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 Kelo controversy at heart...
 Career Services
 Events and opportunities
 People, scholarship and activi...
 Why wait? Practice law now...
 Law professors celebrate Const...
 Calendar


UF UFLAW



Fla law newsletter of the University of Florida College of Law
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00072281/00148
 Material Information
Title: Fla law newsletter of the University of Florida College of Law
Portion of title: Flalaw
Physical Description: Serial
Creator: Levin College of Law
Publisher: s.n.
Place of Publication: <Gainesville FL> College of Law Communications Office 1997-
Creation Date: October 3, 2005
Frequency: weekly
completely irregular
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Genre: periodical   ( marcgt )
serial   ( sobekcm )
 Notes
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol.1, no. 1 (Oct. 6, 1997)-
General Note: Weekly during the school year with a biweekly insert, numbered separately called: The Docket.
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Table of Contents
    Kelo controversy at heart of conference
        Page 1
    Career Services
        Page 2
        Page 3
    Events and opportunities
        Page 4
        Page 5
    People, scholarship and activities
        Page 6
    Why wait? Practice law now in clinics
        Page 7
    Law professors celebrate Constitution
        Page 8
    Calendar
        Page 8
Full Text



















Kelo Controversy at Heart of Conference


Can the government force
you to sell your home to make
way for a factory or shopping
mall? Should a city council
have the power to take land for
development by private com-
panies? And should the courts
intervene when they do?
These are some of the ques-
tions to be discussed at the
Richard E. Nelson Symposium
Nov. 17-18 in Gainesville.
Sponsored by the University
of Florida's Levin College of
Law, the symposium will bring
together legal experts from
around the country to debate
one of the most controversial
court decisions of recent years.
"The backlash against Kelo
has been kind of amazing,"
said Richard E. Nelson Profess-
sor Michael Allan Wolf, orga-
nizer of the conference. "This
is a ruling on eminent domain
- a concept that isn't exactly a
topic of dinner table conver-
sation and it has become a
subject of nationwide debate."
Kelo v. New London is the
recent case in which the U.S.
Supreme Court ruled that
the cities could use the power
of eminent domain to take



INSIDE THIS ISSUE
2 Career Services
4 Events and Opportunities
8 Calendar


land for economic develop-
ment purposes including the
building of privately-owned
factories, hotels, and con-
ference centers. The ruling
sparked a nationwide backlash,
with activists ac-
cusing the court
of overreaching
its authority, and
some state legis-
latures moving to Wolf
ban local govern-
ments from taking land for
private development.
Wolf has been active in the
Kelo debate since the day the
ruling was handed down. He
believes activists have vastly




Hurricane
Katrina
Investigation


overstated the threat the rul-
ing poses to private property.
While Kelo does grant cities
and counties the power to take
property to make way for a
factory or shopping mall, he
said, it won't spark a land grab
by local governments. Buying
land is expensive even under
eminent domain, Wolf notes,
and popular opposition to
such takings will make elected
officials think twice about
pursuing them.
"The Court ruled that the
Constitution allows these tak-
ings, but the elected officials
are the ones who have the
power to decide whose land
Continued on Page 6


Apply Now
for Clinics


VOL. 9, NO. 7 OCTOBER 3,2005



Dean's Town Hall
Meeting with
Students Oct. 6
Dean Robert Jerry will update stu-
dents and take questions on the
"State of the College" and topics
ranging from tuition to Tulane
students at a special town-hall
style meeting at 1 p.m. Thursday,
Oct. 6, in the Bailey Courtroom.
All are welcome, and refresh-
ments will be served.


Library Closes for
Game Days
The Lawton Chiles Legal Informa-
tion Center will close on days
when home football games are
being played. Home game days
include Oct. 8 (Mississippi State),
Nov. 5 (Vanderbilt) and Nov. 26
(FSU).
The closure is due to the scarcity
of parking on game days and the
university's effort to reduce build-
ing utility costs.


Law School Closes
at 1 p.m. Friday
Classes will be held on the law
school campus until 1 p.m. on
Oct. 7, the Friday before Home-
coming. Law school offices will
be closed Friday afternoon.


N











CAREERSERVICES
Hints to help you in the legal profession


Soros Fellowship
The Paul and Daisy Soros
Fellowship Program recog-
nizes the contributions "New
Americans" have made to this
country.
The program defines "New
Americans" as (1) resident
aliens (i.e.,anyone who holds
a Green Card), (2) naturalized
U.S. citizens, or (3) children
of two parents who are both
naturalized citizens.
The fellowship is a grant for
up to two years of graduate
study in the United States.
Thirty fellowships will be
awarded each year.
A successful candidate will
give evidence of at least two
of the following three attri-
butes or criteria for selection:
(1) creativity, originality, and
initiative (2) a commitment to
and capacity for accomplish-
ment (3) a commitment to the
values expressed in the U.S.
Constitution and the Bill of
Rights.
The deadline to apply is Nov.
1. For more information, see
http://www.pdsoros.org/.


2 FLA LAW


Equal Justice Works
What do the AFL-CIO's Gen-
eral Counsel, the U.S. Depart-
ment of State and the Animal
Legal Defense Fund have in
common?
They're among the 100
government agencies and public
interest groups that will interview
students at the Equal Justice
Works Conference & Job Fair, to
be held Oct. 27-28 at the Hilton
Washington Hotel in Wash-
ington, D.C. To learn more,
go to www.equaljusticeworks.
org and register with Career
Services as soon as you can.

Experience Counts
If you're interested in pursuing
a career in public interest law, ex-
perience and desire can outweigh
grades. Public interest employers
always ask for candidates with a
demonstrated commitment to
public interest law work. The
public interest community is
tightly knit, and experience will
help you get to know people and
organizations. Being in the right
place at the right time is the key
to beginning a rewarding career
in this field.
Unlike jobs in other fields,
public interest opportunities
cannot be predicted very far in
advance. Being "in" with the or-
ganization gives you the advan-
tage of being known as someone
who can fill an opening when it
arises, often as a volunteer.
Your resume suggests compe-
tence, but working with a par-
ticular organization demonstrates
it. If you are passionate about an
issue, having experience with re-
lated organizations can also assist
in your development of expertise
in the area. All in all, experience


Help Habitat
The Eighth Judicial Circuit Bar Association is continuing work on its
Habitat for Humanity house this weekend, and work will go on almost
every weekend for the next two months. No construction experience is
necessary to participate in this project, which will give you the chance to
work elbow-to-elbow with practicing lawyers while helping a family build a
much-needed home. To help, contact John Jopling at 372-4381 or jdjop@
earthlink.net or Chris Tharp at execdir@8jcba.org.


helps you develop maturity, no
matter what area of law you hope
to pursue.

Public Interest vs.
Pro Bono
All pro bono is public interest,
but not all public interest is pro
bono. Public interest law is the
field of law encompassing service
to the people through non-profit
organizations, government work,
direct legal services and even
policy and legislative work.
Pro bono is legal work done
in the public interest through
volunteer efforts.
Volunteering for a law firm,
while a valuable experience, is
not pro bono in that it does not
reach the larger goal of pro bono:
bringing services to an under-
served or under-represented
individual or group. The UF Pro
Bono Project offers local place-


ments that provide valuable expe-
rience in assisting with children's
issues, prisoners' rights, and the
general concerns of people with
low income, including access to
public benefits, landlord-tenant
issues and more. There are also
many other opportunities to do
pro bono work in your home-
town during breaks from school,
or elsewhere. To participate in
pro bono, see Jessie Howell Wal-
lace in Career Services.

Fellowships: During
and After Law School
Historically, fellowships were
designed only to provide law grads
with employment for one or two
years following graduation. Today,
however, it is not uncommon to
also find fellowships available to
law students for summer or for a
year-long program. These highly
competitive paid fellowships are















funded through various sources
and typically match law students
or graduates with public service
organizations or law school
programs. Concentrations can
include civil and human rights,
legal services to the disadvan-
taged, children and women's
issues, immigrants and immigra-
tion, innocence projects, farm
workers, environmental and wil-
derness issues and much more.
Deadlines for many fellowship
opportunities occur during the
fall.
To learn more, check out
PSLawNet's "Fellowship Corner"
at www.pslawnet.org/. This
resource includes a calendar of
fellowship application deadlines,
a PDF version of Yale's Fellow-
ship Application Tips for 2005-
2006 and Fellowship and Grant
Resources, as well as Georgetown
University's Post Graduate Inter-
national Fellowship Guide.



Finding Balan

BY NICOLE STERN,
Resource Counselor
In order for anyone to feel
a true sense of
satisfaction with
one's life, certain
needs must be
attended to first.
If we spend too
much time and
energy in any one Stern
area, other areas
become neglected and eventually
remind us of their need for us to
attend to them. They remind us
of their existence in a number
of ways. They may make us feel
tired, sad, frustrated, irritable,
hungry, lonely, jealous, bitter,
anxious, obsessive, or generally


Discover IP Careers
Assistant Professor Elizabeth
Rowe and Jeff Lloyd, of Saliwan-
chik, Lloyd & Saliwanchik of
Gainesville, will present "Careers
in Intellectual Property Law" at
noon Tuesday, Oct. 4, in room
285C.
Rowe is a former partner and
IP litigator with Boston-based
Wilmer Cutler Pickering Hale
& Dorr, and her research focuses
on intellectual property and busi-
ness issues, including areas such
as theft of trade secrets in the
workplace.

Understanding
Public Interest Law
Career Services and the Associ-
ation for Public Interest Law are
co-sponsoring "Understanding
Public Interest Law Careers,"
Wednesday, Oct. 5, at noon in
room 285B. Join several UF



ce in Life
dissatisfied with the way things are
in our life.
Luckily, if we learn to listen
to ourselves (body, mind, and
spirit), we can figure out what it
is we are neglecting, and we can
attend to it. This can be done
by simply pausing and opening
ourselves up to "listening" to our
instincts. Once we see what is
wrong or out of balance, we can
then figure out what can be done
to nourish the part of ourselves
that needs it most.
It can be helpful to talk to a
good friend, family member, or
professional counselor who will
truly hear your concerns and help
you figure out how to go about
finding the balance you need to


alums, including Shelly Beach,
an Americorp Fellow with
Three Rivers Legal Services;
Shelbi Day, an Equal Justice
Works Fellow with Southern
Legal Counsel; Andrea Costello,
a staff attorney for Southern
Legal Counsel; and Kristin
Cooley, an Equal Justice Works
Fellow with Florida Institution-
al Legal Services, as they speak
about their work and career
paths to their public
interest law positions.

One Quick Question
Come to have your one quick
question answered on Thursday,
Oct. 6, from 10:30 a.m-noon at
the table outside of the former
Media Center on the second
floor of Bruton-Geer Hall.








succeed in your life overall. By
paying attention to yourself and
trusting that you can figure out
what you need, you will be on
your way to finding what balance
is right for you.
Once you've found your sense
of balance, it can be easier to
find it again later when life has
tipped its scales again, which is
bound to happen. Things in life
tend to ebb and flow. If we can
learn to go with the flow (and
ebb), we can travel more easily
on our journey of life and take
things in stride as we are faced
with them. Again, it's important
to learn the skill of trusting
yourself and listening to your
body, mind, and spirit.


2004-05 Bar
Results Released
Seventy-nine percent of UF law
graduates taking the bar exam
in July 2005 passed on their
first attempt, according to num-
bers recently released by the
Florida Board of Bar Examiners.
The pass rate for UF graduates
was well over the 70.5 percent
overall rate. It did represent
a dip in the numbers for UF,
which finished third among
Florida law schools in the July
test, behind Florida Coastal
(81.9 percent) and the Univer-
sity of Miami (79.4 percent).
However, when the July
numbers are combined with
numbers from the February
2005 exam, UF has a total
pass rate of 78.5 percent for
the 2004-05 school year the
highest in the state. UF has
been ranked first in annual pass
rate for five out of the past
seven years.
UF also did well on the Multi-
state Professional Responsibil-
ity Exam, with 91.6 percent of
first-time takers passing the
test.


FLA LAW 3











/E VENTS & OPPORTUNITIES


Research
Workshops
This Week
Learn how to use secondary
sources and digests in a series
of legal research workshops
this week. These classes,
which meet at the library's
reference desk, are useful
both to 1Ls and to experienced
students seeking to brush up on
their research skills. The class
schedule for this week is as
follows:
Secondary Sources
Monday, Oct. 3
3-3:30 p.m.
Tuesday, Oct. 4
2:30-3 p.m.
Wednesday, Oct. 5
4-4:30 p.m.
Thursday, Oct. 6
4-4:30 p.m.
Sunday, Oct. 9
2-2:30 p.m.
Finding Case Law
Monday, Oct. 3
4-4:30 p.m.
Tuesday, Oct. 4
2-2:30 p.m.
Wednesday, Oct. 5
2-2:30 p.m.
3-3:30 p.m.
Thursday, Oct. 6
2-2:30 p.m.
Sunday, Oct. 9
7-7:30 p.m.
The workshops will be limited
to 10 students per session.
Please sign up at the reference
desk if you plan to attend.
If you have any comments or
suggestions, e-mail Maryellen
O'Brien, electronic services
librarian, at obrien@law.ufl.edu.


4 FLA LAW


Attention Fall
2005 Graduates
Are you sure you've met all
the requirements for gradua-
tion? If you aren't, arrange an
appointment with Lori Smith,
the law school's registrar, by
calling 273-0620.
If you didn't get your senior
photo taken last week, you have
another chance Wednesday and
Thursday, Oct. 5-6. To sign up
for this make-up date, inquire
in the Office of Student Affairs.
Wear court attire for your ses-
sion: if you wish to be photo-
graphed in regalia, schedule a
second appointment.
If you don't have your regalia
yet, Oct. 14 is the last day to
order. Order forms are available
in PDF format at http://www.
law.ufl.edu/students/resources/
seniorinfo.shtml#form.
Nov. 4 is the last day to
submit your information for
the commencement program.
Please submit information even
if you do not plan to walk.
Check future issues of FlaLaw
for more information.

War on Drugs?
Professor Joseph Spillane of
UF's Department of Criminol-
ogy, Law and Society will dis-
cuss the topic, "Is 'War' Just a
Metaphor? Drugs, Policing, and
Liberties in Historical Perspec-
tive," at noon Tuesday, Oct. 4,
in the Bailey Courtroom.
The event is part of the
American Constitution Soci-
ety's "Constitution in the 21st
Century" speaker series.


Chemerinsky to Speak on Campus

Duke University Law
S Professor Erwin
Chemerinsky, nation-
ally known for his
involvement in sev-
eral high-profile court
battles, will speak at
UF on Oct. 11.

Sw/ Chemerinsky frequent-
'" -- ly argues appellate
cases, including many that have been heard by the U.S. Supreme
Court. He recently argued Lockyer v. Andrade, a challenge to
the application of California's three strikes law, on behalf of an
individual who had been sentenced to 50 years to life in prison for
stealing $153 worth of videotapes.
Chemerinsky will come to UF as the guest of the American Consti-
tution Society. For more details on his appearance here, check the
next issue of FlaLaw.


Learn About
Employment Law
Professor Juan Perea will lead
a roundtable discussion on ca-
reers in employment law today,
Oct. 3, at 6 p.m. in room 345.
The event is sponsored by the
Labor and Employment Law
Society.

IPTLA to Meet
The Intellectual Property &
Technology Law Association
will meet Thursday, Oct. 6, at
5 p.m. in the faculty dining
room. Food will be provided.

Faculty Enrichment
Speaker
Rebecca Tsosie, a law professor
at Arizona State University, will
present "Cultural Challenges to
Biotechnology: Native Ameri-


can Genetic Materials and the
Concept of Cultural Harm," in a
faculty enrichment event at noon
today, Oct. 3, in the faculty din-
ing room.

'Throat' Showing Here
Before Mark Felt started
whispering to reporters in park-
ing garages, the words "Deep
Throat" had an entirely differ-
ent meaning. The documentary
"Inside Deep Throat" tells the
story of the movie that made
porn mainstream, and examines
its effect on popular culture and
the law.
See the film Wednesday,
Oct. 5, from 5 6:30 p.m. in
the faculty dining room, cour-
tesy of the Law Association for
Women and the Entertainment
and Sports Law Society.











Professor Investigates Hurricane Missteps


Before Congress began its
inquiry into the mistakes that
turned Hurricane Katrina into
one of the worst natural disasters
in U.S. history, a University
of Florida law professor led an
investigation into the policy de-
cisions that created a nightmare
scenario in New Orleans.
Professor Alyson Flournoy,
director of the Environmental
and Land Use Law Program, led
a group of 17 legal and policy
scholars in drafting "Unnatural
Disaster," a 56-page white paper
that traces the post-storm fiasco
to years of bad environmental,
energy, and urban planning
policy decisions. She presented
the paper to the Democratic
Caucus of the U.S. House of
Representatives on Sept. 29.
"It's clear that, in the days
after the hurricane, government
failed to do the job that people
expected it to do," Flournoy
said. "But the disaster was also
the result of years of bad policy






problems is due to
choices. We, as a







petence.
Flournoy is a member of the
Center for Progressive Reform,
a policy think tank that ad-
dresses environmental, health
and safety policy issues. In the
wake of Hurricane Katrina, she
and other scholars affiliated with
CPR recognized a need for a
research project that would help
identify the policy failures that


led to the chaos in New Orleans.
The report identified key
questions needing investigation,
including:
* Did the loss of wetlands in
southern Louisiana rob the
city of natural protection from
flooding?
* Why did the Army Corps
of Engineers fail to plan to
protect the city from anything
stronger than a Category 3
hurricane? (Katrina made
landfall as a Category 4).
* Did elimination of funding
sources for the Superfund law
contribute to toxic contami-
nation of the floodwaters in
the city and will this
impair clean-up efforts?
* Did inadequate enforcement
of environmental rules on the
storage of petroleum products
contribute to pollution in
those floodwaters?
* Did downsizing, privatization
and decentralization at the
Federal Emergency Man-
agement Agency lead to an
agency unable to respond to
an emergency?


* Did depletion of the National
Guard by the war in Iraq
impair Lousiana's ability to
respond to the storm?
* Did the failure to adopt
policies that would reduce
our dependence on foreign
oil leave the nation vulnerable
to economic disruption as a
result of Gulf hurricanes?
Little more than a month has
passed since Katrina came ashore
- seemingly little time to con-
duct a scholarly study. Even so,
Flournoy notes, the CPR white
paper draws largely on extensive
research done before the hur-
ricane hit studies and papers
that warned about the potential
for disaster well in advance.
"Compiling this white paper
on such short notice has been a
major undertaking," Flournoy
said. "But many of us had
worked on issues that came to
the forefront in the wake of
Katrina, and knew these issues
needed to be addressed."
The full report is at www.
progressivereform.org/Unnatu-
ral_Disaster_512.pdf.


Loans for Bar
Exam Expenses
A number of private compa-
nies will make bar exam loans
to students in their final year
of law school. These loans
can be used for living expens-
es while studying for the bar,
exam prep classes and other
bar-related expenses. You may
borrow as little as $1,000 or
as much as $11,000. Contact
the lenders directly at:

Access Group
800 282-1550
www.Accessgroup.org

Key Education Resources
800 539-5363
www.Key.com/educate/grad

LawLoans
800 984-0190
www.Salliemae.com




Please Don't
Smoke at Law
School
Smoking is prohibited in law
school facilities or within 50
feet of law school buildings.
This includes the courtyard and
walkways between buildings.
If you do smoke outside the
law school, please choose a
spot outside of areas non-
smokers must pass to enter
or exit buildings. This is more
than an aesthetic concern:
cigarette smoke can cause
serious problems for people
with allergies and other health
issues.


FLA LAW 5


L



















Davis


SCHOLARSHIP
& ACTIVITIES


Scholarship & Activities
Professor Jeffrey Davis spoke
to 300 lawyers at a seminar
in Orlando sponsored by the
Central Florida Bankruptcy
Law Associaton on Sept. 23.
His topic was "Traversing the
Maze of Exemptions Under the
Bankruptcy Abuse Prevention
and Consumer Protection Act
of2005."
Chesterfield Smith Professor
Nancy Dowd presented her
paper, "Right from the Start:
Parentage and Nurture from
Birth," at the Reforming Parent-
ing Laws Conference at the
College of William and Mary
Oct. 1. Center on Children
and Families Director Barbara
Bennett Woodhouse was a
commentator at the conference.
Both professors' papers will
appear in the 'i and Mary
Bill of Rights Journal.
Assistant Professor Chris-
topher Peterson delivered a



Kelofrom Page 1
gets taken," Wolf said. "That's
why it's so upsetting to hear
people describing Kelo as 'judi-
cial activism.'"
Wolf is inviting some of the
nation's most respected scholars
on property rights to take up
both sides of the debate at the
symposium. Speakers include:
* James E. Krier, Earl Warren
Delano Professor of Law at
the University of Michigan
Nicole Stelle Garnett, a Lilly
Endowment Associate, Profes-
sor of Law at Notre Dame
University and a former
attorney for the Institute for
Justice, which represented the


speech on "Disclosure of Risk
Information and the Informed
Consent Doctrine: A Legal Per-
spective" at the Southeast Eye
Specialists Contemporary Topics
Lecture Series in Chattanooga,
Tenn., Sept. 26.
Professor Danaya Wright
presented a paper on the topic
of gender-relevant legislation in
19th-Century Anglo-American
contexts at a workshop at Har-
vard Law School's Islamic Legal
Studies Program on Oct. 1-2.

In the News
Assistant Professor Elizabeth
Rowe was quoted in a Sept. 15
Independent Florida A//l.giro:-
story about a potential lawsuit
against Bowls, a Gainesville caf6
that sells cereal. Seattle-based
Cereality, a similar business
which has a patent pending on
its business method, is reported-
ly considering a lawsuit against
Bowls.





homeowners in Kelo
* Eduardo M. Pefialver, As-
sociate Professor of Law at
Fordham University
* Douglas M. Kmiec, Caruso
Family Chair in Constitution-
al Law at Pepperdine Univer-
sity
* Mark Fenster, Associate
Professor at UF's Levin Col-
lege of Law
Also featured in the program
are several experts on Florida
eminent domain law.
The event is free upon regis-
tration to all UF law faculty and
students. For others, registration


PEOPLE


Assistant Professor Lee-ford
Tritt was quoted in a Sept. 28
Gainesville Sun story on the ef-
fects New Orleans refugees have
had on Gainesville's culture and
economy. Tritt scheduled make-
up classes for Lousiana students
after transfers from Tulane and
Loyola swelled the numbers in
his estates and trusts class.
Affiliate Professor James
Nicholas was quoted in a Sept.
28 South Florida Sun-Sentinel
story about an attempt to raise
construction fees in Palm Beach
County.
Assistant Professor Christo-
pher Peterson was quoted in a
Sept. 28 San Diego Union-Tri-
bune story on new federal rules
that allow credit card companies
to increase the minimum pay-
ments customers must make on
their monthly balances. Peterson
said the change would likely
lead more card-holders to turn
to high-interest payday loans.





is $50, and includes all program
activities. The conference is
worth 7.5 general CLE credits.
To attend, you must register by
Nov. 11. For more information,
contact Director of Conference
Planning Barbara DeVoe at
(352) 273-0615 or devoe@law.
ufl.edu.
The symposium is held in
honor of Richard E. Nelson
- who served with distinction
as Sarasota County attorney for
30 years and Jane Nelson. The
Nelsons, both UF alumni, gave
more than $1 million to estab-
lish the Richard E. Nelson Chair
in Local Government Law,
which sponsors the event.


Dowd


Woodhouse


Peterson


Wright


Rowe


Nicholas


6 FLA LAW











Why Wait? Practice Law Now in Clinics


It's never too early to start
thinking about taking a clinic
in your third year of law school.
Among other benefits, most din-
ics allow you to become a Certi-
fied Legal Intern (CLI), which
gives you the right to actually
practice law under the supervision
of a faculty member. CLI status
can be extended to allow a student
to practice law after graduation
and before being admitted to
the Bar if employed by a state
attorney's office, public defender,
city government or legal services
office. Students graduating with
CLI status are highly sought after
by public employers, and CLI
could mean the difference be-
tween being hired to start working
immediately after graduation or
waiting until your Bar results.
If you are interested in applying
for a Spring 2006 clinic, now is
the time to act. Applications are
available on the Student Affairs
website as of today, Oct. 3, and
must be turned in to Student
Affairs by 5 p.m., Oct. 17. Selec-
tions will be announced Oct. 21.
If you want to learn more about
the clinics, a workshop will be
held today, Oct. 3, at noon in
the Bailey Courtroom, to explain
both clinics and simulation skills
courses.
Here is a glimpse of what UF's
clinics have to offer:
The Pro Se /Unbundling Clin-
ic allows students to give advice
and counsel to litigants represent-
ing themselves in family court.
This is a two-semester sequence;
a three-credit preparation class
the first semester, followed by the
six-credit clinic the second. For
more information, contact Peggy
Schrieber at schriebe@law.ufl.edu
or 100B in the Clinic Suite.
Students enrolled in the Virgil


Pictured here are two students working in the law school's Pro Se/Unbundling
Clinic. Clinics give you the chance to experience the practice of law before
graduation: applications are being accepted this week.


Hawkins Full Representation
Clinic represent clients primarily
in family law cases. Students fully
represent clients from the initial
interview through non-jury trial.
This is a one-semester, nine-credit
course. For more information,
contact Jeff Grater at grater@law.
ufl.edu or 100D in the Clinic
Suite.
Students enrolled in the Gator
TeamChild juvenile advocacy
clinic provide free legal services to
indigent children. This is a two-
semester sequence; a three-credit
preparation class the first semester,
followed by the six-credit clinic.
For more information, contact
Claudia Wright at wright@law.ufl.
edu or 105K in the Clinic Suite.
The Child Welfare Clinic
allows students to provide advice,
interpretations and representation
for a multi-disciplinary team of
doctors, nurses and psycholo-
gists responsible for investigating
and evaluating the most complex
cases of child abuse and neglect
in an eight-county area. This is a
two-semester sequence, for a total
of nine credits. For more informa-


tion, contact Monique Haughton
Worrell at haughton@law.ufl.edu
or 341 Holland Hall.
Students in the Criminal
Clinic work in either the State
Attorney's Office or the Public
Defender's Office. Students have
their own caseload. This is a one-
semester, six-credit course. For
more information, contact Col-
leen Flanagan at flanagan@law.ufl.
edu or in the Clinic Suite.
Through the Conservation
Clinic, students work in teams
with clients in the governmen-
tal, non-governmental and
private sector to advance local,
state, national and international
conservation objectives. This is a
maximum two-semester course,
worth three credits per semester.
CLI certification is not part of this
clinic.
The Mediation Clinic allows
students to observe and co-medi-
ate disputes in county court. CLI
certification is not part of this
clinic, but students become certi-
fied county court mediators. This
clinic is worth six credit hours.


Interested in Being
a CLI? Apply
to Bar Early
There are some important
proposed changes to The Florida
Bar's Student Practice Rule that
make it critical to apply for Bar
admission during your first 180
days of law school if you intend
to become a Certified Legal
Intern.
Previously, you could become
a CLI simply by filling out an
application that was mailed by
the clinic to the Florida Supreme
Court.
Under the proposed new rule,
anyone hoping to become a CLI
must be an applicant to the Bar,
and must have their letter of
initial clearance as to charac-
ter and fitness. The clearance
process can take six months or
more, so it is important that you
apply for admission early.
For more information about
the Student Practice Rule and
the proposed changes, contact
Peggy Schrieber at schriebe@
law.ufl.edu or 100B in the Clinic
Suite (105 Bruton Geer), or
Linda Calvert Hanson at Han-
sonL@law.ufl.edu or in Career
Services (244 Bruton Geer).


FLA LAW 7








College of Law
Administration
* Robert H. Jerry, II, Dean
* George L. Dawson,
Associate Dean for
Academic Affairs
* Stuart R. Cohn,
Associate Dean for
International Studies
* Lyrissa Barnett Lidsky,
Associate Dean for
Faculty Development
* Michael K. Friel,
Associate Dean & Director,
Graduate Tax Program
* M. Kathleen "Kathie" Price,
Associate Dean for Library
and Technology
* Gail E. Sasnett,
Associate Dean for
Students, Professionalism
and Community Relations
* J. Patrick Shannon,
Associate Dean for
Administrative Affairs
* Linda Calvert Hanson,
Assistant Dean for
Career Services
* Jennifer Cope, Interim
Assistant Dean for Students
* Adrian Jones,
Assistant Dean for Diversity
and Community Relations
* J. Michael Patrick,
Assistant Dean for Admissions
* Donald J. Hale,
Senior Director of Development
and Alumni Affairs
* Debra D. Amirin,
Director of Communications

Send Us Your News
FlaLaw is published each week
school is in session by the Levin
College of Law Communica-
tions Office. Submit news of
interest to the law school
community by 10 a.m. Tuesday
for the following Monday's
issue to lockette@law.ufl.edu
or 273-0650.
* Tim Lockette,
Editor, Flalaw
* Linda Johns,
Graphic Designer
* Kristen Hines,
Photographer

UNIVERSITY OF
FLORIDA


Law Professors Celebrate Constitution


BY NATASHA CRESPO (2L)
UF professors and state of-
ficials came together to discuss
and celebrate the U.S. Constitu-
tion at the inau-
gural Constitu-
tion Day panel
discussion, held
Sept. 21 in the
Grand Read-
ing Room in Baldwin
Smathers Library
East.
UF law faculty, including
Chesterfield Smith Professor
Fletcher Bald-
win, Irving
Cypen Profes-
sor Sharon
Rush, Stephen
C. O' Con-
nell Professor
Christopher
Slobogin and Affiliate Professor
Elizabeth Dale, joined State
Representatives Larry Cretul
and Ed Jennings in a panel dis-
cussion about the simplicity and
flexibility that make America's
founding document the oldest


written constitution still in use.
"It is a living document
because we have judicial review,"
said Slobogin. "Many world
constitutions can't be enforced,
but ours can be interpreted and
kept up to date."
The Constitution's flex-
ibility, panel members said,
has allowed the document to
win the trust of groups who
were originally disenfranchised
in America
- people be-
sides the white,
male, Protes-
tant landown-
ers represented
at the Con-
stitutional Dale
Convention.
"Women, African Americans
and other minorities didn't have
rights in the original Constitu-
tion," said Jennings. "In most
other places, that would have
led to revolt and the creation of
a new document. But here the
people had faith in the Consti-


tuition and believed...that the
country they lived in would
apply those rights to them."
It would have been politically
impossible to grant those rights
to everyone in
the Framers'
time, Jen-
nings said. The
beauty of the
Constitution,
he said, is its
ability to adapt Rush
and be inter-
preted throughout the ages.
With the appointment of the
new justices to the Supreme
Court, a new era is emerging,
panel members noted. It is pos-
sible that the new court may
revisit former decisions. More
explicit attention is being paid
to political views as they may
play a part in analyzing former
split decisions, panel members
said.
"The office of justice is be-
coming more politicized," said
Slobogin.


October
3 Clinics and Simulation
Skills Courses Informa-
tional Meeting, noon,
Bailey Courtroom

Faculty Enrichment: Re-
becca Tsosie, noon, faculty
dining room

Toastmasters, 5 p.m.,
room 345

Careers in Employment
Law, 6 p.m., room 345


4 Careers in Intellectual
Property Law, noon, room
285C

Is War Just a Metaphor:
Drugs, Policing and
Liberties in Historical
Perspective, noon, Bailey
Courtroom

5 Understanding Public
Interest Law, noon, 285B

Inside Deep Throat, 5
p.m., faculty dining room


6 Dean's Town Hall Meet-
ing, 1 p.m., Bailey Court-
room

One Quick Question,
10:30 a.m. noon, 244
BG

IPTLA Meeting, 5 p.m.,
faculty dining room

7 Day Before Homecom-
ing; Law School Closes at
1 p.m.


8 FLA LAW


.CALENDAR
"- *








College of Law
Administration
* Robert H. Jerry, II, Dean
* George L. Dawson,
Associate Dean for
Academic Affairs
* Stuart R. Cohn,
Associate Dean for
International Studies
* Lyrissa Barnett Lidsky,
Associate Dean for
Faculty Development
* Michael K. Friel,
Associate Dean & Director,
Graduate Tax Program
* M. Kathleen "Kathie" Price,
Associate Dean for Library
and Technology
* Gail E. Sasnett,
Associate Dean for
Students, Professionalism
and Community Relations
* J. Patrick Shannon,
Associate Dean for
Administrative Affairs
* Linda Calvert Hanson,
Assistant Dean for
Career Services
* Jennifer Cope, Interim
Assistant Dean for Students
* Adrian Jones,
Assistant Dean for Diversity
and Community Relations
* J. Michael Patrick,
Assistant Dean for Admissions
* Donald J. Hale,
Senior Director of Development
and Alumni Affairs
* Debra D. Amirin,
Director of Communications

Send Us Your News
FlaLaw is published each week
school is in session by the Levin
College of Law Communica-
tions Office. Submit news of
interest to the law school
community by 10 a.m. Tuesday
for the following Monday's
issue to lockette@law.ufl.edu
or 273-0650.
* Tim Lockette,
Editor, Flalaw
* Linda Johns,
Graphic Designer
* Kristen Hines,
Photographer

UNIVERSITY OF
FLORIDA


Law Professors Celebrate Constitution


BY NATASHA CRESPO (2L)
UF professors and state of-
ficials came together to discuss
and celebrate the U.S. Constitu-
tion at the inau-
gural Constitu-
tion Day panel
discussion, held
Sept. 21 in the
Grand Read-
ing Room in Baldwin
Smathers Library
East.
UF law faculty, including
Chesterfield Smith Professor
Fletcher Bald-
win, Irving
Cypen Profes-
sor Sharon
Rush, Stephen
C. O' Con-
nell Professor
Christopher
Slobogin and Affiliate Professor
Elizabeth Dale, joined State
Representatives Larry Cretul
and Ed Jennings in a panel dis-
cussion about the simplicity and
flexibility that make America's
founding document the oldest


written constitution still in use.
"It is a living document
because we have judicial review,"
said Slobogin. "Many world
constitutions can't be enforced,
but ours can be interpreted and
kept up to date."
The Constitution's flex-
ibility, panel members said,
has allowed the document to
win the trust of groups who
were originally disenfranchised
in America
- people be-
sides the white,
male, Protes-
tant landown-
ers represented
at the Con-
stitutional Dale
Convention.
"Women, African Americans
and other minorities didn't have
rights in the original Constitu-
tion," said Jennings. "In most
other places, that would have
led to revolt and the creation of
a new document. But here the
people had faith in the Consti-


tuition and believed...that the
country they lived in would
apply those rights to them."
It would have been politically
impossible to grant those rights
to everyone in
the Framers'
time, Jen-
nings said. The
beauty of the
Constitution,
he said, is its
ability to adapt Rush
and be inter-
preted throughout the ages.
With the appointment of the
new justices to the Supreme
Court, a new era is emerging,
panel members noted. It is pos-
sible that the new court may
revisit former decisions. More
explicit attention is being paid
to political views as they may
play a part in analyzing former
split decisions, panel members
said.
"The office of justice is be-
coming more politicized," said
Slobogin.


October
3 Clinics and Simulation
Skills Courses Informa-
tional Meeting, noon,
Bailey Courtroom

Faculty Enrichment: Re-
becca Tsosie, noon, faculty
dining room

Toastmasters, 5 p.m.,
room 345

Careers in Employment
Law, 6 p.m., room 345


4 Careers in Intellectual
Property Law, noon, room
285C

Is War Just a Metaphor:
Drugs, Policing and
Liberties in Historical
Perspective, noon, Bailey
Courtroom

5 Understanding Public
Interest Law, noon, 285B

Inside Deep Throat, 5
p.m., faculty dining room


6 Dean's Town Hall Meet-
ing, 1 p.m., Bailey Court-
room

One Quick Question,
10:30 a.m. noon, 244
BG

IPTLA Meeting, 5 p.m.,
faculty dining room

7 Day Before Homecom-
ing; Law School Closes at
1 p.m.


8 FLA LAW


.CALENDAR
"- *