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 Get involved in family, child...
 Estates and trusts careers...
 Calendar


UF UFLAW



Fla law newsletter of the University of Florida College of Law
ALL VOLUMES CITATION SEARCH THUMBNAILS PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00072281/00149
 Material Information
Title: Fla law newsletter of the University of Florida College of Law
Portion of title: Flalaw
Physical Description: Serial
Creator: Levin College of Law
Publisher: s.n.
Place of Publication: <Gainesville FL> College of Law Communications Office 1997-
Creation Date: October 11, 2005
Frequency: weekly
completely irregular
 Subjects
Genre: periodical   ( marcgt )
serial   ( sobekcm )
 Notes
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol.1, no. 1 (Oct. 6, 1997)-
General Note: Weekly during the school year with a biweekly insert, numbered separately called: The Docket.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved, Board of Trustees of the University of Florida
Resource Identifier: aleph - 002311766
notis - ALR5129
System ID: UF00072281:00149

Table of Contents
    Regional victory for moot court team
        Page 1
    Career Services
        Page 2
        Page 3
    Events and opportunities
        Page 4
    Law students organize homecoming
        Page 5
    People, scholarship and activities
        Page 6
    Get involved in family, child law
        Page 7
    Estates and trusts careers highlighted
        Page 8
    Calendar
        Page 8
Full Text



















Regional Victory for Moot Court Team


VOL. 9, NO. 8 OCTOBER 10,2005


For the second year in a
row, the University of Florida's
Moot Court team has captured
first place in the Thomas Tang
Southeastern Regional Moot
Court Competition.
Team members Chris Car-
mody (3L) and Anne Zerbe (3L)
defeated a team from George
Washington University to
win the competition, which
drew teams from law schools
around the Southeast. The pair
will travel to Chicago in early
November to compete for the
national title.
Competitors were asked to
argue a hypothetical appeal
regarding a man charged with
unlawful possession of firearms
and government documents
after a police officer found a sub-
machine gun and blueprints for
an Aegis-class naval crusier in his
car. The officer searched the car
after arresting the man on drug
charges though the defendant
was on foot, about to enter the
car, at the time of that arrest.
"The case raised some interest-
ing Fourth and Fifth Amend-
ment issues," Carmody said.
UF students Kimberly Lorenz
(3L) and Amy Fletcher (3L) also



INSIDE THIS ISSUE
2 Career Services
4 Events and Opportunities
8 Calendar


competed in the event. The two
UF teams actually competed
against each other at one point
in the contest, after schedules


Judges praised

UF's trial advocacy

program.



were adjusted to make up for the
hurricane-related withdrawal of
the Tulane team.


After the UF teams competed
against each other, Carmody
said, the judges "commented
on how UF always seems to do
well in these competitions."
Carmody and Zerbe were
coached by Alissa Lugo(2L),
Elizabeth Paulk (3L) and Marty
Fulgueira (3L). Lorenz and
Fletcher were coached by Natalia
Medina (2L), Gina Civin (2L)
and Valerie Brennan (3L).
UF's moot court team will
compete in two other com-
petitions this semester. Ajda
Demirdoken (3L), Brady Ward
Continued on Page 6


Am IOn?
Chris Carmody (3L)
prepares to film a
parody newscast to
be played at Gator
Growl, UF's Home-
coming pep rally. For
more on the integral
role law students
played in UF's
Homecoming festivi-
ties, see page 5.


Get Involved l Trusts and 5
in Family Law Estates Careers


Chemerinsky to
Speak Tuesday
Duke University Law Professor
Erwin Chemerinsky, nation-
ally known for his involvement in
several high-profile court battles,
will speak at a meeting of the
American Constitution Society at
2 p.m. Tuesday, Oct. 11, in room
180A.
Chemerinsky frequently argues
appellate cases, including many
that have been heard by the
U.S. Supreme Court. He recently
argued Lockyer v. Andrade, a
challenge to the application of
California's three strikes law, on
behalf of an individual who had
been sentenced to 50 years to life
in prison for stealing $153 worth
of videotapes.

Apply Today for
Spring 2006 Clinics
Today, Oct. 10, is the last day to
apply for a Spring 2006 position
in one of UF's clinical programs.
Applications are available on the
Student Affairs website and must
be completed and returned to the
Student Affairs office by 5 p.m.
Selections will be announced by
5 p.m. Oct 17.












CAREERSERVICES
Hints to help you in the legal profession


Soros Fellowship
The Paul and Daisy Soros
Fellowship Program recog-
nizes the contributions "New
Americans" have made to this
country.
The program defines "New
Americans" as (1) resident
aliens (i.e.,anyone who holds
a Green Card), (2) naturalized
U.S. citizens, or (3) children
of two parents who are both
naturalized citizens.
The fellowship is a grant for
up to two years of graduate
study in the United States.
Thirty fellowships will be
awarded each year.
The deadline to apply is Nov.
1. For more information, see
http://www.pdsoros.org/.

































2 FLA LAW


Federal Employment:
Pros and Cons
When you think about the
career paths available to you
with a law degree, you may
want to consider working for
the federal government. There
are plenty of good reasons why
a federal job is a good way to
begin a legal career.
First of all, the federal
government is a very large
employer. The Department
of Justice employs more than
8,000 lawyers, while the De-
fense and Treasury departments
employ about 2,500 attorneys
each. Many other departments
hire attorneys as well.
The government is facing a
looming retirement boom.
Older workers make up more
than half of the federal govern-
ment work force, with many
employees particularly those
in specialized professions such
as the law scheduled to "age
out" in coming years.
Work experience in a federal
agency provides a solid career
path toward future employ-
ment within law firms and the
corporate world. If you wish,
for instance, to be an immigra-
tion lawyer, the experiences
and contacts you acquire while
working for the Immigation
and Naturalization Service
could prove invaluable.
Entry-level government law-
yers typically are given greater
responsibility in handling a
case load and trying cases much
earlier than a new associate in
a private firm who could still
be doing research and writing
memos.


Government work also fulfills
a strong desire to serve the
public.
The federal government of-
fers work in a wide variety of
locations. A sizable number of
positions are located in Wash-
ington, D.C., but 88 percent
are in other large cities with
regional offices.
While starting salaries tend
to be lower than in the private
sector, federal employment
offers attractive benefit pack-
ages that include student loan
repayment assistance plans,
flextime, retirement pensions
and a more predictable work
schedule.
A government position offers
job security. Even in an
economic downtown, your job
is protected.

Challenging Job Market
However, there are a few
challenges to finding a fed-
eral government job. Federal
employers are less likely to
interview on campus, though


a number participate in Equal
Justice Works and other job
fairs.
Decentralized hiring means
that each agency hires separate-
ly and lists openings in different
places, so it can be difficult to
locate openings.
Attorney positions in the
federal government are in the
"excepted service," usually
found under an appointment
called "Schedule A." These posi-
tions are not covered by regular
civil service hiring procedures.
Agencies may hire for attorney
positions directly, outside of the
Office for Personnel Manage-
ment (OPM).
A rigid bureaucratic pro-
cess requires strict adherence
to procedure in completing
appropriate forms and meeting
deadlines.
Stop by the Center for Career
Services for more information
about opportunities in the federal
government.







( S


Federal
Opportunities Guide
The National Association for
Law Placement has released its
2005-06 Federal Legal Employ-
ment Opportunities Guide. The
guide is now available in PDF
format at http://www.nalp.org/
assets/190_fedemplguide2005.
pdf. Prepared in collaboration
with the Partnership for Public
Service and the ABA Govern-
ment and Public Sector Lawyers
Division, this guide is a compre-
hensive source of information on
federal departments and agencies
as well as the federal government
hiring process.

Upcoming Federal
Hiring Deadlines
October 14
* U.S. Army Corps of Engineers,
Chief Counsel's Civilian Hon-
ors Program for 3Ls
* Nuclear Regulatory Commis-
sion, Honor Law Graduate
Program for 3Ls & LL.M.s
* U.S. Office of Personnel Man-
agement, Presidential Manage-
ment Fellows Program for 3Ls
October 17
* U.S. Department of Labor,
Honors Program for the Office
of the Solicitor for 3Ls
and LL.M.s
October 31
* General Accounting Office,
Summer Intern Program
for 2Ls
* Pension Benefit Guaranty
Corporation (ERISA),
Attorney Honors Program for
3Ls & Summer Law Clerk
Program for 2Ls


CAREER SERVICES PROGRAMS


Practice Family Law
Join the Center for Career Ser-
vices and the Family Law Society
for "Practicing Family Law" with
Professor Barbara Woodhouse
and Stephanie Mack (JD 03),
family law practitioner in the law
offices of Stephen K. Miller, PA.,
on Tuesday, Oct. 11 at noon in
285D. Come learn about differ-
ent areas of family law practice,
career paths to make yourself
more marketable in this area, and
the types of issues dealt with on a
daily basis.

The Final Mile
Assistant Dean Linda Calvert
Hanson and Interim Assistant
Dean Jennifer Cope will guide
you through the Florida Board of
Bar Examiners application pro-
cess in "Preparing for the Final
Mile, Part 1: the Bar Application
Process," at noon Wednesday,
Oct. 12, in the Bailey Court-
room. Remember: in addition to
the financial incentive for filing


early, you need to be cleared by
the FBBE before you can work as
a Certified Legal Intern. The first
in a two-part series of programs
that address the final details you
need to complete before gradu-
ation, this program is co-spon-
sored by Career Services, Student
Affairs and the Black Law
Students Association.

Just Ask
Career Services staff will be
available for "One Quick Ques-
tion," Thursday, Oct. 13, from
10:30 noon outside the former
Media Center on the second
floor of Bruton-Geer Hall.

Coming Next Week
* Career Opportunities with
the FBI, noon, Oct. 18, fac-
ulty dining room.
* Preparing for the Final
Mile: Part II, Complete the
Application and Prepare for
the Bar, noon, Oct.19, Bailey
Courtroom.


Symplicity:

Not Just for OCI
Every day, the Center for Career Services receives job listings
- full time, part time, summer and entry level from many
types of employers. These openings are all posted in UF's
job bank in Symplicity. To view these listings, log in to your
Symplicity account and choose the "jobs/internships" tab. You
can search postings by geographic area, practice area and hiring
criteria. Remember, the narrower your search, the fewer firms
that will meet your criteria. Try searching under just your class
year for a complete listing of available opportunities.


Breakfast
with the
Dean
If you are interested in
attending "Breakfast with the
Dean" on Thursday, Oct. 13,
at 8 a.m. in the faculty dining
room, RSVP to robinsone@law.
ufl.edu.
This is your opportunity to
discuss any concerns, ask ques-
tions or share ideas with Dean
Robert Jerry.















Please Don't
Smoke at Law
School
Smoking is prohibited in law
school facilities or within 50
feet of law school buildings.
This includes the courtyard and
walkways between buildings.
If you do smoke outside the
law school, please choose a
spot outside of areas non-
smokers must pass to enter
or exit buildings. This is more
than an aesthetic concern:
cigarette smoke can cause
serious problems for people
with allergies and other health
issues.


FLA LAW 3











/E VENTS & OPPORTUNITIES


Loans for Bar
Exam Expenses
A number of private compa-
nies will make bar exam loans
to students in their final year
of law school. These loans
can be used for living expens-
es while studying for the bar,
exam prep classes and other
bar-related expenses. You may
borrow as little as $1,000 or
as much as $11,000. Contact
the lenders directly at:

Access Group
800-282-1550
www.Accessgroup.org

Key Education Resources
800-539-5363
www.Key.com/educate/grad

LawLoans
800-984-0190
www.Salliemae.com


4 FLA LAW


Lambda on Family
Lambda Legal Alliance will
host a lecture by Karen Doering,
attorney for the National Center
for Lesbian Rights, on marriage
and adoption in a "post 11-2"
world on Tuesday, Oct. 11, at
noon in the Bailey Courtroom.
Doering will discuss the legal and
political atmosphere in the wake
of the Nov. 2, 2004, elections, in
which 11 states passed measures
banning gay marriage. Food will
be available before the event,
starting at 11:45 a.m.

SALSA at Emiliano's
The Spanish American Law
Students Association will host a
meeting Oct. 12 at Emiliano's
Restaurant downtown at 7 p.m.

JTLP Deadline
Approaches
Students who intend to com-
pete in the Journal of Technology
Law and Policy Write-On Com-
petition must submit their topic
sheets by Wednesday, Oct. 12.
Topic sheets should be dropped
offin the editor-in-chief's
mailbox in the Journal offices or
emailed to ufjtlp@yahoo.com.

International Law
Breakfasts
The International Law Society
hosts breakfasts with discus-
sions on international law topics
- every Thursday morning at 10
a.m. in the faculty dining room.
On Oct. 13, the breakfast will
feature Associate Professor Cally
Jordan, who will speak on the
subject of gender and the prac-
tice of international law. Next
Thursday, Oct. 20, the group will


host Assistant Professor Elizabeth
Rowe, who will discuss interna-
tional intellectual property law.
Seating is open to all law students
on a first-come, first-served basis.
Sign up on the ILS Westlaw
TWEN site.

JMBA to Meet
The John Marshall Bar As-
sociation will meet at noon
Wednesday, Oct. 12, in the
faculty dining room. Everyone is
welcome to attend.

LAW Auction Next Week
The Law Association for
Women will hold its annual
silent auction Oct. 18-20 in the
law school courtyard. Students,
faculty and staff will be able to
bid on a variety of valuable items,
including a half-course of BarBri,
gift certificates to local businesses
and restaurants, and outings with
professors including Christopher
Slobogin, Alyson Flournoy and
Mark Fenster. Proceeds will go to
Peaceful Paths Domestic Abuse
Network and to victims of Hur-
ricane Katrina.

Cabinet
Applications Due
Applications for assistant direc-
tor positions within the Gradu-
ate-Professional Student Affairs
Cabinet are available in Student
Affairs, and are due Oct. 12. For
more information, contact Alex
Hadjilogiou, hadjil31@ufl.edu.

Katrina Funds
Still Coming
Students at the Levin Col-
lege of Law are continuing their
efforts to raise money to benefit


those displaced by Hurricane
Katrina.
The John Marshall Bar As-
sociation raised $560 during its
"Lunch with a Purpose" event in
late September. The Trial Team
will donate $480 money it
raised through sales of tryout
packets to the Red Cross Di-
saster Relief Fund. The American
Bar Association-Law Student
Division raised more than $300
through its field day Sept. 26.
Those totals are in addition to
the $2,270 raised during last
month's "Party with a Purpose"
fundraiser, sponsored by several
student groups.

ETELS Raises
Alzheimer's Funds
The Estates Trusts and Elder
Law Society participated in
the Alzheimer's Association's
Gainesville Memory Walk, held
Oct. 2. With the help of family,
friends, faculty and alumni, the
ETELS team raised over $450
to help local families affected by
Alzheimer's disease.

Learn About
Environmental Law
Learn more about the Envi-
ronmental and Land Use Law
Program at an informational
meeting Oct. 19 at noon in room
285D. The meeting will provide
details about the ELULP curricu-
lum, as well as the Conservation
Clinic, summer externships and
opportunities to study abroad in
Costa Rica. Students will have
the chance to meet and talk with
some of the ELULP faculty. This
is a mandatory meeting for all
students currently enrolled in the
program.




















The staff of the Lawton Chiles
Legal Information Center would
like to thank all who use the
center for helping keep this
beautiful new space clean and
food-free.
The library hosts many visitors,
including potential employ-
ers, donors who helped make
the new furnishings possible,
prospective fellow students,
and other UF faculty and
students. Their first impression
can have a lasting impact on
their view of the law school
and our community. Keeping
the center clean also helps the
law school extend the use of
the library for years to come.
Please remember not to bring
food or beverages other than
water into the library when you
study.


Florida Blue Key Treasurer Lauren Fackender (2L) films the parody news program that was played between acts
at this year's Gator Growl. Once again, this year's Homecoming events were organized largely by law students.



Law Students Organize Homecoming


To people in Gainesville, the
word "Homecoming" carries all
sorts of meanings. A huge party.
A shorter school week, with less
time to study. A game you can't
afford to lose.
To Brian Roof (2L), Home-
coming is all that and a great
deal more. Roof is president
of Florida Blue Key, the group
founded to organize the events
surrounding the big game. For
decades, FBK has been charged
with putting together UF's be-
loved homecoming parade, man-
aging the world's largest pep rally,
hosting a banquet for alumni and
other duties.
This year as happens often
- the group is run largely by law
students. Roof is in his second
year as president of FBK, and
Vice President Chris Carmody
(3L), Treasurer Lauren Fack-
ender (2L) and Secretary Cecily
MacLeod (2L) all hail from the
Levin College of Law. For the
past few weeks, they have been
working around the clock to
balance their studies with their


Homecoming responsibilities.
"The phones have been ringing
off the hook this week," Roof
said in an interview from the
FBK offices a few days before the
game. "We have people calling
non-stop for tickets to Gator
Growl, and we've been inundated
with questions about the parade."
Roof said he typically spends
the week before Homecom-
ing dealing with last-minute
crises. This year, for instance,
an eleventh-hour problem with
insurance policies almost kept the
group from getting the portable
buildings it uses as headquarters
for Gator Growl.
By last week, one of the group's
toughest jobs the nationwide
search for a comic to perform at
the Growl was already done.
The group chose improve virtuoso
Wayne Brady to headline the
show.
"We wanted to find someone
people know and like, but we
also wanted someone with an un-
usual take on comedy," Roof said.
FBK advises comics to "keep it


PG-13," but Roof acknowledges
that, in the past, some acts have
ventured into material that is a
little more racy than the group
expected.
"We do our best to keep it
clean, but in a crowd of thou-
sands, you're always going to have
at least a few people who find
something offensive," Roof said.
Roof and other FBK officers
were also part of the show:
Fackender and Carmody ap-
peared in a pre-recorded comedy
newscast shown between acts.
Roof and others appeared in a
skit described as a "self-parody"
of Florida Blue Key.
After the show, Blue Key's
law-student organizers will get
back to business as usual which
means studying round-the-
clock to make up for material
they missed in the weeks before
Homecoming.
"I wish I could say we all had a
chance to relax after Homecom-
ing is over," Roof said. "But I
don't see that happening for a few
weeks at least."


Keep Library
Clean


FLA LAW 5















Scholarship & Activities
Professor Christine Klein
published "On Integrity: Some
Considerations for Water Law,"
56 Alabama L. Rev. 1009 (2005).
Assistant Professor Christo-
pher Peterson testified at an ad-
ministrative policy hearing held
by the Federal Deposit Insurance
Corporation at its Washington,
D.C. headquarters Sept. 29. The
title of the meeting was "Afford-
able, Responsible Short-Term
Credit," and Peterson spoke on
debt problems and solutions
for military borrowers. Peterson
presented his article "Predatory
Lending and the Military: The
Law and Geography of 'Payday'
Loans in Military Towns," at
the faculty enrichment series at
Florida State University Oct. 3.

In the News
Continued change at the U.S.
Supreme Court kept several




Moot Court from Page 1
(3L), Isaac Wannos (3L), and
Joe Darr (3L) will compete in
the San Diego Criminal Proce-
dure Moot Court Competition
later this month. The team also
will send Christine Fuqua and
Jarrett Deluca to compete in the
Florida-Georgia Annual Battle in
Jacksonville. These competitions
provide students an excellent op-
portunity to hone their advocacy
skills in a realistic setting while
at the same time dealing with
important legal issues.
All third- and fourth-semes-
ter students are encouraged
to try out for Moot Court.
For more information, go to
www.ufmootcourt.org.


SCHOLARSHIP
& ACTIVITIES


UF law professors in the media
spotlight in late September
and early October. Richard E.
Nelson Professor Michael Allan
Wolf appeared on WCJB-TV on
Sept. 29, explaining to viewers
the significance of John Roberts'
confirmation as Chief Justice of
the Supreme Court.
On Oct. 3, Chesterfield Smith
Professor Nancy Dowd did a
similar interview at the studios
of WUFT-TV, discussing the
appointment of White House
Counsel Harriet Miers to fill the
seat left open by Justice San-
dra Day O'Connor. Associate
Dean for Faculty Development
Lyrissa Lidsky was interviewed
by AM 850 shortly after the an-
nouncement of Miers appoint-
ment on Oct. 3.
Much of the early coverage of
the Miers appointment focused
on the candidate's lack of judi-
cial experience. Wolf and Irving
Cypen Professor Sharon Rush


both told The Gainesville Sun, in
an Oct. 4 story on the appoint-
ment, that the Constitution
doesn't require a Justice to be
a judge or even a lawyer, for
that matter. In the early days of
American independence, Wolf
noted, there was no uniform
definition of what it meant to be
a lawyer. Rush commented that
"a personality type that makes
one open-minded and reflective"
is as important as judicial expe-
rience. Rush also commented on
the Miers nomination for AM
850 on Oct. 3.
In other news, Professor Jef-
frey Davis was quoted in an
Oct. 2 Sarasota Herald-Tribune
article on Rod Khleif, a Casey
Key landlord accused by his
tenants of defaulting on "lease-
purchase" contracts that would
allow them to buy homes they
are now renting. Davis called
Khleif's practices "wide-ranging
abuse."


The winners of the Tang Moot Court Competition pose with the judges of
the contest. Shown here are (from left) U.S. District Court Judge William
S. Duffey, Chris Carmody (3L), Ann Zerbe (3L), Georgia Supreme Court
Justice P. Harris Hines, Georgia Supreme Court Justice Carol Hunstein,
and Will Wang of the National Asian/Pacific American Bar Association.


PEOPLE


Peterson


Uowd


Lidsky


Davis


6 FLA LAW











Get Involved in Family, Child Law


Want to get involved in a
fast-growing field of law? Want to
study under UF professors who
are doing cutting-edge research
in their field? You may want to
consider the law school's Family
Law Certificate Program.
Faculty and staff of the
certificate program will hold an
orientation and informational
meeting at noon Oct. 17 in the
Bailey Courtroom to introduce
you to this dynamic program. If
you are interested in attending,
please e-mail Debbie Willis at
Kelley@law.ufl.edu by Oct. 13.
With the increasing complex-
ity of divorce law and children's
law and the rise of the nontra-
ditional family, family law is
one of the fastest growing legal
specialties and one of the most
complex. Practitioners and judges
have expressed a need for better
training of family advocates in
areas such as child development,
the economics of the family,
negotiation and drafting, and
courtroom advocacy for families
and children. Graduates with a
family law certificate from UF
are particularly well equipped to
meet those needs.
Faculty of the program were
instrumental in helping the state
of Florida establish its Unified
Family Court system, designed
to handle all family, juvenile
and delinquency matters. They
regularly submit amicus briefs in
high-profile court cases involving
children and families, including
recent U.S. Supreme Court cases
regarding gay adoption and the
juvenile death penalty. And they
are working with the First Star
Foundation to establish a Multi-
disciplinary Center of Excellence
that will train lawyers, doctors,


law enforcement officers and
others in dealing with children in
the legal system.
Faculty will guide students
through a course of study
that involves both clinical and
classroom experiences, with each
course building on the last.

What: Family Law Certifi-
cate Program Informational
Meeting
When: Noon, Oct. 17
Where: Bailey Courtroom
RSVP by Oct. 13 to
kelley@law.ufl.edu


Students must meet certain
basic academic requirements to
obtain a certificate, although
students who enroll are counseled
on an individualized basis regard-
ing course selection, require-
ments and career focus. Basic
requirements include:
* students who entered the col-
lege of law after the program
was initiated (Fall 2002), must
complete eight additional
credits to the normal 88 for


graduation (total of 96)
* completion of 20 or more
credits (of the 96) in desig-
nated courses, with at least 15
of those credits receiving the
equivalent of an average of 3.0
or better
* completion of a writing project
such as a seminar paper or
equivalent written work
product in a topic related to
the student's field of specific
interest.
Students follow a curriculum
divided into three core require-
ments and a menu of elec-
tive courses and seminars. To
complete the core requirements,
a student would take one or
more courses from each of Core
I (Fundamentals), Core II (Ad-
vanced Principles) and Core III
(Practice-Based Learning).
The balance of the required 20
credits can be earned in seminars,
elective courses or independent
study. Family Law Certificate
students have registration priority
in family law-related courses.


Interested in Being
a CLI? Apply
to Bar Early
There are some important
proposed changes to The Florida
Bar's Student Practice Rule that
make it critical to apply for Bar
admission during your first 180
days of law school if you intend
to become a Certified Legal
Intern.
Previously, you could become
a CLI simply by filling out an
application that was mailed by
the clinic to the Florida Supreme
Court.
Under the proposed new rule,
anyone hoping to become a CLI
must be an applicant to the Bar,
and must have a letter of ini-
tial clearance as to character
and fitness. The clearance
process can take six months or
more, so it is important that you
apply for admission early.
For more information about
the Student Practice Rule and
the proposed changes, contact
Peggy Schrieber at schriebe@
law.ufl.edu or 100B in the Clinic
Suite (105 Bruton Geer), or
Linda Calvert Hanson at Han-
sonL@law.ufl.edu or in Career
Services (244 Bruton Geer).


FLA LAW 7








College of Law
Administration
* Robert H. Jerry, II, Dean
* George L. Dawson,
Associate Dean for
Academic Affairs
* Stuart R. Cohn,
Associate Dean for
International Studies
* Lyrissa Barnett Lidsky,
Associate Dean for
Faculty Development
* Michael K. Friel,
Associate Dean & Director,
Graduate Tax Program
* M. Kathleen "Kathie" Price,
Associate Dean for Library
and Technology
* Gail E. Sasnett,
Associate Dean for
Students, Professionalism
and Community Relations
* J. Patrick Shannon,
Associate Dean for
Administrative Affairs
* Linda Calvert Hanson,
Assistant Dean for
Career Services
* Jennifer Cope, Interim
Assistant Dean for Students
* Adrian Jones,
Assistant Dean for Diversity
and Community Relations
* J. Michael Patrick,
Assistant Dean for Admissions
* Donald J. Hale,
Senior Director of Development
and Alumni Affairs
* Debra D. Amirin,
Director of Communications

Send Us Your News
FlaLaw is published each week
school is in session by the Levin
College of Law Communica-
tions Office. Submit news of
interest to the law school
community by 10 a.m. Tuesday
for the following Monday's
issue to lockette@law.ufl.edu
or 273-0650.
* Tim Lockette,
Editor, FlaLaw
* Linda Johns,
Graphic Designer
* Kristen Hines,
Photographer

UNIVERSITY OF
FLORIDA


Estates and Trusts Careers Highlighted


Lee-ford Tritt likes to joke
that, as a trusts and estates (or
T&E) lawyer, he counseled his
clients to die "bankrupt" so
they could avoid estate taxes
and will contests.
Tritt, in his first semester as
an assistant professor at the
Levin College of Law, gave
students an overview of T&E
career opportunities in a Sept.
29 workshop co-sponsored by
the Center for Career Services
and the Estates, Trusts and
Elder Law Society.
Law students often think
of T&E lawyers as people
who spend most of their time
working on will forms. Tritt
disagrees, saying the profession
requires a "Renaissance-type"
personality and education.
Lawyers in this field are coun-
selors in both a legal and per-
sonal sense, he said, and serve
their client's family members
at every stage of life from
birth to death. Beyond estate
planning, T&E lawyers advise
individuals and corporate
fiduciaries regarding compre-
hensive wealth management
and wealth protection, admin-


istration of trusts and estates,
tax matters, charitable giving
and governance of non-profit
organizations. Tritt said T&E
lawyers need excellent drafting,
reasoning, organizational and
personal skills and an ability
to be discreet doesn't hurt.
A concentration in T&E can
open a number
of doors to a law
school gradu-
ate, Tritt said.
In addition to
providing tra-
ditional private
client services, Tritt
T&E lawyers
are well equipped to oversee
matters related to charitable
giving for non-profit organiza-
tions, work in fundraising and
development capacities, work
as in-house advisors for banks
and trust companies, and serve
many other roles.
To prepare, enter the field,
and excel in a T&E practice,
Tritt recommended joining
T&E-oriented organizations
and bar sections, attending
CLEs and bar association
meetings, and engaging in


informational interviews with
T&E lawyers. Several upcom-
ing opportunities at the law
school will allow students to
gain practical knowledge, expe-
rience and connections.
The Mary Moers Wenig
2006 Student Writing Com-
petition, sponsored by the
American College of Trust and
Estate Counsel (ACTEC) gives
students the chance to trans-
form their interest in T&E law
into cash and an opportunity
to have their writing pub-
lished. Open to both J.D. and
LL.M. students, the contest
will award $5,000 and publica-
tion in the ACTECJournalfor
the first prize essay. Submis-
sions must be postmarked on
or before April 1, 2006.
Students should also take
advantage of an extraordinary
opportunity to meet attorneys
in January, when the Heck-
erling Institute will be held
at the University of Miami.
The Levin College of Law is
hosting an alumni reception in
Miami the week the institute is
being held.


October
11 Practicing Family Law,
noon, room 285D

ACS Meeting with Erwin
Chemerinsky, 2 p.m.,
room 180A

Lambda Legal Alliance:
Marriage and Adoption
in a Post 11-2 World,
noon, Bailey Courtroom


12 Preparing for the Final
Mile, Part 1: The Bar Ap-
plication Process, noon,
Bailey Courtroom

JMBA Meeting, noon,
faculty dining room

SALSA Meeting, 7 p.m.,
Emiliano's Restaurant

13 One Quick Question,
10:30 a.m.-noon, 244 BG


International Law Society
Breakfast w/ Prof. Cally
Jordan, 10 a.m., faculty
dining room

17 Family Law Certificate
Program Informational
Meeting, noon, Bailey
Courtroom

19 Environmental and Land
Use Law Certificate
Program Informational
Meeting, noon, room
285D


8 FLA LAW


CALENDAR








College of Law
Administration
* Robert H. Jerry, II, Dean
* George L. Dawson,
Associate Dean for
Academic Affairs
* Stuart R. Cohn,
Associate Dean for
International Studies
* Lyrissa Barnett Lidsky,
Associate Dean for
Faculty Development
* Michael K. Friel,
Associate Dean & Director,
Graduate Tax Program
* M. Kathleen "Kathie" Price,
Associate Dean for Library
and Technology
* Gail E. Sasnett,
Associate Dean for
Students, Professionalism
and Community Relations
* J. Patrick Shannon,
Associate Dean for
Administrative Affairs
* Linda Calvert Hanson,
Assistant Dean for
Career Services
* Jennifer Cope, Interim
Assistant Dean for Students
* Adrian Jones,
Assistant Dean for Diversity
and Community Relations
* J. Michael Patrick,
Assistant Dean for Admissions
* Donald J. Hale,
Senior Director of Development
and Alumni Affairs
* Debra D. Amirin,
Director of Communications

Send Us Your News
FlaLaw is published each week
school is in session by the Levin
College of Law Communica-
tions Office. Submit news of
interest to the law school
community by 10 a.m. Tuesday
for the following Monday's
issue to lockette@law.ufl.edu
or 273-0650.
* Tim Lockette,
Editor, FlaLaw
* Linda Johns,
Graphic Designer
* Kristen Hines,
Photographer

UNIVERSITY OF
FLORIDA


Estates and Trusts Careers Highlighted


Lee-ford Tritt likes to joke
that, as a trusts and estates (or
T&E) lawyer, he counseled his
clients to die "bankrupt" so
they could avoid estate taxes
and will contests.
Tritt, in his first semester as
an assistant professor at the
Levin College of Law, gave
students an overview of T&E
career opportunities in a Sept.
29 workshop co-sponsored by
the Center for Career Services
and the Estates, Trusts and
Elder Law Society.
Law students often think
of T&E lawyers as people
who spend most of their time
working on will forms. Tritt
disagrees, saying the profession
requires a "Renaissance-type"
personality and education.
Lawyers in this field are coun-
selors in both a legal and per-
sonal sense, he said, and serve
their client's family members
at every stage of life from
birth to death. Beyond estate
planning, T&E lawyers advise
individuals and corporate
fiduciaries regarding compre-
hensive wealth management
and wealth protection, admin-


istration of trusts and estates,
tax matters, charitable giving
and governance of non-profit
organizations. Tritt said T&E
lawyers need excellent drafting,
reasoning, organizational and
personal skills and an ability
to be discreet doesn't hurt.
A concentration in T&E can
open a number
of doors to a law
school gradu-
ate, Tritt said.
In addition to
providing tra-
ditional private
client services, Tritt
T&E lawyers
are well equipped to oversee
matters related to charitable
giving for non-profit organiza-
tions, work in fundraising and
development capacities, work
as in-house advisors for banks
and trust companies, and serve
many other roles.
To prepare, enter the field,
and excel in a T&E practice,
Tritt recommended joining
T&E-oriented organizations
and bar sections, attending
CLEs and bar association
meetings, and engaging in


informational interviews with
T&E lawyers. Several upcom-
ing opportunities at the law
school will allow students to
gain practical knowledge, expe-
rience and connections.
The Mary Moers Wenig
2006 Student Writing Com-
petition, sponsored by the
American College of Trust and
Estate Counsel (ACTEC) gives
students the chance to trans-
form their interest in T&E law
into cash and an opportunity
to have their writing pub-
lished. Open to both J.D. and
LL.M. students, the contest
will award $5,000 and publica-
tion in the ACTECJournalfor
the first prize essay. Submis-
sions must be postmarked on
or before April 1, 2006.
Students should also take
advantage of an extraordinary
opportunity to meet attorneys
in January, when the Heck-
erling Institute will be held
at the University of Miami.
The Levin College of Law is
hosting an alumni reception in
Miami the week the institute is
being held.


October
11 Practicing Family Law,
noon, room 285D

ACS Meeting with Erwin
Chemerinsky, 2 p.m.,
room 180A

Lambda Legal Alliance:
Marriage and Adoption
in a Post 11-2 World,
noon, Bailey Courtroom


12 Preparing for the Final
Mile, Part 1: The Bar Ap-
plication Process, noon,
Bailey Courtroom

JMBA Meeting, noon,
faculty dining room

SALSA Meeting, 7 p.m.,
Emiliano's Restaurant

13 One Quick Question,
10:30 a.m.-noon, 244 BG


International Law Society
Breakfast w/ Prof. Cally
Jordan, 10 a.m., faculty
dining room

17 Family Law Certificate
Program Informational
Meeting, noon, Bailey
Courtroom

19 Environmental and Land
Use Law Certificate
Program Informational
Meeting, noon, room
285D


8 FLA LAW


CALENDAR