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 Diversity dean gets down to...
 Career Services
 Events and opportunities
 Student works to curb human rights...
 People, scholarship and activi...
 Counseling: a tune-up for your...
 Calendar


UF UFLAW



Fla law newsletter of the University of Florida College of Law
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STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00072281/00147
 Material Information
Title: Fla law newsletter of the University of Florida College of Law
Portion of title: Flalaw
Physical Description: Serial
Creator: Levin College of Law
Publisher: s.n.
Place of Publication: <Gainesville FL> College of Law Communications Office 1997-
Creation Date: September 26, 2005
Frequency: weekly
completely irregular
 Subjects
Genre: periodical   ( marcgt )
serial   ( sobekcm )
 Notes
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol.1, no. 1 (Oct. 6, 1997)-
General Note: Weekly during the school year with a biweekly insert, numbered separately called: The Docket.
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Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
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Table of Contents
    Diversity dean gets down to business
        Page 1
    Career Services
        Page 2
        Page 3
    Events and opportunities
        Page 4
        Page 5
    Student works to curb human rights abuses in Peru
        Page 6
    People, scholarship and activities
        Page 7
    Counseling: a tune-up for your mind
        Page 8
    Calendar
        Page 8
Full Text



















Diversity Dean Gets Down to Business


Assistant Dean for Diversity and Community Relations Adrian Jones (center) meets with students and
law school administrators to discuss Americans with Disabilities Act issues on campus. Jones, the law
school's first dean for diversity, began work at UF this semester.


Some people might have
trouble describing, in concrete
terms, just what it is that a di-
versity officer does. Adrian Jones
has never had that problem.
"This job requires you to be a
peacemaker, a firefighter, a ne-
gotiator and a teacher," he said.
"It's the kind of position that
puts all of your talents to their
fullest use."
Jones is in his first semester as
assistant dean for diversity at the
Levin College of Law where
he is charged with building
a welcoming, nurturing, and


INSIDE THIS ISSUE
2 Career Services
4 Events and Opportunities
8 Calendar


inclusive campus community
and providing mediation of
diversity issues on campus. He is
the first person to hold the job,
which places UF among a small
number of law schools with a
dean-level position devoted to
diversity issues.
"I'm impressed with the
Gators," Jones said. "One of
the things that impresses me
most is the proactive approach
the administration is taking on
diversity issues."
Jones comes to UF from the
State University of New York at



Minority H
Mentoring Picnic


Buffalo's medical school, where
he served as director of
multicultural affairs. He is a
2004 graduate of SUNY-
Buffalo's law school.
He faced a trial by fire almost
as soon as he arrived on the
UF campus in August. With
preparations well underway for
Justice Sandra Day O'Connor's
Sept. 9 visit to campus, Jones
was tasked with distributing
tickets to O'Connor's lecture to
students. The job had hundreds
of students lining up outside
the door of his office just a few
Continued on Page 6


New Law
Journal


VOL. 9, NO. 6 SEPTEMBER 26, 2005


A Word From the
Dean: On Respect
for Others
The recent controversy over a car-
toon which I personally found
to be insensitive and repugnant
- in The Independent Florida
Alligator demonstrates what can
happen when people engage in
dialogue without respect for the
sensitivities of others.
As I stated in my comments on
community and collegiality in the
Aug. 23 issue of Falaw (online
at http://www.law.ufl.edu/news/
flalaw/pdf/flalaw-050823.pdf), it
is important that our law school
set an example for the rest of
campus on how these conversa-
tions should be conducted.
I urge students, faculty and
staff at the Levin College of Law
to take responsibility for the
social climate on our campus and
elsewhere to continue to treat
each other with respect and in a
spirit of collegiality regardless
of differences in our backgrounds
or our deeply held beliefs.
As legal professionals, we are
expected to deal responsibly with
conflict, and it is incumbent upon
us to respect opposing beliefs and
viewpoints even as we debate
issues openly and vigorously.
- Dean Robert Jerry


Ifl






I',-F:


Scholarship
Deadline Friday
The Foley Minority Scholarship
Program awards $5,000 to a
first-year minority law student
at any of eight selected law
schools. The scholarship is to
be applied to tuition, books,
fees and other expenses
incidental to law school atten-
dance. Applications, available in
the Center for Career Services,
must be returned by Sept. 30.


Pick Up
Those Papers
Students who have not picked
up their Legal Writing or
Appellate Advocacy papers
from Spring 2005 can obtain
the papers in the communica-
tion folders located in the
lounge outside the Legal
Research and Writing offices
in Bruton-Geer Hall.

Give to
Community
Campaign
The University of Florida's
Community Campaign, which
allows UF employees to give
to their favorite local charities
through payroll deduction,
officially kicks off today with a
goal of raising $1 million.
If you work for the law school,
you have probably already
received your pledge card.
Please fill it out and return it to
Marilyn Henderson by Oct. 21.
For more information, contact
Associate Professor Mark Fen-
ster at fenster@law.ufl.edu.


2 FLA LAW


Out-of-State Job Search

An out-of-area employment
search is more challenging than a
local search, and requires you to
use additional marketing efforts
and search strategies. If you are
interested in clerking out-of-
state next summer or gaining a
position after graduation, there
are steps you need to take to be
competitive. The key to a success-
ful out-of-state job search is to
prepare early in your law school
career and to be resourceful.
Timing: Check the websites of
law schools in your geographic
area of interest and see if they list
the firms who will be interview-
ing, along with the dates of on-
campus interviews. To compete
with the local applicant pool, you
will need to target your mailing
to reach those firms before, or at
the same time as, the local OCIs
are occurring.
Also consider arranging an in-
ternship, externship or volunteer
opportunity for the summer in
the city of your choice, to get
involved and to make contacts.
Government agencies often
sponsor summer programs. These
programs require independent
research and typically have early
application dates.
Be Prepared to Demonstrate
Your Connection: Assess how
you will demonstrate your com-
mitment or connection with the
geographic area you are interested
in. Potential employers tend to be
leery of out-of-town applicants,
and will be less likely to hire a
person who can't show a link to,
or interest in, the local area. Let
them know that you grew up in
the area, or that you have relatives
living there. Employers will be
looking for these ties on your


resume and cover letter, as well as
during the interview.
Develop Your Network: Re-
establish any contacts you may
have in the area. Let them know
you are interested in relocating and
ask them to keep you in mind if
they become aware of opportuni-
ties. You also can contact Career
Services for the names of alumni
mentors in many cities. Consider
getting a student membership to
the local bar association. Try to get
on the local bar's mailing list for
events or periodically check their
website for news.
Research Employers: Run
a search on www.martindale.
com using the following search
parameters: "UF law alumni,"
city desired, and perhaps practice
area. Career Services also has
employer directories of gov-
ernment agencies and public
interest organizations, along with
the NALP Directory of Legal Em-
ployers. While it is true that the
directory contains predominantly
large law firms, most firms have
websites that list their recruit-
ing information and contacts.
Employers routinely consider
submissions from interested law
students from outside the area or
from law schools they don't visit.


Conduct Outreach: Schedule
a visit over a break or during the
summer. If you are able to spend
some time in the area, see if there
are any scheduled Continuing
Legal Education (CLE) seminars,
bar receptions, speaker programs
or events that you can attend
to meet practitioners. Look for
volunteer judicial internships to
enhance your credentials while
bringing you in contact with the
local bar. This also may provide a
path to a coveted judicial clerk-
ship upon graduation that can
segue into a larger firm position
upon completion of your term.
Begin Early: You do not want
to miss out on opportunities
because you were unaware of the
timing process.


New Face in
Career Services
Career Services welcomes triple-
Gator Dexter Smith as the new
assistant director for career services.
Smith most recently served as di-
rector of legislative services for the
National Association of Intercolle-
giate Athletics. He begins work this
week, and will handle the Career
Services Program Series and assist
with externships.


CAREERSERVICES
Hints to help you in the legal profession


I















Federal Career
Opportunities
Thinking about a career with
the federal government? Join
lawyers who have worked in the
federal system Tuesday, Sept. 27,
at noon in room 285D to find
out about abundant opportuni-
ties in this area. Guest speakers
will include Professor Mike
Seigel, former prosecutor with
the United States Attorney's Of-
fice and a former special attorney
with the U.S. Department of
Justice's Organized Crime and
Racketeering Section; and Assis-
tant Professor Mary Jane Angelo,
who worked for the U.S. Envi-
ronmental Protection Agency,
Office of General Counsel, for
five years. This event is co-spon-
sored by Westlaw.

Beyond OCI
Fact: Most legal positions are
not gained through OCI. Wheth-
er you participated in OCI or
not, come to "Beyond OCI:
Exploring All Your Options" and
learn how to use all the tools and
resources available to enhance
your ability to land that ideal
summer or permanent position.
Co-sponsored by Lexis, the event
will be held Wednesday, Sept. 28,
at noon in room 285B.

Career Opportunities in
Estate Planning
Explore estate planning, a
high-demand practice area, with
Assistant Professor Lee-ford Tritt
at 10 a.m. Thursday, Sept. 29,
in the faculty dining room. As
an estates and trusts associate at
the New York City firms Davis
Polk & Wardwell and Milbank,
Tweed, Hadley & McCoy, Tritt


worked on estate, tax and prop-
erty matters. Refreshments will
be provided by the Estates, Trusts
and Elder Law Society.

One Quick Question
Let Career Services answer
your questions about pro bono,
resumes, cover letters, deadlines,
externships, OCI, job searches,
interviews or other career-related
topics Thursday, Sept. 29, from
10:30 a.m. to noon at the Career
Services table outside the former
Media Services area.


Upcoming Deadlines
The last day to apply for the
Congressional Research Service's
Law Recruit Program for 3Ls
is Oct. 1.
Students have until Oct. 10 to
apply for the U.S. Department
of Transportation's Attorney
Honors Program for 3Ls and
recent graduates.
For more information on up-
coming career deadlines, contact
Career Services at 273-0860.


Network, Relax at

Minority Mentoring Picnic
Are you planning to spend
this weekend relaxing and hav-
ing fun or networking and
building your career? You can
do both at the Second Annual
Minority Mentoring Picnic,
scheduled for this Saturday in
Amelia Earhart Park in Hialeah.
Created by Miami lawyer
John Kozyak, the event is
intended to encourage diversity in the legal profession by
giving minority law students a chance to meet and network
with lawyers and judges in a relaxed, informal environment.
Last year's event drew more than 400 lawyers, law professors
and students.
The picnic features music, a wide variety of food, a volley-
ball tournament and more. Prominent members of various
minority-oriented, voluntary bar associations will be there,
as well as Florida Supreme Court Chief Justice Barbara Pari-
ente and Justice Peggy Quince.
Students are welcome to bring their families to the event.
Student groups will be organizing rides to Hialeah for the
picnic. For more information and to RSVP, contact Yasbel
Cardenas of Kozyak, Tropin & Throckmorton, PA. at (305)
728-2928 or at yc@kttlaw.com.


Research
Workshops
Start Today
Learn how to use secondary
sources and digests in a series
of legal research workshops
beginning today, Sept. 26.
These classes, which meet at
the library's Reference Desk,
are useful both to Ls and to
experienced students seeking
to brush up on their research
skills. The class schedule is as
follows:
Secondary Sources
Monday, Sept. 26
2 p.m.
3 p.m.
4p.m.
Tuesday, Sept. 27
2 p.m.
Wednesday, Sept. 28
2 p.m.
4p.m.
Thursday, Sept. 29
2 p.m.
4p.m.
Saturday, Oct. 1
1 p.m.
Finding Case Law
Tuesday, Sept. 27
3 p.m.
Wednesday, Sept. 28
3 p.m.
Sunday, Oct. 2
2 p.m.
If you have any comments or
suggestions, e-mail Electronic
Services Librarian Maryellen
O'Brien at obrien@law.ufl.edu.


FLA LAW 3











/E VENTS & OPPORTUNITIES


Loans for Bar
Exam Expenses
Wondering where you will
come up with the money to pay
for your bar exam expenses?
There are private loan compa-
nies who will make bar exam
loans to students in their final
year of law school. These loans
can be used for living expenses
while studying for the bar,
exam prep classes and other
bar-related expenses. You may
borrow as little as $1,000 or
as much as $11,000. For more
information, contact the lend-
ers directly at:


Access Group
800 282-1550
www.Accessgroup.org

Key Education Resources
800 539-5363
www.Key.com/educate/grad

LawLoans
800 984-0190
www.Salliemae.com


4 FLA LAW


Apply for 2006 Clinics
It's almost time to apply for
Spring 2006 clinics. The process
begins Oct. 3, with applications
available on the Student Affairs
website. Completed applica-
tions are due by 5 p.m. Oct. 10.
Selections will be announced
Oct. 17. For more informa-
tion, contact Sarah Carswell at
carswell@law.ufl.edu.

Vigil for Katrina Victims
Gator Hurricane Relief, a joint
effort between Student Gov-
ernment and the University of
Florida, will conduct a candle-
light vigil honoring all those who
have been affected by the tragedy
of Hurricane Katrina. The vigil
will take place Thursday, Sept.
29, on the north lawn of Reitz
Union at 7:30 p.m. Law student
Jared Hernandez (2L) is coordi-
nating SG relief efforts and can
be reached at gawain@ufl.edu for
further information.

ACS Speaker
Series Begins
The American Constitution
Society's "Constitution in the
21st Century" speaker series
begins Tuesday, Sept. 27, at
noon in the Bailey Courtroom,
with Professor Michael Allan
Wolf's presentation on emi-
nent domain in the wake of
Kelo v. New London.
Federalists Tackle
Eminent Domain
The Federalist Society will host
a discussion of Kelo at 3 p.m.
Tuesday, Sept. 27 in the Bailey
Courtroom. Clark Neily, senior
attorney for the Institute for Jus-
tice, will be featured speaker.


JMBA Meeting Today
The John Marshall Bar Asso-
ciation meets today, Sept. 26, at
7 p.m. in room 285C. Everyone
is welcome to attend.

APIL Begins Activities
The Association for Public In-
terest Law will hold its first meet-
ing of the semester Wednesday,
Sept. 28, at 5 p.m. in room 345.
The group will hold elections and
discuss plans for the year. Pizza
will be served. For more infor-
mation, contact Dina Finkel at
dfinkel@ufl.edu.


Democrats to Meet
The Law School Democrats will
hold a general meeting today, Sept.
26 at 5:30 p.m. in room 382, with
a roundtable discussion on the
topic, "Why are you a Democrat?"

Write-On
Competition Begins
The Journal of Technology Law
and Policy will kick off its Fall
2005 write-on competition with
an informational meeting on
Wednesday, Sept. 28, at 5 p.m.
in room 355A. Write-on packets
will be distributed at that time.
All third-, fourth-, and fifth-


Students Launch

New Law Journal

A group of UF law students are launching a new journal to
explore issues of intellectual property, international trade and
other areas of law related to one of Florida's major
industries entertainment.
The newly formed Entertainment Law Review will tackle First
Amendment concerns, employment issues and other matters
arising from entertainment and media law. Founding member
Edward Lyman said the journal will likely publish its first issue
in Spring Semester 2006. Journal members are currently seeking
submissions from scholars in this growing field of law.
"The journal is an excellent opportunity for students to
explore areas of the law such as contracts, intellectual prop-
erty, international trade, employment, and various others by
researching a subject that truly interests them," Lyman said.
Members of the new journal's executive board include Sergiu
Gherman, Jasmine McNealy, Amanda McLernan, Courtney
Barclay, Heather French, Amanda Groover, Aaron Cook,
Cecilia Bidwell, Kevin Sobel, Joseph Wals, Allison Hunt, Web
Melton, Max Eggleston, Michelle Leyva, Kimberly Chamberlin,
and Valerie Brennan.
To become a general board member, or submit an article,
e-mail editor@entlaw.org or find the journal on Westlaw/
TWEN for more information.















semester students are invited to
attend and compete. If you are
unable to attend the meeting, a
writing packet will be available
for download at http://grove.
ufl.edu/-techlaw/writeon.html.
For more information contact
Ed Quinones, ufjtlp_student-
works@yahoo.com.

Bring the Lion Home
UF law students have the
chance to win $1,000 in
scholarship funds, plus a trip to
Tallahassee to meet the Florida
Supreme Court, through The
Florida Bar's Professionalism
Essay Contest. Entrants must
submit an essay primarily and
specifically dealing with pro-
fessionalism, possibly with an
emphasis on ethics or substan-
tive law. The essay must clearly
identify an issue, problem or
opportunity, and should suggest
solutions. Essays are limited to
approximately 2,400 words, and
will be evaluated on caliber of
theme, creativity, writing style
and compliance with the Uni-
form System of Citations.
The winner of the contest will
bring home the Lion of Justice Tro-
phy, which travels each year to the
winner's alma mater. Students have
until Feb. 1 to submit their essays.
For more information, contact
Student Affairs at 273-0620.

Honor Committee
Seeks Students
LL.M. students interested in
joining the Law School Honor
Committee should submit a
resume and a statement of 100
words or less, to ufhonorcommit-
tee@hotmail.com. The deadline


for submissions is Friday, Sept.
30 at 5 p.m. Students who
submit their information will
be contacted directly regarding
interview times.

Student Fundraising
Pays Off
Law students have raised
$2,270 and counting to
help victims of Hurricane Ka-
trina. Almost half of that money
was raised during "Party With
a Purpose II," a sequel to the
student-organized Spring 2005
fundraiser for tsunami victims.
Organized by the Asian/Pacific
American Law Student Asso-
ciation, the event was co-spon-


scored by the John Marshall Bar
Association, the Association for
Public Interest Law, the Crimi-
nal Law Association, the Mili-
tary Law Students Association,
the Law Association for Women,
the Black Law Student Associa-
tion, CaribLaw, the Jewish Law
Students Association and the
International Law Society.
Fundraising continued
last weekend at the field day
sponsored by the American
Bar Association's Law Student
Division. Check future issues
of FlaLaw for updates on the
fundraising effort.


Fair Showcases

Student Organizations

The Marcia Schott Courtyard filled with tables last
Wednesday, as various law student groups recruited new
members into their ranks. To find out more about the
law school's wide variety of student groups, go online
to http://www.law.ufl.edu/students/organizations/, call
Student Affairs Coordinator Noemar Castro at 273-0620
or contact student group representatives.


Library Closes for
Game Days
The Lawton Chiles Legal
Information Center will close
on days when home football
games are being played. Home
game days include Oct. 8
(Mississippi State), Nov. 5
(Vanderbilt) and Nov. 26 (FSU).
The closure is due to the scar-
city of parking on game days
and the university's drive to
reduce building utility costs.



Classes at Law
School on
Homecoming
Friday
Classes will be held on the law
school campus until 1 p.m. on
Oct. 7, the Friday before Home-
coming. Like the rest of the UF
campus, law school offices will
be closed Friday afternoon.

























FLA LAW 5









Panel to Take
On Censorship
Several UF professors and art-
ist Arnold Mesches who was
spied on by the Federal Bureau
of Investigation for 26 years
- will participate in a panel
discussion on censorship in the
name of national security.
Titled "From Mesches to Kurtz:
From McCarthyism to Anti-Ter-
rorism," the panel will explore
McCarthy-era surveillance of
politically-involved artists such
as Mesches; the actions of
the Johns Committee, which
persecuted gay professors and
students in Florida's university
system; and the FBI investiga-
tion of artist Steven Kurtz, who
uses microbes and laboratory
equipment to build art instal-
lations.
Other speakers at the event
include:
* University of South Florida
Professor Emeritus Charles
Arnade, who was a target of
the Johns Committee

* Affiliate Law Professor Bill
Chamberlin, who will discuss
the Freedom of Information
Act

* Chesterfield Smith Professor
Fletcher Baldwin, who will
discuss the Patriot Act

The discussion will be held at
1 p.m. Friday, Sept. 30, in the
Chesterfield Smith Ceremonial
Classroom (room 180).


Student Works to Curb


Human Rights Abuses in Peru


Law student Ray Dieppa
spent the summer in South
America, helping in the prosecu-
tion of Peruvian soldiers accused
of human rights abuses.
Dieppa worked with Peru's
Institute for Legal Defense, or
IDL, a non-governmental orga-
nization dedicated to curbing
corruption in the Latin Ameri-
can nation.
"Peru is an incredible place
for anyone who wishes to study
or work in international law,"
said Dieppa. "This is a country
which only a few years ago was
plagued by civil war, terrorism,
and large scale human rights
abuses. It was fascinating to
work in a place where these is-
sues were day to day reality and
not just a part of history."
Dieppa was among several UF
students selected to participate
in the UF International Center's
(UFIC) World Citizenship
Program. Each year the pro-
gram, headed by UFIC Dean




Diversity from Page 1
weeks after he started work.
"As it turns out, it was a great
introduction to campus," he said.
"As you can imagine, I got to meet
many of the students face-to-face
and I got to see how the law school
works under pressure."
While handling that challenge,
Jones also was working on a cur-
riculum for diversity training for
incoming law students. And now
that the dedication is over, he is
delving into the core mission of
his job.
"Right now, I'm taking the pulse
of the campus," he said. "I've been


and former U.S. Ambassador to
Peru Dennis Jett, awards fellow-
ships to students
from an array
of disciplines to
work and live in
countries across
the developing
world. Dieppa
The program sent
Dieppa to Lima, where he spent
the summer working with a
team of IDL attorneys and for-
mer military officers, urging the
government to use the country's
civil code to prosecute military
members accused of crimes
against civilians.
"Unfortunately, in Peru sol-
diers often commit crimes like
robbery and murder knowing
they won't be tried in civilian
courts," said Dieppa.
Dieppa said much of his work
involved doing research in both
English and Spanish and provid-
ing summaries of that research
in Spanish to IDL lawyers. He






meeting with student groups, indi-
vidual students and administrators,
trying to get a feel for the situation
here."
People tend to think of a diver-
sity officer as someone who plays
referee in race-based disputes, but
Jones sees his real mission as sim-
pler and broader than that.
"When you say 'diversity,' peo-
ple think black, white and Latino,
but it's much more than that," he
said. "It's about people from dif-
ferent backgrounds and different
experiences coming together to
form a community in this case,


also advised IDL on issues re-
lated to American foreign policy
and political culture.
More exchanges like Dieppa's
IDL internship may be in the
works, thanks to the law school's
newly created Law and Policy
Issues in the Americas Program.
Part of the Center for Gov-
ernmental Responsibility, the
new program will do research
on topics related to rule of law
throughout the Americas and
will provide technical support to
judicial reform efforts through-
out the region.
Program director Meredith
Fensom, recently returned from
a Fulbright fellowship in Chile,
said the program will forge more
student exchanges between UF
and Latin American institutions.
For more information on the
Law and Policy in the Ameri-
cas Program, or on student
exchanges in Latin America,
contact Fensom at fensom@law.
ufl.edu or 273-0835.






a community of citizen lawyers."
Jones said he expects to act
as mediator when disputes arise
between individual students or
groups on campus, regardless of
the nature of the dispute. He said
he also can serve as a contact point
for students who have Americans
with Disabilities Act issues.
Jones is seeking input from
students from all backgrounds on
community-building issues at the
law school. To contact him, call
the Office of Student Affairs at
273-0620.


6 FLA LAW















Scholarship & Activities
James J. Freeland Eminent
Scholar in Taxation Paul
McDaniel was a participant in
an International Tax Confer-
ence in Rust, Austria in July.
Tax scholars from Europe and
the U.S. met to discuss current
issues in international taxation.
McDaniel's paper, "A Critique of
Tax Expenditure Accounting in
Selected OECD Countries," will
appear in a Festschrift for Pro-
fessor Nils Mattson of Uppsala
University in Sweden.
Samuel T. Dell Research
Scholar Winston Nagan, a
fellow of the World Academy
of Art and Science, has been
invited to give a presentation at
the academy's annual congress
in Zagreb, Croatia in Novem-
ber. He has also been invited to
give a presentation at Yale Law
School's Society for the Policy
Sciences, where he serves on the
board of directors. With former
Senior Fellow Craig Hammer
and Junior Fellow Adam Arti-
gliere, he drafted two amicus
briefs for the Second Circuit
Court of Appeals in New York
regarding compelling issues in
ongoing apartheid litigation.
Nagan published "The Global
Challenge To Legal Education:
Training Lawyers For A New
Paradigm Of Economic, Politi-
cal And Legal Cultural Expecta-
tions In The 21st Century" in
11 ILSA Journal oflnt'l & Comp.
Law 1 (2005) (with Professor
Danie Visser).
Assistant Professor Christo-
pher Peterson testified before the
Jacksonville City Commission's
Government Operations, Over-
sight & Human Services Com-
mittee on Sept. 19. He spoke


SCHOLARSHIP
& ACTIVITIES


about a proposed ordinance that
would limit interest rates charged
to military personnel who take
out payday loans.
Professor William Page
presented his paper "The Ideo-
logical Origins and Evolution of
Antitrust Law" Sept. 19 at New
York University's Colloquium on
Market Institutions and Eco-
nomic Processes.
Stephen C. O'Connell Profes-
sor Christopher Slobogin gave a
talk on "Virtual Searches" at the
National Conference on Science,
Technology and the Law in St.
Petersburg Sept. 13. Slobogin
presented draft standards on
mental disability and the death
penalty to the ABA's Criminal
Justice Standards Committee in
Washington, D.C., Sept. 18. He
participated in the University of
Florida's Sept. 21 Constitution
Day panel.
David H. Levin Chair in
Family Law Barbara Bennett
Woodhouse gave the inaugural
lecture Sept. 22 at Harvard Law
School's Child Advocacy Proj-
ect. Her topic was children's
emerging rights and the role of
universities in fostering high


quality multidisciplinary advo-
cacy for children.

In the News
Dean Robert Jerry was quoted
in a Sept. 15 Florida Bar News
article about diversity issues at
law schools across Florida.
Assistant Professor Christo-
pher Peterson was quoted in a
Sept. 18 Arizona Republic article
about the boom in payday lend-
ers in Arizona. The Associated
Press did its own version of the
story, which ran Sept. 19 in The
Tucson Citizen.
Samuel T Dell Research
Scholar Winston Nagan's
editorial "Explain Yourself, Judge
Roberts," appeared in The Tampa
Tribune on Sept. 15 and The
Gainesville Sun on Sept. 16.
Professor Steven Willis and
Tulane University law student
Kevin Reed were the subject of
an article in the Sept. 20 issue
of The Gainesville Sun.
Willis opened his home to
Reed, who is one of more than
30 New Orleans students who
are studying at UF in the wake
of Hurricane Katrina.


Alum, Research Fellow Goes to World Bank
UF law alumnus and Senior Research Fellow Craig Hammer a recent
graduate who co-authored a number of papers with Professor Winston
Nagan has been hired as a Junior Associate at the World Bank.
Hammer will work with the Program to Develop New Bank Practices in
Civic Engagement, Empowerment and Respect for Diversity, which man-
ages a number of the organization's experimental projects. He received
the call from the World Bank last Monday, Sept. 19, and reported for
work two days later. While the pace of the hiring was swift, Nagan said,
it did not come as a complete surprise: Hammer had worked as a consul-
tant for the organization over recent months.
"Craig does bang-up research, and once they got the chance to work with
him, I think the people at the World Bank recognized his talent," Nagan said.


McDaniel


ivagan


Peterson


liooogin


Woodhouse


Jerry


PEOPLE


FLA LAW 7







College of Law
Administration
* Robert H. Jerry, II, Dean
* George L. Dawson,
Associate Dean for
Academic Affairs
* Stuart R. Cohn,
Associate Dean for
International Studies
* Lyrissa Barnett Lidsky,
Associate Dean for
Faculty Development
* Michael K. Friel,
Associate Dean & Director,
Graduate Tax Program
* M. Kathleen "Kathie" Price,
Associate Dean for Library
and Technology
* Gail E. Sasnett,
Associate Dean for
Students, Professionalism
and Community Relations
* J. Patrick Shannon,
Associate Dean for
Administrative Affairs
* Linda Calvert Hanson,
Assistant Dean for
Career Services
* Jennifer Cope, Interim
Assistant Dean for Students
* Adrian Jones,
Assistant Dean for Diversity
and Community Relations
* J. Michael Patrick,
Assistant Dean for
Admissions
* Donald J. Hale,
Senior Director of
Development and
Alumni Affairs
* Debra D. Amirin,
Director of Communications
* Tim Lockette,
Editor, FlaLaw
* Linda Johns,
Graphic Designer
* Kristen Hines,
Photographer

Send Us Your News
FlaLaw is published each week
school is in session by the
Levin College of Law Commu-
nications Office. Submit news
of interest to the law school
community by 10 a.m. Tuesday
for the following Monday's
issue to FlaLaw editor Tim
Lockette at lockette@law.ufl.

UNIVERSITY OF
FLORIDA


Counseling: A Tune-Up for Your Mind

BY NICOLE STERN


People have many ideas about
counseling and the process of
change. In this article, I hope to
bring to light how counseling
can be used
and what it can
do for those
who decide to
use it.
One view is
Stern that counsel-
ing is like a
tune-up for your mind. Just as
people would take their car to
the mechanic if the tires were
out of alignment, people may
see a counselor if they are expe-
riencing something that makes
it difficult to "drive" their mind
or body.
People often seek profes-
sional counseling if they are
dealing with any number of life
circumstances. Some examples
of common situations for which
people may see a counselor
include: relationship difficulties,
sleeping or eating problems,
feelings of being stressed or sad,
adjustment issues, self-esteem,
feelings of being out-of-control,
and many other situations that
life can present to a person.


When people go to a profes-
sional counselor, they are likely
to have different fears and expec-
tations of the experience. Some
have the idea that they will come
into the office and lie on a couch
while the counselor "picks at
their brain" in the old Freudian
psychoanalytic way. Others are
hesitant because they do not like
the idea of a "stranger" know-
ing their intimate and personal
business, and think they should
figure things out on their own.
Still others think that when they
see a professional counselor, the
counselor will listen to their
problems and give them the
solution so they can move on
with life. All of these ideas are
perfectly understandable, but
none is quite true.
Seeing a professional coun-
selor is something that can be
done by any person at any stage
of life with just about any type
of personal problem. It can be
done sitting or lying on a couch,
if there is one.
Hesitation in not wanting a
stranger to know intimate and
personal details is completely
understandable. Be assured that


whatever is discussed with your
counselor is confidential infor-
mation. The only limit to that
confidentiality is the counselors
obligation to act when he or she
believes a client is likely to harm
themselves or others.
Don't expect a counselor to
"fix" your problems. You are the
expert on your own life. The
counselor's expertise lies in the
ability to act as a sort of mirror
that helps reflect back to you
whatever you present as the
problem experienced, in order
to help you see the situation
in an objective way, so solu-
tions are easier to perceive and
achieve.
The process of counseling may
involve an individual, family, or
group working together through
a therapeutic relationship to
bring about change.
The Board of Bar Examin-
ers does not mind you seeking
counseling to help you deal
with the problems that life may
present. They want you to take
care of yourself so you can be
mentally healthy and able to
practice law.


September
26 JMBA Meeting, 7 p.m.,
room 285C

Law School Democrats,
5:30 p.m., room 382

27 ACS Speaker Series with
Prof. Michael Allan Wolf,
noon, Bailey Courtroom

Careers with the Federal
Government, noon,
room 285D


Federalist Society with
Speaker Clark Neily, 3
p.m., Bailey Courtroom

28 APIL Meeting, 5 p.m.,
room 345

JTLP Write-On Begins,
5 p.m., room 355A

Beyond OCI: Exploring
All Your Options,
noon, 285B


29 Career Opportunities in
Estate Planning, 10 a.m.
faculty dining room

One Quick Question,
10:30 a.m.-noon, 244BG

Vigil for Hurricane
Victims, 7:30 p.m. north
lawn, Reitz Union

30 From Mesches to Kurtz,
1 p.m., Chesterfield Smith
Ceremonial Classroom
(room 180)


8 FLA LAW


CALENDAR







College of Law
Administration
* Robert H. Jerry, II, Dean
* George L. Dawson,
Associate Dean for
Academic Affairs
* Stuart R. Cohn,
Associate Dean for
International Studies
* Lyrissa Barnett Lidsky,
Associate Dean for
Faculty Development
* Michael K. Friel,
Associate Dean & Director,
Graduate Tax Program
* M. Kathleen "Kathie" Price,
Associate Dean for Library
and Technology
* Gail E. Sasnett,
Associate Dean for
Students, Professionalism
and Community Relations
* J. Patrick Shannon,
Associate Dean for
Administrative Affairs
* Linda Calvert Hanson,
Assistant Dean for
Career Services
* Jennifer Cope, Interim
Assistant Dean for Students
* Adrian Jones,
Assistant Dean for Diversity
and Community Relations
* J. Michael Patrick,
Assistant Dean for
Admissions
* Donald J. Hale,
Senior Director of
Development and
Alumni Affairs
* Debra D. Amirin,
Director of Communications
* Tim Lockette,
Editor, FlaLaw
* Linda Johns,
Graphic Designer
* Kristen Hines,
Photographer

Send Us Your News
FlaLaw is published each week
school is in session by the
Levin College of Law Commu-
nications Office. Submit news
of interest to the law school
community by 10 a.m. Tuesday
for the following Monday's
issue to FlaLaw editor Tim
Lockette at lockette@law.ufl.

UNIVERSITY OF
FLORIDA


Counseling: A Tune-Up for Your Mind

BY NICOLE STERN


People have many ideas about
counseling and the process of
change. In this article, I hope to
bring to light how counseling
can be used
and what it can
do for those
who decide to
use it.
One view is
Stern that counsel-
ing is like a
tune-up for your mind. Just as
people would take their car to
the mechanic if the tires were
out of alignment, people may
see a counselor if they are expe-
riencing something that makes
it difficult to "drive" their mind
or body.
People often seek profes-
sional counseling if they are
dealing with any number of life
circumstances. Some examples
of common situations for which
people may see a counselor
include: relationship difficulties,
sleeping or eating problems,
feelings of being stressed or sad,
adjustment issues, self-esteem,
feelings of being out-of-control,
and many other situations that
life can present to a person.


When people go to a profes-
sional counselor, they are likely
to have different fears and expec-
tations of the experience. Some
have the idea that they will come
into the office and lie on a couch
while the counselor "picks at
their brain" in the old Freudian
psychoanalytic way. Others are
hesitant because they do not like
the idea of a "stranger" know-
ing their intimate and personal
business, and think they should
figure things out on their own.
Still others think that when they
see a professional counselor, the
counselor will listen to their
problems and give them the
solution so they can move on
with life. All of these ideas are
perfectly understandable, but
none is quite true.
Seeing a professional coun-
selor is something that can be
done by any person at any stage
of life with just about any type
of personal problem. It can be
done sitting or lying on a couch,
if there is one.
Hesitation in not wanting a
stranger to know intimate and
personal details is completely
understandable. Be assured that


whatever is discussed with your
counselor is confidential infor-
mation. The only limit to that
confidentiality is the counselors
obligation to act when he or she
believes a client is likely to harm
themselves or others.
Don't expect a counselor to
"fix" your problems. You are the
expert on your own life. The
counselor's expertise lies in the
ability to act as a sort of mirror
that helps reflect back to you
whatever you present as the
problem experienced, in order
to help you see the situation
in an objective way, so solu-
tions are easier to perceive and
achieve.
The process of counseling may
involve an individual, family, or
group working together through
a therapeutic relationship to
bring about change.
The Board of Bar Examin-
ers does not mind you seeking
counseling to help you deal
with the problems that life may
present. They want you to take
care of yourself so you can be
mentally healthy and able to
practice law.


September
26 JMBA Meeting, 7 p.m.,
room 285C

Law School Democrats,
5:30 p.m., room 382

27 ACS Speaker Series with
Prof. Michael Allan Wolf,
noon, Bailey Courtroom

Careers with the Federal
Government, noon,
room 285D


Federalist Society with
Speaker Clark Neily, 3
p.m., Bailey Courtroom

28 APIL Meeting, 5 p.m.,
room 345

JTLP Write-On Begins,
5 p.m., room 355A

Beyond OCI: Exploring
All Your Options,
noon, 285B


29 Career Opportunities in
Estate Planning, 10 a.m.
faculty dining room

One Quick Question,
10:30 a.m.-noon, 244BG

Vigil for Hurricane
Victims, 7:30 p.m. north
lawn, Reitz Union

30 From Mesches to Kurtz,
1 p.m., Chesterfield Smith
Ceremonial Classroom
(room 180)


8 FLA LAW


CALENDAR