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UF UFLAW



Fla law newsletter of the University of Florida College of Law
ALL VOLUMES CITATION SEARCH THUMBNAILS PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00072281/00160
 Material Information
Title: Fla law newsletter of the University of Florida College of Law
Portion of title: Flalaw
Physical Description: Serial
Creator: Levin College of Law
Publisher: s.n.
Place of Publication: <Gainesville FL> College of Law Communications Office 1997-
Creation Date: January 30, 2006
Frequency: weekly
completely irregular
 Subjects
Genre: periodical   ( marcgt )
serial   ( sobekcm )
 Notes
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol.1, no. 1 (Oct. 6, 1997)-
General Note: Weekly during the school year with a biweekly insert, numbered separately called: The Docket.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved, Board of Trustees of the University of Florida
Resource Identifier: aleph - 002311766
notis - ALR5129
System ID: UF00072281:00160

Table of Contents
    Sign up now for Feb. 3-4 conferences
        Page 1
    Career Services
        Page 2
        Page 3
    Events and opportunities
        Page 4
        Page 5
        Page 6
    People, scholarship and activities
        Page 7
    UF Law to Build National Election Database
        Page 7
    Learning to relax
        Page 8
    Calendar
        Page 8
Full Text



















Sign Up Now for Feb. 3-4 Conferences


The Levin College of Law
will host two major legal con-
ferences this week and stu-
dents, faculty and staff should
register now for complimentary
attendance.

Data Security
To be held Feb. 3-4, "Data
Devolution: Corporate Infor-
mation Security, Consumers
and the Future of Regulation"
will draw legal scholars, privacy
activists, industry representa-
tives and others to discuss one
of the most pressing issues in
the law of technology the
security of personal information
in corporate databases.
"Despite several statutes on
the federal and state level to
protect certain types of person-
ally-identifiable consumer
information, security breaches
and the data crime economy are
burgeoning," Matwyshyn said.
Panelists will provide a broad
overview of social problems as-
sociated with weak information
security, Matwyshyn said, and
will discuss paths governments
can take on state, federal and
international levels to stop the
theft of personal data.



INSIDE THIS ISSUE
2 Career Services
4 Events
8 Calendar


Two major conferences will take place on the law school campus
this weekend. Students can attend both for free.


"It's time companies start
treating personal information
about their consumers as more
than just another corporate
asset," said panelist Lauren Gel-
man, associate director of the
Center for Internet and Society
at Stanford Law School. "This
conference is an important step
in determining the scope of the
problem, assessing the success
of corporate self-regulation and
determining whether further
privacy legislation is required."
The conference will be held
in the Chesterfield Smith Cer-
emonial Classroom. It begins
at 1 p.m. Friday, Feb. 3, and
continues all day Saturday, Feb.


Help Build
Election Law
Database


U


4. The conference is free to UF
law students, faculty and staff.
To register, contact Barbara
DeVoe at 273-0615 or devoe@
law.ufl.edu.

Music Law
If you want to learn more
about the ins and outs of the
music business and hear
demos from local bands at-
tend the Fourth Annual Music
Law Conference Feb. 4.
The conference will feature
panel discussions, a music expo,
demo listening, mentoring ses-
sions and a showcase at Com-
mon Grounds and Abbey Road.
The keynote speaker is
Continued on Page 5


Learn to
Relax


VOL. 9, NO. 19 JANUARY 30, 2006



Black History
Month Begins
The Black Law Students
Association will kick off
Black History Month Feb. 4 at
Gainesville's annual Kids Day
celebration from 11 a.m. to 3
p.m. in T.B. McPherson Park at
1717 SE 15th St.
Kids Day features carnival and
educational games for children.
Law students will volunteer and
organize some of the games at
the event. If you would like to
volunteer, contact BLSA Presi-
dent Byron Owens at owensbl@
ufl.edu.
Black History Month events are
planned throughout February at
the Levin College of Law. For
details, see page 6.


Apply Feb. 10 for
Fall Abroad
Students have until Feb. 10 to ap-
ply for the law school's Fall 2006
exchange programs, which allow
participants to experience other
cultures while learning valuable le-
gal skills. This year the law school
offers programs in: Montpellier
University in Montpellier, France;
Warsaw University in Warsaw,
Poland; Pontifica Universidade
Catolica in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil.


All programs run from September
U to December. For more informa-
tion, contact Noemar Castro at
273-0629 or castro@law.ufl.edu.











CAREERSERVICES
Hints to help you in the legal profession


Scholarship
Deadline Feb. 10
Continuing Student Scholar-
ships ($1,000-$2,000) for
second- and third-year law
students are now available
and listed along with eligibility
requirements on the Financial
Aid Bulletin Board on the con-
course. (Current scholarship
recipients are not eligible.)
Applications can be obtained
from the Office of Student
Affairs, 164 Holland Hall, and
must be filed by 5 p.m. Feb. 10.


2 FLA LAW


The Path to the
Florida Supreme Court
A judicial clerkship is a pres-
tigious, paid position in which
a law graduate is employed by
a judge to assist with research,
writing and review of opinions
and orders, usually for a one- or
two-year period. A clerkship is
a great way to begin your legal
career and opens many employ-
ment doors upon completion. It
gives you the unique opportunity
to watch the law as it is made,
and to be a part of that process.
You will be able to think about
and discuss legal issues without
the pressure of billable hours,
and in most cases, you will be
exposed to a wider variety of
substantive legal areas than most
attorneys' practices allow.
Judicial clerks see many dif-
ferent written and oral advocacy
styles, giving you a chance to
learn what is effective before you
are on the firing line yourself.
Government employers and law
firms recognize the value of the
experience gained in terms of
well-honed research and writing
skills as well as personal knowl-
edge behind the scenes of the
courthouse.

Opportunities In State
Much attention is focused on
federal clerkships, but there are
many rewarding clerkships avail-
able at the state court level, where
a number of clerkship opportuni-
ties are offered and judges often
seek students with local ties.
For example, applications are
currently being accepted for
coveted positions with Florida
Supreme Court Justices Kenneth


Florida Supreme Court Justice Raoul Cantero (left) Chief Justice
Barbara Pariente and Justice Harry Lee Anstead hear arguments at UF's
Moot Court Final Four. Clerking for a justice can be the perfect start to
a career. Career Services can help you compete for a clerkship.


Bell (Summer 2006 opening),
Peggy A. Quince (October 2006
opening), and R. Fred Lewis
(August 2007 opening). These
positions are expected to be for
two-year terms. For details, go to
the job bank on Symplicity.
Each Florida Supreme Court
justice employs two elbow clerks,
who typically serve staggered
two-year terms. That way, the
justice always has one fresh clerk
and one experienced clerk.
Florida's intermediate state
appellate courts, the courts of
appeal, are divided into five
districts with one court in each
district. Each district has about
a dozen judges who hire judicial
law clerks. In Florida, judicial law
clerks are rarely found at the trial
court level in the circuit and the
county courts. More typically,
trial court staff attorneys assist a
group of judges as needed.
Generally speaking, Florida
Supreme Court justices and state


appellate court judges usu-
ally select their clerks late in the
spring of the students' second
year of law school, though some
judges may delay the process
until the following fall. Courts
look to graduating third-year
students and recent graduates to
fill positions as trial court staff
attorneys; because these openings
are not for a set term, they tend
to be less cyclical. Occasionally,
judges need clerks to fill mid-year
vacancies, but those opportuni-
ties are infrequent and can rarely
be predicted in advance.

Extern Advantage
It is not uncommon for the ju-
dicial clerk to have first completed
a judicial externship for a judge
who then hires the law student
for the law clerk position upon
graduation. To enhance your cre-
dentials, consider participating in
the law school's Florida Supreme
Court externship offering. Each






I' I


term, the law school is able to
select one or two well-qualified
students to spend the semester
in Tallahassee at the Florida Su-
preme Court while earning credit
for their experience.
These externs review and make
recommendations on petitions
for discretionary review, at-
torney discipline matters and
extraordinary writ petitions.
They also conduct legal research
and prepare case summaries and
legal memoranda. Externs have a
rich opportunity to discuss legal
issues and cases with justices,


staff attorneys and judicial law
clerks. They also attend oral argu-
ments and special lectures. This
first-hand experience can provide
you with insight to determine
whether this is a career path for
you.
Applications for the Florida
Supreme Court externship are
available in the Center for Career
Services and Center for Govern-
mental Responsibility. Complet-
ed applications are due at 3 p.m.
Friday, Feb. 3, to Lenny Kennedy
in CGR.
To explore other states' judicial


clerkships, check out The Vermont
Law School 2006 Guide to State
Judicial Clerkship Procedures. This
125-page directory, available in
PDF for download, contains
information on applying for state
judicial clerkships in all 50 states
at the supreme court, appellate
court, and trial court levels. The
law school subscribes to this
on-line publication, so you can
contact the Center for Career
Services for the password.


Career Services Programs This Week


Interview Preparation
Workshop
Assistant Director of Career
Services Dexter Smith will
share the nuts and bolts of the
interview process in a workshop
at noon Tuesday, Jan. 31, in the
faculty dining room. He will ex-
plain how to properly prepare for
initial and follow-up interviews
and share tips on how to make
yourself the best job candidate
you can be.

Interviewing From the
Employer's Perspective
Come listen to Imogene
Cathey, assistant general counsel
for the University of Florida, as
she discusses what every success-
ful law student needs to know
about the legal interview and im-
pressing potential employers- all
from the employer's perspective
- at noon Wednesday, Feb. 1, in
the faculty dining room.


One Quick Question
Stop by the Career Services
One Quick Question table on
the concourse near the entrance
to the Lawton Chiles Legal Infor-
mation Center Thursday, Feb. 2,
from 9:45-11:15 a.m. for answers
to your questions about OCI,
externships, mock interviews,
resumes, cover letters, career
development and more.

Mock Interviews Begin
Next Week
Career Services Attorney Advi-
sor Annemarie Schuller, who
previously worked for Jenner
& Block in Chicago, will be
available for mock interviews
beginning Feb. 6. Take advantage
of this outstanding opportunity
to participate in an interview, fol-
lowed by a 15-minute critique in
which Schuller will provide sug-
gestions and comments. If you
want to go into the interviewing
season with a little extra confi-
dence, set up an interview now


by calling 273-0860 or stopping
by the Career Services office.

'Job Goddess'
Is Coming
Job-search guru Kimm Walton
will return to the law school to
speak Feb. 15 at noon in room
180. Known as the "Job God-
dess" through her column in
National Law Journal, Walton is
the nationally acclaimed author
of titles such as Guerilla Tactics
for Getting the Legal Job of Your
Dreams and What Law School
Doesn't Teach You: But You Really
Need to Know. Walton will be
here to do her "Guerilla Tactics"
presentation. Whether you're
looking for a summer job, or
your first permanent job after
graduation, this seminar is a
must, so mark your calendar.
The program is co-sponsored by
BarBri.


Career Deadlines
Approaching
Several important career-
related deadlines are just
around the corner. Check these
dates against your calendar:
Jan. 30
* Baker & Hostetler Minority
Scholarship and Summer
Law Firm Job applications
due in Career Services
* Phase II OCI bidding closes
* Florida Bar Foundation
Summer Legal Services Fel-
lowship applications due
Feb. 3
* Florida Supreme Court
Externship Summer and Fall
2006 applications due, 3
p.m. in Center for Govern-
mental Responsibility
Feb. 6
* Phase III OCI bidding closes
at noon
Feb. 10
* Summer and Fall 2006
faculty-created externships
due in Career Services
Feb. 13
* Phase IV bidding closes
Feb. 15
* Applications for HUD Legal
Honors Program due


FLA LAW 3

















Dean Jerry to
Host Music Night
Got a hidden musical talent?
Show it off at the upcoming
Music Night, to be held Feb.
19 at the home of Dean Robert
Jerry. All students and faculty
are invited.
To participate, you must bring
a dessert and agree to play an
instrument or sing a song. A
piano will be available. Each
participant can bring one guest.
Space is limited. To register,
stop by the Dean's Office and
see Dorris Perron.





















Treasury Official
to Speak
Acting Deputy Secretary of
the Treasury Eric Solomon will
speak on "The Tax Legislative
and Regulatory Process" in the
Graduate Tax Program Enrich-
ment Speakers Series Feb. 10
at 11 a.m. in the Chesterfield
Smith Ceremonial Classroom.
Everyone is welcome.


4 FLA LAW


V VENTS & OPPORTUNITIES


Peruvian Ombudsman
Speaks Today
Jorge Santistevan, former
Ombudsman of Peru, will speak
on the topic "Civil Society and
Human Rights: the Truth and
Reconciliation Commission and
the Defensoria del Pueblo in
Peru" today, Jan. 30, at noon in
the faculty dining room. This is a
bring-your-own-lunch event with
light refreshments served.

Yoga Classes at
New Time
Yoga classes at the Levin
College of Law have been
rescheduled for a new date and
time. Classes will be held every
Tuesday at 5 p.m. in room 355D.
Remember to bring comfortable
clothes and a yoga mat or large
towel. Because the room can ac-
commodate only 30 people, there
will be a sign-in sheet, and classes
will be available on a first-come,
first-served basis. If you can't
make it to these classes, contact
the Student Recreation Center
for their yoga schedule.

SALSA to Meet
The Spanish-American Law
Students Association will meet
at 7:30 p.m. Wednesday, Feb.
1, at Emiliano's restaurant in
downtown Gainesville. Everyone
is welcome. For details, contact
Christine Garcia at cmg0203@
ufl.edu.

Law Review Tutoring
Begins Today
Members of the Florida Law
Review conduct free tutoring
sessions for all first-year classes
beginning today, Jan. 30. All ses-


sions start at 5 p.m. For specific
dates and room locations, check
the Florida Law Review Tutoring
TWEN Web page, where you
can post questions or general
topic areas you would like to
cover in the tutoring session.

JMBA Meets Today
The John Marshall Bar As-
sociation will meet today, Jan.
30, at 7 p.m. in room 285C.
Everyone is invited.

Meet the Toastmasters
Toastmasters meets today,
Jan. 30 at 5 p.m. in room 285A.
Everyone is invited.

Labor Law Meets Today
The Labor and Employment
Law Society meets at 6 p.m.
today, Jan. 30, in room 285A.


LSU Professor to Speak
to Federalists
James R. Stoner, Jr., professor
of political science at Louisiana
State University and member
of the National Council on the
Humanities, will address the
Federalist Society Thursday, Feb.
2, at 1 p.m. in the Bailey Court-
room. Stoner is the author of
Common-Law Liberty: Rethinking
American Constitutionalism and
Common Law and Liberal Theory:
Coke, Hobbes, and the Origins of
American Constitutionalism.

International Breakfasts
Begin
The International Law Society
will hold its first International
Breakfast Thursday, Feb. 2, at
10 a.m. in the faculty dining
room. Stop by for a free break-


Win Trivia Contest
Last week, a lucky student won a year's supply of Ben & Jerry's
ice cream by answering the Intellectual Property Trivia Question of
the Week. (The winner correctly identified the supermarket as the
revolutionary invention patented by Clarence Saunders in 1917.)
This week's winner will receive a surprise gift valued at more than
$100. Here's the question:
Who received the first patent granted by the U.S. (Patent No. 1)?
a) John Ruggles, for a locomotive steam engine
b) Thomas Edison, for the phonograph
c) John Goulding, for an improved wool manufacturing
process
d) Alexander Graham Bell, for a device for "transmitting vocal
or other sounds telegraphically."
E-mail your answer to IptlaTrivia@yahoo.com. The weekly trivia
contest is part of Intellectual Property Month, sponsored by the
Intellectual Property and Technology Law Association.


I




































fast (courtesy ofWestlaw), meet events as well as current political


global-minded classmates and
learn about an interesting facet of
international law.

Republicans to Meet
The Law School Republicans
will hold their first meeting of
the semester at noon Tuesday,
Jan. 31, in room 345. The group
will discuss upcoming LSR


Continued from page 1
Robert Lind, the Paul E. Treusch
Professor of Law at Southwestern
University School of Law in Los
Angeles. He will speak about
the demise of record companies.
Lind works as a consultant with
record companies, music publish-
ers, studios, production compa-
nies, museums and attorneys. He
is an expert in intellectual prop-
erty, entertainment, art, museum
and media law.
Panel topics will include
international publishing, Internet
and guerilla marketing, dealing
with contracts, copyright issues
and ethics of the music busi-
ness. Panelists include Stephen


happenings.

JLPP Welcomes
Grade-Ons
The Journal ofLaw e&Public
Policy welcomes the following
Spring 2006 Grade-on invitees:
Jeffrey Allen, Lisa Blum, Kate
Burnsed, Andrew Cheslock, Tif-
fany Cummins, Billy Dolence,


C. O'Connell Professor Jeffrey
L. Harrison; Visiting Professor
Ulrich Loewenheim, president
of the German Group of the As-
sociation Litteraire et Artistique
International; Brian Mecher,
founder of the Music Law
Conference; Cassandra Willard,
a partner at Franklin & Wil-
lard who focuses on intellectual
property and entertainment law;
and David M. Sams (2L), owner
of 1-2-3 Records, a label that has
been releasing and distributing
independent music since 1997.
The conference will be held in
rooms 285A and 285B. It is free
to all UF students with a valid


Jessica Furst, James Galloway,
Craig Harris, Lee Hart, Shawn
Jewell, Thomas Kesler, Edmond
Lambert, Laura Lothman, Jason
Marques, Jarrett Merk, John Oli-
ver, John Paglio, Simon Rodell,
Megan Ryan, Kelly Scott, Tania
Sebastian, Drew Shenkman,
Andrea Shwayri, Mario Simoes,
Darryl Smith, Kristeen Witt and
Olivia Zink.

Writing Workshops
Rescheduled
Lois Randolph's writing work-
shops have been rescheduled to
room 285D on Wednesdays at
10 a.m. Dates are as follows:
Feb. 1 Paragraphing
Feb. 8 Sentence Structuring
Feb. 15 Punctuation
Feb. 22 Modification
March 1 Word Choice


Gator One card. Lunch is $7.
Conference check-in begins at 9
a.m. and the first panel begins at
10 a.m. Visit www.musiclawcon-
ference.com for more informa-
tion, or contact the director,
Andrew Kanter, at kanter80@
ufl.edu.
Other major February events
include:
* The Black Law Students Asso-
ciation Alumni Reunion, with
a speech Feb. 23 by Florida
Supreme Court Justice Peggy
Quince
* Professionalism Symposium,
Feb. 17


Sheriff Oelrich to
Speak to CLA
Alachua County Sheriff Steve
Oelrich will discuss various
local and state criminal law en-
forcement issues at a meeting
of the Criminal Law Associa-
tion at 5 p.m. Tuesday, Jan.
31, in room 285C. The event
is being co-sponsored by the
Law School Republicans, the
University of Florida College
Republicans and UF Pre-Legal
Honor Society. Everyone is
welcome. E-mail CLA President
Bryon Carroll at bryon322@ufl.
edu with any questions.

























Get FlaLaw Via
E-Mail
Have Falaw delivered to
your computer every Friday
- days before the rest of the
world sees it. Send an e-mail
to lockette@law.ufl.edu
and ask to be added to the
Flalaw PDF list.


FLA LAW 5


















Kennedy to Speak
at Environmental
Conference
Robert F. Kennedy, Jr. and
former EPA administrator Carol
Browner (JD 79) are just a few
of the well-known guests who
will be on hand for the 2006
Public Interest Environmental
Conference March 9-11.
Timely environmental topics
- global warming, children and
the environment, beach re-nour-
ishment, and rhetoric and the
environment will be debated
by environmental heavy hitters,
including Georgetown Law
Professor Edith Brown Weiss,
University of Maryland Pro-
fessor Rena Steinzor, Tulane
University Professor Oliver
Houck, University of Houston
Professor Marcilynn Burke and
University of Virginia Professor
Jonathan Cannon.
The conference is organized
by the Environmental and Land
Use Law Society, which is
joining forces this year with
the National Association of En-
vironmental Law Societies and
the UF Center for Children's
Literature and Culture to create
a more diverse schedule of
panelists and speakers.
For more information, go to
www.law.ufl.edu/elulp/index.htm.


6 FLA LAW


Full Slate of Events for Black History Month


Black History Month begins
Wednesday, and on-campus
organizations have a full slate
of events prepared for Febru-
ary. Whether you're interested
in helping the less fortunate,
passing the bar, meeting African-
American leaders in the law or
deepening your knowledge of
black culture, there's an event
you'll appreciate this month.
"History is important," said
Adrian Jones, assistant dean for
diversity and community rela-
tions. "Not being aware, we are
ignorant of certain challenges we
have faced and overcome. Black
History Month is a celebration.
Unless we appreciate what has
been done, we cannot plan for
the future."
The Black Law Students As-
sociation will kick off the month
Feb. 4 with volunteer work at
Gainesville's Kids Day (see page
1). "This is an opportunity to
give back to residents and the
community," said BLSA member
Lee Glover.
Attorney Kimberly Men-
chion will talk to students, facul-
ty and staff about her experiences
as a young minority lawyer Feb.
8 at noon in the faculty dining
room. Currently practicing in
Tallahassee, Menchion will offer
students the opportunity to learn
about African American history
and how it relates to her oppor-
tunities as an attorney.
The Virgil Hawkins Bar Asso-
ciation has organized a "Beat the
Bar" test preparation class for
students from various law schools
throughout the state Feb. 11.


Members of the Black Law Students Association pose at the "Black for
a Reason" event held in February 2005.


The Black Law Students
Association will hold its an-
nual Culture on the Concourse
event Feb. 15 starting at noon
on the law school concourse. An
exhibition of African and African
American literature, pictures and
cultural artifacts, the event is one
of BLSA's best-known Black His-
tory Month celebrations.
BLSA and the Association for
Public Interest Law will serve
lunch at St. Francis House, a
homeless shelter in downtown
Gainesville, from 9 a.m. to 2
p.m. Feb 15. Volunteers are still
needed for this service project.
To sign up, contact BLSA Presi-
dent Bryon Owens at owensb@
ufl.edu.
Florida Supreme Court
Justice Peggy Quince will speak
to students, faculty and staff at
noon Feb. 23, in the Chesterfield
Smith Ceremonial Classroom.
Her speech is co-sponsored by
BLSA and the American Consti-
tution Society. All are invited to
attend. A reception will be held


after the speech.
BLSA will hold its Alumni
Reunion Weekend Feb. 24-25,
helping BLSA alums connect
with each other and with law stu-
dents. This year's theme is "Light
of the Past, Guiding the Future."
Space for law students is limited,
so sign up now. Registration
costs $40. The reunion includes
the following events:
* A gathering at the home of
Dean Robert Jerry at 7 p.m.
Feb. 24.
* A panel discussion about
diversity in higher education
led by Dean Robert Jerry, As-
sistant Dean Adrian Jones and
Director of Admissions Lewis
Hutchison Feb. 25 at 8:30 a.m.
* A speech by Linnes Finney,
president-elect of the National
Bar Association, at a banquet
culminating the weekend's
events at 7 p.m. Feb. 25.
For more information, contact
BLSA Alumni Reunion Chair
Melanie Thompson at Thomp-
son@ufl.edu.










PEOPLE


SCHOLARSHIP
& ACTIVITIES


Carolyn Bissonnette
Law Student
* Recipient, American Law
Institute-American Bar Asso-
ciation Scholarship. She will
attend the ALI-ABA's annual
Environmental Law Program
in Bethesda, Md. Feb. 8-10.


Clifford A.
Jones
Associate in Law
Research, Center
for Governmental
Responsibility Jones

* Speaker, King's College,
University of London, Dec. 2,
2005. Jones presented his paper,
"Nostradamus Strikes Again: A
Premature Perspective on the
EU's Green Paper on Private
Enforcement."
* Speaker, Jean Monnet Chair/
Miami-Florida European Union
Center of Excellence Sympo-


sium. Jones presented his paper,
"Competition Policy Dimen-
sions of NAFTA and the EU."


Patrick
Shannon
Associate Dean for
Administrative Affairs
Shannon
* Quoted, The Independent Flori-
da A/ll.grov, Jan. 19. Shannon
spoke about minority enroll-
ment at the law school.


Michael Allan
Wolf
Richard E. Nelson Chair
in Local Government
Law; Professor
Wolf

* Media Appearance, WCJB-
TV, Gainesville, Jan. 23. Wolf
spoke about the impact of Roe
v. Wade on the anniversary of
the decision.


'Politics of
Inequality'
Conference
UF and the University of Cape-
town, South Africa, will host a
joint conference March 5-7 in
honor of the 100th birthday of
Gwendolen Carter, a former UF
professor who is considered one
of the founding figures in African
Studies.
Titled "The Politics of Inequality"
- after the groundbreaking 1958
book that established Carter as
an expert on modern African poli-
tics the conference will feature
distinguished political scientists,
lawyers, international studies
experts, diplomats, and poets.
Faculty and students are invited
to attend. For more information,
contact Samuel T. Dell Research
Scholar Winston Nagan at
nagan@law.ufl.edu or log on to
law.ufl.edu.


UF Law to Build National Election Database


The 2000 presidential election
made Florida synonymous with
"disputed election" in the public
mind. Now the Levin College of
Law is helping build a database of
state and federal election laws to
assist government officials and the
media in dealing with contested
elections in the future.
Clifford A. Jones, an associate
in law research at the Center for
Governmental Responsibility, is
one of the recipients of a $285,000
contract from the U.S. Election
Assistance Commission. He and
Lynda Lee Kaid of UF's College of
Journalism and Communications


are developing and will maintain
the Election Law Resources Clear-
inghouse, an online database that
will allow state election adminis-


The project will employ a
number of law students
as research assistants.
To find out more, con-
tact Clifford Jones at
jonesca@law.ufl.edu.


trators, the media and the general
public to research election law free
of charge.


The project will employ a sub-
stantial number of law students,
Jones said. Anyone interested in
working on the database should
contact him at jonesca@law.ufl.
edu.
The U.S. Election Assistance
Commission was created by the
Help America Vote Act of 2002,
following the difficulties the na-
tion experienced in the wake of
the 2000 presidential election.
Jones teaches Election Law and
served as an expert commentator
on Florida election law for NBC
News during the 2000 election.


See France
Through Summer
Study Abroad
Would you like to spend the
summer in the south of France
- while working on your legal
education? Attend an infor-
mational meeting on the Levin
College of Law's summer study
abroad program in France,
Wednesday, Feb. 1, at noon in
room 360.
Held June 25-July 28, UF's
study abroad program with
Montpellier University brings
students to France for one week
in Paris, followed by one month
in Montpellier, near the Mediter-
ranean coast. The application
deadline for this program is
March 24.


FLA LAW 7










PEOPLE


SCHOLARSHIP
& ACTIVITIES


Carolyn Bissonnette
Law Student
* Recipient, American Law
Institute-American Bar Asso-
ciation Scholarship. She will
attend the ALI-ABA's annual
Environmental Law Program
in Bethesda, Md. Feb. 8-10.


Clifford A.
Jones
Associate in Law
Research, Center
for Governmental
Responsibility Jones

* Speaker, King's College,
University of London, Dec. 2,
2005. Jones presented his paper,
"Nostradamus Strikes Again: A
Premature Perspective on the
EU's Green Paper on Private
Enforcement."
* Speaker, Jean Monnet Chair/
Miami-Florida European Union
Center of Excellence Sympo-


sium. Jones presented his paper,
"Competition Policy Dimen-
sions of NAFTA and the EU."


Patrick
Shannon
Associate Dean for
Administrative Affairs
Shannon
* Quoted, The Independent Flori-
da A/ll.grov, Jan. 19. Shannon
spoke about minority enroll-
ment at the law school.


Michael Allan
Wolf
Richard E. Nelson Chair
in Local Government
Law; Professor
Wolf

* Media Appearance, WCJB-
TV, Gainesville, Jan. 23. Wolf
spoke about the impact of Roe
v. Wade on the anniversary of
the decision.


'Politics of
Inequality'
Conference
UF and the University of Cape-
town, South Africa, will host a
joint conference March 5-7 in
honor of the 100th birthday of
Gwendolen Carter, a former UF
professor who is considered one
of the founding figures in African
Studies.
Titled "The Politics of Inequality"
- after the groundbreaking 1958
book that established Carter as
an expert on modern African poli-
tics the conference will feature
distinguished political scientists,
lawyers, international studies
experts, diplomats, and poets.
Faculty and students are invited
to attend. For more information,
contact Samuel T. Dell Research
Scholar Winston Nagan at
nagan@law.ufl.edu or log on to
law.ufl.edu.


UF Law to Build National Election Database


The 2000 presidential election
made Florida synonymous with
"disputed election" in the public
mind. Now the Levin College of
Law is helping build a database of
state and federal election laws to
assist government officials and the
media in dealing with contested
elections in the future.
Clifford A. Jones, an associate
in law research at the Center for
Governmental Responsibility, is
one of the recipients of a $285,000
contract from the U.S. Election
Assistance Commission. He and
Lynda Lee Kaid of UF's College of
Journalism and Communications


are developing and will maintain
the Election Law Resources Clear-
inghouse, an online database that
will allow state election adminis-


The project will employ a
number of law students
as research assistants.
To find out more, con-
tact Clifford Jones at
jonesca@law.ufl.edu.


trators, the media and the general
public to research election law free
of charge.


The project will employ a sub-
stantial number of law students,
Jones said. Anyone interested in
working on the database should
contact him at jonesca@law.ufl.
edu.
The U.S. Election Assistance
Commission was created by the
Help America Vote Act of 2002,
following the difficulties the na-
tion experienced in the wake of
the 2000 presidential election.
Jones teaches Election Law and
served as an expert commentator
on Florida election law for NBC
News during the 2000 election.


See France
Through Summer
Study Abroad
Would you like to spend the
summer in the south of France
- while working on your legal
education? Attend an infor-
mational meeting on the Levin
College of Law's summer study
abroad program in France,
Wednesday, Feb. 1, at noon in
room 360.
Held June 25-July 28, UF's
study abroad program with
Montpellier University brings
students to France for one week
in Paris, followed by one month
in Montpellier, near the Mediter-
ranean coast. The application
deadline for this program is
March 24.


FLA LAW 7








Send Us Your News
Flalaw is published each week
school is in session by the
Levin College of Law Com-
munications Office. Please
submit news of interest to the
law school community by 10
a.m. Tuesday for the following
Monday's issue to lockette@
law.ufl.edu or 273-0650.
* Tim Lockette,
Editor, Flalaw
* Kristen Hines,
Photographer


College of Law
Administration
* Robert H. Jerry, II, Dean
* George L. Dawson,
Associate Dean for
Academic Affairs
* J. Patrick Shannon,
Associate Dean for
Administrative Affairs
* Lyrissa Barnett Lidsky,
Associate Dean for
Faculty Development
* Michael K. Friel,
Associate Dean & Director,
Graduate Tax Program
* Stuart R. Cohn,
Associate Dean for
International Studies
* M. Kathleen "Kathie" Price,
Associate Dean for Library
and Technology
* Gail E. Sasnett,
Associate Dean for
Students, Professionalism
and Community Relations
* J. Michael Patrick,
Assistant Dean for Admissions
* Linda Calvert Hanson,
Assistant Dean for
Career Services
* Adrian Jones,
Assistant Dean for Diversity
and Community Relations
* Jennifer Cope, Interim
Assistant Dean for Students
* Debra D. Amirin,
Director of Communications
* Donald J. Hale,
Senior Director of Development
and Alumni Affairs

UNIVERSITY OF
FLORIDA


Learning to Relax


BY NICOLE STERN
RESOURCE COUNSELOR
Most of you here at the law
school experience stress from
time to time,
and for some
it is relatively
constant. For
others, stress
comes in short,
intense bursts.
Still others of Stern
you have learned
some ways to help yourselves
cope and take things in stride.
This article will discuss stress and
some helpful tools you can use to
manage it.
Stress is what you feel when
you react to pressure, either from
outside (school, friends, family)
or inside (wanting good grades,
wanting to fit in). Stress is a
normal reaction for everyone. A
degree of stress is even healthy.
Competition pushes you to suc-
ceed at things like sports, music,
school and work. Deadlines force


you to finish projects on time. In
extreme situations, stress can even
protect you from danger. Too
much stress, however, can make
you miserable and harm your
health. Fortunately, you can help
yourself when you begin to feel
overwhelmed or stressed.
Try progressive relaxation,
which involves tensing individual
muscle groups throughout the
body for several seconds and then
releasing the tension allowing
the muscles to gradually relax.
This will reduce your pulse rate
and blood pressure as well as
decrease perspiration and respira-
tion rates. Muscle relaxation
reduces tension and is incompat-
ible with anxiety.
The next time you feel a surge
of stress, try a few moments of
deep breathing. Sit in a comfort-
able position and take deep,
measured breaths, e.g., inhaling
while counting up from 1 to 4;
exhaling while counting down
from 4 to 1. Do this 20-30 times


and you're sure to feel refreshed.
Deep breathing aids in relaxation
by increasing the amount of
oxygen in the body and around
the brain.
The final technique I recom-
mend for reducing stress is
visualization. If you, like most
people, think anxious thoughts,
you become tense. In order to
overcome negative feelings, you
can use the power of your imagi-
nation to refocus your mind on
positive, healing images. Get into
a comfortable position, close your
eyes and visualize a scene or place
that you associate with safety
and relaxation. It doesn't matter
what you visualize, as long as it's
calming to you. As you relax your
mind, your body also relaxes,
thus helping you to refocus with
a calmer, more relaxed sense.
For more ideas on relaxation or
for information on the yoga class,
please contact Resource Coun-
selor Nicole Nicolaisen Stern at
Stern@law.ufl.edu.


January
30 Jorge Santistevan, noon,
faculty dining room
Toastmasters, 5 p.m.,
room 285A
Labor and Employment
Law Society, 6 p.m., room
285A
JMBA Meeting, 7 p.m.,
room 285C
31 Interview Preparation
Workshop, noon, faculty
dining room
Law School Republicans,
noon, room 345
Sheriff Steve Oelrich, 5
p.m., room 285C
Yoga Class, 5 p.m., room
355D


February
1 Study Abroad
Informational Meeting,
noon, room 360
Interviews from the
Employer's Perspective,
noon, faculty dining room
SALSA Meeting, 7:30
p.m., Emiliano's Restau-
rant
2 One Quick Question,
9:45-11:15 a.m., concourse
James R. Stoner, Jr., 1
p.m. Bailey Courtroom
3 Data Devolution
Conference, 1 p.m., room
180


4 Music Law Conference,
10 am., room 285A & 285B
Data Devolution
Conference, 9 a.m., room
180






More Dates
Available Online
For more information on
the dates and locations of
upcoming meetings, check the
calendar on the law school's
website at: http://www.law.
ufl.edu/calendars/.


8 FLA LAW


CALENDAR








Send Us Your News
Flalaw is published each week
school is in session by the
Levin College of Law Com-
munications Office. Please
submit news of interest to the
law school community by 10
a.m. Tuesday for the following
Monday's issue to lockette@
law.ufl.edu or 273-0650.
* Tim Lockette,
Editor, Flalaw
* Kristen Hines,
Photographer


College of Law
Administration
* Robert H. Jerry, II, Dean
* George L. Dawson,
Associate Dean for
Academic Affairs
* J. Patrick Shannon,
Associate Dean for
Administrative Affairs
* Lyrissa Barnett Lidsky,
Associate Dean for
Faculty Development
* Michael K. Friel,
Associate Dean & Director,
Graduate Tax Program
* Stuart R. Cohn,
Associate Dean for
International Studies
* M. Kathleen "Kathie" Price,
Associate Dean for Library
and Technology
* Gail E. Sasnett,
Associate Dean for
Students, Professionalism
and Community Relations
* J. Michael Patrick,
Assistant Dean for Admissions
* Linda Calvert Hanson,
Assistant Dean for
Career Services
* Adrian Jones,
Assistant Dean for Diversity
and Community Relations
* Jennifer Cope, Interim
Assistant Dean for Students
* Debra D. Amirin,
Director of Communications
* Donald J. Hale,
Senior Director of Development
and Alumni Affairs

UNIVERSITY OF
FLORIDA


Learning to Relax


BY NICOLE STERN
RESOURCE COUNSELOR
Most of you here at the law
school experience stress from
time to time,
and for some
it is relatively
constant. For
others, stress
comes in short,
intense bursts.
Still others of Stern
you have learned
some ways to help yourselves
cope and take things in stride.
This article will discuss stress and
some helpful tools you can use to
manage it.
Stress is what you feel when
you react to pressure, either from
outside (school, friends, family)
or inside (wanting good grades,
wanting to fit in). Stress is a
normal reaction for everyone. A
degree of stress is even healthy.
Competition pushes you to suc-
ceed at things like sports, music,
school and work. Deadlines force


you to finish projects on time. In
extreme situations, stress can even
protect you from danger. Too
much stress, however, can make
you miserable and harm your
health. Fortunately, you can help
yourself when you begin to feel
overwhelmed or stressed.
Try progressive relaxation,
which involves tensing individual
muscle groups throughout the
body for several seconds and then
releasing the tension allowing
the muscles to gradually relax.
This will reduce your pulse rate
and blood pressure as well as
decrease perspiration and respira-
tion rates. Muscle relaxation
reduces tension and is incompat-
ible with anxiety.
The next time you feel a surge
of stress, try a few moments of
deep breathing. Sit in a comfort-
able position and take deep,
measured breaths, e.g., inhaling
while counting up from 1 to 4;
exhaling while counting down
from 4 to 1. Do this 20-30 times


and you're sure to feel refreshed.
Deep breathing aids in relaxation
by increasing the amount of
oxygen in the body and around
the brain.
The final technique I recom-
mend for reducing stress is
visualization. If you, like most
people, think anxious thoughts,
you become tense. In order to
overcome negative feelings, you
can use the power of your imagi-
nation to refocus your mind on
positive, healing images. Get into
a comfortable position, close your
eyes and visualize a scene or place
that you associate with safety
and relaxation. It doesn't matter
what you visualize, as long as it's
calming to you. As you relax your
mind, your body also relaxes,
thus helping you to refocus with
a calmer, more relaxed sense.
For more ideas on relaxation or
for information on the yoga class,
please contact Resource Coun-
selor Nicole Nicolaisen Stern at
Stern@law.ufl.edu.


January
30 Jorge Santistevan, noon,
faculty dining room
Toastmasters, 5 p.m.,
room 285A
Labor and Employment
Law Society, 6 p.m., room
285A
JMBA Meeting, 7 p.m.,
room 285C
31 Interview Preparation
Workshop, noon, faculty
dining room
Law School Republicans,
noon, room 345
Sheriff Steve Oelrich, 5
p.m., room 285C
Yoga Class, 5 p.m., room
355D


February
1 Study Abroad
Informational Meeting,
noon, room 360
Interviews from the
Employer's Perspective,
noon, faculty dining room
SALSA Meeting, 7:30
p.m., Emiliano's Restau-
rant
2 One Quick Question,
9:45-11:15 a.m., concourse
James R. Stoner, Jr., 1
p.m. Bailey Courtroom
3 Data Devolution
Conference, 1 p.m., room
180


4 Music Law Conference,
10 am., room 285A & 285B
Data Devolution
Conference, 9 a.m., room
180






More Dates
Available Online
For more information on
the dates and locations of
upcoming meetings, check the
calendar on the law school's
website at: http://www.law.
ufl.edu/calendars/.


8 FLA LAW


CALENDAR