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 Trial team wins national title
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UF UFLAW



Fla law newsletter of the University of Florida College of Law
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00072281/00153
 Material Information
Title: Fla law newsletter of the University of Florida College of Law
Portion of title: Flalaw
Physical Description: Serial
Creator: Levin College of Law
Publisher: s.n.
Place of Publication: <Gainesville FL> College of Law Communications Office 1997-
Creation Date: November 7, 2005
Frequency: weekly
completely irregular
 Subjects
Genre: periodical   ( marcgt )
serial   ( sobekcm )
 Notes
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol.1, no. 1 (Oct. 6, 1997)-
General Note: Weekly during the school year with a biweekly insert, numbered separately called: The Docket.
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Table of Contents
    Trial team wins national title
        Page 1
    Career Services
        Page 2
        Page 3
    Events and opportunities
        Page 4
        Page 5
    People, scholarship and activities
        Page 6
    Scholar helps families of child defendents
        Page 7
    SG-funded free printing returns
        Page 8
    Calendar
        Page 8
Full Text



















Trial Team Wins National Title


UF's Trial Team continued its
long winning streak in Octo-
ber, taking first place in the St.
John's National Civil Rights
Competition in Queens, New
York.
The Trial Team beat 15 other
teams from around the country
to win the competition, which
draws teams from around the
country to argue civil rights
cases in front of sitting judges.
The victory represents another
in a series of national wins that
have brought UF's trial advo-
cacy program into the spotlight
in recent years.
"It's fair to say that we've
dominated the St. John's com-
petition so far," said Trial Team
member Carson Barrow. "This
competition has only been
around for three years, and this
is the second time we've won.
The year we didn't win, we
came in second."
Trial Team members Justin
Mazzarra and Katie Brinson
played the defense role for
UF, while Teesha McCrae and
Takisha Richardson played
plaintiffs attorneys. Mazzarra
and Brinson beat a team from
Fordham University School of



INSIDE THIS ISSUE
2 Career Services
4 Events and Opportunities
8 Calendar


Trial Team Members Katie Brinson and Justin Mazzarra review
their case before entering the courtroom for the final round of the
St. John's National Civil Rights Competition. UF beat 15 teams from
around the country to take first place in the competition.


Law in the semi-finals. McCrae
and Richardson faced a team
from the College of William
and Mary in the finals and
brought home the trophy.
The teams argued a case
involving claims of abuse and
neglect at a fictional state-run
home for troubled youths.
Competitors were allowed only
15 minutes to prepare their wit-
nesses before arguing the case.
UF was the top seed through-




Glasser
Barbecue Builds
Community


out the competition, Barrow
said. Much of the credit for the
victory, she said, should go to
the team's coaches, Stacy Scott
of the Alachua County Public
Defender's Office and Joshua
Silverman of the Alachua
County State Attorney's Office.
The advocates were supported
by researchers, including Bar-
row, Justin McCormack and
Brandy Grant.





SG Funds 5
Free Printing


VOL. 9 NO. 12 NOVEMBER 7, 2005












Rep. Bilirakis
to Speak at
Commencement
Congressman Michael Bilirakis (R-
Fla.) will be the featured speaker
at the Levin College of Law's Fall
2005 commencement Dec. 16.
A UF law alumnus, Bilirakis (JD
63) has served in Congress since
1983. See future issues of FlaLaw
for details.

Florida Beats
Georgia...
Before Kickoff
For the second year in a row, the
UF Moot Court Team defeated the
University of Georgia Moot Court
team in the annual battle before
the big football game. Christine
Fuqua and Jarrett Deluca repre-
sented UF on the winning team.
The five federal judges for the
competition noted that both teams
presented the best arguments
they had seen in the competition's
25-year history.
The team also took third place
in the national Tang Moot Court
Competition. See page 4 for
details.











CAREERSERVICES
Hints to help you in the legal profession


Register for
Eminent Domain
Symposium
Friday, Nov. 11, is the last
day to register for the Nelson
Symposium, which will bring
eminent domain experts
from around the country to
Gainesville to discuss Kelo v.
New London and other takings
issues. The symposium will be
held Nov. 18 in the UF Hilton
Conference Center.
UF law students and faculty
can attend for free if they
register by the deadline. Seats
are limited, and are available
on a first-come, first-served
basis. Speakers at the confer-
ence will include:
Michael Allan Wolf, Richard
E. Nelson Professor of Law
at UF

James E. Krier, Earl Warren
Delano Professor of Law at
the University of Michigan

Nicole Stelle Garnett, Profes-
sor of Law at Notre Dame
University

Eduardo M. Pefialver, As-
sociate Professor of Law at
Fordham University

Douglas M. Kmiec, Caruso
Family Chair in Constitu-
tional Law at Pepperdine
University

Mark Fenster, Associate
Professor of Law at UF

To register, contact Director of
Conference Planning Barbara
DeVoe at (352) 273-0615 or
devoe@law.ufl.edu.


2 FLA LAW


Becoming a Trial
Court or Judicial Staff
Attorney
If you're looking for a job that
will give you lots of responsibility
early in your career, working as
a trial court or judicial staff at-
torney might be the path for you.
Here are a few frequently asked
questions about the field:
What does a trial court or
judicial staff attorney do?
They assist circuit and county
judges in ruling on a variety of
issues (criminal, civil, probate, ju-
venile appellate and administra-
tive) by conducting legal research
and analysis. Staff attorneys
draft orders and opinions for the
judges' consideration. They also
track and make recommenda-
tions regarding implementation
of legislation applicable to the
court and conduct research
on case flow management and
caseload distribution.
Isn't this the same as being a
judicial law clerk?
Typically, one thinks of a law
clerk as being assigned to one
particular judge, whereas trial
court or judicial staff attorneys
assist a number of judges.
What are the qualifications?
Judicial staff attorneys are law
school graduates who are mem-
bers of The Florida Bar. Some
circuits will bring in a recent
graduate who will take the bar
exam in the near future, or who
is awaiting scores. Additionally,
strong legal research and writing
skills and a well-developed ana-
lytical ability are essential. Your
resume and cover letter should
emphasize experiences that you
may have gained from participat-


ing in law reviews, journals or
writing competitions, or from
serving as a research or teaching
assistant.
How can I learn of these
openings?
Positions are announced at
www.flcourts.org (under "em-
ployment"), on each circuit's
website, on the Center for Career
Services Hotline listserve, and
in the Symplicity job bank.
Positions are advertised on an
"as-needed" basis, so there is no


traditional hiring cycle for these
openings.
Right now, there are open-
ings in the 10th Judicial Circuit
in Bartow for a trial court staff
attorney (application deadline
Nov. 9, position description at
www.judl0.org), and in the 11th
Judicial Circuit in Miami (ap-
plication deadline Nov. 15, posi-
tion description at www.judl 1.
flcourts.org).


Team Up with Career Services in Spring
Career Services has completed its schedule of workshops for the fall se-
mester. However, programs for Spring 2006 are in the planning stage:
if you are part of a student organization interested in co-sponsoring a
program, contact Assistant Director for Career Services Dexter Smith
at 273-0680. Student organizations can co-sponsor programs that are
already being planned, or work with Career Services to develop new
career-related events.

Turn in Your Pro Bono Hours
You did the work. Now take the credit. December 2005 graduates
should turn in their pro bono time logs to the Center for Career Services,
so that pro bono certificates can be prepared for graduation.













A alternative Careers: What to do After Law School
If You Don't Want to Practice Law


Are you looking for the posi-
tion that will propel you into the
future you envisioned for yourself
when you came to law school?
Are you starting to wonder if you
want to practice law after all?
While most law students tend to
pursue a traditional position with
a law firm after graduation, it is
not unusual for some students to
begin searching for alternatives to
this path. The good news is that
a law degree opens the door to
a plethora of alternative careers.
The trick is to understand what
you are looking for and figure out
where to find it. Career Services
has resources and counselors who
can help you in this endeavor.
According to Nonlegal Careers
for Lawyers (ABA; Munneke,
Henslee, 2004), a background in
law can greatly expand job op-
portunities for someone who also
specializes in another field. Law
school provides unique training
and skills that can be valuable in
professions other than law, from
work at business and governmen-
tal agencies to lobbying, educa-
tion, insurance, health care, the
media and charitable organiza-
tions.
Ninety-nine percent of an
effective alternative career search
happens before you send your
first resume. Your search is more
effective, and more efficient, if
you take your time before you
start mailing.
First, give yourself permission
to be happy. At some point, we
have all succumbed to the no-
tion that it is a "waste" of one's
law degree not to practice law.
Remember that you went to law
school to prepare for a fulfilling


Finding a

Non-Law Job


* Begin with self-assessment. You'll get the info you need to market
yourself to employers.
* Research, research, research!
* It takes time, patience, and a spirit of adventure.
* Know your transferable skills cold. Be able to give specific
examples of those skills in action.
* Prepare a brief "sound bite" to describe your skills, what you offer
and what you want.
* Conduct informational interviews. They can be the key to getting
"inside" an organization.
* Become an expert networker.
* Prepare to address employer resistance to hiring a JD. Anticipate
concerns and be prepared to address them.
* Have compelling reasons for seeking a non-traditional career.
Learn buzzwords of the field to capture the employer's interest.
* Demonstrate your enthusiasm for your chosen field through com-
munity involvement, volunteer activities or writing an article.

Source: Lisa L. Abrams, The Official Guide to Legal Specialties


career: you just need to find the
career that meets that goal.
Second, assess what you want
from a job and what you bring
to the job. Think about environ-
ment, activities, and duties you
enjoy. Then, itemize your skills
and qualifications. Perform your
own personal inventory.
Third, after reviewing a myriad
of career options, choose some
options that look like a good fit.
Lastly, explore those options.
Talk to lawyers working in the
particular positions you've identi-
fied. What do they like? What
skills do they utilize? Find out
how they found their job. All
of these steps will prepare you


to efficiently begin sending out
resumes. (Source: Gina Sauer,
i! Mitchell College)

Suggested Reading
* Alternative Careers for Lawyers
by Hillary Mantis
* Beyond LA Law: Break the Tra-
ditional Lawyer Mold, edited
by Janet Smith
* Full Disclosure: Do you Really
Want to be a Lawyer? by S.J. Bell
* J.D. Preferred, 400+ Things You
Can Do With a Law Degree
(Other Than Practice Law) pub-
lished by Federal Reports, Inc.


Law School
Closed for
Veterans Day
The Levin College of Law will
be closed Friday, Nov. 11, for
Veterans Day. Wednesday
classes are cancelled, and
Friday classes will be held
Wednesday.


Walk-In
Resume Reviews
Want to make sure your resume
is in top shape? Bring it to the
Center for Career Services for a
quick review, from 9 a.m. to 1
p.m. Wednesday, Nov. 9. These
walk-in reviews will be held on
a first-come, first served basis.



Writing Contest
Deadline Soon
The magazine LegalAffairs is
holding its third annual writing
contest for law students.
Entrants are asked to make
an argument of 1,500 words
about a pertinent topic in the
law, written in a style acces-
sible to general readers and
lawyers alike. The first-place
winner will receive a prize of
$2,000 and be published in
LegalAffairs, a general interest
magazine on the law.
Entries must be submitted by
Dec. 1. For more information,
go to http://www.legalaffairs.
org/contest.msp.


FLA LAW 3


I

















Conservation
Clinic Gets Grant
The UF Conservation Clinic has
been approved for two more
years of funding through Florida
Sea Grant. The clinic will re-
cieve approximately $30,000
per year for the next two years
to support students and travel,
and to host CLE conferences
for lawyers with an interest
in conservation. The clinic is
charged with continuing to con-
duct statewide legal research
for and services to coastal
communities.



















Help Is Available
Test time is a tough time for
law students. As the end of the
semester approaches, remem-
ber that you're not in it alone.
The law school's resource
counselor can help you find
ways to cope with test-taking
anxiety and the other stresses
you're likely to feel as the
semester comes to an end. Con-
tact Nicole Stern at stern@law.
ufl.edu or drop by her office in
Student Affairs.


4 FLA LAW


/EVENT





'Playing the Race Card'
The Center for the Study of
Race and Race Relations is spon-
soring a forum, titled "Playing
the Race Card," Wednesday, Nov.
9, at 4 p.m. in room 285B. The
controversial cartoons featured in
The Independent Florida All.garor
have raised important race rela-
tions issues that beg for further
dialogue. Come and participate
in the first of a series of open,
lively, and provocative discus-
sions. Speakers include Professors
Pedro Malavet, Kenneth Nunn
and Sharon Rush.

ELULS To Meet UF Takes
If you are interested in envi- Chris Carmody
ronmental or land use issues, place at the Th
make sure you attend the official Oct. 21-22. Thl
kickoff of the newly-revived En- ing the first- an
vironmental and Land Use Law Pictured here, f
Society at noon Tuesday, Nov. and competitor
8, in the Bailey Courtroom. The
group is awakening from a long first PIEC Eco
period of hibernation, and needs fund scholarship
fund scholarship:
both officers and ideas. Free pizza attend the confer
attend the confer
will be served at the event.
in March 2006.
Brazilian Judge to Speak will be held Nov.
istration ends Tu
Brazilian Federal Judge Saulo Preitration
Pre-registration i:
Casali, a professor of law at the want an Eco-run
University of Bahia, will speak on tion forms are
fundamental aspects of Brazil's ufl.e county
ufl.edu/countach
1988 constitution at noon Nov.
16 in room 345. Everyone is CaribLaw He
invited to the event, which is Hurricane Vi
co-sponsored by the American
The Caribbean
Constitution Society, the Law and
Association will i
Policy in the Americas Program
Nov. 14-17 for it
and the International Law Society.
nonperishable fo
Join the Eco-Run toiletries to dona
victims and othe:
The organizers of the Public itim and
munity for Than
Interest Environmental Confer-
S( a s t remember to bri
ence (PIEC) are sponsoring the


S & OPPORTUNITIES


Third at Tang Nationals
and Anne Zerbe, of UF's Moot Court Team, took third
omas Tang National Moot Court Competition in Chicago
e national competition consisted of 12 teams, represent-
d second-place teams from each regional competition.
rom left, are coaches Alissa Lugo and Elizabeth Paulk


s Zerbe and Carmody.


un, an event to
s for students to
ence, to be held
The Eco-Run
19; pre-reg-
esday, Nov. 8.
s$10, $12 ifyou
t-shirt. Registra-
ailable at plaza.


Ips
ctims
Law Students
be tabling from
ems such as
od, clothes and
te to Katrina
rs in the com-
ksgiving. Please
ng your items to


the table in the concourse during
those days or to place them in the
bins in front of the JMBA office
by the elevator, in the cafeteria
and by Career Services.

Criminalizing
Homelessness
The Florida Bar Foundation
and the Public Service Law
Fellows will host a panel discus-
sion on "The Criminalization
of Homelessness" Tuesday, Nov.
8, at 5:30 p.m. in the Bailey
Courtroom. Food and drink will
be provided.
The Public Service Fellows will
participate in Breakfast on the
Plaza, part of National Hunger
and Homelessness Awareness
Week, on Thursday, Nov. 10,


I









from 9 a.m. to noon in the
Downtown Community Plaza.
Volunteers will serve breakfast
to the homeless and hungry on
the plaza, and volunteers from
the law school are needed.
For more information, contact
Thomas Allison at tcauf@ufl.edu.

Florida Law Review Fall
2005 Symposium
Florida Law Review will present
its Fall 2005 panel discussion
Nov. 18 at 2 p.m in room 180.
This year's topics are federal
judicial nominations and the
confirmation process. Panelists
will discuss the recent nomination
of Samuel Alito, the confirmation
of Chief Justice John Roberts, and
the pros and cons of the system.
Panelists include Judge Gerald
Tjoflat from the Court of Appeals
for the 11th Circuit, Professor
Sharon Rush, Dean Emeritus Jon
Mills and Judge Stephan Mickle
from the United States District
Court for the Northern District
of Florida. If you have any ques-
tions you would like answered
during the discussion, e-mail
them to Review8@law.ufl.edu.

International Breakfast
Thursday
The International Law Society
continues its international break-
fast series with a presentation by
Professor Steven Powell on inter-
national trade and human rights.
The potluck breakfast will be held
at 11 a.m. Thursday, Nov. 10, in
the faculty dining room.

Jessup Moot Court
Selects Members
The Jessup Moot Court Team
has selected members for the
2005-2006 school year. Members
include Amanda McLeman, Brian
Eves, Ashli Gagliano, Jay Kubica,
Jose Florez, David Sams, Brian A.
Frankel (captain) and Datan Dorot
(research).


Glasser BBQ Builds Community


Hundreds of law students,
faculty and staff turned out
for the Glasser Barbecue in
the Marcia Schott Courtyard
Nov. 2. The event was spon-
sored by UF alumni Gene and
Elaine Glasser, who hoped
the event would sponsor a
greater sense of community
among people at the law
school. "It seems to have
worked," Assistant Dean
for Diversity Adrian Jones
said at the event. "Just look
around you."


FLA LAW 5




















uavis


SCHOLARSHIP
& ACTIVITIES


Scholarship & Activities
Assistant Professor Mary
Jane Angelo has published, to-
gether with Anthony J. Cotter,
an article entitled "Redressing
the Failure of Environmental
Law to Protect Birds and Their
Habitat." The article appears in
Natural Resources and Environ-
mentJournal (Fall 2005).
Professor Jeffrey Davis'
article, "Ending the Nonsense:
The In Pari Delicto Doctrine
Has Nothing to do With What
is Section 541 Property of
the Bankruptcy Estate," was
discussed at the View From
the Bench Seminar held by the
Business Section of The Florida
Bar Oct. 21. U.S. Bankruptcy
Court Judge Raymond Ray
cited the article in his ruling
in a recent bankruptcy case
involving Fuzion Technologies
Group.
Research Foundation Profes-
sor Diane H. Mazur presented
and critiqued the papers of
three military researchers
during a panel on "Human Re-
source Challenges in the Armed
Forces" in Chicago on Oct. 23
at the Biennial International
Conference of the Inter-Univer-
sity Seminar on Armed Forces
and Society. The IUS is the
preeminent academic organiza-
tion for the interdisciplinary
study of the military.
Mazur also spoke on the
subject of her upcoming article,
"A Blueprint for Law School
Engagement with the Mili-
tary," at the annual Lavender
Law Conference in San Diego
on Oct. 29. This article, to be
published this fall in the Jour-


nal of National Security Law &
Policy, examines the Solomon
Amendment litigation (mili-
tary recruiting on law school
campuses) pending in the U.S.
Supreme Court.

In the News
Continuing changes at the
U.S. Supreme Court once again
placed a number of UF law
professors in the media spot-
light.
Richard E. Nelson Profes-
sor Professor Michael Allan
Wolf was quoted in an Oct.
27 Gainesville Sun story on the
withdrawal of Harriet Miers
as a Supreme Court nominee.
Wolf said the withdrawal shows
that the Senate does indeed
play a significant role in the
nomination process.
Professor Juan Perea was
quoted in an Oct. 28 Indepen-
dent Florida All.galrof story on
the Miers situation. He said
Miers' resignation was likely
tied to the President's weakened
political image, and predicted,
correctly, Bush would announce
a new appointee by Oct. 31 at
the latest.
Associate Dean for Faculty
Development Lyrissa Lidsky
spoke to AM850 and WUFT-
TV on Oct. 31 regarding the
nomination of Samuel Alito to
the Supreme Court vacancy.
She said the naming of Alito,
a conservative judge, should
satisfy conservatives who were
disappointed with the nomina-
tion of Miers.
Irving Cypen Professor
Sharon Rush was quoted
in a Nov. 1 Gainesville Sun


Continued on Page 7


6 FLA LAW


PEOPLE


Angelo


story on the Alito nomination.
Rush said Alito's career on the
bench makes him "eminently
qualified" to sit on the Supreme
Court, but also provides his
opponents with a paper trail,
making it easier to find points
of contention.
Professor Fletcher Baldwin
commented on the Alito nomi-
nation for The Ocala Star-Ban-
ner on Nov. 1. Baldwin said he
was troubled by the similarities
between Alito's record and that
ofAntonin Scalia, whom Bald-
win described as "not a conser-
vative" but a "reactionary." He
said the nomination process has
become too polarized on both
sides of the political fence.
Baldwin also was quoted in a
Nov. 1 Independent Florida Al-
ligator story on the nomination.
He said the nomination does
not bode well for Roe v. Wade.
In other news, Conservation
Clinic Director Tom Ankersen
was featured in an Oct. 16 Flor-
ida Real Estate Journal article on
Madera, a Gainesville subdivi-
sion constructed in compliance
with the city's green-build-
ing ordinance. Ankersen and
students in the clinic drafted
the ordinance, which requires
environmentally friendly con-
struction in city buildings, and
encourages similar practices in
private development.
Professor Alyson Flournoy
made several media appear-
ances discussing a recent report
by the Center for Progressive
Reform, which outlines public
policy decisions that contribut-
ed to the loss of life and prop-
erty from Hurricane Katrina.


Seigel


Perea


Rush


Ankersen


ui iuy












Scholar Helps Families of Child Defendants


They're arguably the least
understood people in America's
justice system. Some see them as
monsters without conscience, oth-
ers as victims without free will.
But Olufunke Grace Bankole, a
visiting scholar at the law school's
Center for the Study of Race and
Race Relations, is working to
change the way we see juvenile
offenders and their families.
"I think that sometimes, in the
law, we lose sight of the faces and
only see statistics," she said.
A graduate of Cornell Univer-
sity and Harvard Law School,
Bankole is here for a year on a So-
ros Justice Advocacy Fellowship,
where she is working with the
families of children in the juvenile
justice system.
"My goal is to educate family
members about the issues they
face in the system, and teach
them what they need to know to
protect the rights of their chil-
dren," she said.


In the News from Page 6
Flournoy, who headed the panel
of 17 scholars who drafted the
report, spoke to WWRL-AM
in New York City on Oct. 24;
to KAHL-AM in San Antonio,
Tex. on Oct. 26; to KXEL-AM
in Des Moines, Iowa on Oct.
27, and to WGTD-FM in
Milwaukee,Wis. on Oct. 27.
Professor Michael Seigel
commented on the indictment
of Lewis "Scooter" Libby, for
AM850 on Oct. 27.


racial disparities in the system,"
said Bankole. "Particularly at the
disproportionate number of black
men who are incarcerated."
In an earlier project, Bankole
investigated the use of plea
bargaining in New Orleans-area
courts.
"Much of the bias in the system
results from the great amount of
discretion prosecutors have in the
plea bargaining process," she said.
That bias is particularly appar-
ent in the prosecution of juvenile
Bankole defendants, Bankole said, where
the social influence and wealth of
The daughter of Nigerian im a defendant's family can greatly
migrants, Bankole lived in the influence the process.
influence the process.
African nation for eight years. She "The lives ofyouth offenders'
says she knew from an early age families are often shattered by
that she wanted to be a lawyer their children' incarceration,"
- and that she wanted to do she said. "Most of these parents
something about the inequities certainly want what is best for
between whites and African their children, but lack the tools
Americans in the U.S. justice and the knowledge to effectively
system. advocate on their behalf.
"I've always had an interest in


Honoring the Fallen
Kadiatou Diallo (left) pauses to remember her son, Amadou, who was killed
in 1999 by New York City police officers who mistook him for a serial
rape suspect. UF race and law scholars including Professor Kenneth Nunn
(right) and Professor Michelle Jacobs joined Diallo for a panel discussion
on racial profiling and police brutality Nov. 1 in Emerson Alumni Hall.


-ear

Forensic Science
for Lawyers
Forensic Science for Law Pro-
fessionals is a non-credit course
now offered online through the
UF College of Pharmacy Forensic
Science program. The 10-
week program provides a solid
background in the fundamentals
and principles of forensic sci-
ence and evidence that may be
presented in court. This course
is suited to anyone who works
within the legal system, includ-
ing law enforcement officers,
attorneys and investigators.
Enrollment is open now. Visit
www.ForensicScience.ufl.edu/
csi for course details, or contact
Jennifer Larson, jlarson@dce.ufl.
edu, 352-392-1711, ext. 213.



Faculty
Enrichment
Speaker
Mark Godsey, associate profes-
sor at the University of Cincin-
nati College of Law, will speak
on "Reformulating the Miranda
Warnings in Light of Contempo-
rary Law and Understandings,"
at a faculty enrichment luncheon
at noon Wednesday, Nov. 9 in
the faculty dining room. All fac-
ulty are welcome at the event.
Students interested in attending
must check with Associate Dean
for Faculty Development Lyrissa
Lidsky at lidsky@law.ufl.edu.


FLA LAW 7








College of Law
Administration
* Robert H. Jerry, II, Dean
* George L. Dawson,
Associate Dean for
Academic Affairs
* J. Patrick Shannon,
Associate Dean for
Administrative Affairs
* Lyrissa Barnett Lidsky,
Associate Dean for
Faculty Development
* Michael K. Friel,
Associate Dean & Director,
Graduate Tax Program
* Stuart R. Cohn,
Associate Dean for
International Studies
* M. Kathleen "Kathie" Price,
Associate Dean for Library
and Technology
* Gail E. Sasnett,
Associate Dean for
Students, Professionalism
and Community Relations
* J. Michael Patrick,
Assistant Dean for Admissions
* Linda Calvert Hanson,
Assistant Dean for
Career Services
* Adrian Jones,
Assistant Dean for Diversity
and Community Relations
* Jennifer Cope, Interim
Assistant Dean for Students
* Debra D. Amirin,
Director of Communications
* Donald J. Hale,
Senior Director of Development
and Alumni Affairs

Send Us Your News
FlaLaw is published each week
school is in session by the Levin
College of Law Communica-
tions Office. Submit news of
interest to the law school
community by 10 a.m. Tuesday
for the following Monday's
issue to lockette@law.ufl.edu
or 273-0650.
* Tim Lockette,
Editor, Flalaw
* Kristen Hines,
Photographer




UNIVERSITY OF
FLORIDA


SG-Funded Free Printing Returns


Students visiting the
Internet cafe will welcome
the return of student govern-
ment-funded free printing
to the Levin College of Law.
Students will have the use
of two state-of-the-art HP
9000 LaserJet printers, each
capable of printing up to 50
sheets per minute. The free
printing will be limited to 75
pages per student per semes-
ter (subject to utilization and
funding limitations).
SG-funded free print-
ing was brought to the law
school through the efforts
of law student and former
student senator Nathan Skop
(2L). During the Summer
2004 term, Skop started a
student petition, drafted leg-
islation, and obtained Senate
funding approval for nearly
$15,000 to purchase the print-
ers. Former law school student
senators Kurt Zaner (3L) and
Joshua Cossey (2L), and current
Student Senator Jared Hernan-
dez (2L), each made significant


Nathan Skop (2L) helped bring
student-government-funded free
printing to the law school.

contributions to this project.
After an initial rollout during
the Fall 2004 term, free print-
ing was discontinued due to
student abuse (individual stu-
dents printing up to 500 pages
at a time) and related funding


limitations. Before printing was
discontinued, students printed
approximately 140,000 sheets
resulting in a combined cost
savings of$14,000.
Now the printers are back,
with software safeguards that
prevent abuse. The CIRCA pay-
to-print machines will remain
available as a secondary student
printing option.
Any law student can access
the free printers through a
wireless-equipped laptop. To
gain access to the free printers,
you must install both client and
printer software. Just log into
the iPrint website at http://
iprint.law.ufl.edu/ipp and fol-
low the instructions to install
each piece of software. This can
be done only through Internet
Explorer.
Skop and the Law College
Council are currently seeking
volunteers to keep the printers
stocked with paper and toner.
To help, please e-mail: skop@
ufl.edu.


November
8 ELULS Meeting, noon,
Bailey Courtroom

The Criminalization of
Homelessness, 5:30 p.m.,
Bailey Courtroom

9 Walk-In Resume Reviews,
9 a.m-1 p.m., 244 BG

Faculty Enrichment
Luncheon, noon, faculty
dining room


Playing the Race Card,
4 p.m., room 285B

10 Breakfast on the Plaza,
9 a.m., Downtown Com-
munity Plaza

One Quick Question,
10:30 a.m.-noon, second
floor, Bruton-Geer

International Law
Breakfast, 11 a.m., faculty
dining room


11 Veterans Day Holiday

16 Saulo Casali on the
Brazilian Constitution,
noon, room 345

More Dates
Available Online
For more information on
the dates and locations of
upcoming meetings, check the
calendar on the law school's
website at: http://www.law.
ufl.edu/calendars/.


8 FLA LAW


CALENDAR








College of Law
Administration
* Robert H. Jerry, II, Dean
* George L. Dawson,
Associate Dean for
Academic Affairs
* J. Patrick Shannon,
Associate Dean for
Administrative Affairs
* Lyrissa Barnett Lidsky,
Associate Dean for
Faculty Development
* Michael K. Friel,
Associate Dean & Director,
Graduate Tax Program
* Stuart R. Cohn,
Associate Dean for
International Studies
* M. Kathleen "Kathie" Price,
Associate Dean for Library
and Technology
* Gail E. Sasnett,
Associate Dean for
Students, Professionalism
and Community Relations
* J. Michael Patrick,
Assistant Dean for Admissions
* Linda Calvert Hanson,
Assistant Dean for
Career Services
* Adrian Jones,
Assistant Dean for Diversity
and Community Relations
* Jennifer Cope, Interim
Assistant Dean for Students
* Debra D. Amirin,
Director of Communications
* Donald J. Hale,
Senior Director of Development
and Alumni Affairs

Send Us Your News
FlaLaw is published each week
school is in session by the Levin
College of Law Communica-
tions Office. Submit news of
interest to the law school
community by 10 a.m. Tuesday
for the following Monday's
issue to lockette@law.ufl.edu
or 273-0650.
* Tim Lockette,
Editor, Flalaw
* Kristen Hines,
Photographer




UNIVERSITY OF
FLORIDA


SG-Funded Free Printing Returns


Students visiting the
Internet cafe will welcome
the return of student govern-
ment-funded free printing
to the Levin College of Law.
Students will have the use
of two state-of-the-art HP
9000 LaserJet printers, each
capable of printing up to 50
sheets per minute. The free
printing will be limited to 75
pages per student per semes-
ter (subject to utilization and
funding limitations).
SG-funded free print-
ing was brought to the law
school through the efforts
of law student and former
student senator Nathan Skop
(2L). During the Summer
2004 term, Skop started a
student petition, drafted leg-
islation, and obtained Senate
funding approval for nearly
$15,000 to purchase the print-
ers. Former law school student
senators Kurt Zaner (3L) and
Joshua Cossey (2L), and current
Student Senator Jared Hernan-
dez (2L), each made significant


Nathan Skop (2L) helped bring
student-government-funded free
printing to the law school.

contributions to this project.
After an initial rollout during
the Fall 2004 term, free print-
ing was discontinued due to
student abuse (individual stu-
dents printing up to 500 pages
at a time) and related funding


limitations. Before printing was
discontinued, students printed
approximately 140,000 sheets
resulting in a combined cost
savings of$14,000.
Now the printers are back,
with software safeguards that
prevent abuse. The CIRCA pay-
to-print machines will remain
available as a secondary student
printing option.
Any law student can access
the free printers through a
wireless-equipped laptop. To
gain access to the free printers,
you must install both client and
printer software. Just log into
the iPrint website at http://
iprint.law.ufl.edu/ipp and fol-
low the instructions to install
each piece of software. This can
be done only through Internet
Explorer.
Skop and the Law College
Council are currently seeking
volunteers to keep the printers
stocked with paper and toner.
To help, please e-mail: skop@
ufl.edu.


November
8 ELULS Meeting, noon,
Bailey Courtroom

The Criminalization of
Homelessness, 5:30 p.m.,
Bailey Courtroom

9 Walk-In Resume Reviews,
9 a.m-1 p.m., 244 BG

Faculty Enrichment
Luncheon, noon, faculty
dining room


Playing the Race Card,
4 p.m., room 285B

10 Breakfast on the Plaza,
9 a.m., Downtown Com-
munity Plaza

One Quick Question,
10:30 a.m.-noon, second
floor, Bruton-Geer

International Law
Breakfast, 11 a.m., faculty
dining room


11 Veterans Day Holiday

16 Saulo Casali on the
Brazilian Constitution,
noon, room 345

More Dates
Available Online
For more information on
the dates and locations of
upcoming meetings, check the
calendar on the law school's
website at: http://www.law.
ufl.edu/calendars/.


8 FLA LAW


CALENDAR