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 Judges weigh final four
 Career Services
 UF law students to become federal...
 Events and opportunities
 People, scholarship and opport...
 Help law students far from...
 Calendar


UF UFLAW



Fla law newsletter of the University of Florida College of Law
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00072281/00154
 Material Information
Title: Fla law newsletter of the University of Florida College of Law
Portion of title: Flalaw
Physical Description: Serial
Creator: Levin College of Law
Publisher: s.n.
Place of Publication: <Gainesville FL> College of Law Communications Office 1997-
Creation Date: November 14, 2005
Frequency: weekly
completely irregular
 Subjects
Genre: periodical   ( marcgt )
serial   ( sobekcm )
 Notes
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol.1, no. 1 (Oct. 6, 1997)-
General Note: Weekly during the school year with a biweekly insert, numbered separately called: The Docket.
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Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved, Board of Trustees of the University of Florida
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Table of Contents
    Judges weigh final four
        Page 1
    Career Services
        Page 2
    UF law students to become federal judicial clerks
        Page 3
    Events and opportunities
        Page 4
        Page 5
    People, scholarship and opportunities
        Page 6
        Page 7
    Help law students far from home
        Page 8
    Calendar
        Page 8
Full Text

































Moot Court Team member Oshia Gainer presents her case to current and former members of the Florida
Supreme Court in the Final Four Competition, held Nov. 4 in the Chesterfield Smith Ceremonial Classroo


Judges Weigh Final Four


Current and former justices
of the Florida Supreme Court
were on hand to judge the UF
Moot Court Team's Final Four
Competition Nov. 4, as com-
petitors argued a problem with a
distinctly post-Sept. 11 flavor.
Respondents Brad Barrios and
John Rains IV won Best Team
in the competition, debating
petitioners Oshia Gainer and
Laura Post. Jason Hawkins acted
as alternate for both teams.
Rains was named the team's best
advocate.
Students, faculty and staff
packed the Chesterfield Smith
Ceremonial Classroom to see the



INSIDE THIS ISSUE
2 Career Services
4 Events and Opportunities
8 Calendar


competition, which was judged
by four sitting members of the
Florida Supreme Court (Chief
Justice Barbara Pariente and Jus-
tices Harry Lee Anstead, Charles
T. Wells and Raoul Cantero),
two former justices (Parker Lee
MacDonald and Ben Overton)
and District Court Judge Fred
Hazouri.
"It's a great honor to have so
many members of the Supreme
Court regularly appearing at this
event," said Moot Court Team
President Chris Carmody. "This
is something you typically see
only at national competitions,
but we've been fotunate enough


Federal
Judicial
Clerkships


El


to regularly host most or al
the justices during Final Fo
Carmody said that despi
their prominent positions,
justices were quite accomoc
ing.
"It's like having a rock cc
cert, without all the rock st
egos," he said.
The problem in the case
involved a 17-year-old susp
who was arrested in connec
with the terrorist bombing
a bus. The suspect invoked
right to counsel, but spoke
investigators, without a law
present, after being present
with a charging statement
Continued on 1


Book
Awards


VOL. 9 NO. 13 NOVEMBER 14, 2005

Panel to Discuss
Federal Courts,
Nomination Process
Judges and law professors will
discuss federal judicial nomina-
tions and the confirmation process
in the Fall 2005 Florida Law
S Review Panel Discussion held
Friday, Nov. 18, at 2 p.m. in the
Chesterfield Smith Ceremonial
Classroom.
Im. Panelists include Judge Gerald
Tjoflat of the 11th Circuit Court
of Appeals, Judge Stephan Mickle
of the U.S. District Court for the
Northern District of Florida, Dean
Emeritus Jon Mills and Professor
1 of Sharon Rush. Associate Dean
ur." Lyrissa Lidsky will moderate the
te discussion.
the "In light of the recent controversy
dat- surrounding the withdrawal of
Harriet Miers and the nomination
n- of Samuel Alito, this discussion
ar will be extremely timely," said
Monica Vila, editor-in-chief of the
Review.
ect Panelists will discuss various
:tion aspects of the judicial nomination
of and confirmation process, includ-
his ing the Senate's role in Miers'
to withdrawal, the shortcomings
yer of the system, how the federal
ed system compares to the Florida
which judicial nomination system, and
age 7 the Alito nomination.
The event is free and open to
the public. If you have questions
for the panelists, you can submit
them in advance to Review8@
law.ufl.edu.

















Graduating in
December...


... and have yet to accept an
offer? Have questions about
employment options? Schedule
an appointment as soon as
possible with an attorney coun-
selor in Career Services. They
can help you explore the career
paths available to you.


Clerk in the
Garden State
The Center for Career Services
now has information on 480
one-year judicial clerkship
openings in New Jersey for the
2006-2007 court term. These
positions do not require New
Jersey residency or member-
ship in the New Jersey Bar.
Applications must be received
by Dec. 31 for inclusion in the
resume book (you can also
apply to the justices or judges
directly).
Additional information is on the
web at http://www.judiciary.
state.nj.us/jobs/j050427g.pdf.



New Jersey
Fellowship
Applications are being ac-
cepted, on a rolling basis,
for paid Public Interest Legal
Fellowships in New Jersey for
Summer 2006. Early applica-
tions are recommended. Find
out more at www.lsnj.org.


2 FLA LAW


CAREERSERVICES
Hints to help you in the legal profession


Clerking to the Top:
Supreme Court Positions
How would you like to be the
first UF law alum to clerk for the
United States Supreme Court?
Only a handful of the best and
brightest lawyers around the
country have achieved this honor
(Professor Barbara Woodhouse
is among them), and it's only
a matter of time before a UF
graduate gets the nod. The Cen-
ter for Career Services is ready
to help talented, well-qualified
alums pursue this goal.
While each Supreme Court
justice has a highly individualized
approach to selecting clerks, there
are a few common factors appli-
cants should keep in mind:
Not all Supreme Court law
clerks are graduates of the
"top" law schools. Justices seek
outstanding credentials, but
they also tend to hire well-
rounded candidates from a
variety of backgrounds.
* A clerk's typical term is one
year, beginning in July.
* The Chief Justice employs
three clerks, associate justices
each employ four.
"Retired" justices do remain
involved in proceedings, and
each typically employs one
clerk.
* It is customary to apply to
all nine justices, regardless of
your ideology. The assumption
is that you have the intel-
lectual capacity to objectively
represent the views of any of
the justices.
* None of the sitting justices has
hired a clerk without previous


clerking experience, usually at
the appellate level.
Some applicants are accepted
on the first try: some success-
ful applicants have applied as
many as three times.
Most justices hire clerks about
one year in advance.


A typical Supreme Court clerk
files for the position while still
in law school, after accepting a
federal clerkship. This allows the
applicant to list a "prospective"
clerkship on a resume. (This is
exactly what happened to Profes-
sor Barbara Woodhouse, who
filed for a clerkship with Justice
Sandra Day O'Connor in her
final year at Columbia, while
waiting to begin a clerkship with
Judge Abraham Sofaer. Justice
O'Connor called the judge
halfway through that clerkship
to find out how Woodhouse was
doing, then called Woodhouse to
offer her a position.)
For those unable to catch a jus-


tice's attention on the first try, an
important strategy is to submit a
second, fully updated application
the next year, and even a third
application a year or two after
completing a clerkship. Given the
highly competitive nature of the
process only about 35 clerks
are selected every year there is
no stigma or penalty attached to
applying more than once.
Many people have carefully
studied the application process.
In fact, it is possible to contact
the U.S. Courts and obtain a
list of all Supreme Court clerks
since 1940. Many students do as-
similate this information, looking
for trends that will give them an
edge in the application process.
One thing is clear from this
data: certain appellate courts
contribute a higher-than-average
number of clerks to the Supreme
Court. These courts have become
known as "feeder courts,"and
positions on these courts are
highly coveted. Some court-
watchers have compiled "feeder
court charts" that track appellate
judges' history of supplying clerks
to the high court: the University
of Michigan makes just such a
chart available on its website as a
downloadable file.
As one might expect, the 2nd,
9th, and District of Columbia
circuits all have high numbers
of "feeder" judges. A few 11th
Circuit positions have also
served as stepping stones for
to the Supreme Court; former
clerks for Judges Edward Carnes
(Montgomery), Phyllis Kravitch
(Atlanta) and Gerald Tjoflat
(Jacksonville) have gone on to
the nation's highest court.


I I

















One rationale behind the
"feeder court" phenomenon is
that justices are more likely to
seek and accept recommenda-
tions from judges who have
already established a working
relationship with them. Don't
let this discourage you if you
are seeking or have accepted a
position in a non-"feeder" court.
Justices do not always follow the
pack.
Aside from clerkship in a
feeder court, its is difficult to
track the qualities that set past
and present clerks apart from the
general pool of applicants. People
who try for a Supreme Court
clerkship are invariably from
respected law schools, with law
review experience and excellent
academic records, and many have
other types of practical or life
experience.
Don't be afraid to mention
outside experiences or extracur-
ricular interests in your resume.
Anecdotal evidence indicates that
sharing a common interest with
a justice can make a difference in
the selection process. According
to Behind the Bench: the Guide to
Judicial Clerkships, Chief Justice
Rehnquist's attention was often
piqued by applicants who shared
his interest in tennis, or hailed
from his home state.
It will take more than a few
paragraphs of advice to help
you achieve this highest prize of
post-graduate employment but
with a great resume and the right
strategy, this is an achievable goal.
So don't be afraid to set your
sights on a Supreme Court clerk-
ship. You could become the first
UF graduate to obtain one.


UF Law Students to Become

Federal Judicial Clerks


Five students from the Levin
College of Law have been
chosen for federal clerkships
- highly competitive positions
that will allow each student to
work for a federal judge after
graduation.
"These positions are highly
sought-after by the top stu-
dents in every law school,"
said Assistant Dean for Career
Services Linda Calvert Hanson.
"These five students have
shown that they are the best of
the best, and their accomplish-
ment reflects great credit on
UF as well."
Clerks chosen this year
include:
* Tobi Butensky, who will
work for one year with U.S.
Magistrate Judge Gary Jones
in Ocala.
SMeaghan Gragg, who will
spend two years as clerk for
District Judge Ursula Ungaro-
Benages in Miami.
* Christine Menendez, who will
serve as clerk for Judge Susan
Bucklew in Tampa during
2007 and 2008.
SMonica Vila, who will clerk for
Judge Susan Black of the 11th
Circuit Court of Appeal in
Jacksonville.
SKurt Zaner, who will clerk
with Judge Kenneth Marra in
West Palm Beach.


This year's federal judicial clerks
include, clockwise from top: Kurt
Zaner, Meaghan Gragg, Tobi
Butensky and Monica Vila, as
well as Christine Menendez (not
pictured). A term as a federal
law clerk can be a stepping stone
to a brilliant career.


Serving as a judicial clerk can
be a great start to a legal career,
notes Calvert Hanson. Top law
firms often hire former clerks,
and a federal clerkship particu-
larly at the appellate level can
be a stepping stone to a clerkship
with the U.S. Supreme Court.
You can learn more about
clerkships online at www.law.ufl.
edu/career/pdf/clerkships.pdf,
or by stopping by the Center for
Career Services.


Attention 1Ls: Get
Your Password
Symplicity passwords and
login information have been
sent to your e-mail address of
record. If you haven't received
a password, contact Career
Services.

Catch Up On
Open House
If you are a first-year student
and were unable to make it
to the 1L Open House in the
Center for Career Services,
there's still time to catch up
on information you missed.
Stop by Career Services for
important handouts from the
event, including the 1L timeline,
a list of Florida firms that hire
1Ls, a list of services available
from Career Services, and a
primer on preparing your bar
application.

Employer
Deadlines for 1Ls
Even though an employer may
post a Dec. 1 deadline for the
submission of resumes, most
firms will not consider a 1L
for a summer position without
grades. It is therefore vital that
you have your materials ready
to send as soon as your grades
are posted January.
Many government employers
do post Dec. 15 or Jan. 1
deadlines for the submission of
resumes. You must have your
materials to these employers by
the published deadline, even if
you don't have grades. Just in-
dicate to them that the desired
transcript is forthcoming.


FLA LAW 3











/ EVENT


S & OPPORTUNITIES


Scholarship
Available


Applications for the William L.
Graddy Law School Scholar-
ship are available at the front
desk in the Student Affairs
Office. Applicants for the
$1,000 scholarship must 1)
have completed their first year
of law school; 2) have a GPA
of 2.8 or higher, or be in the
top 25 percent of their class;
3) must have been a resident
of Charlotte, Collier, Glades,
Hendry or Lee counties for at
least three years, and; 4) must
demonstrate financial need.

Civil Liberties
Fellowship
Available
Applications are now available
for the Robert Masur Fellow-
ship in Civil Liberties, a $1,000
fellowship that is open to
students who intend to carry
out significant activities during
the summer in the areas of civil
rights and civil liberties. Pro-
posed activities include writing
or research projects, work with
public interest organizations, or
work on civil liberties cases un-
der the supervision of a faculty
member or lawyer. For more
information, inquire at the front
desk in Student Affairs.

Get FlaLaw
Via E-Mail
Have Flalaw delivered to your
inbox every Friday days
before the rest of the world
sees it. Send an e-mail to
lockette@law.ufl.edu and ask
to be added to the Flalaw
PDF list.


4 FLA LAW


Panel to Discuss Storm's
'Silver Lining'
Could there be a good side
to Hurricane Katrina? Will the
harsh images of the storm's after-
math teach Americans important
lessons about racial bias, poverty
and environmental degradation?
Government officials and
environmental law experts will
discuss these issues in "The
Silver Lining of Katrina," a panel
discussion to be held Tuesday,
Nov. 15 at 5 p.m. in room 285D.
Panelists include state Rep. Ed
Jennings (D-Gainesville); Profes-
sors Alyson Flournoy, Sharon
Rush and Michael Allan Wolf;
and law student Josh Walker, an
officer in the National Guard.

Eco-Run This Saturday
The organizers of the Public
Interest Environmental Confer-
ence will hold the law school's
first Eco-Run, a 5K fun run start-
ing at the law school, at 8 a.m.
Saturday, Nov. 19. Registration
forms are available at plaza.ufl.
edu/countach. For more informa-
tion, contact Ricky Thakrar at
countach@ufl.edu.

Homelessness Panel
Rescheduled
The Public Service Law
Fellows' panel discussion on
"Criminalizing Homelessness,"
originally scheduled for last
week, will be held Thursday, Nov.
17, at 5:30 p.m. in the Bailey
Courtroom. Pizza and soda will
be served. For more information,
contact Thomas Allison at tcauf@
ufl.edu.


Research

Opportunity

in Jamaica

The Law and Policy in the Americas Program is seeking law students to
spend one month of the coming summer working in the areas of human
rights, citizens' security, and women's and children's issues in Jamaica.
Two selected law students will join a group of other graduate level
students working with non-governmental organizations to conduct focus
groups on these issues in the island nation. These positions will likely be
funded by Management Systems International, the UF College of Liberal
Arts and Sciences, and the U.S. Agency for International Development.
Students interested in this opportunity are encouraged to enroll in the
political science course POS 6933, which is offered in the spring. The
course addresses governance in Jamaica, with a focus on crime. For
more information on the course or the summer position, contact Mer-
edith Fensom, director of the Law and Policy in the Americas Program
at fensom@law.ufl.edu.


Costa Rica Meeting
Next Week
The meeting for students
interested in summer study in
Costa Rica has been resched-
uled. The meeting will be held
Nov. 22 at noon in 285A.
Students who are interested in
the program should feel free to
contact Program Director Tom
Ankersen at ankersen@.law.ufl.
edu or 273-0840.

Democrats Hold
Final Fall Meeting
The Law School Democrats
will hold their last meeting of the
semester at 5 p.m. Tuesday, Nov.
15, in room 345. The group will
have a roundtable discussion on
the recent troubles in the White


House and on pre-war intel-
ligence.

Brazilian Judge Speaks
Wednesday
Brazilian Federal Judge Saulo
Casali, professor of law at the
University ofBahia, will speak
on fundamental aspects of the
Brazilian Constitution at noon
Wednesday, Nov. 16, in room
345. The event is sponsored
by the American Constitution
Society, the Law and Policy in
the Americas Program and the
International Law Society.

CaribLaw Holiday Drive
This Week
Don't forget to drop off
nonperishable food, clothing and
other items at the CaribLaw table
Continued on next page















Students Receive Book Awards


Students, faculty and friends of the
law school gathered in the Chester-
field Smith Ceremonial Classroom
Nov. 4 to honor Book Award re-
cipients for the spring and summer
semesters.
Presented every semester, Book
Awards recognize the top perform-
ers in each class, and give alumni a
chance to support academic excellence
at the Levin College of Law.
More than 100 students were hon-
ored for their performance in classes
over the past two semesters. Multiple
award winners include Kirsten An-
derson, Ron Antonin, Drew Altman,
Jessica Furst, Daniel Glassman, Kelly
Lyon, Nicholas Purvis, Kevin Shuler,
Sarah Stoddard and Adam Zeidel.
For a full list of winners and award
sponsors, go to http://www.law.ufl.
edu/alumni/bookawardwinners.shtml.
If you have recieved a Book Award,
but weren't able to attend the Nov.
4 ceremony, you can pick up your
plaque in the Office of Development
and Alumni Affairs at 267 Holland
Hall. The office is open from 8 a.m. to
5 p.m. on weekdays.


CaribLaw from Page 4
on the concourse this week. From
Monday, Nov. 14, to Thursday,
Nov. 17, the Caribbean Law Stu-
dents Association will be collect-
ing the items to benefit hurricane
victims.

Get Involved in LCC
The Law College Council has
three open seats, and students are
encouraged to apply for them.
Interested students should attend
the LCC's next meeting, held in
the faculty dining room at 6 p.m.
Wednesday, Nov. 16, and make
a brief presentation introducing


Dozens of students, faculty and staff gathered for the Nov. 4 Book
Awards ceremony, honoring top performers in each spring and
summer class. The awards are made possible by gifts from alumni.


Law student Kimberly Lorenz accepts a Book Award from Dean
Robert Jerry. Lorenz was one of dozens of students who were
recognized at the Nov. 4 ceremony.


themselves. The LCC will vote
on new members at the same
meeting. Any law student can be
a candidate for a council seat.

Get Lucky at Casino
Night
A group of student organiza-
tions are teaming up this year
to co-sponsor the John Marshall
Bar Association's Casino Night
and Poker Tournament, to be
held Nov. 18 at Eventfuls in
Newberry. Tickets are available in
the JMBA office: all proceeds go
to the Red Cross Disaster Relief


Fund. The event is co-sponsored
by the International Law Society,
the Jewish Law Students Associa-
tion, the Military Law Student
Association, and the American
Bar Association's Law Student
Division.

JMBA Ski Trip
The John Marshall Bar Associa-
tion is planning a Spring Break
ski trip to Breckenridge, Colo.
JMBA will hold an informational
meeting on the trip Wednesday,
Nov. 16, at 5:30 p.m. in room
285B.


Flu Shots Today
Flu shots will be available for
students in the courtyard near
the Student Affairs office
today, Nov. 14, from noon to 1
p.m. or as long as supplies last.
Students must pay $5 per shot.


Writing Contest
Deadline Soon
The magazine legalAffairs is
holding its third annual writing
contest for law students.
Entrants are asked to make
an argument of 1,500 words
about a pertinent topic in the
law, written in a style acces-
sible to general readers and
lawyers alike. The first-place
winner will receive a prize of
$2,000 and be published in
LegalAffairs, a general interest
magazine on the law.
Entries must be submitted by
Dec. 1. For more information,
go to http://www.legalaffairs.
org/contest.msp.


Student Wins
Scholarship
Law student Kenneth Angell
(2L) has been chosen as the
recipient of the James F. Bailey
Jr. Scholarship. The $1,500
scholarship is awarded to a law
student who intends to practice
in Jacksonville. Angell came
out on top of a record number
of applicants from law schools
around the state.


FLA LAW 5










PEOPLE


SCHOLARSHIP
& ACTIVITIES


Adkins


Collier


Scholarship & Activities
Director of Technology Ser-
vices Andrew Adkins' book, You
Can't Get Much Closer Than This,
has been released by Casemate
Publishing. The nonfiction
book, based on the World War II
diaries of Adkins' father, is now
a main selection of the Military
Book Club.
Professor Charles Collier's es-
say, entitled "Affirmative Action
and the Decline of Intellectual
Culture," has been published in
55 Journal ofLegal Education 3
(2005).
Professor Jeffrey Davis par-
ticipated in a panel discussion
on "Chapter 11 Puzzlers: In Pari
Delicto (Are Innocent Credi-
tors the Victims?)" at the annual
meeting of the National Confer-
ence of Bankruptcy Judges in
San Antonio Nov. 4.
Professor Nancy Dowd
submitted testimony to the
United States Senate Judiciary
Committee on the Constitu-
tion, Civil Rights, and Property
Rights for its Oct. 20 hearing,
entitled "An Examination of the
Constitutional Amendment on
Marriage." Her testimony was
in opposition to the proposed
amendment banning same-sex
marriage.
John H. and Mary Lou
Dasburg Professor Michael W.
Gordon was re-elected to the
Board of Directors of the United
States/Mexico Law Institute. He
also was elected vice chairman of
the board and a member of the
Executive Committee. The board
includes eight members from
the United States and eight from
Mexico.


Gordon moderated and served
as a panelist on two panels
at the institute's 14th annual
symposium in Mexico City. The
panels were on the Bridgestone/
Firestone tire litigation and the
enforcement of foreign judg-
ments in Mexico and the United
States. Gordon also was recently
elected editor-in-chief of the
U.S.-Mexico Law Journal.
Professor Cally Jordan has
recently been selected as an ex-
ternal peer reviewer for a World
Bank study on capital markets
and directions for development
in Vietnam. She joins two other
peer reviewers, one from the US
Securities and Exchange Com-
mission and the other from the
International Monetary Fund.
Jordan has also been appoint-
ed to the Advisory Board to the
Chaire en Droit des Affaires et
Commerce International at the
University of Montreal.
Affiliate Professor Paul J.
Magnarella served on the Board
of Advisors of the recently
published Encyclopedia ofthe
Developing World Vol. 1-3.
New York/London: Routledge,
2005. He also contributed the
following four articles to the
encyclopedia: "Human Rights:
Definitions and Violations," pp.
777-784; "Military and Human
Rights," pp. 1053-1057; "Self-
Determination," pp. 1393-1395;
and "Universal Declaration of
Human Rights," pp. 1638-1639.
Clarence TeSelle Professor
Martin McMahon delivered a
CLE presentation on "Recent
Federal Income Tax Develop-
ments" Nov. 2 at the 52nd An-
nual Taxation Conference at the
University of Texas.


In the News
Assistant Professor Mark
Fenster was quoted in a Nov. 6
(New York) Newsday story about
the growing culture of conspiracy
theories surrounding the Sept. 11
attacks.
Professor Jon Mills, director
of the Center for Governmental
Responsibility, was quoted in a
Nov. 3 Gainesville Sun story about
police use of surveillance cameras.
Mills said the government has
the right to use such cameras in
public places, though he noted
that such a measure would prob-
ably not be cost-effective in a city
such as Gainesville, where crime is
already on the decline.
Professor Sharon Rush spoke
to Mid-Florida Public Radio
about the nomination of Samuel
Alito as U.S. Supreme Court
Justice on Nov. 3.
Professor Michael Seigel was
quoted in a Nov. 3 St. Petersburg
Times story on independent coun-
sels and special prosecutors. Seigel
said these positions "can take on a
life of their own."
Stephen C. O'Connell Profes-
sor Christopher Slobogin was
quoted in a Nov. 3 Gainesville Sun
story about the killing of a UF
student after the Florida-Georgia
game. Slobogin said that, based
on the evidence available to the
public so far, the five alleged
attackers would be more likely
to face charges of second-degree
murder or manslaughter than
charges of first-degree murder.


Dowd


Gordon


Jordan


Magnarlla
Magnarella


McMahon


6 FLA LAW










ST l How to De-Stress
Learning to R lax: During Hectic Times


I know that at the end of a hectic
week you most likely want to find
some way to unwind and de-stress.
You may be in the mood to be
social and go out with friends to a
bar, club, restaurant, or movie; or
you may feel like spending some
quality time with a companion
or by yourself. Whatever the case
may be, doing what you need to in
order to allow yourself a break from
studying is important for your
well-being overall.
If you are in a social mood or
are feeling like you want a release
from your stress and are drinking
alcohol, be sure you take it slow
and pace yourself, making sure to
stay hydrated by drinking a glass of
water between drinks, and being
sure to have some food in your
stomach.
The feeling of being "buzzed"


Final Four from Page 1
incorrectly stated he could be tried
on a capital murder charge.
Gainer and Post, represent-
ing the suspect, argued that his
statement should be suppressed,
while Barrios and Rains repre-
sented the government, who
argued that it should be admitted.
Both sides fielded tough inquiries
from the judges particularly the
respondents, who faced withering
questions about why the defen-
dant spent several hours in police
custody without a lawyer.
Chief Justice Pariente praised
both teams as "extremely well-pre-
pared," and noted that, while the
respondents won, the petitioners
seemed to have the more difficult
case. She praised the problem,
written by Moot Court team
member Christine Fuqua, and
commended Barrios for "exhibit-
ing grace under pressure" during


happens after the first two or three
drinks. If you try and intensify that
feeling by drinking much more
after that, all you are doing is inten-
sifying the depressive effects of the
alcohol, which
leads a person to
experience some
of the more nega-
tive consequences
of not moderating
their intake of the
drug: decreased Stern
libido, periods of
blackout, decreased speech and
motor functioning, and sometimes
an increased dependence on the
drug, leading to addiction.
So, if you're going to go out and
drink, remember the steps above
and take it slow because you will be
more likely to enjoy your time and
remember it.


Here are some ideas for fun ways
to relax: watch a sunrise, sunset, or
meteor shower; pamper yourself
with a bubble bath; read a book;
make yourself a cup of hot tea
or hot chocolate with marshmal-
lows; go for a walk and observe
nature's wonders; dance; write a
letter to a friend; go see a movie;
draw a picture or paint something;
window shop; take a nap; catch up
with family; have a picnic; or have
a good laugh with a friend.
Whatever you decide, do it
because it makes you feel good,
nourished, and complete.

Nicole Stern is the Resource Coun-
selor for the Levin College ofLaw.
Her services are free and confidential.
She can be contacted at stern@law.
ufl.edu, or at her office in Student
A.r


Chief Justice Barbara Pariente, left, chats with law students Laura
Lothman, center, and Lesley Bowling, right, after the competition.


intense questioning by the judges.
"I hope what you learn from
this is not that there are winners
and losers in life, but that in the
court, our process is a truth-seek-
ing process," Pariente said.


Pariente also offered advice for
future competitors and litigators
in general.
"The way you win is through
preparation, preparation, prepara-
tion," she said.


Professor Wins
Sutherland Prize
Professor Danaya Wright was
awarded the 2005 Donald
Sutherland Prize of the American
Society for Legal History, given
each year to the author whose
recently-published work "made
the most significant impact" on
the study of English legal his-
tory, on Nov. 12.
Wright's article, "Well-Behaved
Women Rarely Make History:
Rethinking English Family, Law
and History," examined the
outcomes of
divorce cases
under the 1858
British law
which replaced
coverture a
system in which Wright
a woman's
rights were effectively erased
when she married with a fam-
ily court system.
The 1858 reform is generally
viewed as a watershed moment
for women's rights. But after
more than a decade of research
into outcomes of actual divorce
cases in the decades following
the reform, Wright found that
women obtained relatively few
divorces under the new law, and
often did so at the expense of
their parental rights, reputations
and livelihoods.
Wright accepted the award at
the society's annual conference
in Cincinnati over the weekend
of Nov. 12. She also presented a
related paper, "Family Law and
the Unfulfilled Promise of the
1858 Divorce Court."
Wright plans to travel to
England this winter to do further
research, tracking the outcomes
of historical divorce cases
that were withdrawn from the
court system before they were
resolved.


FLA LAW 7








College of Law
Administration
* Robert H. Jerry, II, Dean
* George L. Dawson,
Associate Dean for
Academic Affairs
* J. Patrick Shannon,
Associate Dean for
Administrative Affairs
* Lyrissa Barnett Lidsky,
Associate Dean for
Faculty Development
* Michael K. Friel,
Associate Dean & Director,
Graduate Tax Program
* Stuart R. Cohn,
Associate Dean for
International Studies
* M. Kathleen "Kathie" Price,
Associate Dean for Library
and Technology
* Gail E. Sasnett,
Associate Dean for
Students, Professionalism
and Community Relations
* J. Michael Patrick,
Assistant Dean for Admissions
* Linda Calvert Hanson,
Assistant Dean for
Career Services
* Adrian Jones,
Assistant Dean for Diversity
and Community Relations
* Jennifer Cope, Interim
Assistant Dean for Students
* Debra D. Amirin,
Director of Communications
* Donald J. Hale,
Senior Director of Development
and Alumni Affairs

Send Us Your News
FlaLaw is published each week
school is in session by the Levin
College of Law Communica-
tions Office. Submit news of
interest to the law school
community by 10 a.m. Tuesday
for the following Monday's
issue to lockette@law.ufl.edu
or 273-0650.
* Tim Lockette,
Editor, Flalaw
* Kristen Hines,
Photographer




UNIVERSITY OF
FLORIDA


Help Law Students Far From Home


In a few weeks, many law
students in Gainesville will
be heading home for a much-
needed holiday break. But some
will spend the holidays very far
from home and in a high-stress
environment.
Many students from the Gator
Nation are now serving their
country in Iraq, Afghanistan
and surrounding countries. The
Military Law Students Associa-
tion is asking the law school com-
munity to keep these students in
their thoughts over the holidays.
The group is also asking students
to send care packages to their
colleagues overseas and send
them soon, to assure they arrive
on time.
Among the students currently
deployed are:
* 1st Lt. David Oliver, a 2L who
is serving in Afghanistan with
the Florida National Guard.
Oliver is executive officer of a
medical unit.
* Capt. Christian Torres, who
has been in the Fallujah area
since mid-August. He is part
of a team that is training an


1st Lt. David Oliver shows the Gator colors on a mountaintop in
Afghanistan. He is one of several law students serving overseas.


Iraqi light infrantry battalion
to become self-sufficient as an
infantry unit.
* Sgt. MarkTober, a 3L who was
called up as part of the Inactive
Ready Reserve this summer,
and is leading small unit con-
voy operations in Saudi Arabia
and Iraq. Tober also served in
Afghanistan in 2002.
* Capt. Dan McKillop, who is
deployed to Balad Air Base in
Iraq, where he is in charge of


a joint forces communications
support center. McKillop ex-
pects to return to the campus
in December and resume
his studies during the spring
semester.
If you would like to send a
letter or care package to any of
these students, contact MLSA
president Alex Hadjilogiou at
hadjil31@ufl.edu for addresses
and other information.


^CALENDAR


November
14 Flu Shots, noon- 1 p.m.,
courtyard, near Student
Affairs

15 The Silver Lining of
Hurricane Katrina,
5 p.m., room 285D

Law School Democrats,
5 p.m., room 345

16 JMBA Ski Trip Meeting,
5:30 p.m., room 285B


Saulo Casali on the
Brazilian Constitution,
noon, room 345

LCC Meeting, 6 p.m.
faculty dining room

17 The Criminalization of
Homelessness, 5:30 p.m.,
Bailey Courtroom

18 Nelson Symposium,
8:30 a.m., Hilton Confer-
ence Center


Law Review Panel,
2 p.m., room 180

19 PIEC Eco-Run, 8 a.m.,
outside law school campus

More Dates
Available Online
For more information on
the dates and locations of
upcoming meetings, check the
calendar on the law school's
website at: http://www.law.
ufl.edu/calendars/.


8 FLA LAW








College of Law
Administration
* Robert H. Jerry, II, Dean
* George L. Dawson,
Associate Dean for
Academic Affairs
* J. Patrick Shannon,
Associate Dean for
Administrative Affairs
* Lyrissa Barnett Lidsky,
Associate Dean for
Faculty Development
* Michael K. Friel,
Associate Dean & Director,
Graduate Tax Program
* Stuart R. Cohn,
Associate Dean for
International Studies
* M. Kathleen "Kathie" Price,
Associate Dean for Library
and Technology
* Gail E. Sasnett,
Associate Dean for
Students, Professionalism
and Community Relations
* J. Michael Patrick,
Assistant Dean for Admissions
* Linda Calvert Hanson,
Assistant Dean for
Career Services
* Adrian Jones,
Assistant Dean for Diversity
and Community Relations
* Jennifer Cope, Interim
Assistant Dean for Students
* Debra D. Amirin,
Director of Communications
* Donald J. Hale,
Senior Director of Development
and Alumni Affairs

Send Us Your News
FlaLaw is published each week
school is in session by the Levin
College of Law Communica-
tions Office. Submit news of
interest to the law school
community by 10 a.m. Tuesday
for the following Monday's
issue to lockette@law.ufl.edu
or 273-0650.
* Tim Lockette,
Editor, Flalaw
* Kristen Hines,
Photographer




UNIVERSITY OF
FLORIDA


Help Law Students Far From Home


In a few weeks, many law
students in Gainesville will
be heading home for a much-
needed holiday break. But some
will spend the holidays very far
from home and in a high-stress
environment.
Many students from the Gator
Nation are now serving their
country in Iraq, Afghanistan
and surrounding countries. The
Military Law Students Associa-
tion is asking the law school com-
munity to keep these students in
their thoughts over the holidays.
The group is also asking students
to send care packages to their
colleagues overseas and send
them soon, to assure they arrive
on time.
Among the students currently
deployed are:
* 1st Lt. David Oliver, a 2L who
is serving in Afghanistan with
the Florida National Guard.
Oliver is executive officer of a
medical unit.
* Capt. Christian Torres, who
has been in the Fallujah area
since mid-August. He is part
of a team that is training an


1st Lt. David Oliver shows the Gator colors on a mountaintop in
Afghanistan. He is one of several law students serving overseas.


Iraqi light infrantry battalion
to become self-sufficient as an
infantry unit.
* Sgt. MarkTober, a 3L who was
called up as part of the Inactive
Ready Reserve this summer,
and is leading small unit con-
voy operations in Saudi Arabia
and Iraq. Tober also served in
Afghanistan in 2002.
* Capt. Dan McKillop, who is
deployed to Balad Air Base in
Iraq, where he is in charge of


a joint forces communications
support center. McKillop ex-
pects to return to the campus
in December and resume
his studies during the spring
semester.
If you would like to send a
letter or care package to any of
these students, contact MLSA
president Alex Hadjilogiou at
hadjil31@ufl.edu for addresses
and other information.


^CALENDAR


November
14 Flu Shots, noon- 1 p.m.,
courtyard, near Student
Affairs

15 The Silver Lining of
Hurricane Katrina,
5 p.m., room 285D

Law School Democrats,
5 p.m., room 345

16 JMBA Ski Trip Meeting,
5:30 p.m., room 285B


Saulo Casali on the
Brazilian Constitution,
noon, room 345

LCC Meeting, 6 p.m.
faculty dining room

17 The Criminalization of
Homelessness, 5:30 p.m.,
Bailey Courtroom

18 Nelson Symposium,
8:30 a.m., Hilton Confer-
ence Center


Law Review Panel,
2 p.m., room 180

19 PIEC Eco-Run, 8 a.m.,
outside law school campus

More Dates
Available Online
For more information on
the dates and locations of
upcoming meetings, check the
calendar on the law school's
website at: http://www.law.
ufl.edu/calendars/.


8 FLA LAW