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UF UFLAW



Fla law newsletter of the University of Florida College of Law
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00072281/00161
 Material Information
Title: Fla law newsletter of the University of Florida College of Law
Portion of title: Flalaw
Physical Description: Serial
Creator: Levin College of Law
Publisher: s.n.
Place of Publication: <Gainesville FL> College of Law Communications Office 1997-
Creation Date: February 6, 2006
Frequency: weekly
completely irregular
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Genre: periodical   ( marcgt )
serial   ( sobekcm )
 Notes
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol.1, no. 1 (Oct. 6, 1997)-
General Note: Weekly during the school year with a biweekly insert, numbered separately called: The Docket.
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Table of Contents
    Suggestions shared at UF law 'town hall' meeting on diversity
        Page 1
    Career Services
        Page 2
        Page 3
        Page 4
        Page 5
    Events and opportunities
        Page 6
        Page 7
    People, scholarship and activities
        Page 8
    Calendar
        Page 8
Full Text












I I
UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA
LEVIN^^^^^^^^^^^^ COLLEG OF^^ LAW1 F la^^^ L a wA^^


Suggestions Shared at UF Law 'Town Hall'

Meeting on Diversity


VOL. 9, NO. 20 FEBRUARY 6, 2006


Issues ranging from increas-
ing minority representation to
establishing and maintaining
a supportive and welcoming
atmosphere for diverse popula-
tions are hot button topics at
institutions nationwide. Levin
College of Law Dean Robert
Jerry held a town hall style
meeting Jan. 26 to discuss these
issues and gather input from
the law school community.
"The purpose of this session
is to share ideas about how
we can move the law school
forward on an issue that is
extraordinarily important, not
only to the future of our col-
lege, but also to the future of
the communities in which we
live, to our state, and to our
nation," the dean explained.
"I'm referring, of course, to the
need to increase diversity in all
aspects of the legal profession,
including here at the Levin
College of Law."
Close to 100 students and
faculty listened intently as the
dean outlined the nature and
scope of diversity issues facing
UF's law school and other
educational institutions nation-
wide. An animated audience

INSIDE THIS ISSUE
2 Career Services
6 Events & Opportunities
8 Calendar


offered numerous insights and
suggestions in the discussion
that followed, with the majority
of the questions and comments
focused on problem-solving and
the need to work together as a
community to raise awareness
and address issues of concern.
Assistant Dean for Diversity
and Community Relations
Adrian Jones joined the dean
at the front of the room for the
discussion. He emphasized the
importance of opening chan-
nels of communication, and
said, "We all have to be agents
of change. We, WE, have to be
part of the process. We all have
to educate each other."
Law Professor Kenneth
Nunn, who for years has been
at the forefront of efforts to
address diversity issues, said,
"First, I commend this admin-
istration for holding this forum
and providing the opportunity
to bring issues out into the
open where we can discuss and
address them.
"I also suggest that we form
a student-faculty committee to
look at our admissions process
and determine to what degree
One Florida and other legal


Students Report *
on Summer Study
Abroad


Assistant Dean for Diversity and
Community Relations Adrian
Jones (right) spoke with students
following the forum. Jones
encourages you to contact him to
report incidents andlor offer input
into establishing and maintaining
successful diversity programs.
restrictions apply to the College
of Law and impact our efforts
to diversify," said Nunn.
Participants focused at
first on the need to increase
minority enrollment UF's
law school ranked 11th out of
26 AAU public law schools in
minority student enrollment in
2004-05 then broke into ap-
plause when law student Pedro
Continued on Page 5


Events Honor
Black History
Month


Apply by Friday
for Fall Student
Exchange in The
Netherlands, France,
Poland or Brazil
Students have until Friday,
Feb. 10, to apply for Fall 2006
exchange programs and experi-
ence other cultures while learning
valuable legal skills. This year
the Levin College of Law offers
programs with Leiden University
in The Netherlands, Montpellier
University in France; Warsaw
University in Poland; and Pontifica
Universidade Catolica in Rio de
Janeiro in Brazil.
Participants pay UF tuition and
can transfer up to 14 credit hours.
For more information or the appli-
cation form, go online to www.
law.ufl.edu/students/abroad/ or
contact Noemar Castro in the
Office of Student Affairs at 273-
0629 or castro@law.ufl.edu.












CAREERSERVICES
Hints to help you in the legal profession


Return of the
'Job Goddess'
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Externship Deadlines
* Apply for faculty-created
externships by noon Friday,
Feb. 10, except for WIPO
applications, which are due by
noon Friday, Feb. 17.
* Completed applications for
student-created externships
must be submitted by noon
March 20.
* The mandatory orientation
for summer 2006 extern-
ships will be held 5-7:30 p.m.
Wednesday, April 5.

Consider a Law
Librarian Career
Have you considered becoming
a law librarian as an alternative to
practicing law? It's estimated that
more than half the law library
directors in the U.S. will retire in
the next five to 10 years, and the
associate directors are following
closely behind.
"Opportunities for bright
young J.D.-M.L.S. graduates in
careers that pay up to $250k per
year in private law schools exist.
For tenure track positions, can-
didates should expect to graduate
in the top 10 percent of their
class with journal experience.
Many directors teach substantive
law courses, especially in IP," said
Legal Information Center Direc-
tor Kathie Price.
In addition to opportunities
as a law librarian in academic
law libraries, Assistant Dean
Calvert Hanson also noted there
are positions in government law
libraries at the county, city, state
and federal levels as well as in
private law firms or corporate
legal departments.
The American Association of
Law Libraries (AALL) website
offers a detailed handout at www.
aallnet.org/committee/tfedu/


education.html that answers
questions such as: How can I
learn about law librarianship as
a career? What are the academic
qualifications for a law librarian?
How do I evaluate library and
information science programs for
a career in law librarianship? The
AALL site offers a job posting
section at www.aall.org/hotline/
if you would like to review open
positions to learn more about op-
portunities for law librarians. It
also offers a listing of educational
scholarships for those working on
a Masters in Library Science.
The Southeastern Chapter of
AALL offers resources for those
interested in the southeastern
states. An example of the types of
assistance available is a fellow-
ship offered by the University of
Arizona School of Information
Resources and Library Science
(SIRLS) and the Law Library of
the James E. Rogers College of
Law. This two-year fellowship
in law librarianship for lawyers
seeking to become law librar-
ians allows successful applicants
to work 20 hours a week in the
law library while pursuing an
M.L.S. The first year will focus
on technical and access services,
the second year will focus on
public services. The salary is
$11,000 a year, plus benefits and
tuition remission. (In the current
fiscal year, the fellowship recipi-
ent would pay a program fee of
$79 per semester and have the
remaining tuition and other fees
waived.) The application deadline
is April 1. Candidates must have
earned their J.D. degree from an
ABA-accredited school by start of
Fall Semester 2006. Full details
are available in the Center for
Career Services.


A career as a law librarian can be
rewarding financially as well as
intellectually, according to Legal
Information Center Director Kathie
Price (standing, with Associate LIC
Director Rick Donnelly).

Programs This Week
* What I Did Last Summer,
Tuesday, Feb. 7, noon-12:50 p.m.
in the faculty dining room. Learn
from other law students how you
can make the most of your summer
break and find summer positions.
They will share their experiences
about externing for a judge and
agency, working in a corporate legal
department, doing a public service
fellowship and more.
* One Quick Question, Thursday,
Feb. 9, 9:45 a.m.-11:15 a.m. Stop
by the One Quick Question table
on the concourse near the entrance
to the Legal Information Center
for answers to your questions about
OCI, externships, mock interviews,
resumes, cover letters, career devel-
opment and more.
* Life as a Public Defender,
Thursday, Feb. 9, noon-12:50
p.m. in the faculty dining room.
Aubroncee Martin, assistant public
defender for the 8th Judicial Cir-
cuit, Gainesville, and current presi-
dent of the 8th Judicial Circuit Bar
Association, will share a day in the
life of a public defender.
* Note: Life as a State Attorney,
scheduled for noon Wednesday,
Feb. 8, featuring 4th Judicial
Circuit State Attorney Harry Shor-
stein, has been rescheduled to noon
March 21.


2 FLA LAW

















Hone Your Interview Skills


Do you have interviews coming up for
potential summer opportunities? Check out the
"Guide to Interviewing" on the Career Services
website under resources at www.law.ufl.edu/
career/pdf/interviewingguide.pdf. Also keep in
mind the following:

Mock Interviews
You can schedule a mock interview as early
as today, Feb. 6, with Annemarie Schuller, a
new attorney-advisor in Career Services who
previously worked for almost four years with
Jenner & Block in Chicago. Take advantage of
this outstanding opportunity to participate in
an interview followed by a 15-minute critique
where Annemarie will provide suggestions and
comments. If you want to go into the interview
season with extra confidence, set up a mock
interview now by calling 273-0860 or stopping
by the Career Services office.


Interview Preparation
* Craft a marketing plan to sell the product
-YOU. Your overall theme should be, "I am
well qualified to add value to ..."
* Be prepared to answer the question, "Why
should I hire you?" Write out an answer
demonstrating how you would be a strength to
the organization, then memorize it.
* Know yourself be prepared to discuss
anything on your resume in detail. Accentu-
ate the positive and answer questions honestly.
* Research the firm or organization and the
interviewers. Utilize personal contacts, the
NALP Directory of Legal Employers
(www.nalpdirectory.com/), Martindale-
Hubbell (www.martindale.com), and/or
the firm's website.
* Prepare a closing. Interviews often conclude
with, "Is there anything else?" Be able to state
in one positive, effective, closing sentence your
interest in the position and the contributions
you can make to the organization.


During the Interview
Do:
* Arrive early, and be polite to EVERYONE
you meet.
* Greet your interviewer with a firm hand-
shake. Make eye contact.
* Listen carefully and take time to reflect
before answering questions. Don't be afraid
to show enthusiasm let them know you
are interested in what they do. When it's your
turn, ask targeted questions this shows you
did your homework.
* Determine when the next communication
will take place between you and the inter-
viewer. Obtain a business card to help you
follow up, and THANK your interviewerss.

Don't:
* Stress your need for the job. Desperation is
not appealing.
* Blame poor performance on past employers,
workplaces, bosses or co-workers. Do not
talk negatively about anyone or anything, no
matter how true. It always makes you look bad
and you are a positive person.
* Appear too eager to discuss matters of
compensation, hours or vacation time. These
are legitimate questions, but they should take
a back seat to discovering whether or not you
and the job are a good fit.
* Let nervousness affect your actions. For
example, don't speak too quickly, fumble with
objects in your hand, rearrange your hair,
jiggle pocket change, chew gum or slouch.


Be an Ambassador
Highly committed and energetic
students aie encouraged to
apply by 5 p.m. Feb. I ito be
introduction to law school and
the profession ambassadors.
Applications are available in
the Ollice of Student Affairs.
Ambassadors are upper class
students interested in helping
and guiding a team ol si' to
eight entering students during
their first semester. Duties
include conducting activities so
participants can get to know
each other and assisting in
their transition to law school.
developing a support group for
new students, and challenging
the students to become an ac
live part of the community. All
applicants must be available to
attend an interview and a train
ing meeting this semester and
be available by Aug. 21. (First
and fifth semester students
are discouraged romn applying.)
For more information. contact
Noemar Castro in the Office of
Student Allairs at castro@law.
ull.edu or 273 0629.


Scholarship
Deadline Feb. 10
Continuing Student Scholar
ships (S1.000$S2.000) for
second and third year law
students are available and
listed along with eligibility
requirements on the Financial
Aid Bulletin Board on the
concourse. (Current scholarship
recipients are not eligible.)
Applications can be obtained
from the Oflice of Student
Affairs. 164 Holland Hall. and
must be liled by 5 p.m. Friday.
Feb. 10.


FLA LAW 3











SStudents Report on Summer Study Abroad


Cape Town
Summer Study
Meeting
Enjoy ABA accredited law
study abroad this summer at
top universities at favorable
tuition rales through UF lai,'s
programs in Costa Rica, France
and South Africa. An informa
tional meeting on the summer
program in Cape Town, South
Africa, will be held at noon
Wednesday. Feb. 8, in room
360. For details, contact
Noemar Castro in the Oflice
of Student Affairs at castro@
law.ufl.edu.











Bar Exam Loans
Are you planning to take the
bar and wondering where to
lind financing ior out of pocket
expenses? There are private
loan companies that will make
Bar eani loans to students in
their final year of law school to
pay for living expenses while
you study or the Ba Bar prep
classes, and other Bar related
expenses. You may borrow
s 1.000 to s 1.000. For more
information regarding these
private loans, contact the lend
els directly at:
* AicceL: :. rup 300 282 1550


* I. -, Eduiailnin Ret.:urlt:.
8005395363 ,oo',r, h-
.:.omleducaii raijra
LajLj:.an 800 984 0190
i Ijiu d Salli-ma~ iiom


4 FLA LAW


By Natasha Crespo (2L)
Broaden your horizons and ex-
plore the unknown this summer.
UF offers ABA-accredited pro-
grams in Paris and Montpellier,
France; Cape Town, South Africa;
and San Jose, Costa Rica. The
Office of Student Affairs also can
help you find other programs that
allow you to venture to almost
any place on the planet. Do not
pass up this rare opportunity to
learn about the culture, traditions
and legal institutions of another
country, all while earning law
school credit and paying favor-
able UF tuition rates.
Some students cite financial
concerns as the reason they
hesitate to venture far from
Gainesville, but they may not be
aware that since participants will
be taking classes, many lend-
ers will cover program costs. In
addition, UF programs charge a
flat tuition fee of $2,300 for UF
students and Florida residents
and $3,000 for others. The fee
covers up to seven transferable
credits. Additional costs include
books and materials, transporta-
tion, housing and personal items.
Financial Aid Director Carol
Huber can provide helpful hints
and guides for financing summer
abroad expenses that can help
make participation more afford-
able. The international experience
you gain by participating is, of
course, invaluable.
More detailed program and
curricular information is online


Beautiful Costa Rica offers a wide
variety of environmental law oppor-
tunities and exciting field trips.


at www.law.ufl.edu/students/
abroad/summer.shtml, but the
following provides first-hand
insight from 2005 participants.

Paris & Montpellier,
France, June 25-July 28
Classes: European Union Business
Law; International Sales Law; and
Comparative Criminal Procedure
"France was so much fun," said UF law
student lan Holmes. "The French students
were fantastic. They were kind and
friendly and were incredibly helpful when
it came to communicating with non-English
speaking people. The students threw us
a party for the Fourth of July and we
celebrated Bastille Day with them."
Students can see much more than the
inside of a classroom.
"The courses are scheduled Monday
through Thursday to give the students long
weekends for travel," said Holmes. "We
traveled to small towns in the southern
part of France as well as to Paris, London
and Barcelona. Some students planned
their trips to arrive a couple weeks early
or stay late so they could do more travel-
ing, although there were many opportuni-
ties within the six-week program."

San Jose, Costa Rica,
June 18-July 31
Classes: Comparative Environmental
Law: Water, Wetlands and Wildlife;
International and Environmental Law;
Environmental Dispute Resolution; and
Conservation Clinic
"The professors and students were great,"
said UF student Kristen Yerkes. "I feel like
I have a special bond with everyone who
went on the trip. It's great knowing people
from Costa Rica, Peru, Brazil, Jamaica and
across the United States.
"The classes were taught in ways very
similar to how they are taught here. The
main difference was that parts were
taught by Costa Ricans (Ticos) in English,
and there were Ticos in our class. This
provided the opportunity to hear different
views and thoughts. I have some great
new friends who I might never have met
otherwise," said Yerkes.
In addition to classes, students can have
amazing adventures.


For the first time this year, UF law
students in the Study Abroad Pro-
gram in France will spend part of
the program in Paris before moving
on to Montpellier, greatly enriching
their experience.

"I had lots of excursions. We went white
water rafting first, and then we tagged
turtles at Torteguero National Park," said
Yerkes. "I also visited volcanoes, rainfor-
ests and beaches."

Cape Town, South
Africa, June 19-July 21
Classes: Introduction to South African
Law; Human Rights Law; Cultural
Property; and Selected Issues in Com-
parative Law and Development
"Cape Town is one of the most beautiful
cities I have ever experienced," said UF
law student Suzette Maylor. "We woke
up every morning to majestic mountain
scenery in one direction and the beach in
the other it was simply breathtaking.
Almost all the students planned excur-
sions during or after our program. I went
shark-diving, rappelling off of a 3,000-foot
mountain, and on a three-day safari in the
Kruger National Park."

The application deadline for UF
programs is March 24, 2006. For
more information, contact Noemar
Castro in the Student Affairs Office
at 273-0629 or castro@law.ufl.edu,
or go to www.law.ufl.edu/students/
abroad/summer.shtml. A list of
non-UF programs is online at
www.nationaljurist.com.










"What will draw minorities here is to make this

a good environment for minorities. An essential

part of this is to make non-minorities under-

stand that it is essential and beneficial to them

for 'us' to be here."

Pedro Pavon (1L)


Diversity from Page 1
Pavon decried the emphasis on
numbers.
"What will draw minorities here
is to make this a good environ-
ment for minorities," said Pavon.
"An essential part of this is to
make non-minorities understand
that it is essential and beneficial
to them for 'us' to be here."
Law student Felix Felicier is-
sued a statement earlier, and reit-
erated at the forum, "We believe
a diverse student body is integral
to the law school's vision of
advancing human dignity, social
welfare, and justice through the
knowledge of law. As the state's
flagship law school, the Levin
College of Law trains many of
Florida's future leaders. Our
students will be judges, gover-
nors, senators and leaders in their
communities. A multiplicity of
cultural perspectives ensures that
the law school realistically reflects
the population of our state.
"Moreover, true cultural
diversity also ensures that the
dialogues in our classroom are
rich in perspective. These con-
versations will prepare UF law
graduates to better understand
and serve a diverse population of
clients, leading to better lawyer-
ing," Felicier continued.
Other suggestions included:
* Adding diversity training to the
curriculum
* Increasing the law school's pres-
ence at minority preprofessional
conferences or community
events
* Offering workshops and forums


to help minorities acclimate to
law school
* Provide academic and cultural
support, since some students
reported feelings of isolation
* Surveying other schools for
successful approaches

Student Affairs Coordinator
Noemar Castro said, "I've been
here since 1997, and we've had
conversations about racial issues
before. We must constantly
evaluate ourselves and make
changes, and administrators must
lead the way and provide the
funding and training needed to
make programs a reality."
Jones urged students and
faculty to contact him to report
problems or discriminatory be-
havior as soon as it happens.
Dean Jerry concurred, and
said, "I've asked Dean Jones
to review work done by the ad
hoc committee in 2003-04 to
determine whether the plan
drafted then would make sense
today, and to evaluate how it
might be revised or updated to fit
our current situation. He's told


me he plans to consult widely
with students about this plan
through a series of meetings that
will begin immediately. I would
suggest that the charge to such a
committee should be articulated
broadly to address how we can
achieve diversity and become the
model for other law schools in
the nation.
"In this particular regard, I'm
going to ask for the help of each
of you in a very important way:
When incidents occur that tear
at the fabric of our community,
when incidents occur that are
hurtful to you, our students, you
need to report them. My staff
can do nothing to help resolve it
unless we know about it.
"We are not going to be able
to meet our goals with respect to
diversity and improvement of our
climate overnight, but if each of
us faculty, students, adminis-
trators and alumni becomes
actively engaged in this process, I
am very optimistic about our fu-
ture, and I look forward to hear-
ing your suggestions about how
we can advance this agenda. We
want you all to be involved, and
to help us make this happen."
Jones e-mailed the law school
community Jan. 30 regarding
formation of the new Communi-
ty Relations Commitee, and held
a lunch meeting on the issue Feb.
1. For information or to help,
contact Jones in the Student
Affairs Office at 273-0626 or
jonesa@law.ufl.edu.


An intent audience listened to the dean's presentation then offered their
views and suggestions to help create a more welcoming atmosphere for
minorities and increase diversity at the law school.


Support Diversity
A diverse law school corn
nunily enriches Ihe aca
denic environment and learning
experience lor everyone. You
can help support diversity and
fight discrimination at the Levin
College of Law by:
* Speaking up when corn
nients are made no smaller
how casually that degrade
others on the basis of race.
gender or national origin.
* Engaging in healthy
conversations with those
dillerent roni you.
* Reporting discriminatory
comments or actions im-
mediately to Assistant Dean
lor Diversity and Coniniunity
Relations Adrian Jones or
others in the administration.
* Reaching beyond your
usual circle to include
others in social activities
or law school groups. Try to
meet someone new each day.
This will benefit you as well
as others.
* Respecting others and
their differences while not
becoming overly sensitive or
feeling like you have to "alk
on eggshells."



Treasury Official
to Speak Friday
Acting Deputy Secretary ol
the Treasury Eric Solomon will
speak on 'The Tai Legislative
and Regulatory Piocess" in the
Graduate Tax Program Enrich
nent Speaker Series Friday.
Feb. 10, at II a.m. in the
Chesterlield Snith Ceremo
nial Classroom. Everyone is
welcome.


FLA LAW 5











EVENT


S & OPPORTUNITIES


UF Law Hosts
Regional Trial
Team Competition
For the first time in 31 years
and thanks to the sponsorship
of Runberger, Kirk & Caldwell.
the Levin College of La i is
hosting the Region Five Nation
al Trial Competition here Feb.
10 12. Several partners fron
the lirm will serve as judges
and evaluators. This prestigious
trial competition is sponsored
nationally by the Teias Young
Lawyers Association and the
American College of Trial
LaAwyers. Eleven schools will
compete for the regional lille
and opportunity to advance to
nationals in March.
The team will hold its Final Four
Competition at the law school
10 a.m. 2 p.m. Feb. 24 in room
180A. For more information.
visit the Trial Team's website
at www.ultrialteani.conm.










Writing
Workshops
The following writing work
shops by Lois Randolph will be
held at 10 a.m. Wednesday in
room 285D:
Feb. 8 Sentence Structuring
Feb. 15 Punctuation
Feb. 22 Modification
March 1 Woid Choice
Brochures are available in the
Student Allairs Olfice on the
front counter.


6 FLA LAW


Meetings
* Toastmasters meets at 5 p.m.
today, Feb. 6, in room 285A.
* The Labor and Employment
Law Society meets at 6 p.m.
today, Feb. 6, in room 285A.
* JMBA meets at 7 p.m. today,
Feb. 6, in room 285C. Elec-
tions will be held for three
representative seats, and JMBA
members from any semester are
encouraged to run and voice
their opinions. The meeting is
open to all.
* The Law Association for
Women (LAW) meets at noon
Tuesday, Feb. 7, in the Bailey
Courtroom. Pizza and soda will
be provided, and all are wel-
come. For information, e-mail
Christine at cmg0203@ufl.edu.
* ACS meets at noon Wednesday,
Feb. 8, in room 345. They will
discuss the upcoming ACS na-
tional convention in June, and
plan activities for this semester.
Pizza will be served, and all are
welcome.

Race Roundtable
The Law School Democrats
will hold a general meeting with
a roundtable discussion on race
at the law school at 5 p.m. today,
Feb. 6, in room 359.

Workshop on Protection
ofArcheological & Native
American Resources
Agents from the Bureau of
Indian Affairs at the Department
of the Interior will discuss the
federal Archeological Resources
Act and Native American Graves
Protection & Repatriation Act
at a workshop 2-5 p.m. Tuesday,
Feb. 7, in the Florida Museum
of Natural History's Powell Hall
classroom. Topics will include


looting and trafficking of Native
American artifacts, and criminal
and civil enforcement of fed-
eral resource protection laws For
information, e-mail Jenny Barton
at jcbarton@ufl.edu.

Criminal Law Research
Workshop Feb. 7
The Criminal Law Association
and Westlaw are sponsoring a
workshop at noon Tuesday, Feb.
7, in room 345 to teach students
and faculty how to conduct crim-
inal law research and searches on
Westlaw. Westlaw has numerous
criminal law-related functions,
including researching state and
local criminal laws. Pizza and
soda will be provided, and all are
welcome. For more information,
e-mail CLA President Bryon Car-
roll at bryon322@ufl.edu.

ILS Ethnic Dining Night
& International Breakfast
The International Law Society
(ILS) will have their first Ethnic
Dining Night at Sawamura Japa-
nese Steakhouse, 1624 SW 13th
Street, at 6:30 p.m. Wednesday,
Feb. 8. All are welcome to attend
and learn more about what ILS
has planned for the semester
while meeting other global-
minded students.
ILS will host the next install-
ment of their International
Breakfast Series 10-11 a.m.
Thursday, Feb. 9, in the faculty
dining room. Associate Dean for
Library and Technology Kathleen
Price will speak on international
art law, and Westlaw will provide
a free breakfast and brief pre-
sentation on how to search for
international jobs, internships
and documents.


tre Panama ConventKn
a The rules of UNCTRAL and s r
Ie&lMrnafl nr) a btlndrig instrurr
* The t'lashnin Convention wih
aiL'E.5 rc the Incernarona
rr vestientt Der
*rom6B Sar.l


Professor Jorge Santistevan, former
Ombudsman of Peru, is teaching part
of the Law & Policy in the Americas
foreign enrichment course.

'Lunch & Learn'
The Jewish Law Students As-
sociation invites everyone to join
them for "Lunch and Learn" at
noon Wednesday, Feb. 8, in the
Bailey Courtroom. Rabbi Siger
will discuss issues of Jewish law
and modern law. Kosher lunch
will be provided.

Foley Here Thursday
The Entertainment, Arts &
Sports Law Society (EASLS),
in coordination with Professor
Hurst's Sports Law Seminar, is
hosting University of Florida
Athletic Director Jeremy Foley
at 4 p.m. Thursday, Feb. 9, in
room 283. Foley's presentation
will be followed by a question
and answer segment. Topics
are expected to include NCAA
compliance procedures, recruit-
ing, and instances where the UF
Athletic Department must seek
legal advice. All University of
Florida students and faculty are
















encouraged to attend. EASLS
officers will be available after the
presentation to answer questions
regarding EASLS. For informa-
tion, e-mail Jerilyn Hattendorf at
jhatten@ufl.edu.

Valentine's Candy-Grams
Send a crush, friend, boyfriend
or girlfriend some love for only
a dollar. The Law Association for
Women will sell candy-grams in
the courtyard Wednesday, Feb. 8,
until Monday, Feb. 13. Stop by
the LAW table for details.

Be a Children's Fellow
Apply by Feb. 15 to the Center
on Children and Families (CCF)
if you are interested in being
a 2006 Children's Fellow. You
must have completed at least
three semesters of law school.
The Children's Fellows Program
recruits and mentors individu-
als interested in advocacy for
children and youth. The fellows
contribute an important dimen-


sion to CCF's work, including
helping to organize and host
its annual conference, attend-
ing CCF faculty meetings, and
working under faculty guidance
on research and writing projects
such as amicus briefs and posi-
tion papers on issues of current
importance. Fellows also gather
regularly for dinner to discuss
ongoing projects and hear guest
speakers from the children's advo-
cacy community. Fellows receive
a $1,000 honorarium upon the
completion of approximately
100 hours over the course of the
year, and are listed on the CCF
website and in its publications.
To apply, send an e-mail
describing your background and
interests to CCF Program Co-
ordinator Debbie Kelley Willis
at kelley@law.ufl.edu, or contact
her at 273-0613 or room 368A,
PO Box 117625, Gainesville FL
32611-7625. Information about
the center is online at www.law.
ufl.edu/centers/childlaw/.


Law Review Tutoring
Members of Florida Law
Review are conducting free tutor-
ing sessions for first-year classes.
Information about specific dates
and room locations for each
session is on the calendar on the
Florida Law Review Tutoring
TWEN webpage, where you also
can post any questions or general
topic areas you would like to
cover in the session.

Yoga Classes
Resource Counselor Nicole
Stern is offering yoga classes at
5 p.m. each Tuesday until April
18 in room 355-D. Participants
should bring comfortable clothes
and a yoga mat or large towel.
The classes will help partici-
pants stretch, breathe, relax and
achieve strength, flexibility and
clarity of mind. Due to room
capacity, there will be a sign-in
sheet and the class will be on a
first come, first serve basis.


LIC News
The Legal Information Center
has purchased a new historical
database of briefs and other
documents filed in the Supreme
Court. Alaking ol Mlodem law:
U.S. Supreme Court Records
and Biefs. 1832 1978. These
ale PDF images of the actual
documents ailingg stamps and
all). and the database is
expected to be very useful
for scholarly research (e.g..
seminar papers, research for
professors. law review and
journal research edits. etc.).
Brief liiteis can use the data
base for inspiration or potential
models, and history bulls and
law geeks of all persuasions
may just find it fascinating to
review. To access the data
base. you must be logged into
the UF network, then go online
to http://infolrac.galegroup.
com/itwebl?db=SCRB. Contact
a reference librarian at 273
0723 if you have questions or
need assistance.


Events Honor Black History Month


The Black Law Students As-
sociation (BLSA) invites everyone
in the law school community to
attend the following events in
honor of Black History Month:
* Attorney Kimberly Menchion will
discuss her experiences as a young
minority lawyer Wednesday, Feb. 8,
at noon in the faculty dining room.
Currently practicing in Tallahas-
see, Menchion will discuss African
American history and how it relates
to her opportunities as an attorney.
* The Virgil Hawkins Bar Associa-
tion will hold a "Beat the Bar" test
preparation class for students from
law schools throughout the state
Saturday, Feb. 11.
* BLSA's annual Culture on the
Concourse event will be held at


noon Feb. 15 on the law school
concourse, and will feature an
exhibition of African and African
American literature, pictures and
cultural artifacts.
BLSA and the Association for Pub-
lic Interest Law will serve lunch
at St. Francis House, a homeless
shelter in downtown Gainesville, 9
a.m.-2 p.m. Feb. 15. To help, con-
tact BLSA President Byron Owens
at owensb@ufl.edu.
Florida Supreme Court Justice
Peggy Quince will speak at noon
Feb. 23 in the Chesterfield Smith
Ceremonial Classroom. Her speech
is co-sponsored by BLSA and the
American Constitution Society.
A reception will be held after the
speech.


* BLSA Alumni
Reunion
Weekend
Feb. 24-25
is intended to help BLSA alums
connect with each other and with
current students. This year's theme
is "Light of the Past, Guiding the
Future." Space for law students is
limited, so sign up now. Registra-
tion is $40. The reunion includes
a gathering at the home of Dean
Robert Jerry; a panel discussion
about diversity in higher education;
and a speech by Linnes Finney,
president-elect of the National Bar
Association, at a banquet Feb. 25.
For information, contact Reunion
Chair Melanie Thompson at
Thompson@ufl.edu.


LIC Workshops
* Feb. 15 and March 1, 3 p.m.,
Resejrch W ai:rd Librjr, Cala
Iloii O l.jbDatj-'e e J',urnjal
* March 8, 3 p.m., Rs'.jar:h
Wilard The ODigei- S,l[em
* March 22, 3 p.m., RF:r arih
Wi:ard LEgial En:,i:li:pediai
,and ALR
* April 5, 3 p.m., Le :lqalivi-
Hii[o:r,
* Feb. 22 & March 29, 3 p.m.,
Blupeboi.i iCiiad .n Si illi
Sign up sheets are al the Refer
ence Desk. For assistance,
e mail Elizabeth Duller (ouller@
law.ufl.edu) or Maryellen
O'Brien (obiien@law.ufl.edu).


FLA LAW 7








Send Us Your News
Flalawv is published each week
school is in session by the Levin
College ol Law Conmmunications
Office. Submit news of interest
to the law school community by
10 a.m. Tuesday for the follow
ing Monday's issue to lockelle@
law.ull.edu or 273 0650.
Contact amirin@law.ull.edu
to be e mailed a weekly early
release pdf of Flalaw.

* Tim Lockette. Editor
* Kristen Hines. Photographer



College of Law
Administration
* Robert H. Jerry. II. Dean
* George L. Dawson.
Associate Dean lor
Academic Affairs
* J. Patrick Shannon.
Associate Dean lor
Administrative Affairs
* Lyrissa Barnett Lidsky.
Associate Dean lor
Faculty Development
* Michael K. Friel,
Associate Dean & Director.
Graduate Tax Progran
* Stuart R. Cohn.
Associate Dean lor
International Studies
* M. Kathleen "Kathie" Price.
Associate Dean lor Library
and Technology
* Gail E. Sasnett,
Associate Dean lor
Students. Professionalism
and Community Relations
* J. Michael Patrick.
Assistant Dean for Admissions
* Linda Calvert Hanson,
Assistant Dean for
Career Services
* Adrian Jones.
Assistant Dean for Diversity
and Community Relations
* Jenniler Cope. Interim
Assistant Dean for Students
* Debra D. Amiirin.
Director ol Communications
* Donald J. Hale,
Senior Director ol Development
and Alumni Affairs

i. Ni\VTiL -.iT' OF
FLORIDA


PEOPLE


Scholarship & Activities
Francisco Ferreiro
UF Law Student
* First-place, Legal Affairs Writing
Contest for Law Students, spon-
sored by The Marbury Institute
of DLA Piper Rudnick Gray Cary
US LLP His entry, "Overprivi-
leged," will be published in the
MarchlApril 2006 issue of Legal
Aft., and made available online
at www.legalaffairs.org.
Christopher Slobogin
Stephen C. O'Connell Professor
* Published "Transaction Surveil-
lance by the Government," Missis-
sippi Law Journal symposium
issue devoted to "The Search
and Seizure of Computers and
Electronic Evidence." His article
argues that current regulation
of the government's attempts to
obtain records about our transac-
tions ranging from medical
and financial documents to inter-
net and phone logs is far


too lax, and makes several specific
reform proposals.

In the News
George R. "Bob" Dekle
Director, Criminal Law Clinic-
Prosecution, Legal Skills Professor
* Jacksonville Daily Record, Jan. 31.
Mentioned in article on new fac-
ulty at the Levin College of Law.
Andrea Matwyshyn
Assistant Professor
* Jacksonville Daily Record. Jan.
31. Matwyshyn was quoted as
organizer of the conference "Data
Devolution: Corporate Informa-
tion Security, Consumers and the
Future of Regulation."
* WRUF AM/FM, Feb. 3. Mat-
wyshyn was interviewed on the
"Data Devolution" conference,
and discussed the dangers of
identity theft.
Christopher L. Peterson
Assistant Professor
* "Law Matters" show on WUFT
TV Jan. 26. Peterson discussed


SCHOLARSHIP
& ACTIVITIES


consumer protection issues such
as warranties, consumer fraud
and predatory lending.
Meshon Rawls
Director, Juvenile Law Clinic,
Legal Skills Professor
* Jacksonville Daily Record, Jan. 31.
Mentioned in article on new fac-
ulty at the Levin College of Law.
Christopher Slobogin
Stephen C. O'Connell Professor
* WRUF /AMFM, Feb. 2. Slobo-
gin was interviewed regarding the
possible abolition of the death
penalty.
Barbara Bennett Woodhouse
David Levin Chair in Family
Law, Professor, Center on Chil-
dren and Families Director
* WRUF AM/FM, Feb. 1 & 3.
Woodhouse discussed the confir-
mation of Alito to the Supreme
Court, and cited concerns that it
led to a homogenous court that
lacked diversity in terms of race
and gender.


CALENDAR


February
6 Law School Democrats Meeting &
Race Roundtable, 5 p.m., rm. 359
Toastmasters, 5 p.m., rm. 285A
Labor & Employment Law Society
Meeting, 6 p.m., rm. 285A
JMBA Meeting & Elections, 7
p.m., rm. 285C
7 What I Did Last Summer, noon,
faculty dining room (FDR)
Criminal Law Research Workshop,
noon, rm. 345
LAW Meeting, noon, Bailey
Courtroom
Workshop on Protection of
Archeological & Native American
Resources, 2-5 p.m., Powell Hall
Classroom


ACS Meeting, noon, rm. 345
Yoga Class, 5 p.m., rm. 355D
8 WritingWorkshop, 10 a.m., rm.
285D
BLSA Speaker, Kimberly Men-
chion, noon, FDR
Cape Town Summer Study Meet-
ing, noon, rm. 360
Jewish Law Students Association
"Lunch & Learn," noon, Bailey
Courtroom
ILS Ethnic Dining Night, 6:30
p.m., Sawamura Steakhouse
9 ILS International Breakfast, 10-11
a.m., FDR
Life as a Public Defender, noon, FDR
EASLS Speaker, Jeremy Foley, 4
p.m., rm. 283


10 Acting Treasury Deputy Secretary
Eric Solomon, Graduate Tax
Speaker Series, 11 a.m., rm. 180
14 IRS Career Opportunities,
noon, Bailey Courtroom
15 KimmWalton, National
Legal Career Author and
Speaker, noon, 180


Online Calendar
More information on upcoming
meetings and events is avail-
able through the Levin College
of Law's online calendars at:
www.law.ufl.edu/calendars/.


8 FLA LAW








Send Us Your News
Flalawv is published each week
school is in session by the Levin
College ol Law Conmmunications
Office. Submit news of interest
to the law school community by
10 a.m. Tuesday for the follow
ing Monday's issue to lockelle@
law.ull.edu or 273 0650.
Contact amirin@law.ull.edu
to be e mailed a weekly early
release pdf of Flalaw.

* Tim Lockette. Editor
* Kristen Hines. Photographer



College of Law
Administration
* Robert H. Jerry. II. Dean
* George L. Dawson.
Associate Dean lor
Academic Affairs
* J. Patrick Shannon.
Associate Dean lor
Administrative Affairs
* Lyrissa Barnett Lidsky.
Associate Dean lor
Faculty Development
* Michael K. Friel,
Associate Dean & Director.
Graduate Tax Progran
* Stuart R. Cohn.
Associate Dean lor
International Studies
* M. Kathleen "Kathie" Price.
Associate Dean lor Library
and Technology
* Gail E. Sasnett,
Associate Dean lor
Students. Professionalism
and Community Relations
* J. Michael Patrick.
Assistant Dean for Admissions
* Linda Calvert Hanson,
Assistant Dean for
Career Services
* Adrian Jones.
Assistant Dean for Diversity
and Community Relations
* Jenniler Cope. Interim
Assistant Dean for Students
* Debra D. Amiirin.
Director ol Communications
* Donald J. Hale,
Senior Director ol Development
and Alumni Affairs

i. Ni\VTiL -.iT' OF
FLORIDA


PEOPLE


Scholarship & Activities
Francisco Ferreiro
UF Law Student
* First-place, Legal Affairs Writing
Contest for Law Students, spon-
sored by The Marbury Institute
of DLA Piper Rudnick Gray Cary
US LLP His entry, "Overprivi-
leged," will be published in the
MarchlApril 2006 issue of Legal
Aft., and made available online
at www.legalaffairs.org.
Christopher Slobogin
Stephen C. O'Connell Professor
* Published "Transaction Surveil-
lance by the Government," Missis-
sippi Law Journal symposium
issue devoted to "The Search
and Seizure of Computers and
Electronic Evidence." His article
argues that current regulation
of the government's attempts to
obtain records about our transac-
tions ranging from medical
and financial documents to inter-
net and phone logs is far


too lax, and makes several specific
reform proposals.

In the News
George R. "Bob" Dekle
Director, Criminal Law Clinic-
Prosecution, Legal Skills Professor
* Jacksonville Daily Record, Jan. 31.
Mentioned in article on new fac-
ulty at the Levin College of Law.
Andrea Matwyshyn
Assistant Professor
* Jacksonville Daily Record. Jan.
31. Matwyshyn was quoted as
organizer of the conference "Data
Devolution: Corporate Informa-
tion Security, Consumers and the
Future of Regulation."
* WRUF AM/FM, Feb. 3. Mat-
wyshyn was interviewed on the
"Data Devolution" conference,
and discussed the dangers of
identity theft.
Christopher L. Peterson
Assistant Professor
* "Law Matters" show on WUFT
TV Jan. 26. Peterson discussed


SCHOLARSHIP
& ACTIVITIES


consumer protection issues such
as warranties, consumer fraud
and predatory lending.
Meshon Rawls
Director, Juvenile Law Clinic,
Legal Skills Professor
* Jacksonville Daily Record, Jan. 31.
Mentioned in article on new fac-
ulty at the Levin College of Law.
Christopher Slobogin
Stephen C. O'Connell Professor
* WRUF /AMFM, Feb. 2. Slobo-
gin was interviewed regarding the
possible abolition of the death
penalty.
Barbara Bennett Woodhouse
David Levin Chair in Family
Law, Professor, Center on Chil-
dren and Families Director
* WRUF AM/FM, Feb. 1 & 3.
Woodhouse discussed the confir-
mation of Alito to the Supreme
Court, and cited concerns that it
led to a homogenous court that
lacked diversity in terms of race
and gender.


CALENDAR


February
6 Law School Democrats Meeting &
Race Roundtable, 5 p.m., rm. 359
Toastmasters, 5 p.m., rm. 285A
Labor & Employment Law Society
Meeting, 6 p.m., rm. 285A
JMBA Meeting & Elections, 7
p.m., rm. 285C
7 What I Did Last Summer, noon,
faculty dining room (FDR)
Criminal Law Research Workshop,
noon, rm. 345
LAW Meeting, noon, Bailey
Courtroom
Workshop on Protection of
Archeological & Native American
Resources, 2-5 p.m., Powell Hall
Classroom


ACS Meeting, noon, rm. 345
Yoga Class, 5 p.m., rm. 355D
8 WritingWorkshop, 10 a.m., rm.
285D
BLSA Speaker, Kimberly Men-
chion, noon, FDR
Cape Town Summer Study Meet-
ing, noon, rm. 360
Jewish Law Students Association
"Lunch & Learn," noon, Bailey
Courtroom
ILS Ethnic Dining Night, 6:30
p.m., Sawamura Steakhouse
9 ILS International Breakfast, 10-11
a.m., FDR
Life as a Public Defender, noon, FDR
EASLS Speaker, Jeremy Foley, 4
p.m., rm. 283


10 Acting Treasury Deputy Secretary
Eric Solomon, Graduate Tax
Speaker Series, 11 a.m., rm. 180
14 IRS Career Opportunities,
noon, Bailey Courtroom
15 KimmWalton, National
Legal Career Author and
Speaker, noon, 180


Online Calendar
More information on upcoming
meetings and events is avail-
able through the Levin College
of Law's online calendars at:
www.law.ufl.edu/calendars/.


8 FLA LAW