<%BANNER%>
HIDE
 Chemerinsky: Crucial moment for...
 Career Services
 Events and opportunities
 People, scholarship and activi...
 Discover environmental law
 Student helps develop translator...
 Calendar


UF UFLAW



Fla law newsletter of the University of Florida College of Law
ALL VOLUMES CITATION SEARCH THUMBNAILS PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00072281/00150
 Material Information
Title: Fla law newsletter of the University of Florida College of Law
Portion of title: Flalaw
Physical Description: Serial
Creator: Levin College of Law
Publisher: s.n.
Place of Publication: <Gainesville FL> College of Law Communications Office 1997-
Creation Date: October 17, 2005
Frequency: weekly
completely irregular
 Subjects
Genre: periodical   ( marcgt )
serial   ( sobekcm )
 Notes
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol.1, no. 1 (Oct. 6, 1997)-
General Note: Weekly during the school year with a biweekly insert, numbered separately called: The Docket.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved, Board of Trustees of the University of Florida
Resource Identifier: aleph - 002311766
notis - ALR5129
System ID: UF00072281:00150

Table of Contents
    Chemerinsky: Crucial moment for court
        Page 1
    Career Services
        Page 2
        Page 3
    Events and opportunities
        Page 4
        Page 5
    People, scholarship and activities
        Page 6
    Discover environmental law
        Page 7
    Student helps develop translator for military
        Page 8
    Calendar
        Page 8
Full Text


















Chemerinsky: Crucial

Moment for Court

Erwin Chemerinsky finds it hard to believe that people
could think of the Rehnquist court as liberal.
The court has racked up an impressive record of "activ-
ist" conservative rulings in the past two decades, the Duke
University law professor says and with the appointment
of two new justices, the nation's highest court could shift
further right.
"What is in the balance is the future of Constitutional
law for most of our lives and the rest of our careers," said
Chemerinsky, Alston and Bird Professor of Law at Duke.
Chemerinsky, a veteran litigator who has argued a number
of cases before the U.S. Supreme Court, spoke to a stand-
ing-room-only crowd in the Chesterfield Smith Ceremonial
Continued on Page 6


VOL. 9, NO. 9 OCTOBER 17, 2005

U.S. Senator to
Speak to Students
Friday
U.S. Senator Mel Martinez (R-Fla.)
will be on campus Friday, Oct. 21,
to discuss foreign
policy, internation-
al law and other is-
sues with law and
political science
students. Martinez
will speak at 1:30
p.m. in the Chesterfield Smith
Ceremonial Classroom (room
180A). The event is expected to
last one hour.


Apply Early
BY REBECCA MARCI BROWN (2L)
So you just started law
school, and are struggling to
get through the first-year crush.
Registering as a student with
the Florida Board of Bar Exam-
iners is a worry for another day.
Right?
Maybe not. Knowledgeable
students and UF administrators
say there is a distinct advantage
in registering within your first
six months of law school. Fil-
ing within 180 days can save



INSIDE THIS ISSUE
2 Career Services
4 Events and Opportunities
8 Calendar


for Bar Admission


you $475 in application fees.
Even if you miss the 180-day
deadline, there are still savings
for filing within 195 days or
even 250 days. If you want to
be in a clinic, you will also need
to complete the character and
fitness section so that you can be
a certified legal intern.
While the application process
can be daunting, collecting the
necessary information can be
much easier if you start early.
When you are ready to fill out
Continued on Page 5


Discover
Environmental
Law


Finishing the Mile
The Center for Career
Services and PMBR are co-
sponsoring "Preparing for the
Final Mile: Part II, Complete
the Application and Prepare
for the Exam," Wednesday,
Oct. 19, at noon in the Bailey
Courtroom. This program, de-
signed for 3Ls, will help you
convert your application and
prepare for the Bar exam.




Student Helps 5
Develop Tool for
Translation


Sculptures Arrive
Vermont artist Jim Cole began
installing "Separation of Powers,"
a group of sculptures funded
through the Art in State Buildings
Program, at the law school on
Oct. 13. Cole, an assistant profes-
sor at the Rhode Island School of
Design, will return in January to
install the final piece, titled "The
Jurist." For more information on
this public art project, check the
next issue of laLaw.











CAREERSERVICES
Hints to help you in the legal profession


Register for Spring
Through ISIS
Final Spring 2006 registration
appointments may now be
viewed in ISIS. If you checked
your appointment time prior to
Oct. 11, please check it again,
as it may have changed.
The spring schedule should be
available for viewing today,
Oct. 17, and registration for
all students will begin Oct.
24. Please note that ISIS is
designed for the entire campus,
and law classes do not neces-
sarily meet at the times listed
in the system. For the exact
time your classes meet, check
the "course schedules" link on
the Student Affairs website.
As a matter of integrity, stu-
dents are asked not to register
for courses with the intention
of "holding" them for other
students. Circumventing estab-
lished procedures is a violation
of the Honor Code.




Deadline Nears for
Soros Fellowship
Nov. 1 is the deadline to apply
for the Paul and Daisy Soros
Fellowship Program. For more
information, see http://www.
pdsoros.org/.


2 FLA LAW


On Practicing Law...
Without a License
While gaining legal experience
provides a meaningful way to
enrich your legal education and
enhance your legal credentials, it
is critical to recognize that there
are limits to the work law stu-
dents legally can perform without
violating Florida Bar rules pro-
hibiting the unlicensed practice
of law. Law students, as well as
law graduates yet to be sworn in
to the bar, may not practice law
or provide legal advice.
Law students should be mind-
ful that Chapter 10 of the Rules
Regulating The Florida Bar
regulates the unlicensed practice
of law. These rules caution that,
while nonlawyers can "engage in
limited oral communications...
reasonably necessary to elicit
factual information ... to assist
a person in the completion of
blanks on a legal form approved
by the Supreme Court of Flori-
da...and inform the person how
to file the form," the nonlawyer
preparer/assistant must include
on the document a signed, writ-
ten disclosure as stated in Florida
Bar Rule 10 2.1(a).
A law student or law graduate
who is certified by the Supreme
Court of Florida as a certified legal
intern (CLI) pursuant to Chapter
11 of the Rules Regulating The
Florida Bar, may represent certain
individuals in limited circum-
stances while performing under
the supervision of a Florida li-
censed attorney in good standing.
The only mechanism for becoming
a CLI is to register for and partici-
pate in certain clinical programs
offered by the law school.


UF law students and alumni showed up in force for the Second Annual
Minority Mentoring Picnic in Hialeah Oct. 1. Shown here are (front,
from left) Judge Shirlyon McWhorter, Karen Darby, and (back, from left)
Adrian Chandler, Beejal Patel, Jontavia Cobb, Veniese Smith Wilkerson,
Alicia Phillip, Sabina Frederick, Carnelia Craft, Rhonda Stroman and
Jessica Anderson.


The Florida Bar has the au-
thority to investigate UPL (Unli-
censed Practice of Law) com-
plaints and to prosecute these
cases. Please ask before you act.
You can reach the UPL Division
at (850) 561-5840 or check with
your professor about whether an
act you are considering would
constitute the unlicensed
practice of law.

Reception in
Jacksonville
Interested in the Jacksonville
employment market? Attend the
"Beat the Dawgs" alumni recep-
tion in Jacksonville Oct. 27 from
5:30-7:30 p.m. at the River Club,
at the top of the Modis Building.
Space is available for 20 students
only, so interested students
should send an e-mail indicating
class year to careers@law.ufl.edu
by Thursday, Oct. 20.


Work with Attorney
General
The Florida Attorney Gen-
eral's Honor Program for 3Ls
and recent graduates provides
opportunities for aspiring law
school grads to begin their
careers in an active and diverse
practice environment benefiting
both the graduate and the state.
This is a two-year, paid posi-
tion. Selected honors attorneys
will be placed with a mentor
and will work for about six
months each in the Antitrust
Division, the Criminal Divi-
sion (Appeals), the Economic
Crimes Unit and with the
state's lead litigator, the Solici-
tor General. The application
deadline is Dec. 31; applica-
tions are available online at
http://myfloridalegal.com/hon-
orsapp.pdf.


















ABA Judicial Intern
Opportunities
The American Bar Associa-
tion Section of Litigation will
begin accepting applications for
its 2005-2006 Judicial Intern
Opportunity Program Nov. 1.
The program is a full-time, six
week minimum summer intern-
ship program open to all first- or
second-year minority and/or
financially disadvantaged law
students. Selected students will
receive a $1,500 summer stipend
and will intern with state or
federal judges in either Chicago,
Central or Southern Illinois,
Houston or Southern Texas,
Miami or Phoenix.
This program is a partnership
with the ABA Section of Intel-
lectual Property Law. Therefore,
in addition to the litigation
internships, internships for stu-
dents with an intellectual prop-
erty law focus will be offered in
Chicago and Houston. Students
can indicate their interest on
their applications.
Screening interviews will
be done on a rolling basis, so
students should apply as soon
as possible after Nov. 1. The ap-
plication deadline is Jan. 31. For
additional information, go to
www.abanet.org/litigation/jiop
or pick up an application packet
in Career Services.

Diversity Scholarship in
Pacific Northwest
The law firm of Lane Powell
is offering the George V. Powell
Diversity Scholarship for 2006


for 2Ls. The George V. Powell
Scholar will be a 2006 summer
associate in the firm's Seattle or
Portland offices and will receive
a $6,000 scholarship toward
tuition and expenses during the
third year of law school. All ap-
plication materials must be post-
marked by Nov. 1. Additional
information on the summer
associate program is available at
www.lanepowell.com/recruit-
ment.

ABA Offers
Career Advice
Be sure to check out the Amer-
ican Bar Association's Career
Counsel website at http://www.
abanet.org/careercounsel. The site
offers job search Q&A and more
than 300 profiles of attorneys in
57 practice areas and alternative
careers.


Careers with FBI
The Center for Career Services
and the Criminal Law Associa-
tion are co-sponsoring "Career
Opportunities with the FBI"
on Tuesday, Oct. 18, at noon in
the faculty dining room. Field
agents from Jacksonville and
Gainesville will speak about gen-
eral career paths as well as the
FBI's Office of General Counsel


Volunteer Internship Program
and the Honors Internship Pro-
gram. Applications for the FBI's
10-week paid summer program
in Washington, D.C. are due
Nov. 1. Before you apply, you
must first talk to the local ap-
plicant recruiter, who will be on
hand for this presentation.

Just Ask!
Career Services staff will be
on hand for One Quick Ques-
tion, Thursday, Oct. 20, from
10:30 a.m.-noon outside the
former Media Center on the
second floor of Bruton-Geer
Hall.

Upcoming Deadlines:
Nov. 1:
* FBI: Paid Summer Honors
Internship Program (1L, 2L,
3L)
* Federal Reserve Board: Paid
Summer Law Clerk Program
(2Ls)
* Securities & Exchange
Commission: Paid Summer
Honors Program 2Ls (1Ls)
* U.S. Dept. of State, Office of
the Legal Advisor: Paid Sum-
mer Intern Program (2Ls) &
Law Clerk Program (3Ls)
Nov. 5:
* Federal Election Commis-
sion: Paid Law Clerk Honors
(3L & 2L) Summer 2006
Intern Programs


LIC to Host Law
Librarians
Law librarians from around
the state will converge on the
Lawton Chiles Legal Informa-
tion Center Friday, Oct. 21, for
a conference and tour of the
law school's new library.






UF Hosts South
African Professor
As part of Professor Winston
Nagan's "International Com-
parative Law in Development
Perspective" program, Professor
Dieter Welz recently offered a
series of lectures entitled "De-
mocracy and Good Governance
in Africa Today: An Appraisal
Based on Recent Fact-Finding
Missions and Legal Findings in
Sudan, Zimbabwe and South
Africa" on the UF campus. Welz
is a senior research professor in
the Nelson R. Mandela School
of Law at the University of Fort
Hare, which is Mandela's alma
mater.


FLA LAW 3











/E VENTS & OPPORTUNITIES


Journal Seeks
Submissions
The American College of Civil
Trial Mediators is now seeking
short articles (no more than
30 pages in length, includ-
ing footnotes) that deal with
current issues relevant to
mediation for its new Journal
ofMediation. Professor Don Pe-
ters, a member of the college,
is participating in this journal
as a law school collaborator.
Contact him before Nov. 1 if
you are interested in submitting
something for possible publica-
tion. Selection of participants
will follow, with final drafts
due no later Jan. 26.



Loans for Bar
Exam Expenses
A number of private compa-
nies will make bar exam loans
to students in their final year
of law school. Contact the
lenders directly at:

Access Group
800-282-1550
www.Accessgroup.org

Key Education Resources
800-539-5363
www.Key.com/educate/grad

LawLoans
800-984-0190
www.Salliemae.com


4 FLA LAW


ACS to Meet
The American Constitution
Society will hold a general meet-
ing Tuesday, Oct. 18, at noon in
the Bailey Courtroom.

JMBA Meets Today
The John Marshall Bar Asso-
ciation will meet at 7 p.m. today,
Oct. 17, in room 355B.

Join Phi Delta Phi
Today is the first day students
can submit applications for
membership in the Cockrell Inn
of Phi Delta Phi, an interna-
tional legal fraternity established
in 1869 to promote a higher
standard of professionalism and
ethics in the legal field. Criteria
for membership include aca-
demic achievement, community
involvement and demonstrated
high ethical standards.
Applications will be available
at a table in the courtyard today,
Oct. 17, from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m.
For more information, e-mail
Xavier Balderas at XavierBal-
deras@bellsouth.net.

Speak Easy
Meet new people and find bal-
ance in your life at "Speak Easy,"
a social event planned for 9:30
p.m. Thursday, Oct. 20, at Sky
Bar and Lounge. Organized by
law student Suzette Maylor (2L),
the event is designed to give busy
young professionals and gradu-
ate-level students a chance to un-
wind and socialize. Admission is
$5 and proceeds will be donated
to Three Rivers Legal Services.


Think Pink
The American Bar Associa-
tion/Law School Division will be
tabling the week of Oct. 24-28
in the courtyard as part of the
National ABA's Work-A-Day
event. This year's theme is "Law
Students Think Pink," an effort
to educate law school communi-
ties on breast cancer and help
promote research to find a cure.
Look for the ABA table and
help support the Susan G. Ko-
men Breast Cancer Foundation
by purchasing pink ribbons and
pink bracelets in support of
survivors. For more information,
contact ashhop@ufl.edu.


Send Info for
Commencement
The Office of Student Affairs
is now collecting information for
the program to be used at com-
mencement in December. The
program includes background in-
formation on every student who
graduates, whether they walk or
not. If you are graduating this
semester, please download the
commencement program form
at www.law.ufl.edu/students/pdf/
commencement_fall05.pdf and
return it to Student Affairs by
Nov. 4.


CLA Hosts State Attorney
The Criminal Law Associa-
tion will host State Attorney Bill
Cervone Oct. 26 at 5 p.m. in
room 285B for a discussion
with students and faculty. For
more information, contact
CLA President Bryon Carroll at
bryon322@ufl.edu.

They Served;
Serve Them
Would you like to do pro bono
work on behalf of our nation's
veterans? The Military Law
Students Association is pleased
to announce the creation of the
Veterans Outreach Clinic. This
project is sponsored by MLSA
and Three Rivers Legal Services.
For more information, contact
Alex Hadjilogiou, MLSA Presi-
dent (hadjil31@ufl.edu).

LAW Auction
The Law Association for
Women will hold its annual auc-
tion Oct. 18-20 in the law school
courtyard. Proceeds from the
auction will go to Peaceful Paths
Domestic Abuse Network and
victims of Hurricane Katrina.
The event is co-sponsored by the
Association for Law and Busi-
ness.

Supreme Court Openings
Applications for positions on
the UF Student Supreme Court
are due Oct. 27. If you are inter-
ested in sitting on the court, send
a resume and a brief statement
on why you want to become a
justice to president@sg.ufl.edu.









Bar Application from Page 1
the application, Associate Dean
for Student Affairs Gail Sasnett
warns that candor "being forth-
right and honest to a fault" is
the abiding rule.
"Students should disclose past
conduct even if they don't have
to, are embarrassed, or think the
Florida Board of Bar Examiners
won't find out when they investi-
gate." The board will generally be
satisfied, she said, if the student
candidly admits "yes, I did it, I
know it was wrong, and I'm not
going to do it again."
One of the biggest mistakes
you can make is reporting
something in your bar applica-
tion that you did not report in
your law school application. If
this happens to you, make sure
you meet with Interim Assistant
Dean Jennifer Cope and petition
to amend your law school ap-
plication.
Because the board evaluates


the applicant's fitness of character
to responsibly serve clients, it is
concerned with untreated sub-
stance abuse or significant mental
health issues, and with past
actions that demonstrate lack of
financial integrity. Don't let the
mental health requirement keep
you from seeking stress-related
or couples counseling, Sasnett
said. Students can seek additional
support and obtain confidential
assistance by calling Florida
Lawyers Assistance, Inc. at (800)
282-8981.
In addition to submitting the
electronic registration, when you
mail the printed version, you
need to include a check payable
to the Florida Board of Bar Ex-
aminers and have the application
notarized (several staff members
are notaries public).
When you convert your reg-
istration to an application, you
will need to submit a fingerprint-


The Bar Application:

What You Need
1. Residence information (dates and addresses for the past three
years; dates and city/state since your 16th birthday).
2. All undergraduate, graduate, and law schools you at-
tended, including community colleges attended for dual enrollment
during high school.


ing card. The University Police
Department comes to campus
several times each semester to fin-
gerprint law students. Nov. 15 is
the deadline for submitting your
application (or converting your
registration to an application) for
the February exam.
Be sure to keep your copy of
the application in a safe place.
If any of your circumstances
change, you must amend your
application within 30 days us-
ing a form available online at
www.floridabarexam.org/. For
example, you need to amend if
you get a speeding ticket, start a
job or internship, move to a new
apartment or just live somewhere
else for the summer without
changing your official home
address.
For more information, read the
Florida Bar Exam FAQ section
online, or call the Florida Board of
Bar Examiners at (850) 487-1292.


~U -~ tisan 1


3. Employment information for the last 10 years or since your 16th birthday, whichever is shorter. Include self-
employment; association with any occupation, business, enterprise or profession; employment as a law clerk; and
positions in clinics, internships, externships, or other similar non-paid positions.
4. Financial information (delinquent credit, defaulted credit, unfiled tax returns, checks returned for insuf-
ficient funds and delinquent student loans).
5. Information about all arrests, charges or accusations (including traffic violations) reporting dates, law
enforcement agency, explanation of event and final disposition. If your arrest records are sealed, you must peti-
tion the appropriate court to unseal those records. For lawsuits in which you are personally named a defendant
or counter-defendant, include an exact and complete copy of the complaint or other initial pleading, answer,
counterclaim, if any, and the disposition of each action, or a letter from the court verifying that the documents
are not available.
6. Information about all prior bar admission or registration applications filed in Florida or elsewhere.


1Ls : Learn to
Self-Register
Are you a 1L getting ready to
register yourself for classes

for the first time? The Office
of Student Affairs will hold an
Academic Open House at 11
a.m. Tuesday, Oct. 18, in room
355B. Several faculty members
will be available to discuss
course options, certificate
programs, and other offerings.
For example, Professor Stephen
Powell will answer questions
about the International Trade
Law Program, Associate Dean
George Dawson will discuss the
Intellectual Property Certificate
Program, and Associate Dean
Michael Friel will talk about the
Graduate Tax Program. Student
Affairs staff will explain ISIS
and the registration process.
Attending this session will
help you reduce your registra-
tion anxiety and plan your law
school career.


FLA LAW 5


I



















McMahon


SCHOLARSHIP
& ACTIVITIES


Scholarship & Activities
Clarence J. TeSelle Profes-
sor Martin McMahon spoke
on the topic "Recent Devel-
opments in Federal Income
Taxation," jointly with Professor
Ira Shepard, at the 40th Annual
Southern Federal Tax Institute
on Sept. 26.
Associate Professor Cally
Jordan has been invited to pres-
ent her recently published paper,
"The Conundrum of Corporate
Governance," at the London
School of Economics Oct. 24,
and at Cambridge University
Oct. 25.



Chemerinsky from Page 1
Classroom during an Oct. 11
visit to UF Invited to campus
by the American Constitution
Society, Chemerinsky delivered a
45-minute speech on the current
and future direction of the court.
"History will remember the
Rehnquist court as a conservative
court that moved the court to the
right," he said. "My sense is that
this is not the popular opinion of
the court."
While the Rehnquist court
sparked angry protest from social
conservatives for upholding ear-
lier rulings on abortion, school
prayer and other issues, Chemer-
insky said, the court has proven
consistently conservative in the
vast majority of less-celebrated
cases. He said the Rehnquist
era could even be described as a
period of conservative "activism"
on the court.
"I'm skeptical of the term
'judicial activism,"' he said. "It's
a phrase we usually apply to
decisions we don't like. But I


Professor Don Peters pre-
sented "Changing Habits and
Opening Minds: American
Experiences Helping Judges
Lawyers and Law Students
Understand and Value Me-
diation" at the UF-sponsored
international conference titled
"Mediation A New Method
of Dispute Resolution in Civil
Cases," held in Warsaw, Poland,
on Oct. 7. Peters also partici-
pated in a panel with Polish and
British mediators who critically
evaluated video vignettes from
the mediation of a complex
international business problem.




think it's fair to say that a court
is being restrained if it upholds
precedent and active if it over-
rules precedent."
Over most of the past 20 years,
Chemerinsky said, the court has
consistently issued rulings that
broaden police power, extend
government aid to religious
schools and limit Congressional
power under the interstate com-
merce clause.
Chemerinsky said the replace-
ment for Associate Justice Sandra
Day O'Connor will determine
the future direction of the court.
O'Connor has often rejected
the label of "swing voter," but
Chemerinsky says lawyers have
learned that on most issues, only
O'Connor and sometimes As-
sociate Justice Anthony Kennedy
are in play. He cited his own ex-
perience in arguing Van Orden v.
Perry, the Texas Ten Command-
ments case, earlier this year.
"My brief in that case was a
shameless attempt to pander to
Justice O'Connor," he joked.


PEOPLE


In The News
Professor Jeffrey Davis was
interviewed by WCJB-TV on
Oct. 11 for a story on recent
amendments to the Bankruptcy
Code, which go into effect
today.
Assistant Professor Christo-
pher Peterson was quoted in an
Oct. 8 Peoria (Ill.) Journal-Star
story about new federal rules that
increase the minimum payments
credit card customers must make
on their monthly balances. He
said the rule would likely increase
the number of people who turn
to fringe lenders.



"I did everything but put her
picture on the cover."
If Supreme Court nominee
Harriet Miers votes consistently
with the court's conservative
wing, Chemerinsky said, the
court may ban affirmative action
in college admissions, strike
down much of existing campaign
finance law, allow more restric-
tions or outright bans on abor-
tion and potentially "obliterate
separation of church and state."
Chemerinsky said Miers seems
to have enough experience for
the job, and described much of
the criticism of her as "sexist and
eltitist." Even so, he said, given
Miers' lack of a paper trail, the
White House should be willing
to release Miers' internal memos,
to give Congress a glimpse of her
legal opinions.
"It should not be (possible)
that a nominee can be approved
on nothing but faith in the Presi-
dent," he said.


Jordan


Peters


Uavis


Peterson


6 FLA LAW










Discover Environmental Law


The Environmental and Land
Use Law Program (ELULP) offers
many opportunities for you to
become involved and learn about
important areas of law. There will
be an informational meeting on
Wednesday, Oct. 19, at noon in
room 285D. The meeting will
provide more details about these
opportunities, including the Con-
servation Clinic, summer extern-
ships, summer study abroad in
Costa Rica and detailed informa-
tion about the curriculum. (You
also can download the program's
new brochure at www.law.ufl.edu/
publications.) This is a mandatory
meeting for all students currently
enrolled in the program.
If you are interested in the En-
vironmental and Land Use Law
Certificate Program and haven't
signed up yet, now is the time to
enroll. Once you enroll, you will
receive help in registering for the
courses you need and planning for
the semesters ahead. Applications
and a "Frequently Asked Ques-
tions" document are available
on our website at www.law.ufl.
edu/elulp or from Marla Wolfe in
the ELULP offices in room 319.
The Capstone Colloquium
is a one-credit course that all
certificate students are required
to take once before they graduate.
The colloquium provides a chance
to meet with ELULP faculty
and other certificate students in
an informal setting to discuss
cutting-edge environmental law
scholarship. In Spring 2006, the
colloquium will feature five na-
tionally known scholars who will
present their work.
The law school's Conservation
Clinic is a unique non-litigation
program that provides students the
opportunity to work on real world
projects with a conservation goal.


Study Law in Costa Rica
The Levin College of Law offers a unique study abroad program in com-
parative and international environmental law with a special emphasis on
skills training. Students can earn up to six credits over a six-week period
beginning June 18, 2006. The program includes optional and required field
trips to tropical forests, rivers and beaches, a cultural immersion homestay
program and clinical opportunities for students with language skills and
an interest in the field of conservation and development assistance.
Interested students are encouraged to visit the Program's website at
http://conservation.law.ufl.edu/summercostarica and contact Program
Director Tom Ankersen at ankersen@law.ufl.edu or Student Affairs Coor-
dinator Noemar Castro at castro@law.ufl.edu. An interest meeting will be
scheduled in early November.


The Environmental and
Land Use Law Society provides
students an opportunity to get
involved with other students in-
terested in these issues in organiz-
ing and participating in activities,
including a speaker series, field
trips, the Pace University Environ-
mental Moot Court Competition
and the Public Interest Environ-
mental Conference. For more
information, contact ELULS's
co-presidents Adrienne Dessy
(adessy@ufl.edu) and Ryan Baya
(ryanbaya@cox.net).
If you haven't attended or par-
ticipated in organizing the Public
Interest Environmental Confer-
ence, you're missing a great op-


portunity to learn about current
environmental issues, meet and
work with environmental lawyers
and other professionals, and work
with a fun and committed group
of law students and students from
other disciplines. In addition, this
spring, law students from around
the country will participate in the
conference because the National
Association of Environmental
Law Societies will hold its annual
meeting in conjunction with the
PIEC. To find out more, contact
this year's co-chairs, Heather
Halter (halterh@ufl.edu) and
Christina Storz (casper4@ufl.edu).


Clinic Selections
Announced Today
Clinic selections are expected
to be announced today, Oct. 17.
Please note that if you applied
for a clinic, and were not cho-
sen, you may still be considered
at a later date should someone
decline or drop the clinic.




Attend Research
Workshops
Electronic Services Librarian
Maryellen O' Brien is offer-
ing a series of workshops on
legal research this week in the
Lawton Chiles Legal Informa-
tion Center. These classes
meet at the library's reference
desk. Topics and dates are as
follows:
Secondary Sources
Oct. 18 3 p.m.
Oct. 19 2 p.m.
Oct. 20 11 a.m.
Oct. 23 2 p.m.
Finding Case Law
Oct. 17 3 p.m.
Oct. 18 2 p.m.
Oct. 19 2:30 p.m.
Oct. 20 3 p.m.
Oct. 21 11 a.m.
Oct. 22 11 a.m.
Oct. 23 7 p.m.
Finding Statutes
Oct. 17 4 p.m.
Oct. 19 3 p.m.
Oct. 20 3 p.m.

For more information, e-mail
O'Brien at: obrien@law.ufl.edu.


FLA LAW 7








College of Law
Administration
* Robert H. Jerry, II, Dean
* George L. Dawson,
Associate Dean for
Academic Affairs
* Stuart R. Cohn,
Associate Dean for
International Studies
* Lyrissa Barnett Lidsky,
Associate Dean for
Faculty Development
* Michael K. Friel,
Associate Dean & Director,
Graduate Tax Program
* M. Kathleen "Kathie" Price,
Associate Dean for Library
and Technology
* Gail E. Sasnett,
Associate Dean for
Students, Professionalism
and Community Relations
* J. Patrick Shannon,
Associate Dean for
Administrative Affairs
* Linda Calvert Hanson,
Assistant Dean for
Career Services
* Jennifer Cope, Interim
Assistant Dean for Students
* Adrian Jones,
Assistant Dean for Diversity
and Community Relations
* J. Michael Patrick,
Assistant Dean for Admissions
* Donald J. Hale,
Senior Director of Development
and Alumni Affairs
* Debra D. Amirin,
Director of Communications

Send Us Your News
FlaLaw is published each week
school is in session by the Levin
College of Law Communica-
tions Office. Submit news of
interest to the law school
community by 10 a.m. Tuesday
for the following Monday's
issue to lockette@law.ufl.edu
or 273-0650.
* Tim Lockette,
Editor, FlaLaw
* Linda Johns,
Graphic Designer
* Kristen Hines,
Photographer

UNIVERSITY OF
FLORIDA


Student Helps Develop Translator for Military


In the days after the Sept. 11
terrorist attacks, many Ameri-
cans felt paralyzed, wondering
what they could do to help.
Law student Mike Geers (2L)
didn't just wonder. He tem-
porarily walked
away from his
law school career
to work on tech-
nology that helps
the military fight Geers
the war in Afghanistan.
Geers went to work for SRI
International, a California-based
technology company that de-
veloped a small, portable device
that translates spoken English
into speech in various Afghan
dialects.
"At the time, as now, there
was a serious shortage of people
trained as translators," Geers
said. "With increasing numbers
of people going into Afghani-
stan, there was an increasing
need need for some way for
soldiers to communicate with
the locals."


Formerly known as Stanford
Research Institute, SRI had
been producing computerized
translation devices for years,
but most of those machines
translated English into West-
ern European languages. The
company needed native speakers
of Afghan dialects to help them
develop a device for Afghani-
stan, and in the post-Sept. 11
environment, bringing na-
tive speakers into the country
became more difficult than ever.
That's where Geers came in.
"My job was to take care
of government compliance
and security issues in regards
to obtaining appropriate visas
for Afghani citizens who were
working on the project," he said.
SRI's device has been used
successfully in the field in
Afghanistan, Geers said. While
the device doesn't allow for
complex conversations, he said,
it is extremely useful in helping
soldiers express their intentions
to Afghanis they meet.


"The reports back from the
field indicate that it has enabled
some on-the-spot mediation
that wouldn't have taken place
otherwise," he said.
Geers said he device, now
being sold in a slightly modi-
fied civilian version known as
the Phraselator, has been used
in humanitarian efforts in the
region, including the response
to the recent earthquake in
Pakistan.
After three years with SRI,
Geers is back in law school.
While the break may have
delayed plans for his legal career,
he said he is grateful for the op-
portunity to work on a project
that helps the United States in
its efforts in Afghanistan.
"If you look at the friendly
fire incidents and accidental
shootings that have occasion-
ally happened, you can see how
important good communication
can be," he said.


CALENDAR


October
17 Family Law Certificate
Program Informational
Meeting, noon, Bailey
Courtroom

John Marshall Bar As-
sociation, 7 p.m., room
355B

18 Career Opportunities
with the FBI, noon, fac-
ulty dining room

Academic Open House,
11 a.m., room 355B


American Constitution
Society Meeting, noon,
Bailey Courtroom

19 Environmental and Land
Use Law Program Infor-
mational Meeting, noon,
room 285D

Preparing for the Final
Mile, Part II, noon, Bailey
Courtroom

20 One Quick Question,
10:30 a.m..-noon, second
floor, Bruton Geer


Speak Easy, 9:30 p.m.,
Sky Bar and Lounge

21 Sen. Mel Martinez, 1:30
p.m., Chesterfield Smith
Ceremonial Classroom


More Dates
Available on Web
For more information on
the dates and locations of
upcoming meetings, check the
calendar on the law school's
website at: http://www.law.
ufl.edu/calendars/.


8 FLA LAW








College of Law
Administration
* Robert H. Jerry, II, Dean
* George L. Dawson,
Associate Dean for
Academic Affairs
* Stuart R. Cohn,
Associate Dean for
International Studies
* Lyrissa Barnett Lidsky,
Associate Dean for
Faculty Development
* Michael K. Friel,
Associate Dean & Director,
Graduate Tax Program
* M. Kathleen "Kathie" Price,
Associate Dean for Library
and Technology
* Gail E. Sasnett,
Associate Dean for
Students, Professionalism
and Community Relations
* J. Patrick Shannon,
Associate Dean for
Administrative Affairs
* Linda Calvert Hanson,
Assistant Dean for
Career Services
* Jennifer Cope, Interim
Assistant Dean for Students
* Adrian Jones,
Assistant Dean for Diversity
and Community Relations
* J. Michael Patrick,
Assistant Dean for Admissions
* Donald J. Hale,
Senior Director of Development
and Alumni Affairs
* Debra D. Amirin,
Director of Communications

Send Us Your News
FlaLaw is published each week
school is in session by the Levin
College of Law Communica-
tions Office. Submit news of
interest to the law school
community by 10 a.m. Tuesday
for the following Monday's
issue to lockette@law.ufl.edu
or 273-0650.
* Tim Lockette,
Editor, FlaLaw
* Linda Johns,
Graphic Designer
* Kristen Hines,
Photographer

UNIVERSITY OF
FLORIDA


Student Helps Develop Translator for Military


In the days after the Sept. 11
terrorist attacks, many Ameri-
cans felt paralyzed, wondering
what they could do to help.
Law student Mike Geers (2L)
didn't just wonder. He tem-
porarily walked
away from his
law school career
to work on tech-
nology that helps
the military fight Geers
the war in Afghanistan.
Geers went to work for SRI
International, a California-based
technology company that de-
veloped a small, portable device
that translates spoken English
into speech in various Afghan
dialects.
"At the time, as now, there
was a serious shortage of people
trained as translators," Geers
said. "With increasing numbers
of people going into Afghani-
stan, there was an increasing
need need for some way for
soldiers to communicate with
the locals."


Formerly known as Stanford
Research Institute, SRI had
been producing computerized
translation devices for years,
but most of those machines
translated English into West-
ern European languages. The
company needed native speakers
of Afghan dialects to help them
develop a device for Afghani-
stan, and in the post-Sept. 11
environment, bringing na-
tive speakers into the country
became more difficult than ever.
That's where Geers came in.
"My job was to take care
of government compliance
and security issues in regards
to obtaining appropriate visas
for Afghani citizens who were
working on the project," he said.
SRI's device has been used
successfully in the field in
Afghanistan, Geers said. While
the device doesn't allow for
complex conversations, he said,
it is extremely useful in helping
soldiers express their intentions
to Afghanis they meet.


"The reports back from the
field indicate that it has enabled
some on-the-spot mediation
that wouldn't have taken place
otherwise," he said.
Geers said he device, now
being sold in a slightly modi-
fied civilian version known as
the Phraselator, has been used
in humanitarian efforts in the
region, including the response
to the recent earthquake in
Pakistan.
After three years with SRI,
Geers is back in law school.
While the break may have
delayed plans for his legal career,
he said he is grateful for the op-
portunity to work on a project
that helps the United States in
its efforts in Afghanistan.
"If you look at the friendly
fire incidents and accidental
shootings that have occasion-
ally happened, you can see how
important good communication
can be," he said.


CALENDAR


October
17 Family Law Certificate
Program Informational
Meeting, noon, Bailey
Courtroom

John Marshall Bar As-
sociation, 7 p.m., room
355B

18 Career Opportunities
with the FBI, noon, fac-
ulty dining room

Academic Open House,
11 a.m., room 355B


American Constitution
Society Meeting, noon,
Bailey Courtroom

19 Environmental and Land
Use Law Program Infor-
mational Meeting, noon,
room 285D

Preparing for the Final
Mile, Part II, noon, Bailey
Courtroom

20 One Quick Question,
10:30 a.m..-noon, second
floor, Bruton Geer


Speak Easy, 9:30 p.m.,
Sky Bar and Lounge

21 Sen. Mel Martinez, 1:30
p.m., Chesterfield Smith
Ceremonial Classroom


More Dates
Available on Web
For more information on
the dates and locations of
upcoming meetings, check the
calendar on the law school's
website at: http://www.law.
ufl.edu/calendars/.


8 FLA LAW