleen "Kathie" Price,
Associate Dean for Library
and Technology
* Gail E. Sasnett,
Associate Dean for
Students, Professionalism
and Community Relations
* J. Michael Patrick,
Assistant Dean for Admissions
* Linda Calvert Hanson,
Assistant Dean for
Career Services
* Adrian Jones,
Assistant Dean for Diversity
and Community Relations
* Jennifer Cope, Interim
Assistant Dean for Students
* Debra D. Amirin,
Director of Communications
* Donald J. Hale,
Senior Director of Development
and Alumni Affairs

UNIVERSITY OF
FLORIDA


PEOPLE


Scholarship & Activities
Gertrude Block
Emeritus Lecturer
* Presented "Can Words Change the
World?" to the retired faculty of the
University of Florida March 15 at
the Harn Museum of Art.
Meredith Fensom
Director, Law and Policy in the
Americas Program
SPresented "Judicial Reform,
Military Justice and the Case of
Chile's Carabinieros" at the 26th
International Congress of the Latin
American Studies Association in
San Juan, Puerto Rico, March 15-
18. Fensom also participated in a
panel discussion on military justice
and democracy at the conference.
Cally Jordan
Associate Professor
* Presented "The Story of Audit
Committees: Controversies and
Alternatives" March 16 at the Uni-
versity of Montreal.
Christine Klein
Professor
* Published "Survey of Florida Water
Law" in Waters andWater R.,',.
(Robert E. Beck, ed., Matthew Bend-
er & Co., Inc., rev. vol. 6 (2005).


In the News
Jennifer Kent
Law Student
* Gainesville Sun, March 23. Q
in an article on the March 22
speech by George Parnham,
torney for Andrea Yates.
Michelle Jacobs
Professor
* WUFT-TV, March 22. Inter-
viewed regarding the case of
Lafave, the Hillsborough Coi
schoolteacher convicted of le
and lascivious behavior with
year-old student.
Christopher Peterson
Assistant Professor
* Daily Business Review, March
Quoted in a story about payc
lenders and their effect on th
iness of U.S. military person
Michael Siegel
Professor
* The (Edinburgh) Scotsman, N
14. Commented on the trial
two New York City police ofl
accused of being hit men for
Mafia.
* WCJB, TV-20, March 22. G
live interview on the case of I
Lafave.


March
27 Academic Advisement for Fall
2005 Entrants, noon, 355C
28 Preparing for the Final Mile,
Part 1, noon, Bailey Courtroom
Legal Ease: Finding Balance
Between Life andWork, noon,
room 355C
29 Bill McBride, 3 p.m. room 180


Learning Across the Color Line
w/Prof. Rush, noon, room 345
Blue BookWorkshop, 2 p.m. &
3 p.m., library
30 Haitian Relief Concert, 10 p.m.,
The Bank
Pre-ClerkingWorkshop, 2 p.m.,
library
31 Judge JuanVasquez, 11 a.m.,
room 285B


SCHOLARSHIP
& ACTIVITIES




Environmental
Conference
Luoted in the News

at-.l rI. ..iu-ii.n P1 l. h: Inr.i-
.. r E n ..rr'..ir, i .. t... -c.
I ..I .cl i ...
u li l ...,:r ..t rr I..1., n:.=1 ,_,.i




a 4-
p....' l I Roberi- F. kennedi.
Ir. TI.. JI ........- LiF
President Bernic MNachen's
r,.. u rO i"'., r ,-, .1..3 -.;n
23 rl-. : *..nt. .. -... rl ,r i.iF I
lay ....l.,, h. ,ni r. I. I .1
e read- I ..... .. ..I pl I M .. ic puL
el.
Christopher Slobogin
Stephen C. O'Connell Professor
larch Gainesvile Sun, March 23. Quoted
of in coverage of his joint presentation
icers with George Parnham, defense at-
the torney for Andrea Yates.
WRUF-TV, March 23. Spoke about
ave a the Supreme Courts ruling that
)ebra police cannot search a house when
one resident invites them to enter
but another resident refuses.


More Dates
Available Online
More information on upcoming
meetings and events is avail-
able through the Levin College
of Law's online calendars at:
www.law.ufl.edu/calendars/.


8 FLA LAW


CALENDAR


4"








Send Us Your News
FlaLaw is published each week
school is in session by the Levin
College of Law Communications
Office. Submit news of interest
to the law school community by
10 a.m. Tuesday for the follow-
ing Monday's issue to flalaw@
law.ufl.edu or 273-0650.
E-mail FlaLaw@law.ufl.edu to be
e-mailed a weekly early release
pdf of FlaLaw.

* Tim Lockette, Editor
* Kristen Hines, Photographer



College of Law
Administration
* Robert H. Jerry, II, Dean
* George L. Dawson,
Associate Dean for
Academic Affairs
* J. Patrick Shannon,
Associate Dean for
Administrative Affairs
* Lyrissa Barnett Lidsky,
Associate Dean for
Faculty Development
* Michael K. Friel,
Associate Dean & Director,
Graduate Tax Program
* Stuart R. Cohn,
Associate Dean for
International Studies
* M. Kathleen "Kathie" Price,
Associate Dean for Library
and Technology
* Gail E. Sasnett,
Associate Dean for
Students, Professionalism
and Community Relations
* J. Michael Patrick,
Assistant Dean for Admissions
* Linda Calvert Hanson,
Assistant Dean for
Career Services
* Adrian Jones,
Assistant Dean for Diversity
and Community Relations
* Jennifer Cope, Interim
Assistant Dean for Students
* Debra D. Amirin,
Director of Communications
* Donald J. Hale,
Senior Director of Development
and Alumni Affairs

UNIVERSITY OF
FLORIDA


PEOPLE


Scholarship & Activities
Gertrude Block
Emeritus Lecturer
* Presented "Can Words Change the
World?" to the retired faculty of the
University of Florida March 15 at
the Harn Museum of Art.
Meredith Fensom
Director, Law and Policy in the
Americas Program
SPresented "Judicial Reform,
Military Justice and the Case of
Chile's Carabinieros" at the 26th
International Congress of the Latin
American Studies Association in
San Juan, Puerto Rico, March 15-
18. Fensom also participated in a
panel discussion on military justice
and democracy at the conference.
Cally Jordan
Associate Professor
* Presented "The Story of Audit
Committees: Controversies and
Alternatives" March 16 at the Uni-
versity of Montreal.
Christine Klein
Professor
* Published "Survey of Florida Water
Law" in Waters andWater R.,',.
(Robert E. Beck, ed., Matthew Bend-
er & Co., Inc., rev. vol. 6 (2005).


In the News
Jennifer Kent
Law Student
* Gainesville Sun, March 23. Q
in an article on the March 22
speech by George Parnham,
torney for Andrea Yates.
Michelle Jacobs
Professor
* WUFT-TV, March 22. Inter-
viewed regarding the case of
Lafave, the Hillsborough Coi
schoolteacher convicted of le
and lascivious behavior with
year-old student.
Christopher Peterson
Assistant Professor
* Daily Business Review, March
Quoted in a story about payc
lenders and their effect on th
iness of U.S. military person
Michael Siegel
Professor
* The (Edinburgh) Scotsman, N
14. Commented on the trial
two New York City police ofl
accused of being hit men for
Mafia.
* WCJB, TV-20, March 22. G
live interview on the case of I
Lafave.


March
27 Academic Advisement for Fall
2005 Entrants, noon, 355C
28 Preparing for the Final Mile,
Part 1, noon, Bailey Courtroom
Legal Ease: Finding Balance
Between Life andWork, noon,
room 355C
29 Bill McBride, 3 p.m. room 180


Learning Across the Color Line
w/Prof. Rush, noon, room 345
Blue BookWorkshop, 2 p.m. &
3 p.m., library
30 Haitian Relief Concert, 10 p.m.,
The Bank
Pre-ClerkingWorkshop, 2 p.m.,
library
31 Judge JuanVasquez, 11 a.m.,
room 285B


SCHOLARSHIP
& ACTIVITIES




Environmental
Conference
Luoted in the News

at-.l rI. ..iu-ii.n P1 l. h: Inr.i-
.. r E n ..rr'..ir, i .. t... -c.
I ..I .cl i ...
u li l ...,:r ..t rr I..1., n:.=1 ,_,.i




a 4-
p....' l I Roberi- F. kennedi.
Ir. TI.. JI ........- LiF
President Bernic MNachen's
r,.. u rO i"'., r ,-, .1..3 -.;n
23 rl-. : *..nt. .. -... rl ,r i.iF I
lay ....l.,, h. ,ni r. I. I .1
e read- I ..... .. ..I pl I M .. ic puL
el.
Christopher Slobogin
Stephen C. O'Connell Professor
larch Gainesvile Sun, March 23. Quoted
of in coverage of his joint presentation
icers with George Parnham, defense at-
the torney for Andrea Yates.
WRUF-TV, March 23. Spoke about
ave a the Supreme Courts ruling that
)ebra police cannot search a house when
one resident invites them to enter
but another resident refuses.


More Dates
Available Online
More information on upcoming
meetings and events is avail-
able through the Levin College
of Law's online calendars at:
www.law.ufl.edu/calendars/.


8 FLA LAW


CALENDAR


4"