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UF UFLAW



Fla law newsletter of the University of Florida College of Law
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00072281/00163
 Material Information
Title: Fla law newsletter of the University of Florida College of Law
Portion of title: Flalaw
Physical Description: Serial
Creator: Levin College of Law
Publisher: s.n.
Place of Publication: <Gainesville FL> College of Law Communications Office 1997-
Creation Date: February 20, 2006
Frequency: weekly
completely irregular
 Subjects
Genre: periodical   ( marcgt )
serial   ( sobekcm )
 Notes
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol.1, no. 1 (Oct. 6, 1997)-
General Note: Weekly during the school year with a biweekly insert, numbered separately called: The Docket.
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Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved, Board of Trustees of the University of Florida
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Table of Contents
    Gifts fund $5.2 million advocacy center
        Page 1
        Page 2
        Page 3
        Page 4
        Page 5
    Events and opportunities
        Page 6
        Page 7
    People, scholarship and activities
        Page 8
    Calendar
        Page 8
Full Text












I I
UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA
LEVIN^^^^^^^^^^^^ COLLEG OF^^ LAW1 F la^^^ L a wA^^


Gifts Fund $5.2 Million Advocacy Center


BY KATHY FLEMING
One of the country's most
successful trial attorneys is
again providing major financial
support to help his alma mater
train law students in state-of-
the-art facilities.
Pensacola attorney Fred Levin
has contributed $2 million as
the lead gift to
the University
of Florida Levin
College of Law
to build a $5.2
million complex
that will include
a large, modern
courtroom and
much needed
faculty offices.
Along with two
other significant Martin Levin
gifts, Levin's gift porrtait of the
is eligible for uted $2 million
matching funds Levin Advocac
from the State of
Florida Facilities
Enhancement Challenge Grant
Program, which should bring
the value of the gifts to $5.2
million for UF's law school.
Levin, a 1961 alumnus and
namesake of the UF law school,
also provided a $10 million
cash gift in 1999 that, with


INSIDE THIS ISSUE
2 Career Services
6 Events & Opportunities
8 Calendar


state matching funds, moved
the college's endowment into
the top 10 of all public law
schools in the nation.
Levin College of Law Dean
Robert Jerry said the expan-
sion to be named the Martin
H. Levin Advocacy Center in
honor of Levin's son and former


left) and his father, Fredric G. Levin, pose with
elder Levin in this 2000 photo. Fred Levin has
n toward the construction of the $5.2 million I
:y Center which will house the new courtroom


colleague will put the UF law
school at the forefront of major
law colleges providing students
with sophisticated facilities and
services.
"This a transformational
gift for the law school and


Supreme
Court Justice
to Speak


critically needed by our trial
advocacy program, which ranks
13th in the nation," said Jerry.
"Combined with the recent
$25 million renovation of our
academic space, the addition of
this advocacy courtroom places
our facilities among the best in
the nation."
Other significant
financial pledges for
the project come
from Robert Mont-
gomery, of Robert
M. Montgomery, Jr.
& Associates in West
Palm Beach, and the
law firm of Kerri-
gan, Estess, Rankin,
McLeod & Thomp-
son in Pensacola.
a Both law firms have
contrib- exceptional records
Martin H. as trial attorneys and
S were instrumental in
representing the State
of Florida in its $13
billion settlement against the
tobacco industry.
The two-and-a-half story
complex will feature a grand en-
try foyer, a fully functional trial
and appellate courtroom with a
120-seat gallery and bench for
Continued on page 5


*| Work Hard,
Play Hard


VOL. 9, NO. 22 FEBRUARY 20, 2006



Law Student Runs
for SG Presidency
UF may soon have a law student at
the head of its student government
for the first time in five years.
Jared Hernandez (2L), a member
of the Unite Party, is on the list of
candidates in the SG presidential
election to be held Feb. 28 and
March 1.
If elected, Hernandez would
become UF's 100th SG president.
He would be the first
law student in the
position since 2001,
and first Hispanic
SG president in the
university's history.
As the law school's Hernandez
SG senate represen-
tative, a position he
has held since Spring 2005, Her-
nandez helped free up additional
study space for law students and
secured new law student parking
spaces at Corry Village.
"As president, I would oversee
a $12 million budget and hold a
position on the Board of Trustees,"
he said. "This is a chance to return
some of our student dollars to this
college."
To volunteer for Hernandez's cam-
paign, e-mail uniteuf@gmail.com.


H











CAREERSERVICES
Hints to help you in the legal profession


Meet Prominent
Alums at BLSA
Reunion
Students will have a chance
to interact with some of the
Levin College of Law's most
prominent alumni, including
Florida Supreme Court Justice
Peggy Quince and National Bar
Association president-elect
Linnes Finney during the Black
Law Students Association's
Alumni Reunion Weekend, held
this week on the law school
campus.
Reunion events will kick off at
noon Thursday, Feb. 23, with a
speech by Justice Quince, who
will speak about the role of
African-Americans in the legal
profession.
Other events include:
* A gathering at the home of
Dean Robert Jerry at 7 p.m.
Friday, Feb. 24.

* Panel discussions with law
faculty about diversity in
higher education, Saturday
Feb. 25, beginning at 8:30
a.m. in the Chesterfield
Smith Ceremonial Class-
room.

A speech by Linnes Finney,
president-elect of the
National Bar Association
and UF law graduate, at
a banquet culminating the
weekend's events at 7 p.m.
Saturday, Feb. 25.

Events are free for UF law
students, faculty and staff. For
more information, contact BLSA
Alumni Reunion Chair Melanie
Thompson at Thompson@ufl.
edu.


2 FLA LAW


Life as a Lobbyist
Jane Adams, UF's vice
president of university relations
and former vice president for
government relations at the Walt
Disney Company, will discuss
the role of the lobbyist and pro-
vide insight on how to prepare
for career opportunities in this
area Tuesday, Feb. 21, at noon in
the faculty dining room.

Small Firm
Opportunities
Join Career Services to dis-
cuss life as a solo practitioner or
practitioner in a medium-size
law firm at noon Wednesday,
Feb. 22, in the faculty dining
room.

Career Opportunities
in Real Property
Would you like to learn more
about property law? The Florida
Bar's Real Property, Probate and
Trust Law (RPPTL) Section
will hold a panel discussion and
reception Wednesday, Feb. 22,
at 6 p.m. in the faculty dining
room to give students the oppor-
tunity to speak with lawyers who
are practicing in various areas of
real property law, including real
estate transactions, real estate
litigation, financing, construc-
tion law and construction liens.
Panelists will discuss their ex-
periences in the transition from
law school to law practice.

One Quick Question
A counselor from the Center
for Career Services is available
on the concourse from 9:45-11
a.m every Thursday to answer
your career-related questions.
Stop wondering... ask that
pressing question.


Did You Miss the 'Job Goddess?'
If you missed your chance to hear job-search guru Kimm Walton speak on
campus, come by the Center for Career Services to check out one of her
award-winning books or borrow the video of the presentation. You can
also check upcoming issues of Flalaw for advice from her lecture.


Register Today for
Job Fair
Students interested in attend-
ing the Southeastern Intel-
lectual Property Job Fair in
Atlanta Aug. 1 must register by
3 p.m. today, Feb. 20. Registra-
tion forms are available in the
Center for Career Services.

OCI Interviews
Begin This Week
Phase 1 On-Campus Inter-
views begin Tuesday, Feb. 21,
on the second floor of the Legal
Information Center. Interview-
ers and room assignments are
available in Symplicity as they
are received. Please do not
change any interview times
without going through Career
Services, and remember there
should be no employer contact
until after the employer has
visited campus.


Jobs at EEOC
The 2006 U.S. Equal Em-
ployment Opportunity Com-
mission Honor Program is for
law students graduating in
2006, law graduates and judi-
cial law clerks.
Attorneys hired under the
program can rotate within
different segments of the
EEOC and the National Labor
Relations Board. In addition,
Honor Program attorneys
receive extensive training to en-
sure their legal proficiency and
expertise in particular practice
areas.
The application is available
online at www.eeoc.gov.
Applications must be received
by March 10.

















Career Option: Contract Lawyering


If you are looking for autonomy, flexible hours
and interesting and varied work, then working as a
contract attorney may be a career alternative worth
exploring. The contract practice of law is becoming
more common as the legal marketplace becomes
increasingly competitive, with law firms merging,
dissolving and cutting back on new hires.
Although contract lawyering arrangements
vary widely, generally contract lawyers are hired
by other lawyers to work on an hourly or project
basis. There are many different reasons why lawyers
choose to do contract work. Some want to practice
law, but are turned off by law firm politics. Others
want more time and freedom to pursue other
interests or commitments. Many small-firm or solo
practitioners who are building their own law prac-
tices supplement their income by doing contract
work on a temporary basis, covering depositions
for out-of-area law firms, or handling projects such
as a phase of discovery.

Challenging and Rewarding
Whatever the reason, those thinking about
contract lawyering should consider some of the
issues involved before choosing this path. Contract
attorneys are called upon to handle many novel
legal and factual situations, often on very short
notice. An effective contract attorney should be
comfortable walking into a new office, work-
ing with new people and being dropped into the


middle of an existing case. Like all self-employed
people, contract attorneys must market themselves
and continually cultivate business. The quantity of
work may fluctuate, causing an irregular income.
Finding openings can be a challenge. Contract
lawyering is more common in large metropolitan
cities like Chicago, Washington, D.C., New York
and Miami, and these areas are more likely to have
contract lawyer placement agencies. These agen-
cies charge the firm a fee (sometimes double the
amount the contract lawyer receives) and then the
contract lawyer is paid by the agency.
Another way to find these positions is to check
the websites of legal recruiting agencies. For ex-
ample, Special Counsel lists positions as "contract,"
"direct hire" and "contract to hire." There are
several current contract attorney openings for proj-
ect-based positions performing document review
in cities such as Chicago and Philadelphia.

Build a Network
Networking and word-of-mouth are the more
typical means of sharing information regarding
these openings. In some locations, the state or local
bar may offer a "contract lawyer listserve" such as
one offered by Oregon Women Lawyers. Some
resourceful contract attorneys even create their
own websites to market themselves and list their
specialties.
A contract lawyer can earn a good salary, similar
to that of lawyers in small firms, while often
spending less time working. Work hours are much
more flexible and can be arranged to accommo-
date the lawyer's other responsibilities or interests.
The work can also be intellectually challenging, as
the contract lawyer is often required to pick up a
file and quickly familiarize herself with the issues
involved. There is also the potential for a great
variety of work.
If you are interested in learning more about
contract lawyering, The Complete Guide to Contract
Lawyering by Deborah Arron and Deborah Guyol
is an excellent resource. This book is available for
check-out in the Center for Career Services.


Brevard County
Scholarship
The Frederick W. & Grace
P. Brecht Scholarship offers
$1,000 per year to a student
whose home and place of resi-
dence is in Brevard County, who
has graduated from a Brevard
County high school, and who
can demonstrate financial need
as determined by the 2006-07
FAFSA minimum. The deadline is
May 15. See Financial Aid Coor-
dinator Carol Huber in Student
Affairs for more information.

$1,000 Prize in
GLBT Writing
Competition
Students can compete for a
$1,000 prize in the National
Lesbian and Gay Law Asso-
ciation's Michael Greenberg
Student Writing Competition.
The competition invites students
from around the country to
submit papers on cutting-edge
legal issues affecting the les-
bian, gay, bisexual, transgender
and/or intersex community.
The deadline is June 15. See
Financial Aid Coordinator Carol
Huber in Student Affairs for
more information.

Externship
Deadlines
* Completed applications for
student-created externships
must be submitted by noon
March 20.

* The mandatory orientation
for Summer 2006 extern-
ships will be 5-7:30 p.m.
Wednesday, April 5.


FLA LAW 3










Z Conferences Address Environment, Inequality


Trial Team Final Four
This Week
Law students Tyler Cathey and
Camille Warren will face off
against fellow students Hilary
Hussin and Chris Lambert in
the UF Trial Team's Final
Four Competition Friday, Feb.
24, in the Chesterfield Smith
Ceremonial Classroom. The
competition begins at 11 a.m.
The event is open to students,
staff and faculty. Students
interested in participating in
Trial Team are particularly
encouraged to attend.



























Get FlaLaw
Via E-Mail
Have Flalaw delivered to
your computer every Friday
- days before the rest of the
world sees it. Send an e-mail
to lockette@law.ufl.edu and
ask to be added to the Flalaw
PDF list.


4 FLA LAW


Prominent lawyers, scholars,
authors and activists from around
the world will come to campus in
March for a pair of groundbreaking
conferences sponsored by the law
school.

Environmental
Conference
Robert E Kennedy, Jr., senior
attorney for the Natural Resources
Defense Council, and Carol
Browner, former administrator
of the Environmental Protection
Agency, will be among the speak-
ers at the Twelfth Annual Public
Interest Environmental Conference
(PIEC) March 8-11 at the Phillips


Center for the Performing Arts and
the Reitz Student Union.
PIEC is the nation's first confer-
ence to combine humanities, law,
policy, children and the environ-
ment. The event is is co-sponsored
by the law school; UF's Center for
Children's Literature and Culture;
and the National Association of
Environmental Law Societies.
The conference is free for all UF
students, faculty and staff, with the
exception of the banquet, which
costs $35. The registration deadline
is March 1.
For more information, contact
Barbara Serokee at (352) 273-0856
or bserokee@ufl.edu.


Diversity Update
Levin College of Law students and faculty continue to
work together on diversity issues and initiatives following
input and suggestions from a Town Hall Meeting Jan. 26
and subsequent meetings and forums. Highlights of these
efforts, according to Assistant Dean for Diversity and
Community Relations Adrian Jones, include:
* A Community Diversity Committee will be formed by
April 2006 to act as an advisory group to the dean and
law school community, systematically and periodically
assess the quality of life issues, and make recom-
mendations regarding educational programs and other
areas of concern. Its 13 representatives will include six
students (selected through a student government pro-
cess); four faculty (appointed by the dean); two staff
(selected by staff); and Assistant Dean for Diversity
and Community Relations Adrian Jones.
* Following student recommendations that the law
school's mission and vision statements be expanded
to include statements on diversity and the quest to de-
velop "citizen lawyers," the statements are undergoing
a thorough evaluation and examination.
* A "Wall of Distinction" a historical chronology
of UF law diversity efforts and distinguished minority
alumni and their accomplishments will be created.
The Legal Information Center is featuring an exhibit
this month with a dedication to distinguished African
American UF law alumni in honor of Black History
Month and as part of BLSA's Alumni Reunion Weekend.
Future displays also will honor alumni from other di-
verse backgrounds who have added to our community,
such as Hispanic/Latina, Jewish and female graduates.


Gwendolen Carter
Conference
Legal scholars, writers and
political scientists will discuss the
politics of inequality in Africa in
an international conference at UF
March 5-7. The Gwendolen Carter
Conference will honor the 100th
anniversary of the birth of Carter,
the political scientist who is widely
regarded as one of the founding fig-
ures in African Studies in the U.S.
Co-sponsored by the law school,
the Center for African Studies and
the Center for International Stud-
ies, the conference is free and open
to the public.


* The Virgil Hawkins
Kiosk in the LIC lobby
offers information on
Hawkins, his efforts
to gain admittance to
the College of Law and
historical case sites.
* Student leaders have worked with the law school to es-
tablish a "Caring and Sharing Mentoring Program"
to assist and mentor students at a local elementary
charter school in need of academic help. Contact Jones
for details.
* Student leaders initiated a new program, Legal Ease,
to address quality of life issues for students.
* The Communications Office is developing a minority
recruitment brochure for use in Fall 2006 recruiting.
* Assistant Dean Jones will assist the Admissions
Office by personally contacting under-represented
and minority students accepted for admission
to welcome them and encourage them to study law
here. He plans site visits and contacts with other
institutions nationwide over the next six months to
examine diversity efforts and learn from other success-
ful models.
* Funding is being pursued to establish the law school's
successful community BBQ as an annual tradition to
help build a stronger community.
If you have comments or suggestions, contact Assistant
Dean Jones in the Office of Student Affairs at 273-0626
or jonesa@law.ufl.edu.










Keep Work, Play Separate to Manage Stress


When attorney Brent Gordon
was in law school, he found
there was only one thing more
stressful than taking tests: hang-
ing out with students who talk
about taking tests.
"You know that lunch they
offer when you take the Bar
exam?" said Gordon. "There was
no way you could get me to sign
up for that. Sitting around with
a bunch of other people taking
the Bar would have driven me
crazy."
Gordon, who now works
for the Alachua County State
Attorney's Office, was one of
several UF law faculty and
alumni who offered their advice
on how to deal with the pressure
of tests and grades Feb. 7. The
panel was the first installment in
"Legal Ease," a series of seminars
organized by Resource Coun-
selor Nicole Nicolaisen Stern.
While a certain amount of
stress is unavoidable in the legal
profession, panelists said, keep-
ing school or work separate from
your personal life can help keep
that stress to a manageable level.
"I believe in the philosophy
of 'work hard, play hard,'" said
Adrian Jones, assistant dean for
diversity and community rela-
tions. "I work...but when I'm on
my own time, I make a point of
making a separation."
Professor Joe Little reminded
students that while law school


Continued from page 1
seven judges, as well as 10 offices
for retired faculty and four apart-
ments for distinguished scholars
and visitors. The new complex
will extend from the west end of
Bruton-Geer Hall.
Construction will begin in


Legal Skills Professor Tracy Rambo uses metaphors from her favorite sport,
fencing, to describe the effect of stress on a student's performance. Rambo
was one of several speakers at Legal Ease, a workshop held Feb. 7.


is indeed stressful, the stress
doesn't end with graduation so
developing good habits now is
important. The best way to deal
with exams, he said, is to pay
attention in class, and speak up
early if there's something you
don't understand.
"Don't undertake a crash
course the night before the
exams," Little advised. "You
should be watching a movie,
sleeping, or doing something
other than studying."
For some students, drawing a
line between school and the rest
of life comes more easily than
others, panelists said. And some
students have no choice but to
keep school and "real life" sepa-
rate. That was true for UF law
alum Mary Vallandingham, who
entered law school as a single



May 2007 and should be com-
pleted for Fall 2008 classes, with
the bulk of construction occur-
ring over two summers to ensure
limited disruption of classes.
In making the new facilities
possible, Levin said, "Law school


mother.
"I had that focus built in to
my situation," she said. "At the
end of the day, when I walked
away, I really walked away. I
think it gave me an advantage
in the longer term over other
students."
Managing stress won't just
make you happier, panelists said,
it will make you a better lawyer.
Legal Skills Professor Tracy
Rambo used her favorite hobby,
fencing, as a metaphor for the
value of managing stress.
"If you're squeezing too hard,
if you're holding the foil like a
club, you can't be quick," she
said. "But if you relax your grip,
you have some control."
The next session of Legal Ease
will be held March 7.


changed my whole life. It was
there I found a sense of purpose,
and fell in love with the logic
and beauty of the law. My hope
is that my gifts to the law school
will ensure the college takes that
next step to true greatness."


No Pets in Law
School Buildings

A number of students and
faculty have been observed
in recent weeks bringing their
pets into law school offices.
Some of these pets have left
behind messes of a distinctly
unpleasant nature. Please
remember that pets are not
allowed in buildings on campus.
























Opening on Elections
Commission
There is an opening on the
Elections Commission for
one qualified law student. To
qualify, a student must have
completed one full year of
law school and may not have
worked on a campus political
campaign within the last
calendar year. This is a great
way to get involved with
the upcoming election while
at the same time building
your resume. Interested law
students should contact Kevin
McCoy at mccoy@ufl.edu for
more information.


FLA LAW 5











EVENT


S & OPPORTUNITIES


Learn About Law
Clinics; Application
Deadline Friday
If you're interested in par-
ticipating in the law school's
clinical or simulation skills pro-
grams, attend an informational
meeting about these programs
Wednesday, Feb. 22, at 11
a.m. in the Bailey Courtroom.
Faculty from the clinics will be
on hand to answer your ques-
tions. Free pizza will be served.
Applications for the clinics are
due by 5 p.m. Friday, Feb. 24 in
the Office of Student Affairs.










Loans for Bar
Exam Expenses
Privately-financed Bar Exam
loans of $1,000-$11,000 are
available to students who are
in their final year of law school.
These loans can be used for
Bar prep classes, to pay living
expenses while studying for
the exam and other Bar-related
expenses. You may contact the
lenders directly at:
Access Group
(800) 282-1550
www.Accessgroup.org
Key Education Resources
(800) 539-5363
www.Key.com/educate/grad
LawLoans
(800) 984-0190
www.Salliemae.com


6 FLA LAW


Meetings and Deadlines
* The Labor and Employment
Law Society will meet today,
Feb. 20, at 5 p.m. in room
285A. The speaker will be Paul
Donnelly. Pizza will be served.
* Toastmasters meets at 6 p.m.
today, Feb. 20, in room 285A.
* The John Marshall Bar Asso-
ciation meets today, Feb. 20,
at 7 p.m. in room 285C.
* The St. Thomas More Society
will meet at noon Tuesday,
Feb. 21, room TBA.
* The Spanish American Law
Student Association will meet
Wednesday, Feb. 22, at noon
in room 285A. Officer elec-
tions will be held.
* Comments for the Journal of
Law and Public Policy are
due 5 p.m. Thursday, Feb. 23.

Show Your Artwork
A student-initiated art exhibi-
tion to be held at the law school
later this year is still accepting
submissions of original artwork
from the law school community.
Any law student or member of
the faculty or staff can submit
up to three original pieces for
consideration.
To participate, e-mail a digital
image of the works to kdbos-
ton@gmail.com. Along with
your submissions, include the
title of the work, the year it
was created, the medium, the
dimensions and your affiliation
with the Levin College of Law.
You may also submit a short (50
words or less) description of the
piece. All submissions are due by
5 p.m. March 1.


Culture on the Concourse
Black Law Students Association President Byron Owens (left) and Black His-
tory Month Committee Chairman Lee Glover were instrumental in organizing
Culture on the Concourse, an annual exhibition of African and African Ameri-
can history, art and literature on the law school concourse Feb. 15. This
year, the event included a display by the Military Law Students Association,
recognizing the contributions of African Americans to the nation's defense.


Spring Graduate
Get-Together
All May graduates are invited
to a class social March 6 at 1:45
p.m. The dessert social will be
held outside the west side of the
Lawton Chiles Legal Informa-
tion Center and will kick off the
Spring 2006 Class Gift Cam-
paign.

Senior Photos,
Graduation Check
To make sure you have met
the requirements for graduation,
you must arrange an appoint-
ment with Law Registrar Lori
Smith for a graduation check.
Please call 273-0620 and make
your appointment now if you
have not already done so.
Senior photos will be taken
Feb. 28, March 1 and March 2
from 8:30 a.m. to 3:30 p.m in


the Office of Student Affairs.
Court attire is required. Each
photo session is three minutes.
Schedule an extra session if you
wish to be photographed in
regalia. For details, inquire in
Student Affairs.

Explore Business Law
Interested in Business Law?
Hear about the different classes
available, from the professors
who teach them, at the Associa-
tion for Business Law's curricu-
lum review at noon March 1 in
room 285C.

Get Estates and Trusts
Certificate
Learn more about the benefits
of earning an Estates and Trusts
Planning Certificate Friday,
Feb. 24, at 1 p.m. in the Bailey
Courtroom. For more informa-
tion, go to grove.ufl.edu/-etels.
















Student Scholarship
to Peru Conference
The Center for Governmen-
tal Responsibility has an-
nounced a scholarship that will
cover major expenses for a UF
law student wishing to attend
the 7th Annual Legal & Policy
Issues in the Americas Confer-
ence, to be held in Lima, Peru,
May 25-26.
The scholarship will cover
the cost of the flight to Peru
and provides $250 towards the
student's lodging and additional
expenses in Lima. Apply by
March 1 through the Law &
Policy in the Americas Program
in 230 Bruton-Geer Hall. For
details and application informa-
tion, contact Meredith Fensom
at fensom@law.ufl.edu. Addi-


tional conference information
is available at www.ufl.edu/cgr/
conference.


Patenting the
Costa Rican Forest
Molecular biologist Ana
Sittenfeld of the University
of Costa Rica will talk about
"bioprospecting" and intellectual
property law at noon March 1 in
room 283.
Sittenfeld was involved in an
agreement between the Costa


Rican government and Merck
Pharmaceuticals, which allowed
the drug company exclusive
access to the genetic resources of
the tropical forest in exchange
for development assistance
and royalties. In addition to its
promotion as a tool for tropical
forest conservation, bioprospect-
ing raises interesting issues of
sovereignty, intellectual property
and environmental and cultural
ethics.
The speech is part of Tropilaw,
a speaker series co-sponsored by
the Environmental and Land Use
Law Society, the International
Law Society, the Law and Policy
in the Americas Program and the
Conservation Clinic. Free pizza
will be served after the event.


UF Hosts Regional Trial Competition


Twenty-two teams from 11 law schools around
the Southeast came to Gainesville this month for
the regional round of the National Trial Competi-
tion. The regional event was sponsored by the firm
of Rumberger, Kirk, & Caldwell. This is the 31st
year of the National Trial Competition, sponsored
nationally by the Texas Young Lawyers Association
and the American College of Trial Lawyers. Four
rounds of trials were held in the new Alachua
County Criminal Justice Center in downtown
Gainesville. A number of prominent judges and
lawyers from all over the country participated as
judges for this event, including several members of
the Rumberger firm.
"This is one of the most prestigious trial com-
petitions in the nation," said Legal Skills Professor
Jennifer Zedalis, organizer of the competition. "It's
fitting that a school with one of the country's top-
ranked trial advocacy programs would host it."
The regional winner this year was the University


UF's team for Region 5 National Trial Competition in-
cluded (from left) Sarah Stoddard, Scott Barnes, Ashley
Hopson, coach Tom Farkash, Kemay Jackson, Justin
McCormack and Jason Seigal. Not pictured are team
members Justin Mazzarra and Brikena Tomasic.

of Georgia, with both Georgia teams advancing
to nationals in March. UF's trial team also had an
impressive weekend, finishing fifth of 22 teams.


LIC News
Have you heard of the Center
for Computer-Assisted Legal
Instruction? If you've never
seen or used this incredible
set of legal education tutori-
als, take a few minutes to
check it out.
CALl is a consortium of law
schools that develops comput-
er-based lessons for a broad
array of legal subjects. There
are more than 600 lessons
covering 32 legal education
subject areas. The lessons
include very specific coverage
of particular points of law,
like Character Evidence Under
the Federal Rules, or Owner-
ship of Copyright: Works
Made for Hire. CALl offers
podcasts on some topics.To
find out more, go to www.
cali.org and register by using
the code assigned to the law
school. You can obtain the
code by visiting the Reference
Desk or calling the library at
273-0723.
Wednesday Workshops
Visit the Reference Desk to
sign up for weekly workshops
on research. Workshops are
held every Wednesday at 2
p.m., and 3 p.m. Upcoming
workshops include:
Feb. 22
Blue Book Workshop
Mar. 1
Research Wizard: Library
Catalog, Databases & e-
Journals
Mar. 8
Research Wizard: The Digest
System


FLA LAW 7








Send Us Your News
FlaLaw is published each week
school is in session by the Levin
College of Law Communications
Office. Submit news of interest
to the law school community by
10 a.m. Tuesday for the follow-
ing Monday's issue to lockette@
law.ufl.edu or 273-0650.
Contact amirin@law.ufl.edu
to be e-mailed a weekly early
release pdf of FlaLaw.

* Tim Lockette, Editor
* Kristen Hines, Photographer



College of Law
Administration
* Robert H. Jerry, II, Dean
* George L. Dawson,
Associate Dean for
Academic Affairs
* J. Patrick Shannon,
Associate Dean for
Administrative Affairs
* Lyrissa Barnett Lidsky,
Associate Dean for
Faculty Development
* Michael K. Friel,
Associate Dean & Director,
Graduate Tax Program
* Stuart R. Cohn,
Associate Dean for
International Studies
* M. Kathleen "Kathie" Price,
Associate Dean for Library
and Technology
* Gail E. Sasnett,
Associate Dean for
Students, Professionalism
and Community Relations
* J. Michael Patrick,
Assistant Dean for Admissions
* Linda Calvert Hanson,
Assistant Dean for
Career Services
* Adrian Jones,
Assistant Dean for Diversity
and Community Relations
* Jennifer Cope, Interim
Assistant Dean for Students
* Debra D. Amirin,
Director of Communications
* Donald J. Hale,
Senior Director of Development
and Alumni Affairs

UNIVERSITY OF
FLORIDA


Scholarship & Activities
Michael Gordon
John H. and Mary Lou Dasburg
Professor
* Signed contracts with West
Publishing to write the ninth edi-
tion of his co-authored casebook
International Business Transactions,
as well the second edition of his
co-authored casebook Interna-
tional Dispute Resolution.
Lyrissa Lidsky
Associate Dean for Faculty
Development
* Cited in Klehr Harrison Harvey
Branzburg & Ellers, LLP v. JPA
Development, Inc., 2006 WL
37020 (Jan. 4, 2006), an opinion
in the Pennsylvania Court of
Common Pleas that deals with
the balance between the right
to speak anonymously on the
Internet and a plaintiffs right
to protect his reputation. The
opinion cited Lidsky's article
"Silencing John Doe: Defamation
and Discourse in Cyberspace."


February
20 Labor and Employment Law
Society, 5 p.m., room 285A
JMBA, 7 p.m., room 285C
Toastmasters, 6 p.m., 285A
21 Lunch with the Dean, 11
a.m., faculty dining room
Career Opportunities in Lob-
bying, noon, faculty dining
room
St. Thomas More Society,
noon, TBA
22 Career Opportunities in Small
& Medium-Sized Firms, noon,
faculty dining room


William Page
Marshall M. Criser Eminent
Scholar in Electronic Commun-
cations and Administrative Law
* Presented "Policy Choices in De-
fining the Measure of Antitrust
Damages" Feb. 7 at a workshop
of the Competition Committee
of the Organization for Economic
Cooperation and Development
in Paris. The conference was
held to discuss the European
Commission's recent Green Paper
on measures to enhance private
antitrust enforcement in Europe.
* Presented the same paper Feb. 10
at Notre Dame University Law
School.
Christopher Vallandingham
Foreign and International Law
Librarian
* Organizer of"Ethics and Intel-
ligence 2006," a conference held
Jan. 27-28 in Springfield, Va.
where former i r..II. ..i. officials
discuss the moral implications of
ir.r.ll ..r-,. gathering.


Clinics Informational Meet-
ing, 11 a.m., Bailey Courtroom
SALSA, noon, room 285A
Blue BookWorkshop, 2 p.m. &
3 p.m., Legal Information Center
23 Florida Supreme Court
Justice Peggy Quince, noon,
room 180
24 Trial Team Final Four, 11
a.m., room 180
Estates and Trusts Certificate
Informational Meeting, 1
p.m., Bailey Courtroom
BLSA Gathering, 7 p.m.,
home of Dean Jerry


SCHOLARSHIP
& ACTIVITIES


In the News
Jeffrey Harrison
Stephen C. O'Connell Professor
* The Independent Florida ..: .:
Feb. 14. Quoted on copyright
violations in response to the case
involving Custom Copies Inc.
Christopher Peterson
Assistant Professor
* WCJB-TV, Feb. 8. Featured
in a news story on the national
attention received by his study
of predatory lending to military
personnel.
Elizabeth Rowe
Assistant Professor
* Mid-Florida Public Radio
(WUFT-FM) Feb. 13. Rowe
discussed the recent copyright
infringement lawsuit against Cus-
tom Copies in Gainesville.
* The Miami Herald, Feb. 13.
Quoted in a lawsuit filed by
department store chain Neiman
Marcus against a pet boutique
called Neiman Barkus.


25 Panel Discussions on Diver-
sity in Higher Education,
8:30 a.m., room 180
26 Linnes Finney at BLSA
Banquet, 7 p.m., Paramount
Plaza Hotel


Online Calendar
More information on upcoming
meetings and events is avail-
able through the Levin College
of Law's online calendars at:
www.law.ufl.edu/calendars/.


8 FLA LAW


PEOPLE


CALENDAR








Send Us Your News
FlaLaw is published each week
school is in session by the Levin
College of Law Communications
Office. Submit news of interest
to the law school community by
10 a.m. Tuesday for the follow-
ing Monday's issue to lockette@
law.ufl.edu or 273-0650.
Contact amirin@law.ufl.edu
to be e-mailed a weekly early
release pdf of FlaLaw.

* Tim Lockette, Editor
* Kristen Hines, Photographer



College of Law
Administration
* Robert H. Jerry, II, Dean
* George L. Dawson,
Associate Dean for
Academic Affairs
* J. Patrick Shannon,
Associate Dean for
Administrative Affairs
* Lyrissa Barnett Lidsky,
Associate Dean for
Faculty Development
* Michael K. Friel,
Associate Dean & Director,
Graduate Tax Program
* Stuart R. Cohn,
Associate Dean for
International Studies
* M. Kathleen "Kathie" Price,
Associate Dean for Library
and Technology
* Gail E. Sasnett,
Associate Dean for
Students, Professionalism
and Community Relations
* J. Michael Patrick,
Assistant Dean for Admissions
* Linda Calvert Hanson,
Assistant Dean for
Career Services
* Adrian Jones,
Assistant Dean for Diversity
and Community Relations
* Jennifer Cope, Interim
Assistant Dean for Students
* Debra D. Amirin,
Director of Communications
* Donald J. Hale,
Senior Director of Development
and Alumni Affairs

UNIVERSITY OF
FLORIDA


Scholarship & Activities
Michael Gordon
John H. and Mary Lou Dasburg
Professor
* Signed contracts with West
Publishing to write the ninth edi-
tion of his co-authored casebook
International Business Transactions,
as well the second edition of his
co-authored casebook Interna-
tional Dispute Resolution.
Lyrissa Lidsky
Associate Dean for Faculty
Development
* Cited in Klehr Harrison Harvey
Branzburg & Ellers, LLP v. JPA
Development, Inc., 2006 WL
37020 (Jan. 4, 2006), an opinion
in the Pennsylvania Court of
Common Pleas that deals with
the balance between the right
to speak anonymously on the
Internet and a plaintiffs right
to protect his reputation. The
opinion cited Lidsky's article
"Silencing John Doe: Defamation
and Discourse in Cyberspace."


February
20 Labor and Employment Law
Society, 5 p.m., room 285A
JMBA, 7 p.m., room 285C
Toastmasters, 6 p.m., 285A
21 Lunch with the Dean, 11
a.m., faculty dining room
Career Opportunities in Lob-
bying, noon, faculty dining
room
St. Thomas More Society,
noon, TBA
22 Career Opportunities in Small
& Medium-Sized Firms, noon,
faculty dining room


William Page
Marshall M. Criser Eminent
Scholar in Electronic Commun-
cations and Administrative Law
* Presented "Policy Choices in De-
fining the Measure of Antitrust
Damages" Feb. 7 at a workshop
of the Competition Committee
of the Organization for Economic
Cooperation and Development
in Paris. The conference was
held to discuss the European
Commission's recent Green Paper
on measures to enhance private
antitrust enforcement in Europe.
* Presented the same paper Feb. 10
at Notre Dame University Law
School.
Christopher Vallandingham
Foreign and International Law
Librarian
* Organizer of"Ethics and Intel-
ligence 2006," a conference held
Jan. 27-28 in Springfield, Va.
where former i r..II. ..i. officials
discuss the moral implications of
ir.r.ll ..r-,. gathering.


Clinics Informational Meet-
ing, 11 a.m., Bailey Courtroom
SALSA, noon, room 285A
Blue BookWorkshop, 2 p.m. &
3 p.m., Legal Information Center
23 Florida Supreme Court
Justice Peggy Quince, noon,
room 180
24 Trial Team Final Four, 11
a.m., room 180
Estates and Trusts Certificate
Informational Meeting, 1
p.m., Bailey Courtroom
BLSA Gathering, 7 p.m.,
home of Dean Jerry


SCHOLARSHIP
& ACTIVITIES


In the News
Jeffrey Harrison
Stephen C. O'Connell Professor
* The Independent Florida ..: .:
Feb. 14. Quoted on copyright
violations in response to the case
involving Custom Copies Inc.
Christopher Peterson
Assistant Professor
* WCJB-TV, Feb. 8. Featured
in a news story on the national
attention received by his study
of predatory lending to military
personnel.
Elizabeth Rowe
Assistant Professor
* Mid-Florida Public Radio
(WUFT-FM) Feb. 13. Rowe
discussed the recent copyright
infringement lawsuit against Cus-
tom Copies in Gainesville.
* The Miami Herald, Feb. 13.
Quoted in a lawsuit filed by
department store chain Neiman
Marcus against a pet boutique
called Neiman Barkus.


25 Panel Discussions on Diver-
sity in Higher Education,
8:30 a.m., room 180
26 Linnes Finney at BLSA
Banquet, 7 p.m., Paramount
Plaza Hotel


Online Calendar
More information on upcoming
meetings and events is avail-
able through the Levin College
of Law's online calendars at:
www.law.ufl.edu/calendars/.


8 FLA LAW


PEOPLE


CALENDAR