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UF UFLAW



Fla law newsletter of the University of Florida College of Law
ALL VOLUMES CITATION SEARCH THUMBNAILS PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00072281/00164
 Material Information
Title: Fla law newsletter of the University of Florida College of Law
Portion of title: Flalaw
Physical Description: Serial
Creator: Levin College of Law
Publisher: s.n.
Place of Publication: <Gainesville FL> College of Law Communications Office 1997-
Creation Date: February 27, 2006
Frequency: weekly
completely irregular
 Subjects
Genre: periodical   ( marcgt )
serial   ( sobekcm )
 Notes
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol.1, no. 1 (Oct. 6, 1997)-
General Note: Weekly during the school year with a biweekly insert, numbered separately called: The Docket.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved, Board of Trustees of the University of Florida
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System ID: UF00072281:00164

Table of Contents
    'African inequality' is focus of conference
        Page 1
    Career Services
        Page 2
        Page 3
        Page 4
    People, scholarship and activities
        Page 5
    Events and opportunities
        Page 6
        Page 7
    Job search expert: Employers use Google, too
        Page 8
    Calendar
        Page 8
Full Text













I I
UN VE SI Y F LO ID


'African Inequality' is Focus of Conference


Law professors, writers,
political scientists and other
scholars will discuss the
"politics of inequality" in South
Africa in an international
conference at the University of
Florida March 5-7.
The 2006 Gwendolen Carter
Conference, held in honor of
a former UF professor who is
recognized as a founding figure
in African studies in the United
States, will include a day of pan-
el discussions in the Chesterfield
Smith Ceremonial Classroom,
beginning at 9 a.m. March 7.
Topics to be covered include:
* The Media and Democratic
Transition in South Africa
* Framing AIDS and Human
Rights in Post-Apartheid
South Africa


* South African
Land Reform
and the Global
Development
Industry


Carter


* Racial Repara-
tions: The New Pan-African-
ism?
* Truth and Reconciliation in
Post-Apartheid South Africa:
A Pan-Africanist Perspective



INSIDE THIS ISSUE


Career Services
Events & Opportunities
Calendar


Law professors, political scientists, writers and other scholars from around
the world will meet at the University of Florida March 5-7 for a conference on
the politics of inequality in South Africa. The event co-organized by Professor
Winston Nagan will include panel discussions at the Levin College of Law.


Among the speakers sched-
uled to appear at the law school
are UF Law Professor Kenneth
Nunn; Temple University Law
Professor Henry Richardson,
New York University Law
Professor Stephen J. Ellman,
University of Stellenbosch Law
Professor Lourens du Plessis
and University of Cape Town
Law Professor Francois du Bois.
The conference honors the
100th anniversary of the birth
of the late Gwendolen Carter,
whose 1958 book, The Politics
of Inequality: South Africa Since


1948, established her as an au-
thority on 20th century African
politics. The book changed
the way many scholars looked
at African politics by bring-
ing issues of human rights and
equality to the forefront.
"She was a household name
among South African intellec-
tuals and political
exiles," said Samuel
T. Dell Research
Scholar Winston


Nagan


Nagan, a co-orga-
nizer of the confer
ence and personal


Continued on page 4


'Offensive
Personality'
in Spotlight


VOL. 9, NO. 23 FEBRUARY 27, 2006



Moot Court Final
Four March 3

UF's Justice Campbell Thornal Moot
Court Team has selected competi-
tors for its Final Four competition.

Final Four advocates are Nava Ben-
Avraham, Gretchen Lehman, Scott
Bowman and Michael Hargett. Erin
McFann will serve as alternate.

The Final Four competition will be
held at 11:30 a.m. Friday, March 3,
in the Chesterfield Smith Ceremo-
nial Classroom. It will be simulcast
in room 285C. If you would like to
attend, but have class until 11:50
a.m., please enter the classroom
quietly or attend the simulcast.

SG Election
This Week
Elections for UF's Student
Government will be held Tuesday,
Feb. 28, and Wednesday, March
1, from 8 a.m. to 8 p.m.
A law student, Jared Hernandez,
is among the candidates for SG
president. If elected, Hernandez
would become the first law
student to hold the position in
five years, and the first Hispanic
SG president in the university's
history.
Polling will take place at several
locations on the UF campus, in-
cluding the law school cafeteria.


n Job
Search
Tips











CAREERSERVICES
Hints to help you in the legal profession


Tax Scholar to
Speak in
Dunwody Lecture

UF alumnus George Yin, a
professor at the University of
Virginia School of Law and chief
of staff for the U.S. Congress's
Joint Committee on Taxation,
will deliver this year's Dunwody
Lecture at March 24 at 11 a.m.
in the Chesterfield Smith Cer-
emonial Classroom. Yin's topic
is "Is the Tax System Beyond
Reform?"




Fall Externships
Still Available
Looking for a Fall 2006 extern-
ship? It's not too late. There
are still several fall only extern-
ship openings available with
various organizations, including:
* The Family Law Advisory
Group
* The Guardian ad Litem
Program (Bronson)
* Child Welfare Legal Services
(Trenton)
* 5th Circuit Judge Raymond
T. McNeal family law
(Ocala)
* Three Rivers Legal Services
Domestic Violence
* 8th Judicial Circuit State
Attorney (Gainesville) Do-
mestic Violence
* Jacksonville Area Legal Aid
(Jacksonville) Consumer
Protection

Full details on these opportuni-
ties are available online at:
www.law.ufl .edu/career/ex-
ternships/. The application
deadline is March 7.


2 FLA LAW


Public Interest Careers
Discover what motivates
attorneys who practice public in-
terest law, and how their actions
positively affect the traditionally
disenfranchised members of our
society, in a meeting Tuesday,
Feb. 28, at noon in the faculty
dining room.
Panelists will also discuss the
real-world aspects of practicing
public interest law. This event is
co-sponsored by the Association
for Public Interest Law.

The Call-Back
Interview
Jamie Bilotte Moses, partner
with Fisher, Rushmer, Werren-
rath, Dickson, Talley & Dunlap,
PA. of Orlando, and current
president of the Florida Bar
Board of Governors Young Law-
yers Division, will present tips
on how to conduct a successful
call-back interview Wednesday,
March 1, at noon in the faculty
dining room.

Summer Internship
with Universal
Universal Studios Orlando is
seeking a summer legal intern.
Applicants must be available
from the end of May to the end
of August. Pay is $10 per hour
and resumes are due May 1,
though applicants are encour-
aged to apply early.
Send a resume and cover let-
ter to creative-talent@univer-
salorlando.com. Knowledge of
contracts is preferred. Addi-
tional information is available
in Symplicity.


OCI Update
Phase II OCI Interviews begin Tuesday, Feb. 28. Phase I
On-Campus Interviews were a great success, with more than
15 employers visiting campus to interview for summer and
permanent positions. Remember to check Symplicity to verify
your interview room and time and to learn the identity of your
interviewers, so you can research them prior to your meeting. All
interviews will be conducted on the second floor of the Lawton
Chiles Legal Information Center unless otherwise indicated in
Symplicity.
The day of your interview, be sure to arrive at your interview
room a few minutes early. Knock on the door at your designated
time and wait for the employer to come out and get you. The
knock will signify to the employer that it is time to wrap up the
current interview.


From Graduates
to Leaders
The National Italian American
Foundation's Graduates to Lead-
ers Law Workshop will be held
in Washington, D.C. May 21-
23. The group will host Italian
American 1Ls and 2Ls for a two-
day, all-expenses paid workshop
providing in-depth lectures and
discussions with Italian American
leaders in the legal field on topics
such as public interest and advo-
cacy law, statutory and admin-
istrative law, criminal law and


business law. Institutional visits
will involve the U.S. Supreme
Court, Congress, Department of
Justice and some of the top firms
in D.C. Additional information
and applications are available
online at www.niaf.org/G2L, and
the application deadline is Friday,
March 17, at 5 p.m. While this
opportunity covers transporta-
tion to and from D.C., meals
and lodging, a $200 deposit is
required, of which $150 is fully
refundable to students complet-
ing the program.















Take Credit for Your
Volunteer Hours
Start turning in your pro
bono/community service hours
now. This year's pro bono awards
celebration will be held in early
April. You must have completed
a minimum of 35 hours to be eli-
gible to attend. Read future issues
of FlaLaw for more information.
Questions about volunteering?
See the Career Services website at
www.law.ufl.edu/career/probono/
or come to the office.


One Quick Question
Let the experts from Career
Services answer your questions
on career issues at the One
Quick Question table Thursday,
March 2, 9:45-11:15 a.m. on the
concourse.

Sign Up for Job Fairs
There have been two early job
fair deadlines advertised both
on the Career Services Hotline
Listserve, and in FlaLaw. There
will be a job fair informational
program held in late March/
early April to inform students


of the fairs and their sum-
mer deadlines. Be sure you are
signed up on the Career Services
Hotline Listserve to stay current
on all Career Services events. To
sign up, send a blank e-mail to
career-hotline-subscribe@law.
ufl.edu.


Alternative Career: Legal Publishing


Are you thinking about alternatives to the
traditional practice of law? Many JDs have
found career satisfaction in the world of legal
publishing.
A law degree is invaluable in this field. Under-
standing legal issues
and being able to in-
terpret legal language
are essential skills in
legal publishing, as
are strong writing and
editing skills.
Large legal pub-
lishing companies
like LexisNexis and
Thompson West offer
a wide variety of posi-
tions for individuals
with law degrees. West, for example, offers op-
portunities for attorneys to write case analysis,
to plan and market legal information products,
and to work with outside authors to bring their
publications to the market. LexisNexis also of-
fers a number of different positions for attor-
neys, including various consulting, editing, and


customer service positions.
Job openings are listed on the respective pub-
lishers' web sites. Additionally, LRP Publishing
(formerly Labor Relations Press) has a Florida
office in Palm Beach Gardens that has hired sev-
eral UF law alums.
One current Florida
opening is for a
Research Associate
for Jury Verdict Re-
S( search, the nation's
largest database of
personal injury and
employment practice
ing liability cases. Other
opportunities are
also available with
publishers such as
BNA (Bureau of National Affairs) and CCH,
Inc. An excellent resource for anyone consider-
ing a career in legal publishing is the Law and
Legal Information Directory, which lists legal
and law-related publishers and is available in the
Legal Information Center.


Kennedy to Speak
at Environmental
Conference

Robert F. Kennedy, Jr. and
former EPA administrator Carol
Browner (JD 79) are among
the well-known guests who
will be on hand for the 2006
Public Interest Environmental
Conference March 9-11.

Timely environmental topics
- global warming, children
and the environment, beach
re-nourishment, and rhetoric
and the environment will
be debated by environmental
heavy hitters, including
Georgetown Law Professor
Edith Brown Weiss, University
of Maryland Professor Rena
Steinzor, University of Houston
Professor Marcilynn Burke and
University of Virginia Professor
Jonathan Cannon.
The conference is organized
by the Environmental and Land
Use Law Society, which is
joining forces this year with
the National Association of En-
vironmental Law Societies and
the UF Center for Children's
Literature and Culture to cre-
ate a more diverse schedule of
panelists and speakers.
All conference events with
the exception of the PIEC
Banquet March 10 are free
for UF law students, faculty
and staff with registration.
Registration for the banquet
is $35. The registration
deadline is March 1.
For details, contact Barbara
Serokee at 352-273-0856 or
bserokee@ufl.edu.


FLA LAW 3










'Offensive Personality' on the Rise, Professor Says


Learn About
Environmental
Law
If you have an interest in en-
vironmental or land use law, a
wealth of opportunities is avail-
able to you at the Levin College
of Law. During your law school
career you can:
* Obtain a certificate in Envi-
ronmental and Land Use Law
* Take a wide array of land
use law courses, even if you
don't pursue a certificate
* Learn about job opportunities
by signing up through the
ELUL e-mail list (elulp@law.
ufl.edu)
* Spend a summer studying
environmental law in Costa
Rica
* Participate in UF's Conserva-
tion Clinic
* Represent UF at Environmen-
tal Moot Court competitions
* Help organize a major stu-
dent-led conference
* Pursue a joint degree in a
related field
* Enroll in summer externships
with conservation groups
and agencies in Florida,
Atlanta, Washington D.C.
and elsewhere.
* Participate in a Capstone
Colloquium with UF law pro-
fessors and environmental
law experts from around the
country.
Find out more by attending an
informational meeting March
8 at noon in room 355D. The
deadline for enrolling in the cer-
tificate program this semester
is March 20. Applications can
be downloaded from our web-
site www.law.ufl.edu/elulp.
For more information contact
Professor Alyson Flournoy at
flournoy@law.ufl.edu.


4 FLA LAW


By ASHLEY PINDER
Society has changed dramati-
cally in the more than 125 years
since the "offensive personality"
clause became part of the Bar oath,
Professor Amy Mashburn says.
"The law profession has radically
altered its collective gender, race
and ethnicity," said Mashburn.
"Modern life has gotten more
offensive, and society at large has
changed."
Mashburn was keynote speaker
at this year's Professionalism
Symposium, which drew more
than 180 people to the Chesterfield
Smith Ceremonial Classroom Feb.
17.
Held every year by the law
school and the Eighth Circuit Bar
Association, the symposium is an
annual gathering that allows stu-
dents, faculty and law practitioners
to discuss professionalism, ethics
and civility in the legal field.
For decades, the Florida Bar
and other bar associations have
enforced civility through a clause
in the Bar oath prohibiting lawyers
from exhibiting "offensive personal-
ity." The phrase refers to a broad
array of courtroom misbehaviors


Continued from page 1


friend of Carter.
"She could show up just about
any presidential palace in Africa
and find the doors opened to
her," Nagan said.
Among other accomplish-
ments, Carter was able to save
the historical archives of the Af-
rican National Congress during
a period when the South African
government was seizing and
destroying such records.
The conference is free and
open to the public, and is orga-
nized by the Center for African
Studies and co-sponsored by
the Levin College of Law, UF's


including eye-rolling, the use of
improper arguments, talking after
a ruling, ex parte communication
with judges or the use of offensive
language in appellate briefs.
Although it has recently gotten
worse, Mashburn said, offensive
personality has been an issue for
lawyers every since the wording was
included in the oath.
"I've seen some of these things
in my job," said Jennifer Coleman,
a public defender in Gainesville.
"I was surprised to see how some
attorneys acted when I first entered
the law practice."
Unfortunately, according to
Mashburn, talking about "offensive
behavior" among fellow lawyers
also can be considered offensive,
complicating attempts to correct
the problem.
"There is a rich array of tools if
we want to get serious with this,"
she said. "Right now we are being
passive. The profession has turned
away from prosecuting offensive
behavior-but the tools are there."
Tools include professionalism
norms, civility codes, rules of pro-
cedure, local rules of court, statu-
tory provisions and rules regulating



Center for International Studies,
College of Liberal Arts and Sci-
ences, Office of the Provost and
Office of the Vice President for
Research.
While this year's conference
will begin at UF, it will conclude
with a series of events at the
University of Cape Town, South
Africa, to be held later this year.
"This year's conference offers
a retrospective on Gwendolen
Carter's work, with a continuing
examination of her influence on
African Studies," said Leonardo
Villalon, director of the Center
for African Studies. "Because


Professor Amy Mashburn discusses
the 'offensive personality' clause in
the Florida Bar oath at the Profes-
sionalism Symposium Feb. 17.

the Bar, said Mashburn.
Mashburn suggested lawyers
think more about the consequences
of their actions. She also advised
young lawyers not to say everything
they are thinking.
Students said Mashburn's speech
was eye-opening.
"It is interesting to see the
disparity (between) what you get in
the classrooms (and) what actually
goes on in reality," said Cheryl
Fields, 1L.


much of this work is focused on
the law and politics of South Af-
rica, it's fitting that we are hold-
ing panel discussions at the law
school and cooperating with
the University of Cape Town to
hold events in South Africa."
To learn more about the
conference, contact the Center
for African Studies at (352) 392-
2183, go online to web.africa.ufl.
edu/Carter2006.html, or contact
conference co-organizers hdavis@
cns.ufl.edu or nagan@law.ufl.
edu.












PEOPLE


Scholarship & Activities
Cally Jordan
Associate Professor
SPresented "Internal Watchdogs: the
Controversy over Audit Commit-
tees and their Alternatives," Feb.
22 at the Financial Management
Sector Board of the World Bank
in Washington, D.C. She spoke
with Professors Marco Ventoruzzo
and Federico Ghezzi from Bocconi
University in Milan.

In the News
Mark Fenster
Associate Professor
I Voice, Feb. 21. Quoted in
an article about why people believe
that the government is involved in
conspiracies.


Inspired by the O.J. Simpson case, Professor
Katheryn Russell-Brown's new book, Protecting
Our Own, explores the reasons behind the rise
of the "black protectionism" phenomenon and
its implications for the future.
Comparing the plight of the African Ameri-
can community to the melancholy lyrics but
vibrant beat of the blues, Russell-Brown uses
the lyrics of these songs to paint a vivid picture
of the African American community struggling
through the burdens of racial oppression such
as second tier status and lynchings solely due to
the color of their skins. Russell Brown explains
the feelings of protectionism towards African
American celebrities, as many African Ameri-
cans feel that they have to "protect their own


SCHOLARSHIP
& ACTIVITIES


Robert Jerry
Dean; Levin, Mabie and Levin
Professor
* Orlando Sentinel, Feb. 21. Quoted
in a story on black enrollment at
Florida's public law schools.
Jon Mills
Professor; Director of Center for
Governmental Responsibility;
Dean Emeritus
* Miami Herald, Feb. 16. Mentioned
in an article involving public au-
topsy records and the death of Dale
Earnhardt.
James Nicholas
Affiliate Professor of Law; Associ-
ate Director, Environmental and
Land Use Law Program; Professor
of Urban and Regional Planning
* Sarasota Herald-Tribune, Feb. 20.


Mentioned in an article report-
ing the lowering of an impact fee
proposal in Charlotte County. He
released recommendations on the
fees, which are one-time taxes as-
sessed on new construction to help
pay for population growth.
Adam Spunberg
Law Student
* Independent Florida A...,:',. Feb.
17. Profiled in a story as founder of
the Amelie Poulain Society, a group
that anonymously does good deeds
around campus.
Michael Allan Wolf
Richard E. Nelson Chair in Local
Government Law; Professor
* "All Things Considered," National
Public Radio, Feb. 21. In a humor-
ous commentary for the radio
program, Wolf alleged, with
tongue firmly planted in his
clI..l. rlhat his fondness for
N ol'_ kR has subjected him
r.. ... d i.le by elitists in the
D, I. .',,
.on Hera/, Feb. 21.
Q.*r. 1r.d in an article on
S ..t ,,r by the Florida Leg-
islature to review the state's
eminent domain laws.


because no one else will.
Many African Americans,
Russell Brown argues, feel
that African Americans are
still under siege and that the
few lucky African Americans
who find a way into the spot-


U "
OU OW


light deserve a break. How-
ever, with more and more
African Americans in the
spotlight, this practice has new consequences.
The book, which includes a foreword by Der-
rick Bell, visiting professor at New York Univer-
sity School of Law, is scheduled for release Feb.
28 by Rowman Littlefield.


Conference Covers
Child Abuse,
Public Policy
The Center on Children and
Families is teaming up with UF's
Askew Institute on Politics and
Society to host a statewide
conference on collaboration
between public and private
sectors to respond to child abuse
and neglect. To be held March
30 at the UF Hilton Confer-
ence Center, the conference is
expected to draw legal and policy
leaders and citizens from around
the state. Law alumni interested
in child welfare are encouraged
to register. Following the Askew
conference, the Center on
Children and Families will host a
workshop for child law centers
from around the nation. For more
details, check http://www.clas.
ufl.edu/askew/calendar.htm.










The Docket
Stands Alone
At the request of the John
Marshall Bar Association, The
Docket JMBA's regular
newsletter, is now publishing
on its own schedule.
For many years, The Docket
- written and edited by law
students was distributed
as an insert in Falaw, which
is the law school's official
newsletter.
In coming weeks, you'll find
The Docket appearing in stands
near the UF law clinics, distrib-
uted separately from Falaw.


FLA LAW 5


Book Explores Role of Race, Fame in Scandals


I











EVENT


S & OPPORTUNITIES


Apply Now for
Study Abroad
The Levin College of Law
offers its students an exciting
array of opportunities to study
law abroad over the summer.
Summer abroad programs at
Montpellier University (France),
the University of Cape Town
(South Africa) and the Univer-
sity of Costa Rica give students
a chance to earn course credit
while experiencing another
culture. The deadline to apply
for these programs is March
24. For more information, go
to www.law.ufl.edu/students/
abroad/.

















Time to Renew
Financial Aid
If you have not already done so,
now is the time to apply for aid
for the 2006-07 academic year.
You can apply electronically us-
ing FAFSA/Renewal FAFSA on
the Web, which can save you
processing time, and includes a
built-in editing format to reduce
errors. Go to http://www.
FAFSA.ed.gov and follow the
instructions on the site. You
will need to use your Federal
Access Code (PIN) to complete
the renewal electronically.


6 FLA LAW


Meetings
* Toastmasters meets at 5 p.m.
today, Feb. 27, in room 285A.
The Labor and Employment
Law Society meets at 6 p.m.
today, Feb. 27, in room 285A.
The John Marshall Bar As-
sociation will meet today, Feb.
27, at 7 p.m. in room 285C.
All members of the group are
welcome.
The International Law Soci-
ety will hold an International
Breakfast at 9 a.m. Thursday,
March 2, in the faculty dining
room. Professor Christopher
Slobogin will speak on com-
parative criminal procedure.
Free breakfast provided by
Westlaw.

Apply Now for Peru
Conference
Students have until 5 p.m.
March 1 to apply for a competi-
tive scholarship that will allow
one student to travel to Lima,
Peru for UF's Legal and Policy
Issues in the Americas Confer-
ence, held May 25-26.
Held every year at UF or
in a Latin American capital,
the conference brings together
policy makers, scholars and law
enforcement officials from across
the Western Hemisphere to dis-
cuss policy issues related to the
rule of law and justice reform
in the Americas. Panels at this
year's conference will discuss
justice reform in Peru, citizen
security and human rights, eco-
nomic integration and a number
of other topics.
To apply, submit a two-page
statement of purpose describ-
ing how participation in the
conference would benefit your


Talent on Display at Music Night 2006
More than a dozen performers showed their musical
skill at Music Night 2006, held Feb. 19 at Dean Robert
Jerry's new house in northwest Gainesville. Perfor-
mances included an original Jazz piano composition
by Professor Juan Perea, country songs performed by
Technology Services Associate Director Andy Adkins
(above), violin solos and even a dance performance by


law student Tara Trevorrow (right).


program of study and intended
career, as well as a five-page
research paper addressing one of
listed conference panel topics.
Application materials should be
submitted to the Law & Policy
in the Americas Program, 230
Bruton-Geer Hall. For further
information, go to law.ufl.
edu/cgr/conference or contact
Meredith Fensom at 273-0835
or fensom@law.ufl.edu.
For non-scholarship partici-
pants, the conference registra-
tion deadline is March 15.

City Commissioner to
Address Republicans
Gainesville City Commissioner
Tony Domenech will speak to the
Law School Republicans at noon
Tuesday, Feb. 28, in room 283.


Help Restore
Voting Rights
The Florida Bar Foundation
Public Interest Law Fellows invite
all law students concerned about
the voting rights of ex-felons
to attend restoration-of-rights
training Thursday, March 2, at 5
p.m. in room 360. Law students
will learn how they can help
people regain their right to vote
by obtaining clemency for former
convictions.
Students will learn how to
walk people through the clem-
ency process and put together a
portfolio to support clemency
petitions. Refreshments will be
served. The Restoration of Rights
Project is a coalition of various
community groups and the Mar-
tin Luther King Commission.















Tour Prison with CLA
The Criminal Law Association
is organizing a prison tour and
a jail tour. The tour of Florida
State Prison (near Starke) will be
Thursday, March 2, at 1:15 p.m.
The tour of the Alachua County
jail will be Thursday, March 9,
at 3:30 p.m. Space is limited, so
please sign up now through the
CLA's TWEN site on Westlaw.
The tours are free and open to
all UF law students, faculty and
staff. E-mail CLA Vice President
Christina Anton at chick4uf@ufl.
edu for more information.

Learn About
Business Law
If you're interested in business
law, attend the Association for
Business Law's curriculum review
at noon Wednesday, March 1, in
room 285C. Law professors will
provide overviews of the business
classes they teach.

Second-Career
Students Form Group
A group of students who came
to law school after careers in
other fields are now forming the
Second Career Legal Students
Association. E-mail sorreso@ufl.
edu for more information.

Help Consumers in
Jacksonville
The Levin College of Law is
offering two new consumer law
externship positions with Jackson-
ville Area Legal Aid. Consumer
law externs have the opportu-
nity to work with experienced
consumer protection lawyers on
a wide range of consumer issues,
including car repossessions, home
mortgage foreclosures, creditor ha-
rassment and predatory lending.


Students conduct research and
writing, including preparation
of interrogatories and pleadings,
and may appear in depositions
and court proceedings. Lynn
Drysdale, a nationally recognized
consumer protection lawyer and
winner of the National Consumer
Law Center's Vern Countryman
Award, is the field supervisor for
the externship.
Students who wish to stay
closer to campus may apply for
two consumer law externships in
Gainesville through Three Rivers
Legal Services.
These externship positions have
already been filled for the summer,
but fall positions are still available.
For more information, contact
Assistant Professor Christopher
Peterson at petersonc@law.ufl.edu
or submit your application packet
to the Center for Career Services
by March 7.


'Farmer Brown' to
Discuss Animal Rights
Harold Brown, a former beef
farmer who became a vegan and
animal rights activist, will speak to
law students at 1 p.m. Thursday,
March 2, in room 284. Brown
will discuss factory farming and
its effect on the environment, free
range and organic farming, and
our moral responsibilities toward
animals. To learn more, go to
www.askfarmerbrown.org.


Three Branches of
Government to Meet
in Symposium
Students can see members of
the three branches of Florida's
government as they discuss the
role of each branch at the annual
Governmental Affairs Symposium
of the Florida Bar's Young Lawyers
Division 2-4 p.m. March 24 in the
Chesterfield Smith Ceremonial
Classroom. Florida Supreme Court
Chief Justice Barbara Pariente,
State Representative Jeffrey Kott-
kamp, and Raquel A. Rodriguez,
General Counsel to Governor Jeb
Bush, will serve as panelists. Florida
Bar President Alan Bookman will
deliver introductory remarks. The
public is invited to attend. For
more information, contact Carlos
Kelly of the YLD at (239) 344-
1326.

Uruguayan Professor
to Speak
Uruguayan attorney and law
professor Lilia Ferro will speak on
"Human Rights in the Southern
Cone Post-Authoritarian Re-
gimes" March 7 at 2 p.m. in the
faculty dining room. This event is
co-sponsored by the Internation-
al Law Society and the Law and
Policy in the Americas Program.

LawLawPalooza is
Coming
Are you in a band? Would you
like to play a set in front of law
school fans and help raise mon-
ey for a good cause? The Associa-
tion for Public Interest Law will
hold LawLawPalooza, its annual
fundraiser for summer scholar-
ships, March 20 at the Shamrock.
Sign up now by contacting Julia
Kim at jujubean@ufl.edu.


LIC News
Now there's a faster way to
access Lexis.com. LexisNexis
offers a new toolbar that can
be downloaded at http://www.
lexisnexis.com/toolbar. Besides
being a gateway to Lexis.com,
this handy tool also allows
users to search LexisNexis from
any site, or search the Web
using Google or MSN.
Wednesday Workshops
Have Begun
Workshops on research and
writing are held every Wednes-
day at 2 p.m. and 3 p.m. in
the Legal Information Center.
Please take the opportunity to
visit the Reference Desk to sign
up or offer your input into what
types of research instruction
you would like the library to
provide. Class dates and topics
include:
March 1
Research Wizard: Library Cata-
log, Databases & e-Journals
March 8
Research Wizard: The Digest
System
March 22
Research Wizard: Legal Ency-
clopedias & ALR
March 29
Blue Book Workshop
April 5
Legislative History


FLA LAW 7








Send Us Your News
Flalaw is published each week
school is in session by the Levin
College of Law Communications
Office. Submit news of interest
to the law school community by
10 a.m. Tuesday for the follow-
ing Monday's issue to lockette@
law.ufl.edu or 273-0650.
Contact amirin@law.ufl.edu
to be e-mailed a weekly early
release pdf of Flalaw.

* Tim Lockette, Editor
* Kristen Hines, Photographer



College of Law
Administration
* Robert H. Jerry, II, Dean
* George L. Dawson,
Associate Dean for
Academic Affairs
* J. Patrick Shannon,
Associate Dean for
Administrative Affairs
* Lyrissa Barnett Lidsky,
Associate Dean for
Faculty Development
* Michael K. Friel,
Associate Dean & Director,
Graduate Tax Program
* Stuart R. Cohn,
Associate Dean for
International Studies
* M. Kathleen "Kathie" Price,
Associate Dean for Library
and Technology
* Gail E. Sasnett,
Associate Dean for
Students, Professionalism
and Community Relations
* J. Michael Patrick,
Assistant Dean for Admissions
* Linda Calvert Hanson,
Assistant Dean for
Career Services
* Adrian Jones,
Assistant Dean for Diversity
and Community Relations
* Jennifer Cope, Interim
Assistant Dean for Students
* Debra D. Amirin,
Director of Communications
* Donald J. Hale,
Senior Director of Development
and Alumni Affairs

UNIVERSITY OF
FLORIDA


Job Search Expert: Employers Use Google, Too


By LINDSAY DYKSTRA
Before you interview for
a job, take time to do a web
search on yourself and ask
Google to take down any sites
that could embarrass you.
So says Kimm Walton,
author of a popular series of
books on finding
legal jobs. Walton,
also known as the
"Job Goddess"
through her col-
umn of the same Walton
name in National
Law Journal, spoke to UF law
students Feb. 15.
The following are a few of the
pointers Walton provided.

Job Search
* Yes, you can also request
that Google remove online
information in order to avoid
unfavorable impressions
from personal Web pages or
blogging. And you should do
so. Remember that, just as
you are Googling potential
employers, they are googling
you.
Resume
* Don't omit volunteer experi-


ence from your resume,
which is crucial for private
law firms in garnering clients.
* Don't leave out something
interesting about yourself;
even something that may
border on controversial could
intrigue employers.
* Include your resume in the
body of the e-mail, first
sending it to yourself to avoid
formatting mishaps.
Research
* Even if you're first in your
class, with a resume of solid
gold, you cannot afford to
overlook the importance of
doing basic research on the
firm and person conducting
the interview.
* Show that you care enough
about the job by preparing
ahead of time. Spend 15 min-
utes doing what 85 percent of
students fail to do: discover-
ing what is important to the
company.
Network
* Keep your eyes open for
anything related to your field,
and offer to volunteer at such


events. Activities you enjoy
are likely to draw people you
would like to work for, or
who are willing to give advice
or help in your search, if
asked.
Interview
* An interview is not a confes-
sional. Practice image and
message control. Position
yourself strategically by show-
ing enthusiasm, focusing on
the positive and rehearsing
answers to common interview
questions.
Landing the Job
* Don't put too much empha-
sis on the first job on your
wish list. Know that there are
hundreds of places where you
would be happy working, not
one. A job offer is often based
on what meager informa-
tion the employer has in the
interview.
If you are interested in
further advice, contact Walton
at jobgoddess@aol.com or
pick up a book coupon in the
Center for Career Services or
schedule an appointment with
a Career Services counselor.


K'ICALENDAR


February
27 Toastmasters, 5 p.m., room
285A
Labor and Employment Law
Society, 6 p.m., room 285A
JMBA, 7 p.m., room 285C
28 SG Elections, 8 a.m.- 8 p.m.,
cafeteria
Law School Republicans,
noon, room 283
Careers in Public Interest Law,
noon, faculty dining room
March
1 SG Elections, 8 a.m.-8 p.m.,
cafeteria


The Call-Back Interview, noon
faculty dining room
Business Law Curriculum
Review, noon, room 285C
Research Wizard: Library Cata-
log, Databases and e-Journals,
2 p.m. & 3 p.m., Legal Informa-
tion Center
2 International Breakfast w/Prof.
Slobogin, 9 a.m., faculty dining
room
Harold Brown on Animal
Rights, 1 p.m., room 284
CLA Prison Tour, 1:15 p.m.,
Florida State Prison


APIL Restoration of Rights
Training, 5 p.m., room 360
3 Moot Court Final Four Compe-
tition, 11:30 a.m., room 180
5 Carter Conference and Recep-
tion, 7 p.m. UF Libraries Special
Collections

Online Calendar
More information on upcoming
meetings and events is avail-
able through the Levin College
of Law's online calendars at:
www.law.ufl.edu/calendars/.


8 FLA LAW








Send Us Your News
Flalaw is published each week
school is in session by the Levin
College of Law Communications
Office. Submit news of interest
to the law school community by
10 a.m. Tuesday for the follow-
ing Monday's issue to lockette@
law.ufl.edu or 273-0650.
Contact amirin@law.ufl.edu
to be e-mailed a weekly early
release pdf of Flalaw.

* Tim Lockette, Editor
* Kristen Hines, Photographer



College of Law
Administration
* Robert H. Jerry, II, Dean
* George L. Dawson,
Associate Dean for
Academic Affairs
* J. Patrick Shannon,
Associate Dean for
Administrative Affairs
* Lyrissa Barnett Lidsky,
Associate Dean for
Faculty Development
* Michael K. Friel,
Associate Dean & Director,
Graduate Tax Program
* Stuart R. Cohn,
Associate Dean for
International Studies
* M. Kathleen "Kathie" Price,
Associate Dean for Library
and Technology
* Gail E. Sasnett,
Associate Dean for
Students, Professionalism
and Community Relations
* J. Michael Patrick,
Assistant Dean for Admissions
* Linda Calvert Hanson,
Assistant Dean for
Career Services
* Adrian Jones,
Assistant Dean for Diversity
and Community Relations
* Jennifer Cope, Interim
Assistant Dean for Students
* Debra D. Amirin,
Director of Communications
* Donald J. Hale,
Senior Director of Development
and Alumni Affairs

UNIVERSITY OF
FLORIDA


Job Search Expert: Employers Use Google, Too


By LINDSAY DYKSTRA
Before you interview for
a job, take time to do a web
search on yourself and ask
Google to take down any sites
that could embarrass you.
So says Kimm Walton,
author of a popular series of
books on finding
legal jobs. Walton,
also known as the
"Job Goddess"
through her col-
umn of the same Walton
name in National
Law Journal, spoke to UF law
students Feb. 15.
The following are a few of the
pointers Walton provided.

Job Search
* Yes, you can also request
that Google remove online
information in order to avoid
unfavorable impressions
from personal Web pages or
blogging. And you should do
so. Remember that, just as
you are Googling potential
employers, they are googling
you.
Resume
* Don't omit volunteer experi-


ence from your resume,
which is crucial for private
law firms in garnering clients.
* Don't leave out something
interesting about yourself;
even something that may
border on controversial could
intrigue employers.
* Include your resume in the
body of the e-mail, first
sending it to yourself to avoid
formatting mishaps.
Research
* Even if you're first in your
class, with a resume of solid
gold, you cannot afford to
overlook the importance of
doing basic research on the
firm and person conducting
the interview.
* Show that you care enough
about the job by preparing
ahead of time. Spend 15 min-
utes doing what 85 percent of
students fail to do: discover-
ing what is important to the
company.
Network
* Keep your eyes open for
anything related to your field,
and offer to volunteer at such


events. Activities you enjoy
are likely to draw people you
would like to work for, or
who are willing to give advice
or help in your search, if
asked.
Interview
* An interview is not a confes-
sional. Practice image and
message control. Position
yourself strategically by show-
ing enthusiasm, focusing on
the positive and rehearsing
answers to common interview
questions.
Landing the Job
* Don't put too much empha-
sis on the first job on your
wish list. Know that there are
hundreds of places where you
would be happy working, not
one. A job offer is often based
on what meager informa-
tion the employer has in the
interview.
If you are interested in
further advice, contact Walton
at jobgoddess@aol.com or
pick up a book coupon in the
Center for Career Services or
schedule an appointment with
a Career Services counselor.


K'ICALENDAR


February
27 Toastmasters, 5 p.m., room
285A
Labor and Employment Law
Society, 6 p.m., room 285A
JMBA, 7 p.m., room 285C
28 SG Elections, 8 a.m.- 8 p.m.,
cafeteria
Law School Republicans,
noon, room 283
Careers in Public Interest Law,
noon, faculty dining room
March
1 SG Elections, 8 a.m.-8 p.m.,
cafeteria


The Call-Back Interview, noon
faculty dining room
Business Law Curriculum
Review, noon, room 285C
Research Wizard: Library Cata-
log, Databases and e-Journals,
2 p.m. & 3 p.m., Legal Informa-
tion Center
2 International Breakfast w/Prof.
Slobogin, 9 a.m., faculty dining
room
Harold Brown on Animal
Rights, 1 p.m., room 284
CLA Prison Tour, 1:15 p.m.,
Florida State Prison


APIL Restoration of Rights
Training, 5 p.m., room 360
3 Moot Court Final Four Compe-
tition, 11:30 a.m., room 180
5 Carter Conference and Recep-
tion, 7 p.m. UF Libraries Special
Collections

Online Calendar
More information on upcoming
meetings and events is avail-
able through the Levin College
of Law's online calendars at:
www.law.ufl.edu/calendars/.


8 FLA LAW