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 Martinez: Engage Latin America
 Career Services
 Events and opportunities
 People, scholarship and activi...
 UF reaches out to the Americas
 Study environmental law in Costa...
 Calendar


UF UFLAW



Fla law newsletter of the University of Florida College of Law
ALL VOLUMES CITATION SEARCH THUMBNAILS PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00072281/00152
 Material Information
Title: Fla law newsletter of the University of Florida College of Law
Portion of title: Flalaw
Physical Description: Serial
Creator: Levin College of Law
Publisher: s.n.
Place of Publication: <Gainesville FL> College of Law Communications Office 1997-
Creation Date: October 31, 2005
Frequency: weekly
completely irregular
 Subjects
Genre: periodical   ( marcgt )
serial   ( sobekcm )
 Notes
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol.1, no. 1 (Oct. 6, 1997)-
General Note: Weekly during the school year with a biweekly insert, numbered separately called: The Docket.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
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Table of Contents
    Martinez: Engage Latin America
        Page 1
    Career Services
        Page 2
        Page 3
    Events and opportunities
        Page 4
        Page 5
    People, scholarship and activities
        Page 6
    UF reaches out to the Americas
        Page 7
    Study environmental law in Costa Rica
        Page 8
    Calendar
        Page 8
Full Text




















Martinez: Engage Latin America


VOL. 10, NO. 10 OCTOBER 31,2005


The United States should
take a more active role in mat-
ters affecting its Latin Ameri-
can neighbors, U.S. Sen. Mel
Martinez (R Fla.) told UF
students in an Oct. 21 speech at
the Levin College of Law.
Functioning democracies
blossomed across Latin America
in the 1990s, but the standard
of living in those countries


INSIDE THIS ISSUE
2 Career Services
4 Events and Opportunities
8 Calendar


U.S. Senator Mel
Martinez (R-Fla.)
and Dean Robert
Jerry enter the
Chesterfield
Smith Ceremo-
nial Classroom
as Martinez
prepares to speak
to a crowd of
about 200 law
and political
science students
Oct. 21. Martinez
told the crowd
that the United
States should
take a "more pro-
active approach"
in addressing
poverty and other
problems in Latin
America.





hasn't kept pace, the nation's
first Cuban-American senator
said. He said leaders such as
Cuban dictator Fidel Castro
and Venezuelan President Hugo
Chavez are exploiting the lack
of progress to undermine U.S.
influence in the region.
"What we have been doing
in Latin America is reacting to
crises," Martinez told a crowd



UF Reaches Out
to the Americas


of about 200 law and political
science students gathered in the
Chesterfield Smith Ceremonial
Classroom. "We need to take a
more proactive approach."
Martinez cited Chavez, best
known in the United States
for his ties to Castro and his
attempts to nationalize various
Venezuelan industries, as a
threat to democratic values in
the oil-rich nation.
"A person like Chavez...is
elected democratically, but
doesn't rule democratically,"
Martinez said. Among other
things, Martinez said, Chavez
has threatened judicial indepen-
dence by packing courts with
his own political supporters.
Martinez accused Chavez of
"working hand in hand with
Fidel Castro" to foster distrust
of the United States in the
region. To combat anti-U.S.
sentiment in Latin America,
Martinez said, the U.S. should
pursue free-market solutions to
poverty.
Trade agreements such as
CAFTA can help, Martinez
said, but the U.S. should also
join with other governments
to make micro-business loans
Continued on Page 7


Explore Law
in Costa Rica


CGR to Study
Impact of Historic
Preservation
The law school's Center for
Governmental Responsibility
has received an $89,000 grant
to study the effects of historic
preservation efforts on the lives
of Florida citizens.
CGR will develop and use qual-
ity-of-life indicators to help them
judge the impact of ongoing
efforts to preserve historic build-
ings. The study will also identify
best practices for local govern-
ments involved in downtown re-
vitalization, heritage tourism and
other projects related to historic
preservation.
The study will be done in conjunc-
tion with UF's Department of
Urban & Regional Planning, the
Center for Tourism Research and
Development and the College of
Fine Arts. Additional assistance
will be provided by the Florida
Trust for Historic Preservation.
The project is funded by the
National Park Service, adminis-
tered through Florida's Division
of Historical Resources and the
Florida Historical Commission.











CAREERSERVICES
Hints to help you in the legal profession


Free Barbecue
Nov. 2


To help build a stronger law
school community, the Levin
College of Law is holding a free
barbecue for all students, facul-
ty and staff from 11:30 a.m. to
1:30 p.m. Wednesday, Nov. 2,
in the Marcia Schott Courtyard.
The event is sponsored by UF
alumni Gene and Elaine Glasser,
who brought us last semester's
popular ice cream social. Bring
your appetite and a smile.



Fellowship
Deadline
Tomorrow
Nov. 1 is the deadline to apply
for the Paul and Daisy Soros
Fellowship Program. For more
information, see http://www.
pdsoros.org/.


2 FLA LAW


Compensation:
How Much Should You
Negotiate?
You've searched across the state
- maybe across the country for
a place to work. You've taken
part in countless high-pressure
interviews and competed with
dozens of other law students for
a job. Once you're offered a posi-
tion, you may feel lucky simply
to have landed the job you really
want.
But you have loans to pay,
and you didn't go through three
years of law school because you
wanted to live like a student. So
how much bargaining should
you do to make sure you get the
compensation package you want
and need? Do employers expect
you to negotiate, or should you
smile and accept their offer?
There's no one answer to that
question: much depends on the
individual employer. Generally
speaking, offers for summer posi-
tions are non-negotiable, as are
offers from government agencies
and large law firms.

Be Prepared
If you're a savvy job seeker, you
will anticipate the issue, prepar-
ing yourself by evaluating your
needs, researching the market
generally and the policies of your
prospective employer in particu-
lar. First, take a look at your own
bottom line, analyzing your basic
living costs, including repayment
of loans. Then, research the cost
of living in the place you plan to
work (a six-figure salary may have
only a five-figure impact if you
move to a place with astronomi-
cal housing costs.) Don't forget


to factor in transportation costs.
The websites www.salary.com and
www.homefair.com each provide
a salary calculator and cost-of-liv-
ing guide.
Now that you have a more
accurate picture of what you will
need, you can begin researching
employers. A number of the larg-
er OCI firms publish their start-
ing salaries for summer associates
and entry-level associates in the
NALP Directory of Legal Employ-
ers. The on-line version, at www.
nalpdirectory.com, allows you
to generate a chart comparing
salaries for different employers in
different parts of the country.
Many OCI firms provide the
salary data prior to their visit
(check Symplicity for a list of
this data.) Please note that the
recruiters for these companies
typically have little or no ability
to offer more than the set rate.
Exceptions may be made if you
have already passed the Patent
Bar, are barred in multiple states,
hold additional degrees or have
completed a judicial clerkship.
In those circumstances, you may
wish to ask the hiring deci-


sion-maker (not necessarily the
recruiter) about the possibility of
a salary increase based on your
enhanced skill or experience.
Medium-sized and smaller
firms are less likely to provide sal-
ary information beforehand, and
may have more leeway depending
upon the unique attributes of the
applicant. If you have a special
background, are making a career
decision that adversely affects
your spouse or partner, or are
making a major lifestyle adjust-
ment (as is more typical of sec-
ond-career students), all of these
issues can be used to help negoti-
ate a higher salary. Be aware that
this group of employers may be
more challenged to increase a
starting salary, so you may have
to take a creative approach to
negotiating the entire package.
Suggest a bonus structure, if one
is not offered. Firms applaud a
new employee's efforts to bring
in new business and they may be
willing to provide a portion or

cut of the fee generated.

















Beyond the Paycheck
Non-salary benefits open for
negotiation typically can include:
parking, a company car if you will
be called upon to travel frequent-
ly, bar dues, paid continuing legal
education costs, a laptop, health
club membership dues, time off
to study for the bar, relocation
costs, reimbursement for bar prep
courses, child care, first-year stu-
dent loan payment, or attendance
at specific conferences or training
such as NITA.
You may also want to negotiate
quality-of-life issues rather than
dollars and cents. If it's important
to you to have a week off for a
certain holiday or annual event, an
employer may be able to provide
that without incurring out-of-
pocket expenses. Negotiate your
start date. If it is important for you
to work in a specific location or
to be able to develop the practice
in a new direction or not take a
certain type of case, these aspects
may be open to negotiation while
being highly meaningful to you.
How about an understanding
that you will be able to leave each
Wednesday at 5 p.m. to coach your
daughter's soccer team? Do you
want to continue a pro bono case
in which you have been involved?

Timing Is Everything
After researching salaries, you
should think about when and
how to ask for a better compensa-
tion package. Timing and attitude
are everything. You should not
bring compensation issues up be-
fore the employer does; the con-
versation most commonly occurs
during a call-back interview or at
the time of an offer. Don't adopt


an adversarial demeanor; after all,
you will be working with them in
the future. Your goal should be a
win-win situation.
Should an employer ask you
what salary you expect, it is to
your advantage to provide a
range, not a set number. This
prevents you from under- or
over-pricing yourself. You could
state, "My research shows that the
entry-level salary range in Pleas-
antville is from x to y and I would
anticipate being compensated in
that range."
If the employer calls you with
the job offer, states the salary and
asks if you are interested in the
position, voice your enthusiasm
and ask for time to consider. If
the salary is substantially lower
than you can accept based upon
your needs assessment, you may
choose to indicate that fact. "I
would really enjoy working for
your firm and I am going to
carefully evaluate your offer, but I
do want to let you know that the
salary is a bit below the range in


Pleasantville. As I consider your
offer, it would be helpful to know
if there may be some flexibility in
the overall compensation pack-
age." Or ... "it would be helpful
to know the benefit package."
During the subsequent conver-
sation, you will want to restate
your interest in the position be-
fore identifying your concerns or
suggested non-salary benefits that
could make a difference to you. If
the employer is unable to increase
the starting salary, then offer the
possibility of your quality of life
wishes or the non-salary benefits.
Again, the key is to do the
research before you get an offer.
If you are not well-informed, it
will be abundantly apparent to
the employer and harmful to your
potential negotiation. Also, realize
that the starting salary is not nec-
essarily a valid indicator of career
satisfaction or long-term earning
potential. In all, if you have ques-
tions about the process, please
schedule an appointment with a
Career Services counselor.


Career Services Programs


Open House for 1Ls
Learn about all the help the
Center for Career Services has
to offer all in one quick stop
- during the 1L Open House in
244 Bruton-Geer Hall Tuesday,
Nov. 1, from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m.
This event is open to all Fall 2005
entrants.

Explore International
Law
Professor Steven Powell will
discuss "Career Opportunities in


International Law" in a workshop
co-sponsored by Career Services
and the International Law Soci-
ety Wednesday, Nov. 2, at noon
in the faculty dining room.

One Quick Question
Career Services Staff will
answer your inquiries at the One
Quick Question desk outside the
former Media Services office on
the second floor of Bruton-Geer,
from 10:30 a.m. to noon Thurs-
day, Nov. 3.


Forensic Science
for Lawyers
Forensic Science for Law
Professionals is a non-credit
course now offered online
through the UF College of
Pharmacy Forensic Science
program. The 10-week program
provides a solid background
in the fundamentals and prin-
ciples of forensic science and
evidence that may be presented
in court. This course is suited
to anyone who works within
the legal system, including law
enforcement officers, attorneys
and investigators. Enrollment is
open now. Visit www.Forensic-
Science.ufl.edu/csi for course
details, or contact Jennifer
Larson, jlarson@dce.ufl.edu,
352-392-1711 ext. 213.


Contest Seeking
Submissions
The magazine legalAffairs is
holding its third annual writing
contest for law students.
Entrants are asked to make
an argument of 1,500 words
about a pertinent topic in the
law, written in a style acces-
sible to general readers and
lawyers alike. The first-place
winner will receive a prize of
$2,000 and be published in
legalAffairs, a general interest
magazine on the law. The
second-place prize is $1,000
and the third-place winner will
receive $500.
Entries must be submitted by
Dec. 1. For more information,
go to http://www.legalaffairs.
org/contest.msp.


FLA LAW 3


I

















Help Is Available
Test time is a tough time for
law students. As the end of the
semester approaches, remem-
ber that you're not in it alone.
The law school's resource
counselor can help you find
ways to cope with test-taking
anxiety and the other stresses
you're likely to feel as the
semester comes to an end. Con-
tact Nicole Stern at stern@law.
ufl.edu or drop by her office in
Student Affairs.




Professionalism
Luncheon Nov. 1
John Berry, former director
of UF's Center for Profes-
sionalism, will be the featured
speaker at the Dean's Profes-
sionalism Luncheon at noon
Tuesday, Nov. 1 in the faculty
dining room. Berry has served
as executive director of the
State Bar of Michigan and
director of the Legal Division of
The Florida Bar.
Seating at the catered lunch is
limited, and will be offered on
a first-come, first-served basis.
To make reservations, e-mail
Ellen Robinson at robinsone@
law.ufl.edu before noon today,
Oct. 31.


4 FLA LAW


/EVENT




Apply for Phi Delta Phi
Applications for member- Mother
ship in the Cockrell Inn of the to Speal
International Legal Fraternity
of Phi Delta Phi are available Prohlin
in Student Affairs and will be Kadiatou Diallo
accepted Wednesday, Nov. 2, New York police
from 10 a.m.-2 p.m. at the Phi 1999 incident,
Delta Phi table in the courtyard, profiling and po
and Thursday, Nov. 3, in Student Alumni Hall at
Affairs. For more information, e- Guinean immigr
mail Xavier Balderas at Xavier shot and killed
Balderas@bellsouth.net. building, believe
connection to t
Discuss Global Trade, the officers inv
Human Rights later acquitted.
Professor Steven Powell will Kadiatou Diallo
discuss "International Trade Race and Race
and Human Rights" at the American Studi
International Law Society's next
"international breakfast," held
Thursday, Nov. 3 at 10 a.m. in
the faculty dining room. The
breakfast is a potluck; please contact informant
register on the ILS TWEN page. along with your
The breakfast is part of a weekly Please note th
series that allows students and of any type is for
Committee elect
faculty to exchange ideas on top-
ics related to international law. place on Wednes

Honor Committee ELULS Wake
Positions Available If you are inter
ronmental or lan
The College of Law Honor
make sure you at
Committee is seeking five make sure you at
kickoff of the ne7
first-semester students, one
Environmental a
second-semester student, one
Law Society at ne
fourth-semester student, and one
the Bailey Court
fifth-semester student to fill open
is awakening froi
committee positions. is awakening fro
of hibernation, a
If you are interested, submit
officers and ideas
a statement of 100 words or less
be served at the e
explaining why you would be a
good candidate for the Honor Thanks, Cari
Committee. Submissions should
be sent to ufhonorcommittee@ The Caribbean
hotmail.com by 5 p.m. Tuesday, dents Assocation
Nov. 1. Be sure to include your "Thanksgiving D


S & OPPORTUNITIES


of Slain Man
k on Racial

g
, whose son was killed by
e in a widely-publicized
will speak about racial
lice brutality at Emerson
6 p.m. Tuesday, Nov. 1.
ant Amadou Diallo, 23, was
by police officers who had followed him to his apartment
ng he fit the description of a serial rapist. Diallo had no
he crime, and was unarmed at the time of the shooting;
olved were indicted on second-degree murder charges but

s speech is co-sponsored by the Center for the Study of
Relations, the Center for African Studies, the African-
es Program and the Institute for Black Culture.


ion and semester
statement.
at campaigning
bidden. Honor
ions will take
day, Nov. 2.

s Up
-ested in envi-
d use issues,
tend the official
wly-revived
nd Land Use
oon, Nov. 8, in
room. The group
n a long period
nd needs both
. Free pizza will
,vent.

bLaw
SLaw Stu-
will hold a
'rive" to collect


non-perishable items for hur-
ricane victims to use during the
holidays. From Nov. 7-18, the
group will accept items includ-
ing food, toiletries and clothing.
Collection boxes will be placed in
front of the JMBA office, in the
cafeteria and near the Career Ser-
vices office on the second floor of
Bruton-Geer Hall.

Happy Hour with JLSA
The new board of the Jewish
Law Student Association will
hold a "Happy Hour" get-to-
gether at Rehab on South Main
Street, from 8 p.m. to 11 p.m.
Thursday, Nov. 3. There will be a
$5 cover fee.

Here's to Toastmasters
Meet interesting people and
work on your public speaking
skills at the weekly meeting of
















Toastmasters, held 5 p.m. today,
Oct. 31, in room 345. Visitors
are always welcome.

LAW to Meet
The Law Association for
Women will hold a meeting
Wednesday, Nov. 2, at 5 p.m. in
the faculty dining room. A guest
speaker from Peaceful Paths Do-
mestic Abuse Network will dis-
cuss signs of abuse in co-workers.
Refreshments will be provided.

GPD Spokesman to
Discuss Drug Policy
The Criminal Law Associa-
tion will host Gainesville Police
Department Sgt. Keith Kameg
on Wednesday, Nov. 2., at 5
p.m. in room 285B. He will talk
about Gainesville's drug policy
and open container laws. CLA
has also arranged tours of Florida
State Prison and the Alachua
County Jail in November. For
more information on the tours,
please see CLA's TWEN site on
Westlaw or e-mail CLA Vice-
President Christina Anton at
chick4uf@ufl.edu.

Law Review Panel
Coming Up
Florida Law I. 11 present
its Fall 2005 panel discussion at 2
p.m. Nov. 18 in room 180. This
year's topics are federal judicial
nominations and the confirma-
tion process. Panelists will discuss
Harriet Miers' withdrawal from
consideration as Supreme Court
Justice, the recent confirmation
of Chief Justice John Roberts and
the pros and cons of the system.
Panelists will include Judge
Gerald Tjoflat from the Court


of Appeals for the 11th Circuit,
Professor Sharon Rush, and Dean
Emeritus Jon Mills.

LCC to Take on Printing,
Unclaimed Funds
The Law College Council
meets at 6 p.m. Wednesday,
Nov. 2, in room 285C. Mem-
bers will vote on funding for the
free printing program, and will
re-allocate unclaimed student
organization funds. Both items
will be voted on by the executive
council at 6 p.m. and then by the
general body at 6:30 p.m.




Class Gift

Roundup
If you are graduating this fall,
watch out for the "OK Corral."
Every Tuesday and Wednesday, the
Class Gift Committee will "round


LCC and JMBA members are
also working together to create
a tutoring program that would
allow law students to spend an
hour or more per week tutoring
students for the FCAT. Students
are working with a local school
that has been rated 'F' under
Florida's school accountability
system.

JMBA to Meet
The John Marshall Bar Associa-
tion will meet today, Oct. 31, at
7 p.m. in room 285C.


(C-



cci)


up" any graduating students they find in the Marcia Schott Courtyard
and urge them to contribute to the Class Gift.
In a new twist this year, every graduating student's photo is displayed
on a wanted poster. Once the graduating student donates, their picture
is covered with a dollar sign. "We wanted to try something fun, and we
are not afraid to employ shame tactics to get a donation," joked West
Gregory, a member of the Class Gift Committee.
When a student pledges, the student has the option to pay right away
or wait a year to start making payments on the pledge amount. This
allows the student to cover graduation and bar fees and then make a
payment a year later, when the student's finances are in better order. "I
am paying the bar my money this year, and I'll pay the school next year
when I get the letter," said Claudel Pressa, co-chair of the Class Gift
Committee.
Over the next month, the committee has scheduled other events to
celebrate the Fall 2005 graduating class. For more information, stop by
the table in the courtyard on Tuesdays and Wednesday from 11 a.m. to
1 p.m.; or contact Chris Carmody (chrisc2@ufl.edu), Michael Freedman
(mkf@ufl.edu), or Claudel Pressa (cpressa@hotmail.com).


Legal Research
and Writing Seeks
Assistants
The Legal Research, Writing and
Appellate Advocacy Department
is selecting teaching assistants
for Spring 2006. Applications
are available at the Legal
Research and Writing office.



'Playing the Race
Card'
The Center for the Study of
Race and Race Relations is
sponsoring a forum, titled
"Playing the Race Card,"
Wednesday, Nov. 9, at 4 p.m.
in room 285A. The controver-
sial cartoons featured in The
Independent Florida Alligator
have raised important race rela-
tions issues that beg for further
dialogue. Come and participate
in the first of a series of open,
lively, and provocative discus-
sions. Speakers include Profes-
sors Pedro Malavet, Kenneth
Nunn and Sharon Rush.


FLA LAW 5


IT










PEOPLE


SCHOLARSHIP
& ACTIVITIES


Slobogin


Scholarship & Activities
Professor Christine Klein
published "On Integrity: Some
Considerations for Water Law,"
118 Alabama Law Review 1009
(2005). One of her previous
articles on water law was recently
cited by the Arizona Court of
Appeals in support of the state's
first instream flow water right for
the protection offish, wildlife
and recreation.
Stephen C. O'Connell Pro-
fessor Christopher Slobogin
published "Mental Disorder as
an Exemption from the Death
Penalty: The ABA-IRR Task
Force Recommendations" in
a symposium issue of Catholic
Law Review. He also conducted a
three-day workshop for the Flor-
ida Department of Health and
Human Resources on criminal
mental health law Oct. 27-29.

In the News
Professor Michelle Jacobs was
quoted in an Oct. 26 Indepen-
dent Florida Alligator story on the
death of civil rights pioneer Rosa
Parks. Jacobs said Parks' passing
is a loss for younger generations.
"It's those old soldiers who make
the link between finished work
and unfinished work," she said.
Associate Dean for Faculty
Development Lyrissa Lidsky
commented on Harriet Miers'
decision to withdraw her nomi-
nation as Supreme Court Justice
in an Oct. 27 interview with AM
850. Lidsky said Miers likely
backed out because of criticism
of her lack of judicial experience.
Lidsky predicted the President's
next nominee would be more
conservative.
Samuel T Dell Research


Scholar Winston Nagan was
quoted in an Oct. 20 Ocala
Star-Banner story about the trial
of Saddam Hussein. Nagan said
that the appearance of an unfair
trial would set a negative prec-
edent for the Iraqi justice system,
which "has no track record."
Professor James Nicholas was
quoted in an Oct. 25 Raleigh
News and Observer article on the
prospect of imposing fees for
new development in Raleigh,
N.C. Nicholas said the city must
find some way to pay its bills
and must choose between raising
taxes, which charges everyone,
and raising fees, which charges
those who benefit from develop-
ment.
Assistant Professor Christo-
pher Peterson's study on payday
lending and the military was
cited in an Oct. 25 story in the
Raleigh News and Observer. The
story explains how a defense
spending bill, which originally
contained a provision capping
interest on loans to military
families, was changed in the U.S.
Senate. The bill, which now con-
tains no such cap, is expected to
be voted on by the entire Senate
in the next few weeks.
Professor Michael Seigel was
quoted in an Oct. 19 Naples
Daily News story on an appeal
by David Mobley, who pleaded
guilty in Oct. 2001 to taking $60
million from a hedge fund asso-
ciated with a stadium in Naples.
Mobley says he should have
been offered counsel with special
expertise in financial matters,
and argues that his sentencing
hearing was not conducted fairly,
because his lawyers were not
allowed to see victims' impact
statements before the hearing.


Seigel said that, because Mobley
pleaded guilty, the chance of the
conviction being overturned is
"less than one percent."
Seigel also commented on
Harriet Miers' withdrawal in an
Oct. 27 interview with AM 850,
saying he had not expected Miers
to willingly withdraw.
Stephen C. O'Connell Profes-
sor Christopher Slobogin was
quoted in an Oct. 13 Tampa Tri-
bune story on the case of Alfredie
Steele, Jr. who is accused of kill-
ing a Pasco County deputy. The
case was put on hold for months
while the Florida Supreme Court
considered whether a judge can
order jury members to fill out
special verdict forms that list
their votes on aggravating factors
in the capital case. The high
court ruled against the use of the
forms, but asked the Legislature
to review the process by which
judges impose the death penalty.
Slobogin said that since the U.S.
Supreme Court's decision in
Ring v. Arizona, which struck
down death sentences imposed
by judges rather than juries,
the Florida Supreme Court is
"getting more worried that the
Florida death penalty scheme is
unconstitutional."
The Tribune quoted Dean
Emeritus Jon Mills in an Oct.
23 story on the same case. Mills,
a former speaker of the Florida
House of Representatives, said
it is difficult to predict what a
majority of the house will do to
address the concerns brought up
by the case. He said the ruling in
Steele "may be a warning shot,
or it may just be a policy state-
ment."


Jacobs


Lldsky


Nagan


Nicholas


Peterson


Seigel


6 FLA LAW







Martinez fom page 1


to help "build an entrepreneur
class." He said the U.S. should
also harness the power of remit-
tances the funds sent home by
immigrant workers.
"Remittances by people work-
ing in the U.S. and these are
just the ones we know about
- total $43 billion a year," Marti-
nez said. "That almost equals the
amount of foreign investment in
the region."
He said the U.S. needs to find
a way to lessen the "tremendous
transactional cost" associated
with sending that money to Latin
America and should encourage
workers to spend the money on


U.S. Sen. Mel Martinez talks with students after his Oct. 21 speech.


housing and other investments
rather than consumer goods.
"We need to show our caring


side, and not just the side of mul
tinational business," he said.


UF Reaches Out to the Americas


The Levin College of Law has
long had a notable presence in
Latin America. For decades, law
faculty have been traveling to the
political capitals and scholarly cen-
ters of Central and South America,
forging ties with law schools and
making contacts with political
players throughout the region.
Now the law school has
launched a program devoted
solely to promoting those ties. The
Law and Policy in the Americas
Program, founded this semester,
is dedicated to
using UF's legal
expertise to foster
the rule of law in
Latin America and
strengthening UF's
ties with the region. Fensom
The program
coordinates the activities of the
University of Florida's Center for
Governmental Responsibility,
Center for Latin American Studies,
the International Center, and the
Center for International Business
Education and Research (CIBER)
as they relate to law, policy and


relations in the Americas.
Program Director Meredith
Fensom will teach interdisciplinary,
graduate-level seminars on issues
related to the program's mission.
She will also coordinate student
and faculty exchanges intended to
increase UF's profile and influence
in Latin America. Students and
faculty affiliated with the program
will carry out a research agenda on
topics related to the rule of law and
justice reform, and will provide
technical assistance in regional judi-
cial reform efforts.
Fensom recently returned from
a year-long Fulbright Fellowship
in Chile, where she assisted in that
country's judicial reform process
including projects related to civil
and commercial legal and proce-
dural reform, the use of alternative
dispute resolution mechanisms
in judicial reform, and analysis of
military court jurisdiction over all
cases related to Chile's Carabineros,
the country's police.
Fensom has lived in Brazil and
studied financial markets there.
She has also lived in Argentina,


where she researched the prospects
for democracy and challenges pre-
sented by a weak rule of law.
Fensom will be back in Chile
next week, presenting her model
for a small claims court there.
Earlier in October, she traveled to
Costa Rica, securing a position for
a UF law student at the Instituto
Interamericano de Derechos Hu-
manos (or Interamerican Institute
for Human Rights), which is affili-
ated with the Interamerican Court
for Human Rights. The program,
she said, is also exploring extern-
ship opportunities through the
American Chamber of Commerce
in Costa Rica.
The program is assuming
responsibility for organizing UF's
Legal and Policy Issues in the
Americas Conference, an annual
meeting which brings together
scholars and political leaders from
across the Western Hemisphere to
discuss the rule of law, trade and
human rights. The next conference,
scheduled for May 2006, will be
held in Lima, Peru.


Keep It Clean
In the past few weeks, both
students and staff have lodged
a number of complaints about
members of the law school com-
munity leaving garbage in the
cafeteria, classrooms and other
common areas.
Please remember to clean up
cans, food wrappers and other
items when you're done using
them. It saves your fellow stu-
dents the trouble of cleaning up
your mess and makes a good
impression on visitors to the law
school.


Please Don't
Smoke at Law
School
Smoking is prohibited in law
school facilities or within 50
feet of law school buildings.
This includes the courtyard and
walkways between buildings.
If you do smoke outside the law
school, please choose a spot
outside of areas non-smokers
must pass to enter or exit build-
ings. This is more than an aes-
thetic concern: cigarette smoke
can cause serious problems for
people with allergies and other
health issues.


FLA LAW 7








College of Law
Administration
* Robert H. Jerry, II, Dean
* George L. Dawson,
Associate Dean for
Academic Affairs
* Stuart R. Cohn,
Associate Dean for
International Studies
* Lyrissa Barnett Lidsky,
Associate Dean for
Faculty Development
* Michael K. Friel,
Associate Dean & Director,
Graduate Tax Program
* M. Kathleen "Kathie" Price,
Associate Dean for Library
and Technology
* Gail E. Sasnett,
Associate Dean for
Students, Professionalism
and Community Relations
* J. Patrick Shannon,
Associate Dean for
Administrative Affairs
* Linda Calvert Hanson,
Assistant Dean for
Career Services
* Jennifer Cope, Interim
Assistant Dean for Students
* Adrian Jones,
Assistant Dean for Diversity
and Community Relations
* J. Michael Patrick,
Assistant Dean for Admissions
* Donald J. Hale,
Senior Director of Development
and Alumni Affairs
* Debra D. Amirin,
Director of Communications

Send Us Your News
FlaLaw is published each week
school is in session by the Levin
College of Law Communica-
tions Office. Submit news of
interest to the law school
community by 10 a.m. Tuesday
for the following Monday's
issue to lockette@law.ufl.edu
or 273-0650.
* Tim Lockette,
Editor, Flalaw
* Kristen Hines,
Photographer



I- DIVERSITY OF
6 FLORIDA


Study Environmental Law in Costa Rica


Are you interested in
environmental, international
and Comparative Law in the
Americas? Interested in the in-
tersections of trade, intellectu-
al property, human rights and
environmental law and the
north-south debate? Want use
your Spanish professionally, or
just learn Spanish? Want to sit
in a classroom that represents
the hemispheric diaspora and
emphasizes skills training in a
cross-cultural context? Want
to stay up all night tagging sea
turtles. Want to do all of the
above -- and surf, or learn to
surf?
Come find out if the law
school's Costa Rica Program is
for you. Costa Rica has been
at the forefront of some of
the most significant environ-
mental policy innovations on
the global stage. From carbon
trading on the Chicago Board
of Trade and genetic resource


access agreements under the
biodiversity convention to
national biological corridor
strategies and the constitu-
tional right to a healthy envi-
ronment, Costa Rica has been
a leader in the development of
environmental law and policy.
The UF/UCR Joint Program
builds on these programs to
make environmental law a
field experience.
An informational meeting


will take place Wednesday,
Nov. 16 in the faculty din-
ing room. The application
deadline is March 24, 2006.
Enrollment is limited.
For further information
contact Program Director and
Legal Skills Professor Tom
Ankersen (ankersen@law.
ufl.edu) or Student Affairs
Coordinator Noemar Castro
(castro@law.ufl.edu).


CALENDAR


October
31 Toastmasters, 5 p.m.,
room 345

JMBA Meeting, 7 p.m.,
room 285C

November
1 Open House for 1Ls, 10
a.m., 244 BG

Kadiatou Diallo, 6 p.m.,
Emerson Alumni Hall

2 Barbecue, 11:30 a.m.-1:30
p.m., courtyard


Career Opportunities in
International Law, noon,
faculty dining room

LAW Meeting, 5 p.m.
faculty dining room

CLAw/Sgt. Keith Kameg,
5 p.m., room 285B

LCC, 6 p.m. room 285C

3 International Trade and
Human Rights, 10 a.m.,
faculty dining room

One Quick Question,
10:30 a.m.-noon, second


floor of Bruton-Geer

JLSA Happy Hour, 8
p.m., Rehab




More Dates
Available Online
For more information on
the dates and locations of
upcoming meetings, check the
calendar on the law school's
website at: http://www.law.
ufl.edu/calendars/.


8 FLA LAW








College of Law
Administration
* Robert H. Jerry, II, Dean
* George L. Dawson,
Associate Dean for
Academic Affairs
* Stuart R. Cohn,
Associate Dean for
International Studies
* Lyrissa Barnett Lidsky,
Associate Dean for
Faculty Development
* Michael K. Friel,
Associate Dean & Director,
Graduate Tax Program
* M. Kathleen "Kathie" Price,
Associate Dean for Library
and Technology
* Gail E. Sasnett,
Associate Dean for
Students, Professionalism
and Community Relations
* J. Patrick Shannon,
Associate Dean for
Administrative Affairs
* Linda Calvert Hanson,
Assistant Dean for
Career Services
* Jennifer Cope, Interim
Assistant Dean for Students
* Adrian Jones,
Assistant Dean for Diversity
and Community Relations
* J. Michael Patrick,
Assistant Dean for Admissions
* Donald J. Hale,
Senior Director of Development
and Alumni Affairs
* Debra D. Amirin,
Director of Communications

Send Us Your News
FlaLaw is published each week
school is in session by the Levin
College of Law Communica-
tions Office. Submit news of
interest to the law school
community by 10 a.m. Tuesday
for the following Monday's
issue to lockette@law.ufl.edu
or 273-0650.
* Tim Lockette,
Editor, Flalaw
* Kristen Hines,
Photographer



I- DIVERSITY OF
6 FLORIDA


Study Environmental Law in Costa Rica


Are you interested in
environmental, international
and Comparative Law in the
Americas? Interested in the in-
tersections of trade, intellectu-
al property, human rights and
environmental law and the
north-south debate? Want use
your Spanish professionally, or
just learn Spanish? Want to sit
in a classroom that represents
the hemispheric diaspora and
emphasizes skills training in a
cross-cultural context? Want
to stay up all night tagging sea
turtles. Want to do all of the
above -- and surf, or learn to
surf?
Come find out if the law
school's Costa Rica Program is
for you. Costa Rica has been
at the forefront of some of
the most significant environ-
mental policy innovations on
the global stage. From carbon
trading on the Chicago Board
of Trade and genetic resource


access agreements under the
biodiversity convention to
national biological corridor
strategies and the constitu-
tional right to a healthy envi-
ronment, Costa Rica has been
a leader in the development of
environmental law and policy.
The UF/UCR Joint Program
builds on these programs to
make environmental law a
field experience.
An informational meeting


will take place Wednesday,
Nov. 16 in the faculty din-
ing room. The application
deadline is March 24, 2006.
Enrollment is limited.
For further information
contact Program Director and
Legal Skills Professor Tom
Ankersen (ankersen@law.
ufl.edu) or Student Affairs
Coordinator Noemar Castro
(castro@law.ufl.edu).


CALENDAR


October
31 Toastmasters, 5 p.m.,
room 345

JMBA Meeting, 7 p.m.,
room 285C

November
1 Open House for 1Ls, 10
a.m., 244 BG

Kadiatou Diallo, 6 p.m.,
Emerson Alumni Hall

2 Barbecue, 11:30 a.m.-1:30
p.m., courtyard


Career Opportunities in
International Law, noon,
faculty dining room

LAW Meeting, 5 p.m.
faculty dining room

CLAw/Sgt. Keith Kameg,
5 p.m., room 285B

LCC, 6 p.m. room 285C

3 International Trade and
Human Rights, 10 a.m.,
faculty dining room

One Quick Question,
10:30 a.m.-noon, second


floor of Bruton-Geer

JLSA Happy Hour, 8
p.m., Rehab




More Dates
Available Online
For more information on
the dates and locations of
upcoming meetings, check the
calendar on the law school's
website at: http://www.law.
ufl.edu/calendars/.


8 FLA LAW