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UF UFLAW



Fla law newsletter of the University of Florida College of Law
ALL VOLUMES CITATION SEARCH THUMBNAILS PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00072281/00165
 Material Information
Title: Fla law newsletter of the University of Florida College of Law
Portion of title: Flalaw
Physical Description: Serial
Creator: Levin College of Law
Publisher: s.n.
Place of Publication: <Gainesville FL> College of Law Communications Office 1997-
Creation Date: March 6, 2006
Frequency: weekly
completely irregular
 Subjects
Genre: periodical   ( marcgt )
serial   ( sobekcm )
 Notes
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol.1, no. 1 (Oct. 6, 1997)-
General Note: Weekly during the school year with a biweekly insert, numbered separately called: The Docket.
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Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved, Board of Trustees of the University of Florida
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System ID: UF00072281:00165

Table of Contents
    Robert F. Kennedy, Jr. to headline conference
        Page 1
    Career Services
        Page 2
        Page 3
    Justice urges students to get involved
        Page 4
        Page 5
    Events and opportunities
        Page 6
        Page 7
    People, scholarships and activities
        Page 8
    Calendar
        Page 8
Full Text



















Robert E Kennedy, Jr. to Headline Conference


VOL. 9, NO. 24 MARCH 6,2006


BY ASHLEY PINDER
Robert F Kennedy, Jr., senior
attorney for the Natural Re-
sources Defense Council, and
Carol Browner, former admin-
istrator of the Environmental
Protection Agency, are among
the headliners at the nation's
first conference to combine hu-
manities, law, policy, children
and the environment.
The Twelfth Annual Pub-
lic Interest Environmental
Conference will bring together
this unique discussion March
8-11 for "In Fairness to Future
Generations." Most conference
events are free to UF law stu-
dents, and registration is open
until Friday, March 9.
"We are focusing on in-
tergenerational equity and
conserving our resources for
the future," said Professor
Alyson Flournoy, director of the
Environmental and Land Use
Law Program. "The conference
will discuss water as a central
resource today and its impor-
tance in Florida, while linking
the issues to the land and to
future generations."
The conference kicks off with
a speech by Kennedy, president
of Waterkeeper Alliance, March


INSIDE THIS ISSUE


Career Services
Events & Opportunities
Calendar


8 at 8 p.m. at the Phillips Cen-
ter for Performing Arts. The
speech is sponsored by the AC-
CENT Speakers Bureau, and is
free and open to the public.
Richard Louv, a columnist
for The San Diego Union-Tri-
bune and Parents magazine,
will speak about his book, Last
Child in the Woods: Saving Our
Children fom Nature-Deficit
Disorder, March 9 at the confer-
ence welcome reception. The
conference will also feature
Philippe Cousteau, grandson of
Jacques Cousteau and president
of Earth Echo International.
A diverse selection of panel
discussions on Friday and Sat-
urday will feature the following
topics:
* Issues and Challenges in
Restoring the Ecological
Integrity of Lake Okeechobee
Watershed
* Marine Ecosystem Manage-
ment in Florida: Obstacles for
Management-Options for
Change
* All Hot and Bothered: Global
Warming, Endangered Species
& Sustainable Development
* Earth, Wind and Fire: Nature,
Science and Art
* At the Altar of Nature: Reli-


D


Justice
Quince
Speaks


Kennedy


gion and Spirituality
* The Choctawatchee Miracle:
An Uncommon Approach to
Protecting a River Basin
* Disaster Recovery & Waiver
of Environmental Laws
* Fortress Florida: The Future
of Florida Coastal Policy
* Wild Things: Children's Cul-
ture and Ecocriticism
* Shooting the Messenger: Sci-
ence, Politics, and Ethics
All conference events are free
for law students and faculty
except the banquet, which costs
$35. For more information,
contact Barbara Serokee, at
(352) 273-0856 or bserokee@
ufl.edu, or go to www.ufpiec.
org or www.naels.org.



Respect
Diversity


Moot Court Team
Wins Competition
Gina D'Amelia and Victoria Sheph-
ard of UF's Justice Campbell
Thornal Moot Court Team won
the George Wash-
ington University
National Security
Law Competition
Feb. 25-26. UF beat
New York Univer-
sity in the final Shephard
round before a panel of judges,
including the general counsel for
the Central Intelligence Agency, a
federal judge from Michigan and a
judge from the U.S. Criminal Court
of Appeals. D'Amelia and Sheph-
ard also had the second-best brief
Sin the competition,
and team members
Chris Dix and
Zainabu Rumala
had the third best
D'Amelia brief overall.
The Moot Court team extends
congratulations to these four,
their coaches and team members
for this successful effort, and of-
fers special thanks to professors
Lyrissa Lidsky, Fletcher Baldwin,
and Christopher Slobogin for their
help in benching the competitors.
The team also congratulates
Natalia Medina and Alissa Lugo
(coached by Amy Fletcher and
Justin McCormack), who made
it to the Final Four of the George
Mason Law and Economics
Competition.
















Fall Externship
Deadline Tuesday
If you have not yet found an ex-
ternship for Fall 2006, there's
still time to act. There are still
several fall-only openings avail-
able, including positions with:
* The Family Law Advisory
Group
* The Guardian ad Litem
Program in Bronson
* Child Welfare Services in
Trenton
* 5th Circuit Judge Raymond
McNeal (family law) in Ocala
* Three Rivers Legal Services
(domestic violence)
* Jacksonville Area Legal Aid
(consumer protection)
The application deadline for
these internships is 5 p.m.
Tuesday, March 7, in Career
Services. Full details on these
opportunities are available on
the Career Services website
under "externships."



Tax Scholar to
Speak in
Dunwody Lecture

UF alumnus George Yin, a
professor at the University of
Virginia School of Law and chief
of staff for the U.S. Congress's
Joint Committee on Taxation,
will deliver this year's Dunwody
Lecture March 24 at 11 a.m.
in the Chesterfield Smith Cer-
emonial Classroom. Yin's topic
is "Is the Tax
System Beyond
Reform?" The
lecture is free
and open to the
public. Y
Yin


2 FLA LAW


CAREERSERVICES
Hints to help you in the legal profession


Alternative Careers
Have you applied for On-
Campus Interviews and still
haven't gotten an interview?
Don't be discouraged. The firms
that participate in OCI are not
the right fit for everyone.
Perhaps you are seeking work
other than the traditional law
firm job. If so, take the time to
explore an alternative career.
These highly-rewarding career
paths do require a more creative,
self-directed marketing strategy,
as the potential employer may
not realize just how valuable
someone with a JD can be to
their organization or business.
Ninety-nine percent of an
effective alternative career search
happens before you send your
first resume. Your search is more


effective and efficient if you
take your time before you start
mailing.
First, give yourself permission
to be happy. At some point, we
have all succumbed to the no-
tion that it is a "waste" of one's
law degree to not practice law.
Remember, you went to law
school to prepare for a fulfilling
career.
Next, assess what you want
from a job and what you bring
to the job. Think about environ-
ment, activities and duties you
enjoy. Then itemize your skills
and qualifications. Perform
your own personal inventory.
Then, after reviewing a number
of career options, choose some
that look like they would be a
good fit.


Finally, explore. Talk to law-
yers working in the particular
positions you've identified. What
do they like? What skills do they
use? Find out how they found
their job. All of these steps will
prepare you to efficiently begin
sending out resumes. (Source:
Gina Sauer, i Mitchell
College of Law.)

Finding Alternative
Careers: What You
Need To Know
* It takes time, patience and a
spirit of adventure.
* Begin with self assessment.
This will give you the infor-
mation you need to market
yourself to employers.
* Research, research, research.


Alternative Career: Financial Services


If you are exploring alternatives to traditional
law practice, consider putting your skills to
work in the financial services field. Law school
graduates are found throughout the financial
services industry in a wide variety of jobs, in-
cluding financial planning, investment banking,
compliance, lending, trust management and
many more.
Law school graduates in the financial field
can draw upon a broad range of legal skills,
including contract interpretation, negotiation,
awareness of risks and liabilities and the ability
to identify and analyze legal issues. In the area of
investment banking, for example, a law school
graduate can provide strategic and financial
advice to clients.
Investment banks help companies and gov-
ernments issue securities and help investors pur-
chase securities, manage financial assets, trade
securities and provide financial advice. A law
school graduate can be a valuable addition to
an investment banking team because he or she
can bring unique problem solving and analytical


skills, as well as legal expertise, to a group that is
typically made up of business school graduates.
Recent UF law grads have been employed
with companies such as Merrill Lynch and
Wachovia Wealth Management, while other
potential employers in this field could include
Morgan Stanley, Citibank, Charles Schwab, J.P.
Morgan, and Goldman Sachs. For more infor-
mation, check out Moody' Banks and Financial
Manual, an annual publication that provides
information about banking and financial corpo-
rations throughout the United States, including
profiles, addresses, and organizational structures.















* Know your transferrable skills
cold. Be able to give specific
examples in action.
Prepare a brief "sound bite" to
describe your skills, what you
offer and what you want.
Conduct informational inter-
views. They can be the key to
getting "inside."
Become an expert networker.
This is particularly important
when looking for an alternative
career.
Prepare to address employer
resistance to hiring aJD.
Anticipate concerns and be
prepared to address them.
Have compelling reasons for
seeking a non-traditional
career. Learn buzzwords of the
field to capture their interest.
Demonstrate your enthusiasm
for your chosen field through
community involvement,
volunteer activities, or writing
an article.
(Source: Lisa L. Abrams, The
Official Guide to Legal Specialties.)

Public Defender
Job Fair
The Florida Public Defender
Association will host a job fair
April 7-8 at the Embassy Suite
Hotel in Orlando. The event is
open to 3Ls and recent gradu-
ates interested in a career in
public service. Prospective can-
didates must submit a cover let-
ter with a resume directly to the
Florida Public Defender Ciruit
Offices listed on the FPDA
Job Fair website: www.flpda.
org/pages/jobfair.htm. Employ-
ers will prescreen application
materials and contact candidates
directly concerning acceptance


and setting up interview times
for April 8. Current assistant
public defenders employed with
the state of Florida will not be
interviewed. Cover letters and
resumes should be submitted by
noon March 31.

Where Will You Live
This Summer?
While finding summer em-
ployment is important, finding
a place to stay for those eight to
12 weeks is equally important.
To help with your transition,
the National Association for
Legal Professionals (NALP) has
a housing website available at
www.nalpexchange.org. Also,
universities and colleges often
open their dorms to students
from other schools for a fraction
of the cost of renting an apart-
ment. Check the universities in
the city you are considering for
the summer. Career Services also
has information about housing
in New York, Washington, D.C.
and Atlanta.


Spend Your Summer
Helping Hurricane
Victims
This year, in response to the
devastation caused by Hurri-
canes Katrina and Rita, Equal
Justice Works is expanding its
Summer Corps program by 65
new slots, offering $1,000 edu-
cation awards to a total of 315


law students. The 65 additional
slots will be reserved for students
who are providing disaster-re-
lated legal services to hurricane
victims or evacuees in Alabama,
Louisiana, Mississippi and Texas.
Summer Corps is an Ameri-
Corps funded program that sup-
ports law students who spend
their summers in qualifying legal
internships at nonprofit, public
interest organizations. The 2006
Summer Corps application will
be available online March 22 to
April 5. For more information
about the program, visit www.
equaljusticeworks.org/summer-
corpsindex.php.

Career Opportunities
in Higher Education
Discover the various career
opportunities for JDs within
the educational field in a panel
discussion Tuesday, March 7,
at noon in the faculty dining
room. The panel features
JDs who work in administra-
tion at the Levin College of Law,
including Assistant Dean for
Career Services Linda Calvert
Hanson, Assistant Dean for
Diversity Adrian Jones and
Assistant Director of Career
Services Dexter Smith.

One Quick Question
A professional counselor from
the Center for Career Services
will be available to answer ques-
tions about externships, mock
interviews, resumes, cover let-
ters, career development sugges-
tions and more Thursday, March
9, from 9:45-11:15 a.m. on the
concourse.


Apply for
Study Abroad by
March 24

Enjoy ABA-accredited law
study abroad this summer at
top universities at favorable
tuition rates through UF law's
programs in Costa Rica, France
and South Africa. Apply by
March 24. Programs available
this summer include:
* Environmental law in Costa
Rica, including Conservation
Clinic field work and field
trips. Program runs June
18-July 31.

* Business law in Paris and
Montpellier, France,
including tours of the
European Union and French
legal institutions. Held June
25-July 28, with the first
week in Paris and the next
four weeks in Montpellier.

* Legal studies in Cape Town,
South Africa, including
networking with local at-
torneys. Held June 19-July
27 at the University of Cape
Town.

To learn more, see the insert
in today's FlaLaw or go online
to www.law.ufl.edu/students/
abroad. For assistance, contact
Noemar Castro in the Office
of Student Affairs at castro@
law.ufl.edu.

ABA Basketball
Tournament
The American Bar Association-
Law Student Division will hold
its annual basketball tourna-
ment April 2. Teams of three
can compete for a $100 prize.
For more information, e-mail
ashhop@ufl.edu.


FLA LAW 3










Justice Urges Students to Get Involved


Learn About
Environmental Law
Certificate
Find out about UF's environ-
mental certificate program
- and the many other oppor-
tunities available through the
Environmental and Land Use
Law Program by attending
an informational meeting March
8 at noon in room 3550. The
deadline for enrolling in the cer-
tificate program this semester
is March 20. Applications can
be downloaded from the ELULP
website www.law.ufl.edu/elulp.
For more information contact
Professor Alyson Flournoy at
flournoy@law.ufl.edu.




Register for Golf
Tournament
The John Marshall Bar
Association's "Wishes on the
Green" Golf Tournament will
be held March 26. Registra-
tion begins today at the JMBA
table in the courtyard. The
$50 registration fee covers
dinner and prizes.


Attend Conference
on African Politics
Legal scholars, writers and
political scientists will discuss
"The Politics of Inequality
in Africa" in the final day of
the 2006 Gwendolen Carter
Conference at the law school
Tuesday, March 7. Panel dis-
cussions begin at 9 a.m. in the
Chesterfield Smith Ceremonial
Classroom. The event is free
and open to the public. For
more information, contact
Professor Winston Nagan at
nagan@law.ufl.edu.


4 FLA LAW


There are far too few black law-
yers in America, Florida Supreme
Court Justice Peggy Quince told
a crowd of law students, faculty
and staff Feb. 23 at the Levin
College of Law.
The shortage of black lawyers
makes it imperative for African
Americans in the legal field
- including law students to
get involved in the community,
Quince said.
"Our communities desperately
need us," Quince said. "Whether
we can afford to do it or not, we
need to be out in there doing pro
bono work."
The Supreme Court justice
spoke to law students and faculty
on "The Role of the Black Law-
yer" Feb. 23. Her speech, spon-
sored by the Black Law Students
Association and the American
Constitution Society, kicked off
BLSA's annual Alumni Reunion
Weekend.
Quince urged African Ameri-
can students to get involved in
legal organizations such as the
American Bar Association. But
it's equally important, she said, to
get involved in the community
off campus.
"There are many people in our
communities who would love to


Florida Supreme Court Justice Peggy Quince speaks in the Chesterfield Smith
Ceremonial Classroom Feb, 23. Quince's speech kicked off events for the Black
Law Student Association's Alumni Reunion Weekend.


know a budding lawyer," she said.
Quince also offered advice for
all students who are preparing for
graduation, the Bar exam and a
future in the legal profession.
"You need to make sure you
give sufficient time to the Bar
exam," she said. "There's nothing
more disheartening than spend-
ing three years in law without
passing the exam."
Quince advised students to
take Bar review courses. If you
can afford to, she said, you
shouldn't hold down a job while
preparing for the exam.
"I don't hire clerks who have


yet to complete the Bar," she said.
Young lawyers should find
mentors among older lawyers,
Quince said, largely to help them
avoid costly mistakes.
She also urged students to seek
help if they feel overwhelmed
by stress. Many of the discipline
cases that come before the Su-
preme Court, she said, have their
origin in stress-related substance
abuse.
"If you feel yourself on the
edge, please get some help," she
said.


Students Honored at BLSA
Alumni Reunion
Two current law students were honored by distin-
guished alumni at the Black Law Student Associa-
tion's Alumni Reunion Weekend Feb. 24-25.
Reunion organizer Melanie Thompson (left, with UF
alumnus W. George Allen, namesake of UF's BISA
chapter) was given the Hazel Land Female Student
of the Year Award. Lee Glover, organizer of this
year's Black History Month events, was named W.
George Allen Male Student of the Year.










Debate Ideas, Respect Each Other


In this statement in the August 23, 2005 issue of FlaLaw, Dean Robert Jerry offered his thoughts on the principles
that should guide all of us faculty, staff and students in our efforts to improve and strengthen our community
and the relationships within it. It is reprinted here as a reminder of the continuing importance of these principles.


Our college's Vision and Mis-
sion Statement succinctly states
our aspirations at the Levin
College of Law. We are "dedicated
to advancing human dignity,
social welfare and justice through
knowledge of the
law," and we are com-
mitted to "excellence
in educating profes-
sionals, advancing le-
gal scholarship, serv- Jerry
ing the public and
fostering justice." To these ends,
we have assembled an exceptional
faculty, staff, and student body
who are committed to teaching,
learning, and scholarship. Our
community has energy and vital-
ity, and it is talented and diverse.
We take pride in the fact that a
variety of backgrounds, opinions,
and viewpoints are represented
in our community; indeed, in an
educational institution like ours,
this diversity is important because
we learn much from each other.
A vigorous, vibrant community
is essential if we are to provide a
high-quality educational environ-
ment where students can acquire
the knowledge and skills they
need to succeed in their careers
and where faculty can teach and
produce quality scholarship that
serves the public and fosters
justice. Building a strong com-
munity among persons who are
different is not always easy. But
our differences, whether based
on race, gender, socioeconomic
status, ethnicity, culture, religion,
sexual preference, physical ability,
life experience, or something else,
provide excellent opportunities
for us to learn about other people,
our nation and world, and ulti-
mately ourselves.


Notwithstanding our differenc-
es, there exist core values to which
each and every member of our
community should be commit-
ted. We respect the dignity and
value the rights of each member
of our community. We expect
honesty, integrity, and fair dealing
in our relationships. We expect
each member of the commu-
nity to pursue excellence in one's
work. We expect each of us to be


ber's right to communicate one's
ideas simply because we disagree
with the content, or lack of civility
toward those with opposing views.
As members of the legal profes-
sion, we have a special obligation
to assist our society in dealing
with injustice and unfair treat-
ment of individuals. As members
of a law school community, as our
Vision and Mission Statement
urges, we are expected to fulfill


"It is incumbent upon us to

respect opposing opinions and

viewpoints even as we debate

issues openly and vigorously."


responsible, and to be held
accountable, for one's actions
and conduct. In our studies as
law students, our teaching and
research as faculty members, and
ultimately our service as practicing
lawyers, we routinely deal with
controversial questions of great
significance on which public opin-
ion is deeply divided. Because as
legal professionals we are expected
to deal responsibly with conflict,
it is incumbent upon us to respect
opposing opinions and viewpoints
even as we debate issues openly
and vigorously. To these ends,
within our community we do not
practice and we do not tolerate
harassing or threatening behavior,
intimidation, abuse of authority,
the use of degrading language
toward any person or any group,
impeding any community mem-


this obligation in our interactions
with others in the college and our
university. We are also expected
to do our utmost to promote an
environment that encourages full
participation by all of its mem-
bers in learning, discussion, and
intellectual argument. At the law
school, we need to be the leaders
in setting an example in commu-
nity building for the greater uni-
versity, so that the university will
set the best example possible for
our society. It is through efforts
like these in our relationships
with each other that great change
in the world around us becomes
possible.

Robert H. Jerry, II
Dean; Levin, Mabie and
Levin Professor


Conference Covers
Child Abuse,
Public Policy
The Center on Children and
Families is teaming up with UF's
Askew Institute on Politics and
Society to host a statewide
conference on collaboration
between public and private
sectors to respond to child abuse
and neglect. To be held March
30 at the UF Hilton Confer-
ence Center, the conference is
expected to draw legal and policy
leaders and citizens from around
the state. Law alumni interested
in child welfare are encouraged
to register. Following the Askew
conference, the Center on
Children and Families will host a
workshop for child law centers
from around the nation. For
details, check http://www.clas.
ufl.edu/askew/calendar.htm.


Tax Judge to Speak
Federal Judge Juan Vasquez of
U.S. Tax Court will offer "Per-
spectives from the Bench" at 11
a.m. March 31 in room 285B.
Everyone is invited to attend.




Have Breakfast
with the Dean
Students are invited to
"Breakfast with the Dean"
Thursday, March 9, at 8 a.m. in
the faculty dining room. This is
your chance to discuss any con-
cerns, questions, comments or
compliments with Dean Jerry.
Space is limited and the event
is expected to fill up quickly. To
RSVP, e-mail robinsone@law.
ufl.edu.


FLA LAW 5











EVENTS & OPPORTUNITIES


Social Today for May
Graduates
All May graduates are invited
to a dessert social today,
March 6, at 1:45 p.m. on the
east lawn of the law school
(tennis court side) near the
Legal Information Center.
Dean Robert Jerry will speak
at the event, which will kick
off the Spring 2006 Class Gift
Pledge Drive.

Register Now for
Peru Conference
Students, faculty, alumni and
others have until March 15
to register for UF's Legal and
Policy Issues in the Americas
Conference, to be held May
25-26 in Lima, Peru.
The conference will focus on
"Creating a Consensus for Jus-
tice Reform in Peru," and will
feature international experts
including: Michael Shifter,
vice president for policy, Inter-
American Dialogue; Roberto
Danino, former senior vice
president and general counsel
of the World Bank; and
Peruvian President Alejandro
Toledo.
The conference will address
the rule of law and justice re-
form throughout the Americas.
Agenda items include justice
reform in Peru, citizen security
and human rights, alternative
dispute resolution, economic
integration, legal education
and professionalism, emerging
market standards, appellate
systems, and property rights.
Pre-registration is required to at-
tend the conference. Registration
materials are available at: www.
law.ufl.edu/cgr/conference.


6 FLA LAW


Meetings
* The John Marshall Bar As-
sociation meets today, March
6, at 7 p.m. in room 285C.
* The St. Thomas More Society
will meet Wednesday, March 8,
at noon in room 284. A guest
speaker will present "Spiritual
Practice as a Balancing Act."
Everyone is welcome.
* The Law Association for
Women will hold a general
meeting in room 285A Tuesday,
March 7, at noon.

Race Center Offers
Fellowship
The Center for the Study of
Race and Race Relations is accept-
ing applications for a $5,000 fel-
lowship for the 2006-2007 school
year. The fellowship is open to UF
professional and graduate students
in good standing who have dem-
onstrated interest in issues of race
and race relations. If interested,
you must apply by March 31.
Contact Professor Katheryn Rus-
sell-Brown, CSRRR director, or
Melissa Bamba, CSRRR assistant
director, at csrrr@law.ufl.edu or
273-0614 for more information.

Careers in Union Law
Tom Brooks of the firm Meyer
& Brooks, PA. will discuss careers
in union law in Florida March 6
at 5 p.m. in room 285A. Brooks
represents several large public
unions in Florida, including the
United Faculty of Florida.

Professor, Democrats
Take on Bush Budget
Professor Patricia Dilley will
discuss the 2007 federal budget
as proposed by President Bush
at a meeting of the Law School


Trial Team: Defense Wins Final Four


Law students Hilary Hussin and Chris Lambert won Best Team in this year's
Final Four Competition, held by the UF Trial Team.

Hussin and Lambert defended the fictitious
Richard Grouper on a murder charge. Prosecuting
the case for the fictitious State of Lone Star
were students Tyler Cathey and Camille Warren
(above, standing at podium). Hussin (left) was
named the competition's Best Advocate.

"It's been one the most practical and rewarding
experiences of my life," Hussin said. "I was so
surprised when they announced the results.
Knowing all the work that was put into it and
watching the others perform, I felt extremely
flattered to win the competition."


Democrats today, March 6, at 5 Jessup Team in
p.m. in the faculty dining room. Competition
Free dinner will be provided. J t t
UF's Jessup Moot Court Team
'Legal Ease' Takes on Brian Eves, David Sams, Jose
Career Options Florez, Brian Frankel and Jay Ku-
Not so sure that working for a bica- won second runner up for
S u t Best Brief at the 2005-2006 Inter-
major firm is really the job of your national Moot Court Competition
dreams Learn about careers at national Moot Court Competition
dreams? Learn about careers at r i
in Oxford, Miss.
small firms as well as alterna- n Oxf ,
tives to the traditional law-gradu- The team will soon accept ap
ate career path in an open plications for new members. There
ate career path in an open-
panel discussion Tuesday, March will be two meetings for student
7, n in Th interested in applying; one held
7, at noon in room 355C. The
s us sn rr 355 e, Tuesday, March 7, at 6 p.m. in
discussion is part of"Legal Ease," Tuesday, March 7, at 6 p.m. in
room 345 and another Wednesday,
a series of seminars organized by
Resource Counselor Nicole Nico- March 8, at 4 p.m. in the faculty
dining room. Free pizza will be
laisen Stern, and is co-sponsored dining room. Free pizza will be
by the Center for Career Services. served at both meetings.















Human Rights in
South America
Uruguayan attorney and law
professor Lilia Ferro will speak on
"The Legacy of Human Rights
Violations in Post-Authoritarian
Regimes in the Southern Cone
- the Cases of Argentina, Chile
and Uruguay," at 2 p.m. Tuesday,
March 7, in the faculty dining
room. Light refreshments will be
served. The event is sponsored by
the International Law Society and
the Law & Policy in the Americas
Program.

Alzhemiers Fundraiser
Wednesday Night
A coalition of student groups
will host a fundraiser for the Al-
zheimers Association Wednesday,
March 8, at 10 p.m. at the club
Rehab in downtown Gainesville.
Admission is free and dona-
tions will be taken at the door.
Law students will have access to
the roof until closing time. The
event is sponsored by the Jewish
Law Students Association, the
Estates Trusts and Elder Law
Society, the Black Law Students
Association and CaribLaw.

Second-Career
Students to Meet
A new organization for
second-career law students,
SCALeS, will hold its first meet-
ing Wednesday, March 8, at
noon in room 285A. SCALeS
exists to provide second-career
students with networking re-
sources, strategies for represent-
ing the value of previous life ex-
perience to potential employers,
and general law school support.


Learn About Socially
Responsible Investing
Find out how to practice
corporate law while serving the
public interest at Assistant Profes-
sor Michael Siebecker's lecture on
"Socially Responsible Investing"
Wednesday, March 8, at noon
in the faculty dining room. For
details, contact Dina Finkel at
dfinkel@ufl.edu.

CLA Jail Tour Thursday
The Criminal Law Association
is organizing a tour of the Alachua
County Jail to be held Thursday,
March 9, at 3:30 p.m. Tours are
free and open to all UF law stu-
dents, faculty and staff, but space
is limited. You can sign up for
the tour on the CLA's website on
Westlaw. E-mail CLAVice Presi-
dent Christina Anton at chick4uf@
ufl.edu for more information.

Learn the Craft of
Animal Rights Law
Marcy LaHart, an animal rights
attorney from West Palm Beach,
will speak at the law school Thurs-
day, March 9, at 11 a.m. in room
284. As a practicing animal rights
attorney, she will speak about the
craft of animal rights lawyering
and specific animal rights issues
she has litigated in court. Anyone
interested in animal rights law is
encouraged to attend.

UF in IP Competition
Members of the Intellectual
Property and Technology Law
Association participated in the Saul
Lefkowitz Moot Court Competi-
tion Feb. 25. Law students Andrew
Cheslock, Aaron Cook, Keisha
Hylton-Rodic, Laura Momol and
Nathaniel Quirk competed in the
regional competition in Atlanta,


with coaching by students Ryan
Corbett and Joe Worst. Com-
petitors were required to write an
appellate brief and do both on and
off-brief oral arguments. Anyone
interested in trying out for next
year's IP Moot Court competition
should contact momol@ufl.edu.

Yates Attorney to Speak
on Insanity Plea
George Parnham, who defended
Texas housewife Andrea Yates on
murder charges in the death of
Yates' five children, will present
"Gender, Mental Health and the
Law," a discussion on women's
mental health issues and the insani-
ty defense, with Professor Christo-
pher Slobogin at noon March 22
in the Chesterfield Smith Ceremo-
nial Classroom. The event is spon-
sored by the Law Association for
Women, the Association for Public
Interest Law and the Criminal Law
Association.

New Board at
Entertainment Law
Review
The Entertainment Law Review
recently held elections and would
like to congratulate the following
new board members: Editor-in-
ChiefAmanda Groover; Assistant
Editor-in-Chief Aaron Cook;
Executive Managing Editor Sergey
Gherman; Executive Research Edi-
tors Jeff Allen, Tanya Uhl, Court-
ney Barclay and Heather French;
Executive Articles Editors Amanda
McLernan, Ali Mora, Kevin Sobel
and Joseph Walz; Bylaws Chair
Hilary Jonczak; Student Works
Editors Kimberly Chamberlin and
Suzanne Johnson, and Production
Chair Kristi Dosh.


LIC News
Keeping current on legal cases
and issues is important to prac-
ticing attorneys. Many lawyers
subscribe to services such as
Lexis, Westlaw and Tax Ana-
lysts, which will automatically
forward e-mails with breaking
news on issues critical to their
practices. Others read sites
such as that of The Florida
Bar (www.floridabar.org) or
Courthouse News Service
(www.courthousenews.com)
to stay informed of recent
developments.
Another way to keep abreast of
current legal matters is to visit
a "blog," a frequently updated
Web site, typically run by a
single person, consisting of
personal observations, excerpts
from other sources, and hyper-
links to other sites. Try these
out and be "in the know":
* http://www.lawprofessor-
blogs.com
* http://www.blawg.org
* http://appellateblog.blogspot

Wednesday Workshops
Need help researching that
seminar paper? Take the op-
portunity to visit the Reference
Desk in the Legal Information
Center to sign up for work-
shops held at 2 p.m. and 3 p.m.
every Wednesday. Upcoming
topics include:
Mar. 8
Research Wizard: The Digest
System
Mar. 22
Research Wizard: Legal Ency-
clopedias & ALR
Mar. 29
Blue Book Workshop
Apr. 5
Legislative History Research


FLA LAW 7








Send Us Your News
FlaLaw is published each week
school is in session by the Levin
College of Law Communications
Office. Submit news of interest
to the law school community by
10 a.m. Tuesday for the follow-
ing Monday's issue to lockette@
law.ufl.edu or 273-0650.
Contact amirin@law.ufl.edu
to be e-mailed a weekly early
release pdf of FlaLaw.

* Tim Lockette, Editor
* Kristen Hines, Photographer



College of Law
Administration
* Robert H. Jerry, II, Dean
* George L. Dawson,
Associate Dean for
Academic Affairs
* J. Patrick Shannon,
Associate Dean for
Administrative Affairs
* Lyrissa Barnett Lidsky,
Associate Dean for
Faculty Development
* Michael K. Friel,
Associate Dean & Director,
Graduate Tax Program
* Stuart R. Cohn,
Associate Dean for
International Studies
* M. Kathleen "Kathie" Price,
Associate Dean for Library
and Technology
* Gail E. Sasnett,
Associate Dean for
Students, Professionalism
and Community Relations
* J. Michael Patrick,
Assistant Dean for Admissions
* Linda Calvert Hanson,
Assistant Dean for
Career Services
* Adrian Jones,
Assistant Dean for Diversity
and Community Relations
* Jennifer Cope, Interim
Assistant Dean for Students
* Debra D. Amirin,
Director of Communications
* Donald J. Hale,
Senior Director of Development
and Alumni Affairs

UNIVERSITY OF
FLORIDA


EPEC

Scholarship & Activities
Paul McAdoo
Law Student
* Presented "The Scope of a Federal
Common Law Reporter's Privilege:
the Teachings of, Redmond
and its Progeny" at the Association
for Education in Journalism and
Mass Communications Southeast
Colloquium March 3.
Christopher Slobogin
Stephen C. O'Connell Professor
* Described his upcoming book,
Proving the Unprovable: the Role of
Law, Science and Speculation in As-
sessing Culpability andDangerous-
ness, at the American Psychology-
Law Conference in St. Petersburg
March 3.


March
6 Gwendolen Carter Conference,
9 a.m.-4:30 p.m. Reitz Union
May Graduate Social, 1:45 p.m.,
east of Legal Information Center
Careers in Union Law, 5 p.m.,
room 285A
Prof. Dilley on Bush Budget,
5 p.m., faculty dining room
JMBA Meeting, 7 p.m., room
285C
7 Gwendolen Carter Conference,
9 a.m.- 3:45 p.m., room 180
Career Opportunities in Higher
Education, noon, faculty dining
room
LAW Meeting, noon, room 285A
Legal Ease, noon, room 355C
Lilia Ferro on Human Rights in
South America, 2 p.m., faculty
dining room


)PLE


* Presented "Reconceptualizing
Due Process in Juvenile Justice:
Contributions of Law and Social
Science," with Mark Fondacaro, at
the same conference.
Barbara Bennett Woodhouse
David H. Levin Chair in Family
Law; Professor; Director, Center
on Children and Families
* Presented a talk on the multidis-
ciplinary training of children's
advocates Feb. 22 at the Children's
Bureau of the Department of
Health and Human Services in
Washington, D.C. The work of
UF's child law and child welfare
clinics was highlighted as an
example of "best practices" as part
of a national meeting of Childrens'
Justice Act grantees.


Jessup Moot Court Information-
al Meeting, 6 p.m., room 345
8 Second Career Students Meet-
ing, noon, room 285A
Environmental Law Informa-
tional Meeting, noon, room
355D
St. Thomas More Society Meet-
ing, noon, room 284
Prof. Siebecker on Socially
Responsible Investing, noon,
faculty dining room
Jessup Moot Court Informa-
tional Meeting, 4 p.m. faculty
dining room
Robert Kennedy, Jr. Speech,
8 p.m., Phillips Center
Alzheimers Fundraiser, 10 p.m.,
Rehab, 8 S. Main St.
9 Breakfast with the Dean,
8 a.m., faculty dining room


SCHOLARSHIP
& ACTIVITIES


In the News
Robert H. Jerry, II
Dean; Levin Mabie and Levin
Professor
* Gainesville Sun, Feb. 25. Quoted
in an article about the $5.2 million
advocacy center the law school
will build with funding from
alumni Fred Levin and Robert
Montgomery, as well as the firm
Kerrigan, Estess, Rankin, McLeod
& Thompson. Dean Jerry was also
quoted in a story on the gift in the
Pensacola News-Journal Feb. 23, and
spoke about the gift on WUFT and
WCJB Feb. 21.
Joseph W. Little
Professor; Alumni Research
Scholar
* Daytona Beach News-Journal
March 1. Cited in an article about
the delay of a case between the
city of Flagler Beach and an adult
entertainment club.
Patrick Shannon
Associate Dean for Administrative
Affairs
* Sarasota Herald-Tribune, Feb. 25.
Quoted in an article on teachers
who receive their salary after being
suspended for alleged misconduct.


Mary LaHart on Animal Rights,
11 a.m., room 284
CLAJail Tour, 3:30 p.m., Ala-
chua County Jail
Public Interest Environmental
Conference Welcome Reception
with Richard Louv, 6:30 p.m.,
Emerson Alumni Hall
10 Public Interest Environmental
Conference (PIEC), 8:30 a.m.-5
p.m., Reitz Union
PIEC Banquet, 7 p.m., Savannah
Grande
11 Public Interest Environmental
Conference, 9 a.m.-3:30 p.m.,
Reitz Union

More information on upcoming
meetings and events is avail-
able through the Levin College
of Law's online calendars at:
www.law.ufl.edu/calendars/.


8 FLA LAW


CALENDAR








Send Us Your News
FlaLaw is published each week
school is in session by the Levin
College of Law Communications
Office. Submit news of interest
to the law school community by
10 a.m. Tuesday for the follow-
ing Monday's issue to lockette@
law.ufl.edu or 273-0650.
Contact amirin@law.ufl.edu
to be e-mailed a weekly early
release pdf of FlaLaw.

* Tim Lockette, Editor
* Kristen Hines, Photographer



College of Law
Administration
* Robert H. Jerry, II, Dean
* George L. Dawson,
Associate Dean for
Academic Affairs
* J. Patrick Shannon,
Associate Dean for
Administrative Affairs
* Lyrissa Barnett Lidsky,
Associate Dean for
Faculty Development
* Michael K. Friel,
Associate Dean & Director,
Graduate Tax Program
* Stuart R. Cohn,
Associate Dean for
International Studies
* M. Kathleen "Kathie" Price,
Associate Dean for Library
and Technology
* Gail E. Sasnett,
Associate Dean for
Students, Professionalism
and Community Relations
* J. Michael Patrick,
Assistant Dean for Admissions
* Linda Calvert Hanson,
Assistant Dean for
Career Services
* Adrian Jones,
Assistant Dean for Diversity
and Community Relations
* Jennifer Cope, Interim
Assistant Dean for Students
* Debra D. Amirin,
Director of Communications
* Donald J. Hale,
Senior Director of Development
and Alumni Affairs

UNIVERSITY OF
FLORIDA


EPEC

Scholarship & Activities
Paul McAdoo
Law Student
* Presented "The Scope of a Federal
Common Law Reporter's Privilege:
the Teachings of, Redmond
and its Progeny" at the Association
for Education in Journalism and
Mass Communications Southeast
Colloquium March 3.
Christopher Slobogin
Stephen C. O'Connell Professor
* Described his upcoming book,
Proving the Unprovable: the Role of
Law, Science and Speculation in As-
sessing Culpability andDangerous-
ness, at the American Psychology-
Law Conference in St. Petersburg
March 3.


March
6 Gwendolen Carter Conference,
9 a.m.-4:30 p.m. Reitz Union
May Graduate Social, 1:45 p.m.,
east of Legal Information Center
Careers in Union Law, 5 p.m.,
room 285A
Prof. Dilley on Bush Budget,
5 p.m., faculty dining room
JMBA Meeting, 7 p.m., room
285C
7 Gwendolen Carter Conference,
9 a.m.- 3:45 p.m., room 180
Career Opportunities in Higher
Education, noon, faculty dining
room
LAW Meeting, noon, room 285A
Legal Ease, noon, room 355C
Lilia Ferro on Human Rights in
South America, 2 p.m., faculty
dining room


)PLE


* Presented "Reconceptualizing
Due Process in Juvenile Justice:
Contributions of Law and Social
Science," with Mark Fondacaro, at
the same conference.
Barbara Bennett Woodhouse
David H. Levin Chair in Family
Law; Professor; Director, Center
on Children and Families
* Presented a talk on the multidis-
ciplinary training of children's
advocates Feb. 22 at the Children's
Bureau of the Department of
Health and Human Services in
Washington, D.C. The work of
UF's child law and child welfare
clinics was highlighted as an
example of "best practices" as part
of a national meeting of Childrens'
Justice Act grantees.


Jessup Moot Court Information-
al Meeting, 6 p.m., room 345
8 Second Career Students Meet-
ing, noon, room 285A
Environmental Law Informa-
tional Meeting, noon, room
355D
St. Thomas More Society Meet-
ing, noon, room 284
Prof. Siebecker on Socially
Responsible Investing, noon,
faculty dining room
Jessup Moot Court Informa-
tional Meeting, 4 p.m. faculty
dining room
Robert Kennedy, Jr. Speech,
8 p.m., Phillips Center
Alzheimers Fundraiser, 10 p.m.,
Rehab, 8 S. Main St.
9 Breakfast with the Dean,
8 a.m., faculty dining room


SCHOLARSHIP
& ACTIVITIES


In the News
Robert H. Jerry, II
Dean; Levin Mabie and Levin
Professor
* Gainesville Sun, Feb. 25. Quoted
in an article about the $5.2 million
advocacy center the law school
will build with funding from
alumni Fred Levin and Robert
Montgomery, as well as the firm
Kerrigan, Estess, Rankin, McLeod
& Thompson. Dean Jerry was also
quoted in a story on the gift in the
Pensacola News-Journal Feb. 23, and
spoke about the gift on WUFT and
WCJB Feb. 21.
Joseph W. Little
Professor; Alumni Research
Scholar
* Daytona Beach News-Journal
March 1. Cited in an article about
the delay of a case between the
city of Flagler Beach and an adult
entertainment club.
Patrick Shannon
Associate Dean for Administrative
Affairs
* Sarasota Herald-Tribune, Feb. 25.
Quoted in an article on teachers
who receive their salary after being
suspended for alleged misconduct.


Mary LaHart on Animal Rights,
11 a.m., room 284
CLAJail Tour, 3:30 p.m., Ala-
chua County Jail
Public Interest Environmental
Conference Welcome Reception
with Richard Louv, 6:30 p.m.,
Emerson Alumni Hall
10 Public Interest Environmental
Conference (PIEC), 8:30 a.m.-5
p.m., Reitz Union
PIEC Banquet, 7 p.m., Savannah
Grande
11 Public Interest Environmental
Conference, 9 a.m.-3:30 p.m.,
Reitz Union

More information on upcoming
meetings and events is avail-
able through the Levin College
of Law's online calendars at:
www.law.ufl.edu/calendars/.


8 FLA LAW


CALENDAR