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 Congressman to speak at gradua...
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 People, scholarship and activi...
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UF UFLAW



Fla law newsletter of the University of Florida College of Law
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00072281/00155
 Material Information
Title: Fla law newsletter of the University of Florida College of Law
Portion of title: Flalaw
Physical Description: Serial
Creator: Levin College of Law
Publisher: s.n.
Place of Publication: <Gainesville FL> College of Law Communications Office 1997-
Creation Date: November 21, 2005
Frequency: weekly
completely irregular
 Subjects
Genre: periodical   ( marcgt )
serial   ( sobekcm )
 Notes
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol.1, no. 1 (Oct. 6, 1997)-
General Note: Weekly during the school year with a biweekly insert, numbered separately called: The Docket.
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Table of Contents
    Congressman to speak at graduation
        Page 1
    Career Services
        Page 2
        Page 3
    Events and opportunities
        Page 4
        Page 5
    People, scholarship and activities
        Page 6
        Page 7
    Professors seek storm's 'silver lining'
        Page 8
    Calendar
        Page 8
Full Text










UNIVERS O F OI DA
LEV^^ ^ ^ ^ ^^IN C O L G O F LA W IA a

^^^^^^^^4^ 4kl B^R A^


Congressman to Speak at Graduation


A veteran legislator and
UF law alumnus will be the
keynote speaker at graduation
ceremonies for the Levin Col-
lege of Law Dec. 16.
Rep. Michael Bilirakis
(R-Tarpon Springs) is a 1963
graduate of the law school and
a senior member of the Florida
delegation to the U.S. House
of Representatives.
A member of the House
since 1983, Bilirakis is vice-
chairman of the Veterans
Affairs and Energy and Com-
merce committees.
The National Journal's Al-
manac ofAmerican Politics has
described Bilirakis as one of
"the most legislatively produc-
tive" members of Congress.
Among other legislative
accomplishments, he helped
draft the
House
version of
the 2003
Medicare
bill, which
created a
prescrip- Bilirakis
tion drug
benefit for Medicare recipients;
secured resources for Florida



INSIDE THIS ISSUE
2 Career Services
4 Events and Opportunities
8 Calendar


veterans, including $44 million
for a spinal cord injury unit in
Tampa; and authored or spon-
sored a number of significant
bills on health care, including
the Nurse Reinvestment Act,
the Patient Safety and Qual-
ity Improvement Act, and the
Organ Donation Improvement
Act.
"It's an honor to have so
accomplished a legislator on
campus to speak to our newest
group of graduates," Dean
Robert Jerry said. "Rep. Bili-
rakis serves as a good example
of how much a person can
accomplish with a law degree
from UF"


Professors
Discuss the
'Race Card'


a


About 150 law students are
expected to graduate in the
ceremony, which will be held
at 3 p.m. at the Phillips Center
for the Performing Arts.



Nominate a
Speaker Today
Graduating seniors have un-
til 6 p.m. today, Nov. 21, to
nominate members of their
class to speak at the law
school's Dec. 16 graduation.
Submit your nominations to
johnsons@law.ufl.edu.






Seeking Storm's U
Silver Lining


VOL. 9 NO. 14 NOVEMBER 21, 2005



Support Your
Class Gift
Members of the Fall 2005
graduating class have pledged
approximately $40,000 to this
year's class gift so far.
Graduating seniors still have time
to make a pledge and help the
Class Gift Committee raise the ad-
ditional $20,000 it needs to reach
its fundraising goal.
All members of the class are
invited to the committee's pizza
party in the Marcia Schott Court-
yard Tuesday, Nov. 22, from 11
a.m. to 1 p.m. There is no obliga-
tion to give, but pledge forms will
be available.



Justice Ginsburg
to Visit in 2006
U.S. Supreme Court Associate
Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg is
expected to visit the Levin College
of Law next fall.
Justice Ginsburg is scheduled to
speak at the official dedication
ceremony for
the Chesterfield
Smith Ceremonial
Classroom, one of
a series of events
to be held Sept.
21-22, 2006. Ginsburg
For more information on the visit,
check future issues of F/alaw.











CAREERSERVICES
Hints to help you in the legal profession


Get FlaLaw Via
E-Mail
Have Flalaw delivered to your
computer every Friday days
before the rest of the world
sees it. Send an e-mail to
lockette@law.ufl.edu and ask
to be added to the Flalaw
PDF list.



Graduating
Seniors: Submit
Information
If you're graduating in Decem-
ber and have not yet submitted
information for the commence-
ment program, please do so as
soon as possible.
Even if you don't plan to walk
at the ceremony, Student Af-
fairs staff need to know about
your honors, extracurricular
activities and other informa-
tion to make the commence-
ment program accurate and
complete.
To update your information,
contact Sarah Carswell at
carswell@law.ufl.edu or 273-
0623.


2 FLA LAW


Career Services:
Debunking the Myths
Still wondering what you will
do with your law degree at the
end of your three years? Think-
ing about pursuing an LL.M.,
choosing a smaller law firm,
joining the state attorney's office
or becoming a judicial law clerk?
Whether you are a 1L, 2L, 3L
or LL.M. candidate, there are
steps you should be taking while
in school to make the transition
from law school to practice and
to a practice that fosters not only
continual growth but also pro-
found personal fulfillment.
The Center for Career Services
can help you in laying this foun-
dation. Surprised to hear that?
You shouldn't be. Still, every
semester, Career Services staff
meet students who are just learn-
ing what the center can do for
them students who wish they
had come by earlier in their law
school careers. Here are some of
the myths that have kept students
from using this valuable resource
properly.

Myth No. 1:
Finding work won't be a prob-
lem because Career Services will
place me in a job.
This is a popular misconcep-
tion. Career Services exists to
teach students how to conduct a
job search and find a satisfying
job. This is a skill that will serve
you throughout your career, not
just immediately after gradu-
ation. Statistics show that, in
most cases, a law graduate's first
employer is rarely his or her last.
The search for satisfying work


On-campus interviews like this one can be a great way to meet employers
from major firms and government agencies but Career Services has more
to offer than just OCI. Drop in and find out what the center can do for you.


requires a significant amount
of time, energy and diligence.
The first step is to ask yourself
the right questions and develop
an understanding of the type
of work you're looking for. This
kind of soul searching is some-
thing only you can do.
You've heard the saying: Ifyou
give a man a fish, you feed him for
a day, but ifyou teach him tofish,
you feed him forever. Learning
to "fish" for jobs may seem like
a lot more trouble than having
one handed to you, but it will be
worth it in the long run.

Myth No. 2:
I can't go see a Career Services
counselor because I don't know
what type of law I want to practice
and therefore don't know what
questions to ask.
This is exactly why you should
come in to speak with a profes-
sional career counselor. Every


counselor in Career Services has
graduated from law school. They
have all been in your shoes, and
they understand how difficult
it can be to identify a goal and
not know how to obtain it, or to
not know which direction to go
once you are in law school. These
counselors can guide you through
the process and help you concen-
trate on determining which path
or paths to pursue.

Myth No. 3:
Career Services is only useful to
people at the top of their class, such
as OCIparticipants or clerkship
candidates.
Don't be fooled by this line
of thinking. Both OCI and ju-
dicial clerkships are high-profile
programs at the law campus. It's
easy to get the impression that
this is all Career Services does.
While these are options for some
students, the majority of law stu-

















dents will not gain employment
through OCI or become judicial
law clerks. This means that there
are lots of other options avail-
able to you. Many employers are
much more interested in your
moot court, trial team or legal ex-
periences. All students should be
building their resumes with legal
experience while in law school.
Think about pro bono work,
externships, internships or clinics
as options to pursue while you
are in law school. Career Services
can help you find opportunities
in all these areas.

Myth No. 4:
There' plenty of time. I'll be sure
to drop by the Career Services office
right before Igraduate and they'll
help me then.
When you're just beginning
law school, three years of high
intensity study can seem like an
eternity. While you're multi-task-
ing your way through this ordeal,
however, you find that that the
deadlines whiz by with shock-
ing speed. If you aren't careful,
graduation can rush up to meet
you before you're even remotely
ready.
Maintaining a high academic
standard is only one of the goals
you should have in law school.
It is in your best interest to build
your legal credentials as soon as
possible and to continue to ex-
pand on them as you finish your
JD. The experience you obtain
while in law school can lead to
opportunities upon graduation
and beyond. One legal experi-
ence tends to lead to the next,
either directly or indirectly. It is
very challenging to begin to build


employment momentum in your
fifth or sixth semester. The earlier
you begin, the better.

Myth No. 5:
Career Services keeps talk-
ing about "networking this" and
"networking that. "I don't really
need to network to land a post-grad
position.
Networking has become a
tricky concept for some law
students. It is, however, the
backbone of any search for a legal
position. Many of the positions
available in the legal market will
never show up in a publication or
on a job bank. They are generally
offered by word of mouth. This
means that there are times in the
legal field when it truly is who
you know, or being in the right
place at the right time, that lands
you the job. Students who make
the most of their contacts and
then network off those contacts
will be leaps and bounds ahead of
a recent graduate who has no le-
gal experience or is an unknown


in the legal community. If you
want to learn more about infor-
mational interviews or network-
ing, call for an appointment with
a Career Services counselor.

The Center for Career Services
is a resource available to all stu-
dents after their first few months
of law school. Like any resource,
it serves you only as much as you
use it. The center's mission is to
teach, guide and facilitate your
career planning. This process
includes not only building your
legal credentials, but also explor-
ing different options both within
and beyond the legal profession,
as well as serving as a general re-
source base. Optimally, students
should come in early during their
law school career and continue
with regular visits to expand and
modify their individual approach
to obtaining employment after
graduation.


Start Your Career
with the Attorney General
The Florida Attorney General's Office provides opportunities for aspiring
law school graduates to begin their careers in an active and diverse
practice environment.
Third-year students and recent law grads must apply by Dec. 31 for
these positions, which offer a competitive salary. Selected attorneys
will be placed with a mentor and work for approximately six months
each with the Antitrust Division, the Criminal Division (Appeals), the
Economic Crimes Unit and the state's lead litigator, the Solicitor Gen-
eral. The total commitment is two years.
For full details, go to www. Myfloridalegal.com and look under "employ-
ment & internship."


Graduating in
December?


Have yet to accept an offer?
Have questions about employ-
ment options? Please schedule
an appointment with a Career
Services attorney counselor
now. They can help you.


Summer Clerkship
Job Fair
The Nashville Bar Association's
Damali Booker 1L Minority
Summer Clerkship Job Fair
will be held Feb. 25, 2006,
in Nashville, Tennessee. This
job fair involves recruitment
and screening of applicants
for summer clerkships with
firms and organizations. All
interested candidates are
encouraged to send a resume,
writing sample and law school
transcript no later than Jan. 25
to the Nashville Bar Associa-
tion, 315 Union Street, Suite
800, Nashville, TN 37201,
Attention: Traci Hollandsworth.
For more information, go to
www.nashbar.org.











/E VENTS & OPPORTUNITIES


Scholarship
Available


Applications for the William L.
Graddy Law School Scholar-
ship are available at the front
desk in the Student Affairs
Office. Applicants for the
$1,000 scholarship must 1)
have completed their first year
of law school; 2) have a GPA
of 2.8 or higher, or be in the
top 25 percent of their class;
3) have been a resident of Char-
lotte, Collier, Glades, Hendry or
Lee counties for at least three
years; and 4) demonstrate
financial need.

Civil Liberties
Fellowship
Available
Applications are now available
for the Robert Masur Fellow-
ship in Civil Liberties, a $1,000
fellowship that is open to
students who intend to carry
out significant activities during
the summer in the areas of civil
rights and civil liberties. Pro-
posed activities include writing
or research projects, work with
public interest organizations, or
work on civil liberties cases un-
der the supervision of a faculty
member or lawyer. For more
information, inquire at the front
desk in Student Affairs.


4 FLA LAW


Costa Rica Meeting
Tuesday
Students interested in sum-
mer study in Costa Rica should
attend an informational meeting
on the UF/University of Costa
Rica joint program, held Tues-
day, Nov. 22, at noon in 285A.
Interested students also can
contact Program Director Tom
Ankersen at ankersen@law.ufl.
edu or 273-0840.

Republicans Hold Final
Meeting
The Law School Republicans
will hold their last meeting of
the semester Tuesday, Nov. 22,
at noon in room 285D. The
featured speaker will be UF law
alumnus Travis Horn, a candidate
for the District 14 seat in the
State Senate. Free pizza will be
served in the courtyard immedi-
ately following the meeting.

Pizza with the Dean
Students will be able to share
concerns, questions and com-
ments with Dean Robert Jerry
during "Pizza with the Dean" at
4 p.m. Tuesday, Nov. 22, in the
faculty dining room. To reserve
a seat, RSVP to robinsone@law.
ufl.edu.

Trial Team Welcomes
New Members
The UF Trial Team welcomes
its new executive board, which
will take office next semester.
Board members include President
Carson Lange, Vice President
of Intermurals Justin Mazzara,
Vice President of Administra-
tion Cecily McLeod, Senior Vice
President ofIntramurals Schnelle


Tonge, Junior Vice Presidents of
Intramurals Sarah Stoddard and
Brandy Grant, Vice Presidents
of Education Rogers Walker and
Hugh Rowe, Vice President of
Alumni Affairs Jason Siegel, Vice
Presidents of Publicity Thomas
Allison and Oshia Gainer and
Vice President of Communica-
tion Kelly Johnson.

Law Student
Athlete Honored
Law student James "Jet" The-
riac (1L) was recently honored
as Student of the Week by the
Gator Boosters.
In addition to his law school
studies, Theriac is a member of
UF's track team. He is also an
active member of the Goodwill
Gator program, a community
service organization for student
athletes; through the program,
Theriac has spoken to elementary
school children about the impor-
tance of literacy, visited patients
at Shands Hospital, and coached
several youth teams.


'Risky Business' Wins
Softball Challenge
The Laughing Heirs (Associ-
ate Professor Lee-ford Tritt's
Estates and Trusts class) chal-
lenged Risky Business, LLC
(Associate Professor Michael
Siebecker's Business Organiza-
tions class) to a test of"wills"on
the softball field at the South-
west Recreation Center Nov.
11. The bleachers were packed
to capacity with fans from both
classes. Associate Dean Pat
Shannon and Assistant Profes-
sor Andrea Matwyshyn made
special guest appearances to
heckle both teams. The Laugh-
ing Heirs got out to an early
start under the leadership of
co-captains Laura Post and
Adam Spunberg; but after an
action-packed seven innings of
play, Risky Business co-captains
Dina Finkel and Matt Klot-
shche led their classmates to a
21-18 victory.


This Thanksgiving,
Feed 'Nessie'
Phi Delta Phi is conducting a
Thanksgiving food drive in the
west entrance to the law school.
Bring non-perishable food to the
organization's table, near the
recently installed artwork (the
sculpture with the "I'm Nessie"
sign). The food drive, which
will help replenish food banks
depleted by recent natural disas-
ters, continues through Tuesday,
Nov. 22.















Panel Examines 'Race Card'


BY REBECCA MARCI BROWN
What does it mean to "play
the race card?" Are minorities
the only ones who do it?
When is it "appropriate" to
raise issues of race in a political
debate?
Nearly 100 students and
professors gathered Nov. 9 to
engage in substantive dialogue
about these and other impor-
tant issues of race and race
relations raised by a series of
controversial cartoons pub-
lished in The Independent
Florida A//-glro:v.
Shortly after Hurricane
Katrina hit New Orleans
- and after rapper Kanye West
publicly accused the Bush
Administration of neglecting
storm victims because of their
race All.g.Iro: cartoonist Andy
Marlette penned a cartoon on
the debate. The cartoon de-
picted West holding up a "race
card" to a disbelieving Secretary
of State Condoleezza Rice,
who addressed West using the
"n-word."
The cartoon sparked con-
troversy on campus. Profes-
sor Katheryn Russell-Brown,
director of the law school's
Center on the Study of Race
and Race Relations, saw the
event as not just a scandal, but
a teachable moment a chance
to talk about racial issues and
assumptions that too often go
unexamined.
Professor Kenneth Nunn, a
member of the panel, said the
controversy about the cartoon
was generated not by the use


Faculty and students tackled thorny issues of race, politics and appro-
priate speech at a forum on 'Playing the Race Card' Nov. 9. The forum
was sponsored by the Center for the Study of Race and Race Relations.


of the "n-word," but by the
context in which the word was
used.
"I could say 'honey' to my
wife," he said. "But it would be
disrespectful for someone else
to call her that or for me to call
my colleague that."
The most objectionable thing
about the cartoon, Nunn said,
was not its use of a "forbidden"
word, but its suggestion that
West's statement was inappro-
priate.
Professor Sharon Rush
cautioned that a fear of be-
ing called a racist often chills
speech about racial issues, and
asked people to consider the
reasons why the cartoon was
considered offensive. Rush,
who is white, confessed that
she believed she understood
racial issues until she adopted
her daughter, who is black, and
began to see the world through


her eyes. (Rush authored a
book, Loving Across the Color
Line: a White Adoptive Mother
Learns About Race, describing
some of the lessons she has
learned.)
Professor Pedro Malavet
noted that before the 1980s, the
phrase "race card" had mean-
ing only for people who bet on
horses, though it is now used to
silence debate on racial issues.
Dean Robert H. Jerry II
emphasized the need for candid
conversation about socially
constructed categories, includ-
ing race.
"Words matter," he said.
"Language is powerful and
significant. As lawyers, we use
words everyday and need to
use them with precision and
accuracy, or else we create
stereotypes, half truths and
misrepresentations."


Kennedy to Speak
at Environmental
Conference
Timely environmental topics
- global warming, children
and the environment, beach
re-nourishment, and rhetoric
and the environment will be
debated by some heavy hitters
at this year's Public Interest
Environmental Conference
March 9-11, 2006.
Speakers include National Geo-
graphic explorer and renowned
oceanographer Sylvia Earle,
former EPA administrator Carol
Browner (JD 79), University
of Maryland Professor Rena
Steinzor, Tulane University Pro-
fessor Oliver Houck, University
of Houston Professor Marcilynn
Burke and University of Virginia
Professor Jonathan Cannon.
Other invited speakers include
Georgetown Law Professor
Edith Brown Weiss and Robert
F. Kennedy, Jr.
The conference is organized
by the Environmental and Land
Use Law Society, which is
joining forces this year with
the National Association of En-
vironmental Law Societies and
the UF Center for Children's
Literature and Culture to create
a more diverse schedule of
panelists and speakers.
For more information, go to

www.law. ufl.edu/elulp/index.
htm.


FLA LAW 5










PEOPLE


Fensom


Scholarship & Activities
Law and Policy in the Americas
Program Director Meredith Fen-
som participated in "Seminario
Interamericano: Claves Para Una
Reforma a la Justicia Civil (Inter-
American Seminar: Keys to Civil
Justice Reform)" held Nov. 10- 11
in Santiago, Chile, where she pre-
sented her model and proposal for
the establishment of small claims
courts in Chile.
Associate Professor Mark
Fenster delivered a talk en-
titled, "Making Sense of Federal
Constitutional Takings After the
2004-05 U.S. Supreme Court
Term," to the Florida Association
of Eminent Domain Professionals
Oct. 27 in Tampa.
Levin, Mabie and Levin Profes-
sor Berta Hernandez-Truyol
published her article, "Cuba and
Good Governance," in 14 Trans-
national Law & Contemporary


Nelson Symposium Inspires Book
With the Supreme Court in flux and the political winds shifting in
other branches of government, the future of some of the most bas
of America's environmental laws is in question. A new book, inspir
by a debate at UF last year, brings some of the brightest minds in
environmental law to bear on the question of how to save 30 year
ecological progress.
In Strategies for Environmental Success in an Uncertain Judicial
Climate, edited by Richard E. Nelson Professor Michael Allan Wolf,
scholars propose innovate approaches to defending
environmental law in an era when many regulations
are vulnerable to attack on federalism, takings and
separation-of-powers grounds. The volume features
essays by a dozen environmental law scholars, in-
cluding UF Professor Alyson Flournoy and Assistant
Professor Mary Jane Angelo.
Wolf says the book was inspired by a lively debate that began at t
November 2004 Nelson Symposium, which focused on problems in
environmental law.


Problems 655.
Director of Admissions
Hutchison published his
"Give Us the Details: Un
ing the Law School Resun
in the Oct. 2005 issue of
Advisor.
Research Foundation P
Diane H. Mazur spoke a
College Law School Nov.
part of a panel on "Rumsf
FAIR and the Limits of E
sive Association." This ful
conference examined the
Solomon Amendment lit
tion in the U.S. Supreme
Mazur also was quoted in
on the conference in the
issue of BC Heights.
Clarence J. TeSelle Prof
Martin McMahon spoke
University of Virginia Sc
Law's Tax Study Group IN
on the topic, "The Presid
Advisory Panel on Federa
Reform Proposals to Fix


SCHOLARSHIP
& ACTIVITIES



Tax System."
Lewis At the request of the UF
article, International Center, Samuel T.
derstand- Dell Research Scholar Winston
me," Nagan was honored as one of the
The university's outstanding interna-
tional educators in a ceremony
professorr Nov. 15.
t Boston Assistant Professor Elizabeth
11 as Rowe was the invited speaker at
eld v. the Florida Bar Association Com-
xpres- puter Law Committee meeting
1-day in Orlando Nov. 9. She discussed
pending how computers threaten employ-
iga- ers' trade secrets.
Court.
story In the News
a story
Nov. 14 Legal Skills Professors Iris
Burke and Alison Gerencser
fessor were mentioned in the "Law and
to the Order" column in The Gainesville
iool of Sun Nov. 9. Burke and Gerencser
ov. 11 made a presentation on prob-
ent's lem solving to the 8th Judicial
1 Tax Circuit's Family Law Advisory
America's Group.
Affiliate Professor Bill Cham-
berlin was quoted in an Associ-
ated Press article on attempts
to modernize New Hampshire's
open records laws for the Internet
ic age. Chamberlin said such laws
ed have worked best when they
address specific technologies in
s of detail. The article appeared in the
Nov. 15 issue of the Portsmouth
(N.H.) Herald.
legal Professors Michelle Jacobs and
Kenneth Nunn were mentioned
in The Gainesville Guardian' Nov.
10 coverage of a recent panel on
racial profiling and police brutal-
ity.
Affiliate Professor James
Nicholas was quoted in a Nov. 14
he St. Petersburg Times story about
Sthe growing number of Florida
counties that have adopted school
impact fees on new construc-
Continued on next page


Fenster


Hernandez-Truyol


Hutchison


Mazur


McMahon


Nagan


Rowe


6 FLA LAW












Dealing With Change


BY NICOLE STERN
Of all the things we face in our
lives, the one thing we can be
sure of is change.
As the end of the semester
nears, we may be experiencing
change in our families, school,
living environment, within
our relationships, and within
our selves. This change may be
easier to accept under certain
circumstances rather than others.
Change is usually situational and
is often paired with a combina-
tion of emotions ranging from
sadness to excitement.
No matter what emotion a
person experiences as a result of


In the News from page 6

tion. Nicholas said the problem
of school capacity is becoming a
crisis in fast-growing communities
across Florida. The article also ap-
peared in the Nov. 15 issue of The
Lakeland Ledger.
Assistant Professor Christopher
Peterson was quoted in a (Salt
Lake City) Deseret Morning News
series, published the week of Nov.


change, it usually is a sign of an
internal reaction to life circum-
stance, and should be given due
attention in order to understand
and acknowledge it.
Each individual processes the
change he or she
is experiencing
in a unique way,
depending on his
or her experi-
ence of coming
to terms with the
Stern
new situation.
This process of coming to
terms is made easier if the
individual is able to let go of the
past and start exploring his or her


14, on payday lenders and their
effect on Utah residents.
Professor Alyson Flournoy,
director of the Environmental
and Land Use Law Program,
and Richard E. Nelson Professor
Michael Allan Wolf were quoted
in a Nov. 16 Independent Florida
All.gIaro: -,' ry on a panel discus-
sion of ways to rebuild in the wake


choices and opportunities.
If the individual is able to take
a positive, active approach and
anticipate change in order to
mentally prepare for the transi-
tions, he or she has a better
chance of accepting change and
moving on.
If you are having a difficult
time overcoming a life transition
or change and would like help
in working through it, please
feel free to contact me, Nicole
Nicolaisen Stern (Stern@law.ufl.
edu), UF's law school resource
counselor. You don't have to go
through it alone.


of Hurricane Katrina.
The Military Law Students
Association's law clinic for veterans
was mentioned in the Nov. 7 issue
of the Jacksonville Daily Record.
A photograph of MLSA member
David Oliver (2L), now serving
as a reservist in Afghanistan, ap-
peared in the Nov. 10 issue of The
Gainesville Sun.


~ ABA-ACCREDITED STUDY ABROAD
EnviTrullnmenIa law in Coslu Rica. including
Conserration Clinic field work and field trips
Business law in Paris and Montpellicr. France, including
tours of European Union and French legal institution
Human rights and cultural studies in Cape ToI n. South
A Africa, including tours of Robben Island and networking
%% ith local attorneys

ExF\prience the ',uLdy of law at top universities. One low
tuition rate covers all course and administrative expenses.
A Appl y by March 24, 21)X6. For details, go online to
Swww.law.ull.edu/sludenls/abroad.


Library Hours
to Change
The Lawton Chiles Legal
Information Center will close for
Thanksgiving, and will operate
on a modified schedule through
the end of finals. Below are the
library's operating hours for the
rest of the semester:


Thanksgiving Week
Nov. 23 7:30 a.m.-5 p.m.
Nov. 24- Closed
Nov. 25 1 p.m.-5 p.m.
Nov. 26 Closed

Pre-Finals Period
Nov. 27 1 p.m.-1 a.m.
Nov. 28 Dec. 2 -- 7:30 a.m.-1 a.m.

Finals Period
Dec. 3 9 a.m.-2 a.m.
Dec. 4- 1 p.m.-2 a.m.
Dec. 5 Dec. 9- 7:30 a.m.-2
a.m.
Dec. 10 9 a.m.-2 a.m.
Dec. 11 1 p.m. 2 a.m.
Dec. 12 Dec. 14 7:30 a.m.
2 a.m.
Dec. 15 7:30 a.m. 6 p.m.


FLA LAW 7











College of Law
Administration
* Robert H. Jerry, II, Dean
* George L. Dawson,
Associate Dean for
Academic Affairs
* J. Patrick Shannon,
Associate Dean for
Administrative Affairs
* Lyrissa Barnett Lidsky,
Associate Dean for
Faculty Development
* Michael K. Friel,
Associate Dean & Director,
Graduate Tax Program
* Stuart R. Cohn,
Associate Dean for
International Studies
* M. Kathleen "Kathie" Price,
Associate Dean for Library
and Technology
* Gail E. Sasnett,
Associate Dean for
Students, Professionalism
and Community Relations
* J. Michael Patrick,
Assistant Dean for Admissions
* Linda Calvert Hanson,
Assistant Dean for
Career Services
* Adrian Jones,
Assistant Dean for Diversity
and Community Relations
* Jennifer Cope, Interim
Assistant Dean for Students
* Debra D. Amirin,
Director of Communications
* Donald J. Hale,
Senior Director of Development
and Alumni Affairs

Send Us Your News
FlaLaw is published each week
school is in session by the Levin
College of Law Communica-
tions Office. Submit news of
interest to the law school
community by 10 a.m. Tuesday
for the following Monday's
issue to lockette@law.ufl.edu
or 273-0650.
* Tim Lockette,
Editor, Flalaw
* Kristen Hines,
Photographer




UNIVERSITY OF
FLORIDA


Professors Seek Storm's 'Silver Lining'


BY JULIA KIM
AND DINA FINKEL
While Hurricane Katrina
was a natural phenomenon,
its destruction was aggravated
by governmental policies and
actions.
In "The Silver Lining of Hur-
ricane Katrina: Rebuilding to
Minimize the Effects of Race,
Poverty and Environmental
Degradation," a panel co-
sponsored by APIL and BLSA,
commentators discussed how
to change policy to prevent a
similar occurrence during the
next natural disaster.
Speakers included State Rep.
Ed Jennings (D-Gainesville),
who spoke about the need to
require counties to inventory
their population and determine
who has access to transporta-
tion and who would not be able
to leave during an evacuation.
"If this were to happen in
Florida, people would get left
behind," Jennings said.
Law student Josh Walker
(2L) spoke about his deploy-
ment with the Army National
Guard to Waveland, Miss., for
three weeks after the hurricane.
He discussed the differing


-



Rep. Ed Jennings speaks to the
audience at a panel discussion of
Hurricane Katrina Nov. 15

responses that occurred in three
socio-economically distinct
towns, and said the biggest
issues were the breakdown of
communication between relief
agencies and failure to recognize
where aid needed to be sent.
Professor Alyson Flournoy
discussed the role of gov-
ernment in areas of health,
safety and the environment.
She reviewed some past policies
that affected the responses to
Katrina, including the inter-
section of poverty, race and


environment. She pointed to
the flooding of the "Black Love
Canal," a Superfund site where
low-income housing was built.
An inadequate clean up of this
site due to insufficient funding,
coupled with flooding, resulted
in incredibly high arsenic levels
in the impoverished neighbor-
hood.
Professor Sharon Rush point-
ed out that the lingering effects
of segregation were evident in
the aftermath of the storm.
"Plessey has been overruled,
but there are some very long
shadows that continue to hover
over us, which Katrina brought
into the light," she said.
Professor Michael Allan Wolf
criticized the Gulf Opportu-
nity Zone, which is part of the
proposed rebuilding plan. Wolf
explained this program consists
mainly of tax relief which will
benefit only those who earn
enough money to qualify for
the relief. Overall, the panel
was split as to whether there
really is a "silver lining" to the
disaster, but all urged continued
dialogue about the social issues
it revealed.


November
22 Class Gift Pizza Party,
11 a.m.- 1 p.m., courtyard

Costa Rica Program
Informational Meeting,
noon, room 285A

Law School Republicans,
noon, room 285D

Pizza with the Dean,
4 p.m., faculty dining room


24 Thanksgiving; classes
canceled

25 Holiday; classes canceled

December
2 Fall Classes End

5 Reading/Exam Period
Begins


More Dates
Available Online
For more information on
the dates and locations of
upcoming meetings, check the
calendar on the law school's
website at: http://www.law.
ufl.edu/calendars/.


16 Graduation


8 FLA LAW


CALENDAR








College of Law
Administration
* Robert H. Jerry, II, Dean
* George L. Dawson,
Associate Dean for
Academic Affairs
* J. Patrick Shannon,
Associate Dean for
Administrative Affairs
* Lyrissa Barnett Lidsky,
Associate Dean for
Faculty Development
* Michael K. Friel,
Associate Dean & Director,
Graduate Tax Program
* Stuart R. Cohn,
Associate Dean for
International Studies
* M. Kathleen "Kathie" Price,
Associate Dean for Library
and Technology
* Gail E. Sasnett,
Associate Dean for
Students, Professionalism
and Community Relations
* J. Michael Patrick,
Assistant Dean for Admissions
* Linda Calvert Hanson,
Assistant Dean for
Career Services
* Adrian Jones,
Assistant Dean for Diversity
and Community Relations
* Jennifer Cope, Interim
Assistant Dean for Students
* Debra D. Amirin,
Director of Communications
* Donald J. Hale,
Senior Director of Development
and Alumni Affairs

Send Us Your News
FlaLaw is published each week
school is in session by the Levin
College of Law Communica-
tions Office. Submit news of
interest to the law school
community by 10 a.m. Tuesday
for the following Monday's
issue to lockette@law.ufl.edu
or 273-0650.
* Tim Lockette,
Editor, Flalaw
* Kristen Hines,
Photographer




UNIVERSITY OF
FLORIDA


Professors Seek Storm's 'Silver Lining'


BY JULIA KIM
AND DINA FINKEL
While Hurricane Katrina
was a natural phenomenon,
its destruction was aggravated
by governmental policies and
actions.
In "The Silver Lining of Hur-
ricane Katrina: Rebuilding to
Minimize the Effects of Race,
Poverty and Environmental
Degradation," a panel co-
sponsored by APIL and BLSA,
commentators discussed how
to change policy to prevent a
similar occurrence during the
next natural disaster.
Speakers included State Rep.
Ed Jennings (D-Gainesville),
who spoke about the need to
require counties to inventory
their population and determine
who has access to transporta-
tion and who would not be able
to leave during an evacuation.
"If this were to happen in
Florida, people would get left
behind," Jennings said.
Law student Josh Walker
(2L) spoke about his deploy-
ment with the Army National
Guard to Waveland, Miss., for
three weeks after the hurricane.
He discussed the differing


-



Rep. Ed Jennings speaks to the
audience at a panel discussion of
Hurricane Katrina Nov. 15

responses that occurred in three
socio-economically distinct
towns, and said the biggest
issues were the breakdown of
communication between relief
agencies and failure to recognize
where aid needed to be sent.
Professor Alyson Flournoy
discussed the role of gov-
ernment in areas of health,
safety and the environment.
She reviewed some past policies
that affected the responses to
Katrina, including the inter-
section of poverty, race and


environment. She pointed to
the flooding of the "Black Love
Canal," a Superfund site where
low-income housing was built.
An inadequate clean up of this
site due to insufficient funding,
coupled with flooding, resulted
in incredibly high arsenic levels
in the impoverished neighbor-
hood.
Professor Sharon Rush point-
ed out that the lingering effects
of segregation were evident in
the aftermath of the storm.
"Plessey has been overruled,
but there are some very long
shadows that continue to hover
over us, which Katrina brought
into the light," she said.
Professor Michael Allan Wolf
criticized the Gulf Opportu-
nity Zone, which is part of the
proposed rebuilding plan. Wolf
explained this program consists
mainly of tax relief which will
benefit only those who earn
enough money to qualify for
the relief. Overall, the panel
was split as to whether there
really is a "silver lining" to the
disaster, but all urged continued
dialogue about the social issues
it revealed.


November
22 Class Gift Pizza Party,
11 a.m.- 1 p.m., courtyard

Costa Rica Program
Informational Meeting,
noon, room 285A

Law School Republicans,
noon, room 285D

Pizza with the Dean,
4 p.m., faculty dining room


24 Thanksgiving; classes
canceled

25 Holiday; classes canceled

December
2 Fall Classes End

5 Reading/Exam Period
Begins


More Dates
Available Online
For more information on
the dates and locations of
upcoming meetings, check the
calendar on the law school's
website at: http://www.law.
ufl.edu/calendars/.


16 Graduation


8 FLA LAW


CALENDAR