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 Art arrives on campus
 Career Services
 Events and opportunities
 People, scholarship and activi...
 Council targets compulsive...
 UF helps bring ADR to Poland
 Calendar


UF UFLAW



Fla law newsletter of the University of Florida College of Law
ALL VOLUMES CITATION SEARCH THUMBNAILS PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00072281/00151
 Material Information
Title: Fla law newsletter of the University of Florida College of Law
Portion of title: Flalaw
Physical Description: Serial
Creator: Levin College of Law
Publisher: s.n.
Place of Publication: <Gainesville FL> College of Law Communications Office 1997-
Creation Date: October 24, 2005
Frequency: weekly
completely irregular
 Subjects
Genre: periodical   ( marcgt )
serial   ( sobekcm )
 Notes
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol.1, no. 1 (Oct. 6, 1997)-
General Note: Weekly during the school year with a biweekly insert, numbered separately called: The Docket.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved, Board of Trustees of the University of Florida
Resource Identifier: aleph - 002311766
notis - ALR5129
System ID: UF00072281:00151

Table of Contents
    Art arrives on campus
        Page 1
    Career Services
        Page 2
        Page 3
    Events and opportunities
        Page 4
        Page 5
    People, scholarship and activities
        Page 6
    Council targets compulsive gambling
        Page 7
    UF helps bring ADR to Poland
        Page 8
    Calendar
        Page 8
Full Text




















Art Arrives on Campus


VOL. 9, NO. 10 OCTOBER 24, 2005


Since the first time an early
human placed his handprint on
the wall of a cave, artists have
been bedeviled by the question:
"So what is itfor?"
Sculptor Jim Cole doesn't
have that problem. He has
spent his career creating masses
of stone and metal that look
like they should be on display
in an art museum though
they're meant to be used as
furniture.
His latest project, a group of
sculptures titled "Separation of
Powers," is now a permanent
part of the landscape at the
Levin College of Law. Cole
began installing the sculptures
on the law school campus in
mid-October. The artworks are
meant to help define the law
school's main entrance and to
provide seating for more than a
dozen students between classes.
"I think people should be al-
lowed to touch sculpture," said
Cole, who teaches furniture de-
sign at the Rhode Island School
of Design. "Lots of people have
special little objects they feel
very attached to, and texture
is part of that bond. People
should be allowed to bond with



INSIDE THIS ISSUE
2 Career Services
4 Events and Opportunities
8 Calendar


Artist Jim Cole (left) and his assistant, Malcolm Majer, take a break
after installing a sculpture in the west entrance to the law school.
The pair towed the first three pieces of a sculpture collection titled
"Separation of Powers" from Vermont to Florida in mid-October.


art in the same way."
The sculptures are funded
through the Art in State Build-
ings Program, which requires
state agencies and public uni-
versities to set aside funds for
public artwork whenever they
embark on a new construction
project. The law school has
just completed a $25 million
renovation project that mod-
ernized classrooms and greatly
expanded the Lawton Chiles
Legal Information Center, now


the largest law library in the
Southeast.
Associate Dean for Library
and Technology Kathleen Price,
who also teaches art law, served
on the university-wide com-
mittee charged with purchasing
art for the newly-renovated
building. She said the group
chose Cole, in part, because he
suggested they survey Price's art
law students to determine what
sort of art the student body
wants.


Continued on Page 7


Group Targets
Gambling
Addiction


UF Helps Bring 5
Mediation to
Poland


Free Barbecue
Nov. 2
To help build a stronger law
school community, the Levin
College of Law is holding a free
barbecue for all students, faculty
and staff from 11:30 a.m. to 1:30
p.m. next Wednesday, Nov. 2, in
the Marcia Schott Courtyard. The
event is sponsored by UF alumni
Gene and Elaine Glasser, who
brought us last semester's popular
ice cream social. Bring your ap-
petite and a smile.

Time to Fall Back
Daylight Saving Time ends Sun-
day, Oct. 30. Make sure you turn
your clocks back this weekend.


Weather Updates on
UF Website
As Flalaw goes to press, Hur-
ricane Wilma swirls in the Gulf
of Mexico, its future path still
uncertain. For updates on tropi-
cal weather and its effects on
UF activities, go to: www.ufl.
edu/weather/hurricane.html.











CAREERSERVICES
Hints to help you in the legal profession


Learn Research
Techniques
Electronic Services Librarian
Maryellen O'Brien will offer a
series of workshops on legal re-
search this week in the Lawton
Chiles Legal Information Cen-
ter. These classes meet at the
library's reference desk. Topics
and dates are as follows:
Secondary Sources:
Oct. 24- 2 p.m.
Oct. 25 3 p.m.
Oct. 26 2 p.m.
Oct. 27- 11 a.m.
Oct. 30 2 p.m.

Finding Case Law:
Oct. 25 2 p.m.
Oct. 26 2:30 p.m.
Oct. 27 3 p.m.
Oct. 28 11 a.m.
Oct. 29 11 a.m.
Oct. 30 7 a.m.

Finding Statutes
Oct. 24- 3 p.m.
Oct. 26 3 p.m.
Oct. 27 3 p.m.

If you have any comments or
suggestions, e-mail Maryellen
O'Brien at: obrien@law.ufl.edu.








Deadline Nears for
Soros Fellowship
Nov. 1 is the deadline to apply
for the Paul and Daisy Soros
Fellowship Program. For more
information, see http://www.
pdsoros.org/.


2 FLA LAW


Bar Exam Basics: Tips
on Taking the Test
It's out there. Looming in the
future beyond your graduation
date is the test that will allow you
to finally lay claim to the title
"attorney" or send you back for
a few more months of grueling
study.
If you're in your third year of
law school, it's time to focus on
successfully completing the bar
exam. Here's a brief introduction
to the things you need to know
going into the exam.

An Overview
The exam consists of the
Florida General Bar Examina-
tion (Part A), the Multistate Bar
Examination (Part B) and the
Multistate Professional Responsi-
bility Examination (Part C).
Parts A and B of the exam
are administered twice per year,
always on the last Tuesday and
Wednesday in February and July,
at the Tampa Convention Center.
The Florida Essay portion of
the test, consisting of three essay
questions, is held on Tuesday
morning, with a multiple-choice
test following in the afternoon.
Part A covers subjects selected
from the following:
* Florida Constitutional Law
* Florida Rules of Civil and
Criminal Procedure
* Florida Rules of Judicial
Administration (Rules 2.051,
2.060 and 2.160)
* Federal Constitutional Law
* Chapters 4 & 5 of the Rules
Regulating The Florida Bar


* Business Entities including
Corporations & Partnerships
* Wills & Administration of
Estates
* Contracts, Criminal Law &
Procedure
* Evidence
* Family Law
* Real Property
* Torts and Trusts
The Florida Board of Bar Ex-
aminers offers a free download-
able study guide for Part A that
includes essay questions from
two previous administrations,
sample answers to the essay ques-
tions, and sample multiple choice
questions.
Wednesday is devoted to the
Multistate Bar Exam (MBE).
The 2006 MBE Information
Booklet is available online at
the National Conference of Bar
Examiners website (www.ncbex.
org/pub.htm), and provides a de-
scription of the MBE, outlines of
the subject matter covered, and
representative sample questions.


Applying for the Exam
To gain admission to the exam,
you must convert your Florida
Bar application to the application
to take the exam (Form 1A). At
this stage you will go online (www.
floridabarexam.org/) to complete
the exam application. This short
application seeks identifying infor-
mation and then asks for the exam
date and whether you have met the
legal requirements for taking the
exam. You then print this appliac-
tion and mail it along with your
2-by-2 photo, fingerprint card, and
$375 filing fee (presupposing you
filed as an early applicant).
The regular application deadline
is Nov. 15 for the Feb. 2006 exam,
while May 1, 2006, is the regular
application date for the July 2006
exam. In Florida it is possible to
file late for the exam up to Feb. 16
or July 16 at an additional cost of
$100 to $1,000.
If you wish to use a personal
laptop for the Florida essay por-
tion of the exam, there is an
additional $100 non-refundable
fee. You must apply for the lap-
top option between Dec. 1 and


I

















Jan. 15 for the February exam
and May 1 and June 15 for the
July exam. If you need an accom-
modation under the Americans
with Disabilities Act, you will
need to submit a supplemental
application.

A Place to Stay
You will also want to be sure
to make reservations for your
Tampa hotel anywhere from six
months to one year in advance.
The hotels within walking dis-
tance of the Tampa Convention
Center sell out quickly. Usu-
ally the price is more reasonable
if you register far in advance.
Career Services has handouts
with information on hotels. The
law school provides lunch for
interested graduates each day
of the exam for a nominal cost.
Students can register and pre-pay
for this lunch before graduation
or thereafter by contacting Tena
Canter in the Dean's Suite.

One Last Test
Part C, the Multistate Profes-
sional Responsibility Exam
(MPRE), involves a separate
registration process through the
National Conference of Bar Ex-
aminers. Information, along with
an online application, is available
at http://www.ncbex.org/mpre.
htm. This exam is offered in
March, August and November
of each year, and the University
of Florida is one of the test sites.
The exam consists of 60 multiple
choice questions administered
over two hours. The MPRE can
be taken while you are still in
law school but it is important
to carefully plan your exam


schedule, as the MPRE score is
valid for only 25 months. The
next available offering will be on
March 11, 2006, and the regular
registration deadline is Jan. 31.
The test costs $55, though a late
registration fee of $110 will be
accepted until Feb.16, 2006.
Subsequent test dates include:
Aug. 4, 2006 (regular registration
ends June 27; late registration
ends July 21) and Nov. 4, 2006
(regular registration ends Sept.
26; late registration ends Oct.
12).

Waiving In
and Reciprocity
All applicants to The Florida
Bar must take the exam. You
cannot waive into Florida, as
admission is by exam only. Also,
Florida will not accept or transfer
the successful completion of the
MBE taken in another state.
Conversely, a number of other
states will accept members of
the Florida Bar and/or transfer
credit for the successful comple-
tion of the MBE. Assistant
Dean for Career Services Linda
Calvert Hanson explained that a
few jurisdictions have rules that
provide for admission on motion,
including Washington, D.C.,
where an attorney admitted by
exam in Florida who achieved
a 133 scaled MBE score and 75
scaled MPRE score can waive
into the D.C. Bar without taking
an additional bar exam. For full
information on an individual
state's bar requirements, consult
the Comprehensive Guide to Bar
Admission available in the CCS
or online at www.ncbex.org/of-
fices.htm.


Calvert Hanson cautions
students interested in taking the
Georgia Bar exam that, while
Florida permits late bar applica-
tion registrations and allows
graduates to sit for the bar before
their fitness and character deter-
mination has been completed,
that is not the case in Georgia.
"At least once every year, we
hear from a recent UF law gradu-
ate who accepted employment
in Atlanta but failed to timely
register for the Georgia Bar after
having assumed the process was
similar to Florida's." she said.
"Much to their chagrin, they
find there is no recourse except
to wait until the next application
period begins, which also delays
beginning to work."
Calvert Hanson said Georgia
applicants must be certified by
the Georgia board to determine
fitness of the bar applicant prior
to even filing the application to
take the bar, a process that can
take five to seven months.

Some Final Advice
Calvert Hanson offered one
other important piece of advice
to test-takers: try to avoid work-
ing while studying for the Bar, if
at all possible. To make the bar
exam a "once-in-a-lifetime expe-
rience," Dean Calvert Hanson
cautioned, you need full-time,
intensive preparation. Private Bar
study loans are available for up to
12 months prior to graduation to
help pay Bar-related expenses and
to permit you to take time off
from work. Interested students
can see Carol Huber, Financial
Aid Counselor in Student Affairs,
for loan packets.


Deadline
Approaching for
Job Offers
If you received a job offer from
your summer employer before
Sept. 15, remember that Nov.
1 is your deadline to respond.
These matters are governed by
the National Association for
Law Placement's Standards
for the Timing of Offers and
Decisions, which govern both
student and employer behavior
during the hiring process to
ensure fair treatment for all.
Under NALP rules, a student
with a Nov. 1 response dead-
line may extend to Dec. 1, with
the permission of the employer,
if the student is holding one
other offer (and one only). It
is important to let prospective
employers know if you are
competing for a fellowship or
judicial clerkship with late hir-
ing decisions.
Remember that when you
release an offer, it may be
extended to one of your UF
classmates. Holding on to an
offer you do not intend to ac-
cept is not merely discourteous
to the employer it's unfair to
other job-seekers.
Please do not accept a job
unless you intend to honor
your commitment. Rescind-
ing acceptance of an offer is
unprofessional behavior that
may damage your reputation
in the legal community. If your
circumstances change and
you are considering backing
out of an offer, please contact
Career Services for advice
before calling the employer.


FLA LAW 3


I
















Journal Seeks
Submissions


The American College of Civil
Trial Mediators is now seeking
short articles (no more than
30 pages in length, includ-
ing footnotes) that deal with
current issues relevant to
mediation for its new Journal
of Mediation. Professor Don Pe-
ters, a member of the college,
is participating in this journal
as a law school collaborator.
Contact him before Nov. 1 if
you are interested in submitting
something for possible publica-
tion. Selection of participants
will follow, with final drafts
due no later than Jan. 26.


Faculty
Enrichment
Lecture Today
Wayne State University Profes-
sor of Law Jessica Litman will
speak on Grokster and fair use
in this week's faculty enrich-
ment event, held at noon today,
Oct. 24, in the faculty dining
room.


4 FLA LAW


/EVENT




Tour State Prison,
County Jail
The Criminal Law Association
has arranged a series of tours
that will allow students to see
the workings of Florida State
Prison, near Starke, as well as
the Alachua County Jail. Florida
State Prison is a maximum secu-
rity facility that houses Florida's
Death Row. Tours of the prison
will be held at 1 p.m. Nov. 1 and
Nov. 3, and a tour of the county
jail will be held Nov. 15 at 3 p.m.
If you would like to go on any of
these tours, e-mail CLA president
Bryon Carroll at bryon322@ufl.
edu with your full legal name,
gender, birthday, e-mail address Trial Teal
driver's license number and Us T
UF's Trial Team
state, and which of the tours you Allison winning
Allison winning
would like to attend. Once your who represented
who represent
reservation is confirmed, you will and Liz Rigaud r
need to attend the CLA's regular best of UF's stu
meeting on Wednesday, Oct. 26, Gainer, Ashley
at 5 p.m. in room 285B to sign Shanese Rivera
paperwork required by correc- The Trial Team
The Trial Team
tions officials. Katie Brinson, J
Katie Brinson, J
Baldwin on Financial will act as advo
Crime, Terrorism Civil Rights Tria
Tonge, Ray Don
Professor Fletcher Baldwin will pete in the Tour
speak on "The Financial War on Oct. 26-30. Ku
Organized Crime and Terror- will represent ti
ism," at 5 p.m. Wednesday, Oct. Lawyers Compe
26 in room 382. The event is
sponsored by the International
Law Society, and ethnic dining
will follow. LCC Invites I

ILS Holds Oktoberfest All law student
attend the twice-
The International Law Society ings of the Law (
will celebrate Oktoberfest with a the student govel
potluck dinner at the home ofAsso- for the law school
ciate Dean Stuart Cohn on Tuesday, next meeting wil
Oct. 25, from 7-9 p.m. Register on 2, in room 285C
the ILS TWEN site. board meeting b


S & OPPORTUNITIES


Allison Beasley


iviayior


m Final Four
Held its Final Four competition Oct. 14, with Thomas
the award for Best Advocate. Allison and Roni Beasley,
d the defendant, were named Best Team. Suzette Maylor
presented the plaintiff in the competition, which pits the
dent advocates against one another. These four join Oshia
-opson, Kelly Johnson, Scott Barnes, Kemay Jackson and
as new members of Trial Team.
is set to compete in a number of upcoming competitions.
ustin Mazzara, Teesha McCrae and Takisha Richardson
cates at St. John's University School of Law's National
l Competition in Jamaica, New York, Oct. 26-30. Schnelle
ninick, Rogers Walker and Sara Holladay-Tobias will com-
'nament of Champions at the University of Ohio in Akron
rt Zaner, Najah Adams, Loreal Belfon and Greg Edwards
he team in the National Association of Criminal Defense
tition in Santa Fe, New Mexico, Nov. 2-5.


participationn
ts are invited to
monthly meet-
College Council,
rnment body
1. The group's
I be held Nov.
. An executive
begins at 6 p.m.


and the general meeting begins at
6:30 p.m.
The LCC is currently in the
process of allocating office space
for student organizations and re-
allocating funds of organizations
that have forfeited the funds
allocated to them by student
government. At the next meet-

















ing, the group plans to develop
a plan of action for distributing
those funds.
The LCC is also seeking volun-
teers to help assure that the free
printers in the Internet Caf6 are
supplied with paper. The LCC
was instrumental in bringing free
printing back to the law school
after it was discontinued last
semester due to student overuse
of paper. Anyone interested in
helping with the free printers
should contact Nathan Skop at
skop@ufl.edu.

JMBA Meets Today
The John Marshall Bar Associa-
tion will meet today, Oct. 24, at
7 p.m. in room 285C. Everyone
is invited to attend.

ILS Breakfast
The International Law Society
will host a "Bring Your Own
Breakfast" event Thursday, Oct.
27, at 10 a.m. in the faculty din-
ing room, featuring Conservation
Clinic Director Tom Ankersen,
who will discuss a wide variety
of international environmental
law issues. Please register for this
event on the ILS TWEN site.

GOP to Meet
The Law School Republicans
will hold their general meeting
Tuesday, Oct. 25, at noon in
the Bailey Courtroom. Fea-
tured speaker will be Joe Pileggi,
North-Central Florida Field
Representative for the Republican
Party of Florida. Refreshments
will be provided.


Democrats Discuss
Disasters Today
The Law School Democrats
will hold a general meeting today,
Oct. 24, at 5 p.m. in the faculty
dining room to discuss the federal
response to hurricanes and other
catastrophes. Free dinner will be
served.

Business Law Student
Reception
The Business Law Section of
The Florida Bar will sponsor a
student reception Tuesday, Oct.
25, at 4 p.m. in the faculty din-
ing room. Come meet business
law professors and practicing
attorneys and learn about the
Business Law Section. Food and
drink will be provided.


Give Blood, Save a Life
Law students will have a
chance to roll up their sleeves and
help others Wednesday, Oct. 26,
in a blood drive on the law school
campus. The event will be hosted
by the Law School Republicans.

Apply for Phi Delta Phi
Applications for membership
in the Cockrell Inn of the Inter-
national Legal Fraternity of Phi
Delta Phi are available in Student
Affairs, and will be accepted Nov.
2 from 10 a.m.-2 p.m. at the Phi


Delta Phi table in the courtyard,
or Nov 3. in Student Affairs. For
more information, e-mail Xavier
Balderas @ Xavier_Balderas@
bellsouth.net.

Find Early Success
Douglas Bates, of the firm
of Berger Singerman, will give
a question-and-answer-driven
presentation on "Being a First-
Year Lawyer: Making the First
Year a Success," Tuesday, Oct.
25, at noon in room 285C. The
presentation will not be limited
to a specific field of practice, and
will cover topics from the Bar
exam to office politics. The event
is sponsored by the Association
for Law and Business. Everyone is
invited to attend.

Breakfast on the Plaza
Are you looking for an op-
portunity to give back to the
community here in Gainesville in
a tangible and meaningful way?
Breakfast on the Plaza, part of
National Hunger and Homeless-
ness Awareness Week, is sched-
uled for Nov. 10. Local aid agen-
cies will cook and serve breakfast
to the area's homeless and hungry
- and they need volunteers.
These agencies will also distrib-
ute coats, blankets and non-per-
ishable food items to those who
may be sleeping outside in the
coming winter. Starting today,
Oct. 24, the Florida Bar Founda-
tion and the Public Service Law
Fellows will collect items for the
homeless. Look for the boxes
outside Career Services and in the
cafeteria area of Bruton-Geer.


Legal Research
and Writing Seeks
Assistants
The Legal Research, Writing and
Appellate Advocacy Department
is selecting teaching assistants
for Spring 2006. Applica-
tions are available at the Legal
Research and Writing office.


Who's Googling
You?
Affiliate Professor Bill Cham-
berlin is offering a seminar on
"Privacy in the Age of Google"
through the College of Journal-
ism and Mass Communications
ins in spring.
This course will be focused
on privacy law-including
international privacy law, state
and federal privacy law as it
relates to access to govern-
ment information, privacy and
electronic court records, pri-
vacy for relatives of the dead,
and data privacy law in general
and identity theft in particular.
A background in legal research
and permission of the instructor
required in order to register.
Call 273-1095 with questions,
or e-mail bchamberlin@jou.ufl.
edu.


FLA LAW 5


~3~










PEOPLE


SCHOLARSHIP
& ACTIVITIES


Cohen


Scholarship & Activities
Professor Jonathan Cohen
published "The Culture of Legal
Denial" in 84 Nebraska Law
Review 247-312 (2005).
Professor Alyson Flournoy
commented on two papers at an
interdisciplinary symposium on
"Environmental Laws, Environ-
mental Letters" at the University
of Virginia Oct. 6-7.
Associate Dean for Library
and Technology and Clarence J.
TeSelle Professor of Law Kath-
leen Price joined attorneys and
gallery owners in Jacksonville in
an inaugural session for visual
artists Oct. 7. Topics discussed
included gallery relationships,
first amendment issues affect-
ing artists, art in state build-
ings, and Intellectual Property.
Price is working with lawyers
who hope to start a chapter of
Volunteer Lawyers for the Arts,
which would offer externship
opportunities for UF students in
Jacksonville.
Professor Katheryn Russell-
Brown, director of the Center
for the Study of Race and Race
Relations, published a chapter,
"The Myth of Race and Crime"
in Bohm and Walker's Demysti-
fying Crime and Criminal Justice


(2006) Roxbury Press.
Legal Skills Professors Tracy
Rambo and Henry Wihnyk
presented a workshop/lecture
on Appellate Writing to the
Commission on Capital Cases
in Orlando Oct. 15.
Stephen C. O'Connell Profes-
sor Christopher Slobogin gave
a talk on "Forcible Medication,"
at the Ninth Biennial Forensic Fo-
rum in Columbia, S.C. Oct. 20.

In The News
Professor Jeffrey Davis was
mentioned in an Oct. 19 Sara-
sota Herald-Tribune article about
the Florida Attorney General's
investigation into the business
practices of Venice landowner
Rod Khleif whose "rent-to-own"
real estate deals have generated a
series of lawsuits and complaints.
The investigation was launched
in response to an Oct. 2 Herald-
Tribune investigative piece, in
which Davis described Khlief's
contracts as "a wide-ranging
abuse."
Professor Alyson Flournoy
was interviewed live on the Cable
Radio Network Oct. 19, detail-
ing the findings of the Center
for Progressive Reform's recent
report on the role local, state and
federal policy decisions played in


Students Win Bar Scholarship
Dean Robert Jerry (center) congratulated law
students Jeff Bekiares (left) and Kenneth Angell
(right) on being chosen as the recipients of
The Florida Bar 2005 Young Lawyers Division
Scholarship. The two competed against a record
number of applicants for the scholarships, which
are offered to law students throughout the state
of Florida.


the Hurricane Katrina disaster.
Flournoy headed the project,
which included research from 19
scholars at law schools around
the country. Flournoy spoke
about the report with WOOD-
FM in Grand Rapids, Mich. Oct.
20.
Dean Emeritus Jon Mills,
director of the Center for Gov-
ernmental Responsibility, was
interviewed on WRUF-AM Oct.
18 regarding the nomination of
Harriet Miers to the Supreme
Court, the future of Roe v. Wade,
and a number of other Constitu-
tional issues.
Assistant Professor Christo-
pher Peterson's study on payday
lending in military communi-
ties was cited in an Oct. 13
Navy Times story about the
new Jacksonville ordinance that
caps the interest rate on payday
loans. Peterson spoke at hear-
ings before the Jacksonville City
Commission while that body was
considering the ordinance. His
study found that the Jacksonville
area, home to a large number of
Navy personnel, has the highest
concentration of payday lenders
in the state.


Flournoy


Price


Russell-Brown


Rambo


Wihnyk


Slobogin


Davis


Mills


Peterson


6 FLA LAW











Council Targets Compulsive Gambling


Compulsive gambling is the
hidden cause of a significant
amount of white-collar crime in
Florida, say the members of a
think tank co-sponsored by the
Levin College of Law.
Gambling addictions are driv-
ing a growing number of previ-
ously law-abiding people into fi-
nancial crimes such as embezzling
and identity theft, according to
a report released
last week by the
Florida Council
on Compulsive
Gambling, whose
members met
with judges and
law enforcement Sasnett
officials in a UF-sponsored event
in May.
"We need more research on
this problem, and we need a
court system that recognizes the
impact of compulsive gambling,"
said Associate Dean for Student
Affairs Gail Sasnett, a member of
the Council's board of directors
and the law school's representa-
tive on the think tank. "This is a
perfect example of a situation in



Art from page 1
"We asked the students if they
wanted something with a legal
motif and they emphatically said
no,"' Price said. "They seemed
to want a place where they could
retreat from the pressure of the
classroom."
Students also wanted the funds
spent on something useful, Price
said, and the committee wanted
something that would help build
a sense of community.
Cole seemed like the perfect
fit. While some of his works have


which therapuetic justice would
be very helpful."
The council cited a significant
amount of anecdotal evidence,
collected from courts and law
enforcement agencies around the
country, indicating the rise of a
new class of criminals: gambling
addicts, often well-educated and
respected in the community,
who steal to cover gambling
debts.
"At the time they take the
money, they typically don't think
they're stealing," said Pat Fowler,
executive director of the council.
"They're 'borrowing.' They think
they're due for a win, and will
be able to straighten things out
when they do win."
Fowler said roughly one-third
of the compulsive gamblers who
call the council's help line report
having stolen money to pay for
their habit.
Funded largely by the Depart-
ment of the Lottery, the council
is "gaming neutral," taking no
position in disputes over legaliza-
tion of various forms of gam-
bling. But the group warns that




found their home in prominent
museums (one is in the perma-
nent collection of New York
City's Metropolitan Museum
of Art), most of his work was
created for the outdoors, where
people are allowed to approach
and even sit on it.
"When I first got started in
this business, there were a few
artists I was just crazy about, like
(abstract expressionist sculptor)
David Smith," he said. "This
was work that I really wanted to


Florida and other states often
miss the chance to reform a very
treatable group of first offenders.
"Compulsive gamblers are usu-
ally very responsive to treatment
in a 12-step program, particularly
if they've been arrested, and have
lost everything they have," Fowler
said. "Since they commit mostly
property crimes, compulsive gam-
blers are in a good position to
make restitution to their victims
- and making restitution is part
of the treatment process anyway."
The group urges courts and
law enforcement officials to look
for compulsive gamblers in the
justice system and offer them
treatment and restitution as an
alternative to jail time. The group
also advocates inclusion of com-
pulsive gamblers in drug court
or a similar system of therapeutic
justice, as well as the creation of
a state-level position to monitor
the social effect of compulsive
gambling.
"We need someone who can
pull all the pieces together and
take responsibility for dealing
with the problem," said Sasnett.




get close to, and I used to get so
upset that people weren't allowed
to (touch) it."
Cole has installed two large
pieces, titled "The Executive"
and "The Legislator," in the law
school's main entrance on the
west side of campus. A larger
piece, titled "The Jurist," will be

installed nearby in January.
A smaller piece is now on display
in the lobby of the law library. Its
location led library staff to whimsi-
cally dub it "The Lobbyist."


Keep Library
Clean
The staff of the Lawton Chiles
Legal Information Center would
like to thank all who use the
center for helping keep this
beautiful new space clean and
food-free.
The library hosts many visitors,
including potential employ-
ers, donors who helped make
the new furnishings possible,
prospective fellow students, and
other UF faculty and students.
Their first impression can have
a lasting impact on their view
of the law school and our com-
munity. Keeping the center clean
also helps the law school extend
the use of the library for years
to come. Please remember not
to bring food or beverages other
than water into the library when
you study.


Please Don't
Smoke at Law
School
Smoking is prohibited in law
school facilities or within 50
feet of law school buildings.
This includes the courtyard and
walkways between buildings.
If you do smoke outside the law
school, please choose a spot
outside of areas non-smokers
must pass to enter or exit build-
ings. This is more than an aes-
thetic concern: cigarette smoke
can cause serious problems for
people with allergies and other
health issues.


FLA LAW 7








College of Law
Administration
* Robert H. Jerry, II, Dean
* George L. Dawson,
Associate Dean for
Academic Affairs
* Stuart R. Cohn,
Associate Dean for
International Studies
* Lyrissa Barnett Lidsky,
Associate Dean for
Faculty Development
* Michael K. Friel,
Associate Dean & Director,
Graduate Tax Program
* M. Kathleen "Kathie" Price,
Associate Dean for Library
and Technology
* Gail E. Sasnett,
Associate Dean for
Students, Professionalism
and Community Relations
* J. Patrick Shannon,
Associate Dean for
Administrative Affairs
* Linda Calvert Hanson,
Assistant Dean for
Career Services
* Jennifer Cope, Interim
Assistant Dean for Students
* Adrian Jones,
Assistant Dean for Diversity
and Community Relations
* J. Michael Patrick,
Assistant Dean for Admissions
* Donald J. Hale,
Senior Director of Development
and Alumni Affairs
* Debra D. Amirin,
Director of Communications

Send Us Your News
FlaLaw is published each week
school is in session by the Levin
College of Law Communica-
tions Office. Submit news of
interest to the law school
community by 10 a.m. Tuesday
for the following Monday's
issue to lockette@law.ufl.edu
or 273-0650.
* Tim Lockette,
Editor, Flalaw
* Linda Johns,
Graphic Designer
* Kristen Hines,
Photographer

UNIVERSITY OF
FLORIDA


UF Helps Bring ADR to Poland


Since the collapse of Commu-
nism in Eastern Europe, Poland
has played host to a steady
stream of Western lawyers with
advice on how to restructure the
Polish legal system.
Now legal scholars from the
University of Florida are offer-
ing a radically
different kind of
advice: they're
teaching their Pol-
ish counterparts
how to get cases
out of the court
Mills
system.
UF's Levin
College of Law teamed up with
the Warsaw University Fac-
ulty of Law on Oct. 7 to host a
conference on mediation as an
alternative means of settling civil
disputes. Faculty of both univer-
sities organized the conference
in collaboration with Andrez
Kalwasj, Poland's Minister of
Justice. The conference, held in
Warsaw and attended by about
200 prominent lawyers and
judges, was intended to intro-


duce Polish legal professionals to alumnus John Upchurch, CEO
a new civil mediation system to of the firm Upchurch, Watson,
be introduced in Polish courts in White and Max, which special-
December. izes in mediation.
"Mediation has been an The conference is only the be-
important part of the American ginning of UF's commitment to
court system for promoting mediation in Poland;
years, where it has Professor Ewa Gmurzynska, di-
worked wonders rector of the UF-affiliated Cen-

courts' casel- at Warsaw University, has been
oad" said Jon appointed head of a Ministry of
Mills, director of Peters Justice department devoted to
the Center for establishing a sys-
Governmental Responsibility tem for alternate
and one of the organizers of the dispute resolu-
conference. "In Poland, there tion. UF faculty
is some mediation of criminal say the lawyers
issues, but almost none in civil and judges at
matters even in family law, the conference Gmurzynska
where it could be particularly seemed eager for
useful." more information on the topic.
The conference featured panel "There was a lot of inter-
discussions with mediation ex- est in a series of more focused
perts from across Europe as well workshops on topics such as
as the United States. Among the the licensing of mediators and
American speakers at the event the development of a code of
were Mills; Professor Don Peters, ethics," said Peters. "They were
head of the Institute for Dispute very enthusiastic about alternate
Resolution at UF; and UF law means of dispute resolution."


CALENDAR


October
24 Faculty Speaker Series
w/Jessica Litman, noon,
faculty dining room

JMBA Meeting, 7 p.m.,
room 285C

Law School Democrats
on Federal Hurricane
Response, 5 p.m., faculty
dining room

25 Oktoberfest Potluck, 7
p.m., home of Associate
Dean Cohn


Law School Republicans
w/ Joe Pileggi, noon,
Bailey Courtroom

Business Law Student
Reception, 4 p.m., faculty
dining room

Being a First-Year Lawyer,
noon, room 285C

26 CLA Meeting, 5 p.m.,
room 285B

Professor Fletcher Bald-
win on Organized Crime
and Terrorism, 5 p.m.,
room 382


Blood Drive, 10 a.m. 4
p.m., location TBA

27 International Law Society
Breakfast, 10 a.m., faculty
dining room


More Dates
Available Online
For more information on
the dates and locations of
upcoming meetings, check the
calendar on the law school's
website at: http://www.law.
ufl.edu/calendars/.


8 FLA LAW








College of Law
Administration
* Robert H. Jerry, II, Dean
* George L. Dawson,
Associate Dean for
Academic Affairs
* Stuart R. Cohn,
Associate Dean for
International Studies
* Lyrissa Barnett Lidsky,
Associate Dean for
Faculty Development
* Michael K. Friel,
Associate Dean & Director,
Graduate Tax Program
* M. Kathleen "Kathie" Price,
Associate Dean for Library
and Technology
* Gail E. Sasnett,
Associate Dean for
Students, Professionalism
and Community Relations
* J. Patrick Shannon,
Associate Dean for
Administrative Affairs
* Linda Calvert Hanson,
Assistant Dean for
Career Services
* Jennifer Cope, Interim
Assistant Dean for Students
* Adrian Jones,
Assistant Dean for Diversity
and Community Relations
* J. Michael Patrick,
Assistant Dean for Admissions
* Donald J. Hale,
Senior Director of Development
and Alumni Affairs
* Debra D. Amirin,
Director of Communications

Send Us Your News
FlaLaw is published each week
school is in session by the Levin
College of Law Communica-
tions Office. Submit news of
interest to the law school
community by 10 a.m. Tuesday
for the following Monday's
issue to lockette@law.ufl.edu
or 273-0650.
* Tim Lockette,
Editor, Flalaw
* Linda Johns,
Graphic Designer
* Kristen Hines,
Photographer

UNIVERSITY OF
FLORIDA


UF Helps Bring ADR to Poland


Since the collapse of Commu-
nism in Eastern Europe, Poland
has played host to a steady
stream of Western lawyers with
advice on how to restructure the
Polish legal system.
Now legal scholars from the
University of Florida are offer-
ing a radically
different kind of
advice: they're
teaching their Pol-
ish counterparts
how to get cases
out of the court
Mills
system.
UF's Levin
College of Law teamed up with
the Warsaw University Fac-
ulty of Law on Oct. 7 to host a
conference on mediation as an
alternative means of settling civil
disputes. Faculty of both univer-
sities organized the conference
in collaboration with Andrez
Kalwasj, Poland's Minister of
Justice. The conference, held in
Warsaw and attended by about
200 prominent lawyers and
judges, was intended to intro-


duce Polish legal professionals to alumnus John Upchurch, CEO
a new civil mediation system to of the firm Upchurch, Watson,
be introduced in Polish courts in White and Max, which special-
December. izes in mediation.
"Mediation has been an The conference is only the be-
important part of the American ginning of UF's commitment to
court system for promoting mediation in Poland;
years, where it has Professor Ewa Gmurzynska, di-
worked wonders rector of the UF-affiliated Cen-

courts' casel- at Warsaw University, has been
oad" said Jon appointed head of a Ministry of
Mills, director of Peters Justice department devoted to
the Center for establishing a sys-
Governmental Responsibility tem for alternate
and one of the organizers of the dispute resolu-
conference. "In Poland, there tion. UF faculty
is some mediation of criminal say the lawyers
issues, but almost none in civil and judges at
matters even in family law, the conference Gmurzynska
where it could be particularly seemed eager for
useful." more information on the topic.
The conference featured panel "There was a lot of inter-
discussions with mediation ex- est in a series of more focused
perts from across Europe as well workshops on topics such as
as the United States. Among the the licensing of mediators and
American speakers at the event the development of a code of
were Mills; Professor Don Peters, ethics," said Peters. "They were
head of the Institute for Dispute very enthusiastic about alternate
Resolution at UF; and UF law means of dispute resolution."


CALENDAR


October
24 Faculty Speaker Series
w/Jessica Litman, noon,
faculty dining room

JMBA Meeting, 7 p.m.,
room 285C

Law School Democrats
on Federal Hurricane
Response, 5 p.m., faculty
dining room

25 Oktoberfest Potluck, 7
p.m., home of Associate
Dean Cohn


Law School Republicans
w/ Joe Pileggi, noon,
Bailey Courtroom

Business Law Student
Reception, 4 p.m., faculty
dining room

Being a First-Year Lawyer,
noon, room 285C

26 CLA Meeting, 5 p.m.,
room 285B

Professor Fletcher Bald-
win on Organized Crime
and Terrorism, 5 p.m.,
room 382


Blood Drive, 10 a.m. 4
p.m., location TBA

27 International Law Society
Breakfast, 10 a.m., faculty
dining room


More Dates
Available Online
For more information on
the dates and locations of
upcoming meetings, check the
calendar on the law school's
website at: http://www.law.
ufl.edu/calendars/.


8 FLA LAW