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UF UFLAW



Fla law newsletter of the University of Florida College of Law
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Title: Fla law newsletter of the University of Florida College of Law
Portion of title: Flalaw
Physical Description: Serial
Creator: Levin College of Law
Publisher: s.n.
Place of Publication: <Gainesville FL> College of Law Communications Office 1997-
Creation Date: November 28, 2005
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Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol.1, no. 1 (Oct. 6, 1997)-
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Table of Contents
    The state of the college
        Page 1
    Career Services
        Page 2
        Page 3
    Events and opportunities
        Page 4
        Page 5
        Page 6
        Page 7
    People, scholarship and activities
        Page 8
    Calendar
        Page 8
Full Text










UNIVERS O F OI DA
LEV^^ ^ ^ ^ ^^IN C O L G O F LA W IA a

^^^^^^^^4^ 4kl B^R A^


VOL. 9, NO. 15 NOVEMBER 28, 2005


The State of the College


BY DEAN ROBERT H. JERRY II
We celebrated a defining
moment in the college's his-
tory this September with the
completion of our $25 million
renovation and construction
project, just one of the events
that made this both a tumultu-
ous and productive year for the
Levin College of Law. As the
end of fall semester draws near,
I would like to review with you
where our college now stands as
a result.

Students
I start with our students,
because they are the reason for
our existence. Our recent classes
are the most qualified in law
school history (the average GPA
of the last entering class was
3.66, and the median LSAT was
at the 85th percentile nation-
ally), and our students continue
to excel both academically and
professionally. There continue
to be more than 12 applica-
tions for each available seat. But
while we are justifiably proud of
our students' qualifications and
academic performance, we are
especially proud of what many



INSIDE THIS ISSUE
2 Career Services
4 Events and Opportunities
8 Calendar


of you are accomplishing a
persons.
At the college, we stress
importance of being not o
a highly competent profes
sional but also
a "citizen-law-
yer" one who
serves (and
who, through
leadership, sets
an example for
service), and who gives ba
only to our profession but


Ls

the


to our community, our state,
and our country. We are proud
of the efforts of the many stu-


nly dents who have been involved
in public service projects, from
I disaster relief to collecting toys
for needy children.
We also seek to project the
virtues of being a citizen-lawyer
by how we act as an institution.
Jerry For example, we are pleased
that we could offer up to 50
ck not displaced second- and third-
also Continuedon Page 6


Time Running Out to Support Class Gift
Class Gift Committee members (from left) Michael Freedman, Chris
Carmody, Marta Fulgueria and Claudel Pressa encourage students to
participate in the class gift at a pizza party Nov. 22. The committee
has yet to reach its $60,000 goal, but there is still time to give. For
details, see the story on page 6.


Trial Team
Second
in Nationals


D


UFLaw Magazine
Available This Week
The Winter 2006 issue of UFLaw,
the alumni magazine of the Levin
College of Law, will be released
this week.
This issue features a look inside
one of the high points in the law
school's history: the dedication of
the college's
new facilities
and the visit by
U.S. Supreme
Court Justice
Sandra Day
O'Connor.
To download a PDF version of the
magazine, go to http://www.law.
ufl.edu/news/magazine.shtml.



FlaLaw Suspends
Publication; Submit
Items for E-News
FlaLaw will suspend publication
over the winter break, and will
return on Jan. 9.
The Communications Office will
release a new edition of E-News,
the law school's electronic news-
letter, in early December.
Please submit any news items to
lockette@law.ufl.edu.


Summer Study
Abroad











CAREERSERVICES
Hints to help you in the legal profession


Dean Jerry to
Host Music Night
Got a hidden musical talent?
Show it off at the upcoming
Music Night, to be held Feb.
19 at the home of Dean Robert
Jerry. All students and faculty
are invited to the event.
To participate, you must bring
a dessert and agree to perform
a musical piece (play an instru-
ment, sing a song, etc.) A piano
will be available. Each partici-
pant can bring one guest.
Space is limited, so register
early (stop by the Dean's Office
and see Dorris Perron).



















Exam Delays and
Accommodations
If you need to request an exam
delay or accommodation, please
submit your request to Student
Affairs by Nov. 30. Forms are
available online at http://www.
law.ufl.edu/students/forms
apps/examexceptions.shtml.
Notice regarding any requests
will be sent by Dec. 2.


2 FLA LAW


Almost 40 percent of eligible
JD students interviewed during
Fall 2005 On-Campus Inter-
views. Legal employers selected
and interviewed 391 law stu-
dents; 106 students had one in-
terview; 60 had two and 225 had
three or more. A total of 1,951
interviews were conducted on
campus during the fall semester.
All interviews were conducted
in the new library study rooms,
which worked exceptionally well.
Of the 153 visiting employers, 11
were government agencies, three
were accounting firms and 138
were private law firms.

'Tremendous
Improvement'
The employers seemed to be
impressed with both the facili-
ties and the students this year,
and had some helpful advice for
students seeking interviews. A
few of their comments:

* "The new interview facilities
are first-class. A tremendous
improvement, and much
needed."
* "We continue to be amazed at
the high caliber of the students
at UF law."
* "Students need to be more
selective in the interviews they
seek. Several had no idea of
our practice areas and were not
interested once we told them
during the interview."

Spring: A Whole
New Ball Game
Spring OCI can be very
different from fall interviews.
While the process is the same, a


different group of legal employ-
ers tends to interview in spring.
Spring OCI firms are more likely
to be small or medium-sized
firms, rather than the large firms
that visit in the fall, and more
government employers interview
during the spring. It is important
to review the list of employers
and their hiring qualifications,
as most students will meet the
stated requirements.


Phase One for Spring OCI
is open Jan. 17-23. It does not
matter whether you bid on the
first day or the last, as there
is no priority system within a
particular bid phase. Bidding
for employers will end at noon
Jan. 23 and the computer system
will not accept late bids. Spring
OCI runs from Feb. 21 through
March 31, except for the week of
Spring Break.


Employers from Everywhere
Fall On-Campus Interviews drew a wide variety of employers from around
the country. They included:
* 45 employers from Central Florida (Tampa, Lakeland, Orlando and
Daytona areas)

* 13 from Northeast Florida (Jacksonville/Gainesville area)

* Seven from Southwest Florida (Ft. Meyers, Naples, Sarasota)

* 71 from Southeast Florida (West Palm Beach, Boca Raton, Ft. Lauder-
dale and Miami)

* 15 from Atlanta

* Three from Washington, D.C.

* Many from other states, including Virginia, Alabama, Arizona, Tennes-
see, Missouri, New York, Louisiana, South Carolina, Wisconsin and
Pennsylvania.

















How Do I Prepare
for OCI?
Mark your calendar and attend
the Symplicity OCI Orientation
scheduled for Jan. 11 at noon or
5 p.m., or Jan. 17 at noon. You
must have completed the OCI
Policies and Procedures form by
that time, or you will be blocked
from bidding. Be sure to upload
your resume.
If you have not finalized your
resume, bring it it during the
Walk-In Resume Review Jan. 12
from 9:30-11:30 a.m. or Jan. 13
from 1-3 p.m.
Watch for announcements on
programs to help you prepare,
including the interviewing work-
shop, mock interviews, dressing
for success and dining etiquette.

Fall OCI Starts Aug. 15
Factoring in employer, student
and faculty comments, the
Center for Career Services has
scheduled Fall 2006 OCI to be-
gin Aug. 15. The center will hold
an Early Interview Week Aug.
22-25, the week before classes
begin, to make UF more com-
petitive with Georgia law schools,
eliminate parking challenges, and
minimize class disruptions. The
regular Fall 2006 OCI will last
six weeks, from Sept. 19 to Oct.
27. Bidding on legal employers
begins in mid-July. If military ob-
ligations prevent you from having
computer access during that
time, be sure to make advance
arrangements with the Center for
Career Services.


Career Services Notes


Attention Spring
Externs
Remember that all spring
externs must attend the manda-
tory Externship Orientation
Program Wednesday, Jan. 4,
from 9 a.m. to noon in the
faculty dining room.

Most Student-Created
Externships on Hold
The law school's administra-
tion continues to re-evaluate
the summer and fall externship
programs to fully integrate
newly-enacted American Bar
Association rule changes.
Therefore, it is anticipated that
few, if any, student-created
externships will be approved for
summer or fall.
The Center for Career
Services has been advised that
no new or student-created
externships outside the U.S.
will be approved, and approval
of out-of-state student-created
externships is unlikely.
Career Services will hold
a meeting Jan. 24 to provide
students with information on
these and other externships. The
meeting will be repeated Jan.
25. No further information on
student-created externships will
be available until the meeting.
Please note that if you are
applying for any externship, it
is imperative to strictly adhere
to all published deadlines.


Explore Labor Law
The AFL-CIO Lawyers'
Coordinating Committee
Minority Outreach Program is
designed to introduce minority
law students to the practice of
labor law and to the labor com-
munity by providing summer
clerkship opportunities with
participating firms and union
legal departments. Students with
a demonstrated interest in labor
law should pick up the list of
participating firms in the Center
for Career Services.

UF Reception at
Heckerling Institute
Interested in estate planning
or tax consequences of estates
and trusts? The law school will
sponsor a reception Jan. 12 at
the 40th Annual Heckerling
Institute on Estate Planning in
Miami, which will be held Jan.
9-13. The institute is the largest
gathering of estate planning
professionals in the nation. The
Office of Development and
Alumni Affairs is permitting a
number of interested LLM and
JD students to attend the UF
reception, which offers oppor-
tunities to network with tax and
estates and trusts professionals
from around the country. If you
are interested, e-mail careers@
law.ufl.edu and indicate your
class year.


Exit Interviews for
December Grads
If you're graduating in Decem-
ber, call or come by the Center
for Career Services for a quick
(10-minute) exit interview.
Walk-in interviews will be
held Tuesdays, Wednesdays
and Thursdays from 9 a.m.-1
p.m. until graduation. You
might want to stop by for an
interview while picking up your
graduation regalia, which is ex-
pected to be available in Career
Services Dec. 5-15. If you have
not yet accepted a position,
you are strongly encouraged to
schedule an individual appoint-
ment with a Career Services
counselor as well.







Legal Services
Fellowship
The Florida Bar Foundation's
2006 Legal Services Summer
Fellowship Program offers
25 Florida law students the
opportunity to participate in a
full-time, 11-week summer pro-
gram. Fellowship stipends are
$4,500 for first-year students
and $5,500 for second-year
students. Students with a
commitment to public interest
law and experience working
with the low-income community
are encouraged to apply. Full
application details and site
availability are available in the
Center for Career Services. The
application deadline is Jan. 30.


FLA LAW 3

















Intellectual
Property
Internship at UF
The Office of Technology
Licensing is looking to hire
interns for next spring. The
internship involves conducting
prior art searches, creating
marketing brochures to license
new technologies at UF, and
various other tasks, including
database management and web
site design. The internship is
not limited to students with
technical backgrounds, just
people who have an interest in
intellectual property and new
technologies. The internship
is a great way to be exposed
to patent law, and to make
contacts with people in the
IP industry. This is a paid
position, requiring 10-15 hours
per week. If you are inter-
ested, please contact: Andrea
Huisden, huisdeaf@ufl.edu,
352-846-1685, http://www.
rgp.ufl.edu/otl/.





Get FlaLaw Via
E-Mail
Have Flalaw delivered to your
computer every Friday days
before the rest of the world
sees it. Send an e-mail to
lockette@law.ufl.edu and ask
to be added to the Flalaw
PDF list.


4 FLA LAW


SE VENTS & OPPORTUNITIES


Toys for Tots
Phi Delta Phi and the Military
Law Students Association are
co-sponsoring a "Toys-for-Tots"
drive in preparation for the
upcoming holiday season. Please
donate an unwrapped and un-
used toy for a child who may not
otherwise receive one. The drop-
off box is located in the Internet
Caf6 near the Lexis and Westlaw
tables. The drive will continue
through Dec. 2.

JLSA Study Blowout
The Jewish Law Student As-
sociation invites all law students
to the Hillel 24 Study Room
Blowout. There is free wireless
Internet, food, games and movies
for study breaks. Hillel will be


open 24 hours a day Dec. 5-7
and Dec. 11-13, and until mid-
night Dec. 8-9. Hillel is located
at 2020 W. University Ave. If you
have any questions contact Lisa
Kanarek at lkanarek@ufl.edu.

VITA Seeks Volunteers
Earn your Pro Bono Certificate
and assist students and low-in-
come taxpayers in the Gainesville
area by working with Volunteer
Income Tax Assistance in Spring
2006. Training materials are
available in the student organiza-
tion offices next to the cafeteria.
The program runs from early
February to April, and requires a
one day per week commitment.
Please direct questions to ufvita@
yahoo.com.


Trial Team Places Second in National Contest
UF's Trial Team won second place in the National Association of Criminal
Defense Lawyers Cathy Bennet National Criminal Trial Competition, held earlier
this month in Santa Fe, N.M. Shown here are (from left) Trial Team coach
Gregg Anderson and advocates Najah Adams, Loreal Belfon and Greg Edwards
(not pictured is advocate Kurt Zaner.) The advocates were supported by
researchers Hugh Rowe, Will Blair, Brikena Tomasic and Jarrett Deluca.


Moot Court Wins 'Best
Brief for Respondent'
The two teams from the Justice
Campbell Thornal Moot Court
Team advanced to the quarter-
final round of the Seventh
Annual National Criminal
Procedure Tournament in San
Diego, Calif., earlier this month.
The competition involved the
constitutional rights of undocu-
mented aliens. Joe Darr and Isaac
Wannos represented the respon-
dent and Ajda Demirdoken and
Brady Ward represented the
petitioner. Darr and Wannos tied
with another team for Best Brief
for Respondent.

FJIL Welcomes
New Editors
On Nov. 17, the Florida Jour-
nal of International Law elected
their new editorial staff. New
editors include Editor-in-Chief
Dwayne Simpson; Managing
Editor Datan Dorot; Research
Editors Brenda Appledorn, Amal
Laassel, Jessica Casciola and
Charles Hart; Articles Editors
Amanda McLernan and Srujani
Pagidipati; Student Works Editor
Dave Sams; Advertising Edi-
tor Guna Ose; and Policy Chair
Eduardo Fernandez.

Brush Up on CPR
The Red Cross Gators are offer-
ing classes in Child/Infant CPR
Saturday, Dec. 3, from 9 a.m. to
2 p.m. in 106 Rinker Hall. If you
have young children and haven't
attended a class recently, this is
your chance to brush up on what
could be a life-saving skill. Cost
for the class is $20; to register, e-
m ail i it -...r u r. -I 1-.r rni l ,. .,i


I













Summer Study Abroad
Explore the law, explore the world through UF's unique international programs


BY NATASHA CRESPO (2L)
Picture yourself studying law
under professors who helped ban-
ish apartheid from South Africa.
Or exploring the mazy streets of
a French village between classes
in international business law.
Or tramping through a tropical
rainforest with members of your
environmental law class.
These things are possible when
you enhance your education
through the law school's Summer
Abroad Programs. UF's partner-
ships with schools in South Africa,
Costa Rica and France offer unique
experiences where students may
take up to seven school credits,
while making contacts abroad.

Cape Town, South Africa
This program, held at the
University of Cape Town, runs
from June 19 to July 27. Ameri-
can and South African professors,
practitioners and judges examine
issues such as race relations and
the nation's legal systems. Classes
offered include: Introduction to
South African Law, Human Rights
Law, Cultural Property, and Se-
lected Issues in Comparative Law
and Development. The program
includes visits to courthouses and
other government offices giv-
ing students the chance to meet
prominent officials as well as a
tour of the Robben Island prison,
where Nelson Mandela and other
political prisoners were held during
the apartheid era.
"I thoroughly enjoyed learning
about the historical and legal evo-
lution of South Africa, especially
from professors who lived it," said
UF student Suzette Maylor, a
participant in the program.


A -.
~,.. --


Whitewater rafting through the tropical rainforest is just one of the
adventures that can await you in summer study abroad programs.


San Jose, Costa Rica
This program, held in partner-
ship with the University of Costa
Rica, allows U.S. students to study
with their Latin American counter-
parts in a culturally enriching set-
ting. Running from June 18 to July
31, the program offers the classes
Comparative Environmental Law;
Water, Wetlands, and Wildlife; In-
ternational & Environmental Law;
Environmental Dispute Resolu-
tion; and Conservation Clinic.
Classes are taught in English.
Summer study in Costa Rica
gave UF student Heather Halter
a chance to tag sea turtles, raft
through the rainforest and work
with an international group of
lawyers creating a model marine
protected area plan.
"Do not go into this program
thinking it will be easy," she said.
"It is a lot of work, but you will also
learn, grow, and have a lot of fun."

Paris and
Montpellier, France
This program features compara-
tive and international law through
the study of the U.S. and French


legal systems at the University of
Montpellier. The program lasts
from June 25 to July 28, with the
first week spent in Paris and the
last four in the south of France.
Students may choose up to six
credits from the following: Euro-
pean Union Business Law, Interna-
tional Sales Law and Comparative
Criminal Procedure. Classes are
taught in English.
"France is a beautiful country
with rich history and culture," said
UF law student Hillary Hussin.
"It was an invaluable experience
to get to know some of the French
students and talk with them about
the United States."
Each program costs $2,300 for
UF students and Florida residents
and $3,000 for all others. (The
Cape Town program has an ad-
ditional $75 transportation fee).
Additional costs include books,
transportation, housing and per-
sonal costs. The deadline to apply
is March 24. For more informa-
tion, contact Noemar Castro in the
Student Affairs Office at 352-273-
0629, e-mail castro@law.ufl.edu or
go to http://www.law.ufl.edu/stu-
dents/abroad/summer.shtml.


Kennedy to Speak
at Environmental
Conference
Robert F. Kennedy, Jr., former
EPA administrator Carol
Browner (JD 79) and oceanog-
rapher Sylvia Earle are just a
few of the well-known names
that will be on hand for the
2006 Public Interest Environ-
mental Conference, to be held
March 9-11.
Timely environmental topics
- global warming, children and
the environment, beach re-nour-
ishment, and rhetoric and the
environment will be debated
by environmental heavy hitters,
including Georgetown Law
Professor Edith Brown Weiss,
University of Maryland Pro-
fessor Rena Steinzor, Tulane
University Professor Oliver
Houck, University of Houston
Professor Marcilynn Burke and
University of Virginia Professor
Jonathan Cannon.
The conference is organized
by the Environmental and Land
Use Law Society, which is
joining forces this year with
the National Association of En-
vironmental Law Societies and
the UF Center for Children's
Literature and Culture to create
a more diverse schedule of
panelists and speakers.
For more information, go to
www.law.ufl.edu/elulp/index.htm.


FLA LAW 5

















Pledge to Class
Gift by Dec. 2
Members of the Fall 2005
graduating class have only a
few more days to pledge to the
class gift and help make this
semester's gift the largest in
the history of the law school.
The Class Gift Committee plans
to raise $60,000 in pledges
from graduating students,
surpassing the record $55,475
given by the Spring 2005
graduating class. As FlaLaw
goes to press, the committee
is still about $20,000 short of
that goal.
There is still time to give.
Pledges will be accepted until
Dec. 2, according to committee
members.
To make a pledge online, go to
http://www.law.ufl.edu/stu-
dents/resources/classgift.shtml.
Printable pledge forms are also
available on the law school
website, and can be turned in
to any committee member or in
the Dean's Office.
For more information, contact
committee chair Chris Carmody
at chrisc2@ufl.edu, co-chair
Claudel Pressa at cpressa@
alumni.ufl.edu or co-chair
Michael Freedman at mkf@
ufl.edu.


State of the College from page 1
year law students from Tulane
and Loyola-New Orleans the op-
portunity to continue their law
studies here, and 32 are doing so.

Facilities
One of the biggest changes
at the college, of course, is the
expansion and renovation of
our facilities, including our
new classrooms and library,
which are truly extraordinary.
The presence of Justice Sandra
Day O'Connor for the dedica-
tion of these facilities on Sept.
9 was something we all will
remember for the rest of our
lives. (I strongly recommend,
for your reading or listening, her
eloquent remarks on the need
to protect the independence of
the judiciary. Both the text and
an audio file are available on
our website at http://www.law.
ufl.edu/dedication/. The official
publication of her remarks will
occur in the Florida Law Review
in January.)

Faculty
The heart of our institution is
our faculty, and they have been
very productive in their teaching
and research. (I invite you to read
more about recent faculty accom-
plishments in our 2005 Report
From the Faculty, available online
as a link from our publications
page at http://www.law.ufl.edu/
news/publications.shtml.) One
of the major challenges we will
soon face at the college comes
from the reality that 12 of our
nearly 60 tenure-track faculty
have announced plans to retire
in the next five years, and seven


-

The law school's new facilities (shown here during dedication ceremo-
nies on Sept. 9) will help usher in a new era of excellence.


of these retirements will occur in
the next two years. Among these
teachers are many of the people
who are playing important roles
in your educational development
and the start of your careers,
and it is difficult to imagine our
college without them. At the
same time, however, we have
demonstrated that with sufficient
resources (including chairs and
professorships), we can recruit to
our college the very best faculty
in the nation. In other words,
this challenge is also one of our
greatest opportunities.

Funding Our Future
The biggest impediment to
the college reaching its aspira-
tions is our resource base, which
causes us to spend less educating
our students than any other law
school in our peer groups. This
shows up in the resources we can
invest in student services, career
services support, the library, tech-
nology infrastructure, student
scholarships, clinics and skills


offerings, and faculty profes-
sional development and research
support.
To address these needs, we
began to articulate a set of
revenue enhancement proposals
in the spring of 2004, and some
of those are being implemented
now. The most important of
these proposals addresses the
huge discrepancy between our
tuition, which is among the
lowest of the nation's nearly 190
law schools, and the tuition of
other public law schools at our
level. We do not aspire to increase
our tuition to the lofty sums seen
at most private and some public
institutions, but if we are going
to offer an academic program
that successfully competes with
the nation's best law schools
and persuades the best Florida
residents to remain in Florida for
their legal education, we must be
able to charge tuition and fees
that are near at least the average
of the law schools at the nation's
top public universities.


6 FLA LAW

















This past year, the Legislature
approved and the Governor
signed temporary authority that
allowed us, with the approval of
the university Board of Trustees,
to charge a "differential" tuition
to new entering students. We
used this authority responsibly
in its first year to create a modest
increase for first-year students that
in the current year funds a signifi-
cant increase in scholarship aid, a
new professional staff position in
Career Services and a new faculty
position in our clinical programs.
It is our hope that this temporary
authority, or something similar
to it, will be made permanent in
the 2006 legislative session. If this
occurs, we will be able to increase
the quality of our program,
increase need-based financial aid
so that access to a legal education
is not compromised, position
ourselves to be identified with
the nation's highest tier of public
law schools, and achieve a level
of excellence unparalleled in our
college's history.


The Value
of Participation
It has now been more than
three years since I received a call
from the Dean Search Commit-
tee asking me to consider becom-
ing a candidate for the Levin
College of Law deanship. The
committee told me great things
about the talented students, dy-
namic faculty, dedicated staff, and
loyal and enthusiastic alumni,
and they explained how the
antiquated facilities would soon
be transformed into state-of-the-
art academic space. Now that I
have completed almost two and a
half years as dean, I must confess
that things are not the way the
committee described them...they
are better, thanks to all of you
and the generous alumni who
continue to give back to those
who follow them in these halls. I
hope those graduating this semes-
ter will take that tradition as their
own, beginning with participa-
tion in the class gift. The signifi-


chance of that participation goes
far beyond the dollar amount it
raises to support your soon-to-be
alma mater. It is a symbol to our
alumni of your loyalty to this
school and a permanent legacy to
your class, and it sets an example
of early philanthropy and public
spirit that we hold up often to
our graduates.

In January, my family and
I will move into a new home
we are constructing closer to
campus. When we closed on this
contract, we made a decision as a
family that this will be our home
for many years to come. At the
law school, there is much work
to done, but I am committed to
witnessing the realization of our
aspirations, and I hope you are
pleased with our progress thus
far. Thank you for your support
in this effort, and thank you for
giving me a reason to be proud
to serve as your dean every time I
think about our college's future.


Insider's Look at
Judicial Nominations
Prominent judges and UF law
faculty gave students an up-close
look at the judicial nomination
process at the Florida Law Review's
Fall Symposium Nov. 18. Speak-
ers on the panel included (from
left) 11th Circuit Appeals Judge
Gerald Tjoflat, Irving Cypen
Professor Sharon Rush, Professor
Jon Mills and U.S. District Judge
Stephan Mickle.


Library Hours
to Change
The Lawton Chiles Legal Infor-
mation Center will operate on a
modified schedule through the
end of the year. Below are the
library's operating hours:
Pre-Finals Period
Nov. 28-Dec. 2 7:30 a.m.-1 a.m.

Finals Period
Dec. 3 9 a.m.-2 a.m.
Dec. 4- 1 p.m.-2 a.m.
Dec. 5-Dec. 9 7:30 a.m.-2 a.m.
Dec. 10 9 a.m.-2 a.m.
Dec. 11 1 p.m. 2 a.m.
Dec. 12-Dec. 14- 7:30 a.m.-2 a.m.
Dec. 15 7:30 a.m.-6 p.m.

Holiday Break
Dec. 16 8 a.m.-5 p.m.
Dec. 17-Dec. 18- Closed
Dec. 19-Dec. 23 8 a.m.-5 p.m.
Dec. 24-Jan. 2 Closed
Jan. 3 8 a.m.-5 p.m.

The library resumes its normal
hours (7:30 a.m. to 11:30 p.m.)
on Jan. 4.


FLA LAW 7








College of Law
Administration
* Robert H. Jerry, II, Dean
* George L. Dawson,
Associate Dean for
Academic Affairs
* J. Patrick Shannon,
Associate Dean for
Administrative Affairs
* Lyrissa Barnett Lidsky,
Associate Dean for
Faculty Development
* Michael K. Friel,
Associate Dean & Director,
Graduate Tax Program
* Stuart R. Cohn,
Associate Dean for
International Studies
* M. Kathleen "Kathie" Price,
Associate Dean for Library
and Technology
* Gail E. Sasnett,
Associate Dean for
Students, Professionalism
and Community Relations
* J. Michael Patrick,
Assistant Dean for Admissions
* Linda Calvert Hanson,
Assistant Dean for
Career Services
* Adrian Jones,
Assistant Dean for Diversity
and Community Relations
* Jennifer Cope, Interim
Assistant Dean for Students
* Debra D. Amirin,
Director of Communications
* Donald J. Hale,
Senior Director of Development
and Alumni Affairs

Send Us Your News
Flalaw is published each week
school is in session by the Levin
College of Law Communica-
tions Office. The newsletter
will suspend publication for the
winter break, and will resume
with the Jan. 9 issue. Please
submit news of interest to the
law school community to lock-
ette@law.ufl.edu or 273-0650.
* Tim Lockette,
Editor, Flalaw
* Kristen Hines,
Photographer


UNIVERSITY OF
FLORIDA


PEOPLE


Scholarship & Activities
Assistant Dean for Ca-
reer Services Linda Calvert
Hanson's article, "Building Al-
lies Through a Career Services
Student Advisory Panel," ap-
peared in the November NALP
Bulletin.
Professor Alyson Flournoy
spoke on a panel on Hurricane
Katrina at the American Bar
Association Administrative Law
Section's annual conference in
Washington D.C. Nov. 18.
Professor Don Peters
published an article entitled
"To Sue is Human; To Settle
Divine: Intercultural Collabo-
rations to Expand the Use of
Mediation in Costa Rica" in 17
Florida Journal of International
Law 9 (2005).

In the News
Professor Alyson Flournoy
did a half-hour live interview
on WUML-FM in Lowell,
Mass., Nov. 21 discussing the
policy decisions that contrib-
uted to the Hurricane Katrina
disaster.
Law student Sean Lebowitz
was quoted in an Oct. 17 U.S.


SCHOLARSHIP
& ACTIVITIES


Scholars Debate Eminent Domain Issues
Fordham University Law Professor Eduardo M. Pefialver (from left)
talks to UF Assistant Professor Mark Fenster, UF Professor Chris-
tine Klein and University of Notre Dame Law Professor Nicole Stelle
Garnett at the Fall 2005 Richard E. Nelson Symposium, held Nov. 18
at the UF Hotel and Conference Center. The conference drew leading
property rights scholars from around the nation to discuss eminent
domain issues.


Newswire story on law students
who oppose the nomination
of Samuel Alito to the U. S.
Supreme Court. The story was
carried on America Online's
AOL News.
Richard E. Nelson Profes-
sor Michael Allan Wolf was
quoted in a Nov. 1 Voice of


America story on Kelo v. City of
New London. Wolf noted that
a number of innovations in
America's infrastructure, includ-
ing the building of the nation's
railroads and its telephone
system, were made possible by
the power of eminent domain.


CALENDAR


December
2 Fall Classes End

5 Reading/Final Exam
Period Begins

15 Reading/Final Exam
Period Ends

16 Graduation


January
3 "Introduction to Law
School and the Profes-
sion" Begins

5 Spring Classes Begin

16 Martin Luther King, Jr.
Day; Classes Cancelled


More Dates
Available Online
For more information on
the dates and locations of
upcoming meetings, check the
calendar on the law school's
website at: http://www.law.
ufl.edu/calendars/.


8 FLA LAW








College of Law
Administration
* Robert H. Jerry, II, Dean
* George L. Dawson,
Associate Dean for
Academic Affairs
* J. Patrick Shannon,
Associate Dean for
Administrative Affairs
* Lyrissa Barnett Lidsky,
Associate Dean for
Faculty Development
* Michael K. Friel,
Associate Dean & Director,
Graduate Tax Program
* Stuart R. Cohn,
Associate Dean for
International Studies
* M. Kathleen "Kathie" Price,
Associate Dean for Library
and Technology
* Gail E. Sasnett,
Associate Dean for
Students, Professionalism
and Community Relations
* J. Michael Patrick,
Assistant Dean for Admissions
* Linda Calvert Hanson,
Assistant Dean for
Career Services
* Adrian Jones,
Assistant Dean for Diversity
and Community Relations
* Jennifer Cope, Interim
Assistant Dean for Students
* Debra D. Amirin,
Director of Communications
* Donald J. Hale,
Senior Director of Development
and Alumni Affairs

Send Us Your News
Flalaw is published each week
school is in session by the Levin
College of Law Communica-
tions Office. The newsletter
will suspend publication for the
winter break, and will resume
with the Jan. 9 issue. Please
submit news of interest to the
law school community to lock-
ette@law.ufl.edu or 273-0650.
* Tim Lockette,
Editor, Flalaw
* Kristen Hines,
Photographer


UNIVERSITY OF
FLORIDA


PEOPLE


Scholarship & Activities
Assistant Dean for Ca-
reer Services Linda Calvert
Hanson's article, "Building Al-
lies Through a Career Services
Student Advisory Panel," ap-
peared in the November NALP
Bulletin.
Professor Alyson Flournoy
spoke on a panel on Hurricane
Katrina at the American Bar
Association Administrative Law
Section's annual conference in
Washington D.C. Nov. 18.
Professor Don Peters
published an article entitled
"To Sue is Human; To Settle
Divine: Intercultural Collabo-
rations to Expand the Use of
Mediation in Costa Rica" in 17
Florida Journal of International
Law 9 (2005).

In the News
Professor Alyson Flournoy
did a half-hour live interview
on WUML-FM in Lowell,
Mass., Nov. 21 discussing the
policy decisions that contrib-
uted to the Hurricane Katrina
disaster.
Law student Sean Lebowitz
was quoted in an Oct. 17 U.S.


SCHOLARSHIP
& ACTIVITIES


Scholars Debate Eminent Domain Issues
Fordham University Law Professor Eduardo M. Pefialver (from left)
talks to UF Assistant Professor Mark Fenster, UF Professor Chris-
tine Klein and University of Notre Dame Law Professor Nicole Stelle
Garnett at the Fall 2005 Richard E. Nelson Symposium, held Nov. 18
at the UF Hotel and Conference Center. The conference drew leading
property rights scholars from around the nation to discuss eminent
domain issues.


Newswire story on law students
who oppose the nomination
of Samuel Alito to the U. S.
Supreme Court. The story was
carried on America Online's
AOL News.
Richard E. Nelson Profes-
sor Michael Allan Wolf was
quoted in a Nov. 1 Voice of


America story on Kelo v. City of
New London. Wolf noted that
a number of innovations in
America's infrastructure, includ-
ing the building of the nation's
railroads and its telephone
system, were made possible by
the power of eminent domain.


CALENDAR


December
2 Fall Classes End

5 Reading/Final Exam
Period Begins

15 Reading/Final Exam
Period Ends

16 Graduation


January
3 "Introduction to Law
School and the Profes-
sion" Begins

5 Spring Classes Begin

16 Martin Luther King, Jr.
Day; Classes Cancelled


More Dates
Available Online
For more information on
the dates and locations of
upcoming meetings, check the
calendar on the law school's
website at: http://www.law.
ufl.edu/calendars/.


8 FLA LAW