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 People, scholarship and activi...
 Events and opportunities
 Dedication
 Coping with crisis
 Calendar


UF UFLAW



Fla law newsletter of the University of Florida College of Law
ALL VOLUMES CITATION SEARCH THUMBNAILS PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00072281/00146
 Material Information
Title: Fla law newsletter of the University of Florida College of Law
Portion of title: Flalaw
Physical Description: Serial
Creator: Levin College of Law
Publisher: s.n.
Place of Publication: <Gainesville FL> College of Law Communications Office 1997-
Creation Date: September 19, 2005
Frequency: weekly
completely irregular
 Subjects
Genre: periodical   ( marcgt )
serial   ( sobekcm )
 Notes
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol.1, no. 1 (Oct. 6, 1997)-
General Note: Weekly during the school year with a biweekly insert, numbered separately called: The Docket.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved, Board of Trustees of the University of Florida
Resource Identifier: aleph - 002311766
notis - ALR5129
System ID: UF00072281:00146

Table of Contents
    O'Connor: Defend judicial independence
        Page 1
    Career Services
        Page 2
    People, scholarship and activities
        Page 3
    Events and opportunities
        Page 4
        Page 5
    Dedication
        Page 6
        Page 7
    Coping with crisis
        Page 8
    Calendar
        Page 8
Full Text



















O'Connor: Defend Judicial Independence


U.S. Supreme Court Associate
Justice Sandra Day O'Connor
defended the independence of
the judiciary and criticized
politicians for recent remarks
about the courts in a Sept. 9
speech at the dedication of new
facilities at the University of
Florida's Levin College of Law.
"I am against judicial reform
driven by nakedly partisan,
result-oriented reasons," Justice
O'Connor said. "The experience
of developing countries, former
Communist countries, and our
own political culture teaches us
that we must be ever vigilant
against those who would strong-
arm the judiciary into adopting
their preferred policies."


INSIDE THIS ISSUE
2 Career Services
4 Events and Opportunities
8 Calendar


Justice O'Connor spoke to a
crowd of roughly 1,000 UF law
alumni, faculty and staff at the
dedication of the Lawton Chiles
Legal Information Center, the
100,000-square-foot law library
that serves as the centerpiece of
the law school's newly renovated
campus. Named for former
Florida governor and UF law
alumnus Lawton Chiles, the
facility is now the largest aca-
demic law library in
the Southeast.
Justice O'Connor praised the
law school for taking on the
project, which, she said, was
"bound to inspire academic
achievement and nurture inter-
esting and valuable legal


Faculty
In the News


l


scholarship." She urged UF law
faculty to use the facilities to
educate a generation of lawyers
that will maintain America's tra-
dition of judicial independence.
Citing political and physi-
cal threats against judges in the
former Soviet republics, Eastern
Europe, and Zimbabwe -
which she described as "one of
the most nightmarish tyrannies
in the world today" Justice
O'Connor reminded the audi-
ence of the fragile nature of the
independent judiciary.
"Judicial independence
doesn't happen all by itself," she
said. "It's tremendously hard
to create, and easier than most
people imagine to destroy."
She noted that the indepen-
dence of the courts has been
threatened a number of times
throughout American history,
from Andrew Jackson's refusal
to enforce a Supreme Court
decision to the 1950s backlash
against desegregation of schools.
She also mentioned a number
of present-day challenges to the
independence of the
courts including threats
against a judge in the Terry
Schiavo case and recent instances
of violence against judges.
Continued on Page 6


Coping with
Crisis


VOL. 9, NO. 5 SEPTEMBER 19, 2005











UF Celebrates
Constitution Day
The university will hold its
inaugural Constitution Day
event Wednesday, Sept. 21, at
6:30 p.m. in the Grand Reading
Room in Smathers Library East.
Hosted by the law school and
the College of Liberal Arts
and Sciences, the event is a
roundtable discussion about
the nation's changing political,
economic and social climate.
Everyone is invited to attend,
or watch the event online at
http://video.ufl.edu.
Speakers include Chesterfield
Smith Professor Fletcher Bald-
win, Irving Cypen Professor of
Law Sharon Rush, Stephen C.
O'Connell Professor Christopher
Slobogin, and Affiliate Profes-
sor Elizabeth Dale, as well as
political science professors
David Hedge and Sam Staf-
ford, state Reps. Ed Jennings
(D-Gainesville) and Larry Cretul
(R-Ocala), and U.S. District
Judge Stephan Mickle.


fl











CAREERSERVICES
Hints to help you in the legal profession


Fellowship
Database Available
An extensive database of
summer and postgraduate
fellowships is available on the
Public Service Law Network
(PSLawNet) at www.pslawnet.
org. Log on to the site and click
on "Fellowship Corner" to
learn more about these
exciting opportunities.


Get Up to Speed
with Listserv
Don't miss important dead-
lines and details sign up for
the Career Services Hotline
Listserv. The e-mail list is an
important source of campus
news, particularly for people
who have just arrived at UF.
To sign up, send a blank e-mail
to career-hotline-subscribe@
law.ufl.edu.


Classes at Law
School on
Homecoming
Friday
Classes will be held on the law
school campus until 1 p.m. on
Oct. 7, the Friday before Home-
coming. Like the rest of the UF
campus, law school offices will
close at 1 p.m. that day.


2 FLA LAW


OCI: Keeping Things
in Perspective
Fact: Most UF law graduates
do not obtain their employment
through Fall OCI.
Often-cited means of obtaining
post-graduation positions include
referral by a business colleague,
friend, relative, alumni, or school
personnel. Many students initi-
ate contact with employers by a
targeted mailing or informational
interview, or through networking.
Fact: The majority of Florida
law firms are medium sized and
not just seeking students at the
top of their class.
Only ten percent of all practic-
ing lawyers nationally work at
firms of more than 100 lawyers.
Fact: Small and medium-sized
law firms are less likely to par-
ticipate in Fall OCI.
Many legal employers hire on
an "as-needed" basis as opposed to
the hiring cycle of large firms.
Fact: Different employers par-
ticipate in Spring OCI and seek
a broader range of students.
More government employers
interview in spring.
Fact: Eighty percent of all
current job openings are never
advertised.
Fact: The best jobs do not
always go to the best candidate.
They do usually go to the best
job strategist. Persistence pays.
Fact: There are a myriad of job
opportunities available to you
beyond OCI.
For more information, come to
"Beyond OCI: Exploring All Your
Career Options," at noon Wednes-
day, Sept. 28, in room 285B.


Pair from UF Win Diversity Award
Shook, Hardy & Bacon awarded the firm's first Thomas L.
Sager Diversity Award to law students Monica Vila (center left)
and Cecily McLeod (center right) at a ceremony last month in
Tampa. Each student will receive $7,500. These awards are given
annually to UF law students and are named for Thomas L. Sager,
vice president and assistant general counsel of DuPont, who is
known for his efforts in promoting diversity in the practice of
law. Pictured with Vila and MacLeod are Nailah Jaffree (left) and
Daniel E Molony, (right) both of Shook, Hardy & Bacon.


Student Organization
Partners Sought
Career Services is seeking
student organizations interested in
co-sponsoring programs. Career
Services has several career programs
currently scheduled that can be
co-sponsored by your group, and
will be happy to help coordinate
the logistics for a career-related
program of your design.

One Quick Question
Stop and ask Jessie Howell
Wallace and Annemarie Schul-
ler your questions about re-
cruiting, externships, resumes,
cover letters, or job search strat-


egies at the table outside the
former Media Services Office
in Bruton-Geer Thursday, Sept.
22, from 10:30 a.m. to noon.

The Call-Back Interview
Join Catherine G. Wither-
spoon, attorney recruiting and
training manager with Carlton
Fields of Tampa, who will share
her perspectives on how to have a
successful call-back interview ses-
sion at noon, Wednesday, Sept.
21, in Room 285B. Learn about
the different types of interviews,
things to know about meals dur-
ing the interview visit, and what
employers seek in candidates.











PEOPLE


In the News
With the Supreme Court in
transition, Associate Justice Sandra
Day O'Connor visiting campus,
and New Orleans law students
coming to UF in the wake of
Hurricane Katrina, the Levin Col-
lege of Law has been in the news
throughout early September.
The dedication of the law
school's new facilities and visit
by Justice O'Connor were the
subject of an Associated Press
story which appeared in The
Washington Post, The Sacramento
Bee, The Washington Times, The
Tampa Tribune, The Lakeland
Ledger, The Sarasota Herald-Tri-
bune, The Bradenton Herald, The
Daytona Beach News-Journal, The
Tuscaloosa News, the news page of
the search engine Yahoo and the
Australian website News 1.
The Gainesville Sun and The
Independent Florida A//l.giroU also
covered the event. Law student
Scott Fusaro's story about cover-
age of the students-only speech
appeared on the Sunt front page.
Broadcast outlets covering the
event included WUFT-TV and
WCJB in Gainesville, WINK-TV
in Southwest Florida, WPLG in
Miami and the AM radio station
WBZ in Boston, Mass.
O'Connor's visit, along with the
passing of Chief Justice William
Rehnquist, also stirred memories
of UF's last major building dedica-
tion. The Gainesville Sun and
The Miami Heraldboth carried
stories about Rehnquist's appear-
ance at the dedication of Bruton-
Geer Hall in 1984. Stephen C.
O'Connell Professor Christopher
Slobogin was quoted in the Sun
story, recalling Rehnquist as an af-


SCHOLARSHIP
& ACTIVITIES


fable man who liked lawyer jokes
and preferred to be called by his
first name.
Rehnquist's death was followed
by a new flurry of stories about
Supreme Court nominee John
Roberts, now being considered
for the position of Chief Justice.
Samuel T. Dell Research Scholar
Winston Nagan was quoted in a
Sept. 12 Gainesville Sun article on
the nomination process. Professor
Juan Perea commented on the
Roberts nomination hearings for
WUFT-TV on Sept. 12. Irving
Cypen Professor Sharon Rush
commented on the nomination
for AM 850 on Sept. 12 and for
WUFT-FM on Sept. 13
In other news, Associate Pro-
fessor Mark Fenster was quoted
in a Sept. 9 Miami Herald story
about the Miramar City Com-
mission's decision, in a quasi-ju-
dicial hearing, to deny Wal-Mart
a permit to build a new store.
Fenster said the decision was un-
likely to be overturned in court.



UF Law in Top 1


Richard E. Nelson Professor
Michael Allan Wolf was quoted
in a Sept. 9 St. Petersburg Times
article about the constitutional-
ity of emergency powers used
by government officials in
the wake of disasters like
Hurricane Katrina.

Scholarship & Activities

Associate Professor Mark
Fenster presented his paper,
"The Opacity of Transparency,"
at Concordia University in
Montreal on Sept. 9.
Director of Admissions and
Special Programs Lewis Hutchi-
son contributed an article on the
role of the personal statement
in the law school admissions
process to the recently-pub-
lished book Profiles and Essays of
Successful African American Law
School Applicants.
Law student Steven M. Rob-
erts' article, "Managing the Risks
of Terror," appeared in National
Law Journal on Sept. 5.


for Hispanic Students -

The Levin College of Law is one of the top
law schools in the nation for Hispanic stu-
dents, according to the September issue of the e
magazine Hispanic Business. UF law placed No.
6 in the magazine's annual rankings, maintain- l -- -
ing its position in the top tier.
The magazine cited UF's focus on international programs in
Latin America, the scholarship of its Hispanic faculty (includ-
ing Professor Berta Hernandez-Truyol, a founder of the LatCrit
movement), mentoring by prominent alumni and an active
social scene (including SALSA events) as some of the reasons
for UF's high ranking.


iloDogin


imagan


rerea


Kush


Fenster


Hutchison


FLA LAW 3


I


















Cuban-American
Bar Scholarship
Students have until Sept. 23 to
apply for the Cuban-American
Bar Foundation Scholarship.
To apply for the $1,000
scholarship, you must submit a
transcript, an updated resume
and a 1,000-word essay
describing your qualifications.
Applications must be turned in
to Carol Huber at 164 Holland
Hall. For more information,
contact Huber at 273-0620.


Apply for
Continuing
Student
Scholarships
Continuing student scholarships
of $1,000-$2,500 are available
for second- and third-year law
students. The scholarships are
now listed, along with eligibility
requirements, on the Finan-
cial Aid bulletin board on the
concourse. (Current scholarship
recipients are not eligible.)
Applications can be obtained
from the Office of Student
Affairs, 164 Holland Hall (front
desk) and must be filed by 5
p.m. Friday, Sept. 23.


4 FLA LAW


/E VENTS & OPPORTUNITIES


Pose For Pictures
Graduation is coming faster
than you think: it's almost time
for Fall 2005 graduates to pose
for their senior portraits. A
photographer will be available
to take your picture in Student
Affairs Tuesday, Sept. 20, from 1
p.m. to 5 p.m.; and on Wednes-
day, Sept. 21, and Thursday
Sept. 22, from 8:30 a.m. to
noon and from 1 p.m. to 5 p.m.
Portraits cost $10, including
an 8"-by-10" copy of the class
picture seen in the Student Af-
fairs lobby. Remember to wear
court attire. If you would like to
be photographed in graduation
regalia, make sure to book two
time slots.

Lunch and Learn
The Jewish Law Student As-
sociation will hold a "Lunch
and Learn" event Wednesday,
Sept. 21, at noon in the
Bailey Courtroom.

Presidential
Fellows Wanted
For the past 27 years, the
Presidential Management
Fellows (PMF) Program has
attracted outstanding master's,
law, and doctoral-level students
to federal service. The PMF
Program is your passport to a
unique and rewarding career
experience with the federal
government. Fellows in the
program work in domestic or
international issues, technology,
science, criminal justice, health,
financial management, and
many other fields in support of
public service programs.
To be eligible for the pro-
gram, you must be scheduled to


graduate by Aug. 31, 2006, and
must be nominated by the law
school. Associate Dean for Stu-
dent Affairs Gail Sasnett is the
law school's nominating official
for the program. The applica-
tion deadline is noon Oct. 14.
For more information contact
Student Affairs at 273-0620 or
go to http://www.pmf.opm.gov/.

JTLP Welcomes
Write-Ons
Based on their submissions
during the Summer Writing
Competition, The Journal of
Technology Law and Policy wel-
comes the following new mem-
bers: Nathaniel Quirk, Magie
Ozarowski and Peter Vasat.

ILS Meeting, TWEN Site
The International Law
Society will have a meeting on
Wednesday, Sept 21, at 5 p.m.
in room 359. Ethnic dining will
follow.
ILS has just registered a
TWEN site. To receive updated
ILS event information, add ILS
from the list of 'courses offered'
to your TWEN classes.

CaribLaw to Meet
The Caribbean Law Students
Association will meet Thurs-
day, Sept. 22, at 4 p.m. in
room 345.

EASLS Meeting
The Entertainment, Arts &
Sports Law Society will hold a
general membership meeting
Tuesday, Sept. 20 at noon in
room 285B. The group will dis-
cuss the Music Law Conference
and other events, as well as the
the group's new law journal.


JLPP Write-On Meeting
The Journal of Law and Public
Policy will hold a meeting for par-
ticipants in its write-on competi-
tion, titled "How Do I Cite in a
Case Comment," on Wednesday,
Sept. 21, at 5 p.m. in room 355.

ABA Olympics
On Sunday, Sept. 25, the
American Bar Association-Law
Student Division will host the
first ever law school field day,
entitled "ABA Olympics: Battle
of the Semesters." The event will
pit all six semesters (plus a team
composed of our visiting friends
from Louisiana) against each oth-
er in various races and contests.
Participation in the event is free
for all UF law students, including
visitors from Tulane and Loyola.
The event begins at 1 p.m. at
Norman Field, near the corner
of Archer Road and SW 13th
Street. For more information,
contact ABA President Michael
Wild at bufhouse@ufl.edu.

Learn About ACS
The American Constitution
Society will hold its first general
meeting of the year Tuesday,
Sept. 20, at noon in the faculty
dining room. Come join the
group, learn about its mission
and discuss upcoming events.

Democrats Gather
The Law School Democrats
will hold a general meeting Sept.
26 at 5:30 p.m. in room 382. Ev-
eryone is welcome to attend. For
more information, go to www.
uflawdemocrats.org.


I




































Best Brief
Law students Gina D'Amelia (left) and Randy Hall
received the Best Brief Award at this August's E. Earle
Moot Court Competition. D'Amelia and Hall argued
workers' compensation issues before a panel of judges o
tion claims in Orlando, beating eleven other teams for
D'Amelia and Hall are members of UF's Justice Ca
Thornal Moot Court Team, which participates in the
competition every year. The competition includes bot
late brief and oral arguments: team members Amy Fle
Brian Strosahl attended the event as oral argument co



Three From UF Become See Webcast
Gubernatorial Fellows Roberts Debal


UF law students Staci Braswell,
Camille Warren and Nicho-
las Geiseler were selected this
summer for fellowships in the
office of Gov. Jeb Bush. They are
among only 13 students around
the state selected for the fellow-
ship. Gubernatorial fellows are
selected through a competitive
process and are expected to show
strong leadership, written and
oral communication skills, com-
munity activism and a desire to
serve the people of Florida.


Students, faculty
can see a live webc
on the nomination
erts to the Suprem
p.m. Sept. 21 in ro
at Georgetown Sch
the debate is mode
Magazine Senior E
Bazelon. The event
by the Law School
the National Lawy
the American Con
ety. Free food will


Student Affairs Closes
Friday Afternoon
Most of the staff of the Office
of Student Affairs will be out of
the office afternoon Friday, Sept.
23, as they attend a retreat. A
staff member will be available at
the front desk to accept schol-
arship applications and other
time-sensitive documents. Voice
mail and e-mail inquiries will be
returned Monday morning.

ACS Takes on Takings
Richard E. Nelson Professor
Michael Allan Wolf will talk about
takings in the wake of Kelo in the
first installment of the American
Constitution Society's "Constitu-
ight) tion in the 21st Century" speaker
Zehmer
series, at noon Sept. 27 in the
complex
compe Bailey Courtroom. Everyone is
)f compensa-
Sc pensa invited to attend.
the award.
mpbell ICAM to Meet
Zehmer
h an appel The International Commeri-
tcher and cal Arbitration Moot team will
ttcher and
aches. meet today, Sept. 19, at 6 p.m.
in room 359.

UF Moot Court Teams
of Advance to Semi-Finals
te Two teams from the Justice
and others Campbell Thornal Moot Court
ast of a debate Team competed in the Orseck
of John Rob Moot Court Competition at the
e Court at 4 Florida Bar Association Meet-
om 382. Held ing in Orlando in June. Victoria
ool of Law, Shepard and Veronica Tafur
rated by Slate received second place in the brief
editor Emily category. Valerie Brennan and
is sponsored Alissa Lugo received third place in
Democrats, the brief category and third place
ers Guild and overall.
stitution Soci UF was only one of two
be served, schools to have both its teams
advance to competition's semi-fi-
nal round.


Please Don't
Smoke at Law
School
Smoking is prohibited in law
school facilities or within 50
feet of law school buildings.
This includes the courtyard and
walkways between buildings.
If you do smoke outside the
law school, please choose a
spot outside of areas non-smok-
ers must pass to enter or exit
buildings. This is more than an
aesthetic concern: cigarette
smoke can cause serious prob-
lems for people with allergies
and other health issues.





Minority
Scholarship
The firm of Foley & Lardner is
accepting applications for its
Minority Scholarship Program,
created in 1998 to raise
awareness of diversity-related
issues in the legal profession.
Foley will award $5,000 to a
first-year minority law student
(Spring or Fall 2005 entrant)
at one of eight selected law
schools. The scholarship is to
be applied to tuition, books,
fees and other expenses
incidental to law school atten-
dance. Consideration is given
to students with significant
involvement in community ac-
tivities, undergraduate records,
and interest in and/or ties to a
city in which Foley & Lardner
practices. Financial need is not
a consideration. Applications
are available in Career Ser-
vices, and must be submitted
by Sept. 30.


FLA LAW 5










Justice O'Connor
Speaks Out
On the Role of the Judiciary:
"...whatever else courts do, we
have the power to make the
other branches of government
really angry. In fact, if we don't
make them mad at least some
of the time, we judges probably
aren't doing our jobs."
On Protecting Judicial
Independence:
"There's no natural constitu-
ency for judicial independence,
except perhaps for a vibrant,
responsible lawyer class
like the people who will be
educated in this building in the
years to come, and we can't
just trust the courts to protect
themselves...so the best de-
fense against these threats is
the maintenance and expansion
of our own legacy: a culture in
which such threats are frowned
on, and therefore unlikely to
even get off the ground."
On UF Law's New Facilities:
"The new building is beautiful,
and with the new high-tech
classrooms and the additional
library space, the law school
is well equipped to meet the
demands of contemporary legal
education. These new facilities
are bound to inspire aca-
demic achievement and nurture
interesting and valuable legal
scholarship, and to nourish a
sense of community among the
law school students and faculty
and staff and alumni."


DEDICATION


- .- .... .- : -
--_- -


Justice Sandra Day O'Connor takes questions from law students after lecturing on life and work at the U.S.
Supreme Court Sept. 9. The hour-long event was the longest of Justice O'Connor's public appearances at UF.


O'Connor from Page 1
"It doesn't help when a high-
profile senator, after noting that
decisions he sees as activist cause
him great distress, suggests that
there might be a cause-and-effect
connection between such activism
and recent episodes of courthouse
violence," she said.
O'Connor also criticized politi-
cal leaders who have supported
calls for mass impeachment of
judges or acts that would strip
the courts of jurisdiction to hear
certain cases.
Justice O'Connor said she was
not opposed to the establish-
ment of an age limit for Supreme
Court Justices though such term
limits are not mentioned in the
Constitution.
"A retirement age of 75 or so
might be reasonable," said Justice
O'Connor, who herself turned 75
this year. "Anyone who has read
some of my opinions knows I do
not take a formalistic approach to
these questions."
In addition to her appear-
ance at the library dedication,


O'Connor also spoke to roughly
700 students in a one-hour lecture
and question-and-answer session,
and performed a ribbon cutting at
the new facilities for
the law school's Cen-
ter on Children and
Families, headed by
her former law clerk,
Professor Barbara
Bennett Woodhouse.
Her appearances were


the high point of a
two-day celebration
of the completion of
the law school's new
facilities, part of UF's
drive to increase its
standing among the


nation's top-ranked
public law schools.
But the real consecration of the
building, O'Connor noted, will
take place over the coming years.
"We can't dedicate, we can't
consecrate, we cannot hallow
this building," she said. "Rather,
it is for the students and the
professors who use these new


classrooms, and the new library
space, and the offices in the old
buildings that this construc-
tion has made possible, to be


Justice O'Connor shares a light moment with
Senior Legal Skills Professor Tracy Rambo.
O'Connor met Rambo and other UF law faculty at
a breakfast in the new faculty lounge Sept. 9.


dedicated to the practice and the
promise of our Anglo-American
common law tradition, which
makes the courts, armed with
the power of judicial review, and
protected by judicial indepen-
dence, part of the people's arsenal
to enforce the rule of law and
protect individual freedoms."


6 FLA LAW






















Justice O'Connor meets UF law faculty Law Center Association Board Chairman W. C. Gentry
including Professor Jeffrey Davis (front, left), shakes hands with Dean Emeritus Jon Mills at a
Assistant Professor Lee-ford Tritt (front, center) ceremony held in Mills' honor. A portait of Mills will
and Professor and Center for the Study of Race be displayed in the new library, a project that began
and Race Relations Director Katheryn Russell- during Mills' term as interim dean. "Before this facility
Brown (front, right) at a Sept. 9 breakfast. became a dream, it was a nightmare," Mills said, "It
went from impossible to improbable to inevitable."


Justice O'Connor and Professor Barbara Woodhouse
cut the ribbon on the new home of the Center on Chil-
dren and Families. Woodhouse, director of the center,
is one of O'Connor's former law clerks.


Justice O' Connor meets Katie and Ashley Chiles,
granddaughters of former Florida governor and
UF alumnus Lawton Chiles, for whom the Legal
Information Center is named.


'4. -


Hundreds of law students gathered in the Marcia Whitney Schott Courtyard to hear Justice O'Connor speak.


More News on
UF Law Website
Want more information on the
dedication of the Levin College
of Law's new facilities and
Justice O'Connor's visit? The
law school now has a website
devoted to the events. The site
offers:
* A transcript and a podcast of
Justice O'Connor's speech.

* Links to and updates on
news coverage of the event.

* Photos from all the events,
including the dedication of
the Lawton Chiles Legal
Information Center, the
dedication of the Stephen C.
O'Connell/Florida Supreme
Court Reading Room, the
ribbon-cutting ceremony for
the Center on Children and
Families, and more.

* Copies of the programs for
various dedication events, in
pdf format.

To get to the site, go to
www.law.ufl.edu and click on
"Justice O'Connor Speaks at
UF Law."


Library Closes for
Game Days
The Lawton Chiles Legal
Information Center will close
on days when home football
games are being played. Home
game days include Oct. 8
(Mississippi State), Nov. 5
(Vanderbilt) and Nov. 26 (FSU).
The closure is due to the scar-
city of parking on game days
and the university's drive to
reduce building utility costs.


FLA LAW 7







College of Law
Administration
* Robert H. Jerry, II, Dean
* George L. Dawson,
Associate Dean for
Academic Affairs
* Stuart R. Cohn,
Associate Dean for
International Studies
* Lyrissa Barnett Lidsky,
Associate Dean for
Faculty Development
* Michael K. Friel,
Associate Dean & Director,
Graduate Tax Program
* M. Kathleen "Kathie" Price,
Associate Dean for Library
and Technology
* Gail E. Sasnett,
Associate Dean for
Students, Professionalism
and Community Relations
* J. Patrick Shannon,
Associate Dean for
Administrative Affairs
* Linda Calvert Hanson,
Assistant Dean for
Career Services
* Jennifer Cope, Interim
Assistant Dean for Students
* Adrian Jones,
Assistant Dean for Diversity
and Community Relations
* J. Michael Patrick,
Assistant Dean for
Admissions
* Donald J. Hale,
Senior Director of
Development and
Alumni Affairs
* Debra D. Amirin,
Director of Communications
* Tim Lockette,
Editor, FlaLaw
* Linda Johns,
Graphic Designer
* Kristen Hines,
Photographer

Send Us Your News
Flalaw is published each week
school is in session by the Levin
College of Law Communications
Office. Submit news of interest
to the law school community
by 10 a.m. Tuesday for the
following Monday's issue to
Flalaw editor Tim Lockette
at lockette@law.ufl.edu or
273-0650.

UNIVERSITY OF
FLORIDA


Coping with Crisis
BY NICOLE STERN


Chances are, you or someone
you know has been affected by
the recent tragedy caused as a
result of Hurricane Katrina.
Often when
something like
this occurs,
we don't quite
know how to
deal with what
Stern has happened,
or how to be
of help. Here are some ideas
that may be helpful to you when
dealing with people who may be
in crisis.
If you are a friend or family
member of a survivor, there are
many things you can do to help
the person through the process
of recovery. When you speak
to the survivor, it can be most
helpful to them for you to show
you care by using sincere words
and actions. It is important to
accept the person, in whatever
state they are in, without judg-
ing them, trying to make things
better, giving advice, or trying
to solve their problem. Simply
being there and listening with
open ears and a closed mouth
can help the person cope and


accept their loss, and aid them
in the recovery process.
When people experience a
crisis, there is often a deep sense
of loss and grief. Grieving people
go through the stages of denial,
anger, bargaining, depression
and acceptance. Knowing these
stages can be helpful since they
are a natural part of the experi-
ence of the person who has
suffered the loss.
Denial acts as a natural
defense that allows one to do
what is necessary to find a way
to cope. Anger, the next stage of
grief, is often accompanied by
envy and resentment of others
who didn't suffer as much loss.
Bargaining, the third stage, oc-
curs when people make promises
to themselves or others (i.e.
God) in exchange for what they
need. This can be a positive way
to deal with stress, as it provides
comfort, helps people get a han-
dle on the crisis, and helps them
cope with feelings of sadness.
The fourth stage, depression,
happens when people see no
hope. A person suffering from
depression may show changes
in eating or sleeping patterns,


moodiness, irritability, lack of
energy, and feelings of helpless-
ness or hopelessness. When this
passes and all of the stages have
been worked through com-
pletely, people get to the final
stage of grief, acceptance. In this
stage, the person often becomes
stronger than before the disaster
occurred because they have
learned to manage through the
pain and face the present.
People who cope well have the
ability to realistically assess and
confront their situation without
blaming themselves or others
for what has happened. They
have learned to ask for help and
recognize their limits. Also, they
are more able to talk about their
fears, anxieties, and sorrows.
If you are experiencing loss
due to this recent tragedy,
use the resources available to
you, such as close friends and
family, as they can be of great
value through this time. Also,
a weekly support group to help
you through this process is now
available. Contact me at stern@
law.ufl.edu for more informa-
tion.


September
19 ICAM Meeting 6 p.m.,
room 359

20 EASLS Meeting, noon,
room 285B

ACS Meeting, noon,
faculty dining room

Senior Pictures, 1-5 p.m.,
room 164

21 The Call-Back Interview,
noon, room 285B


Senior Pictures, 8:30 a.m.-
noon and 1-5 p.m., room
164

JLSA Lunch and Learn,
noon, Bailey Courtroom

ILS Meeting, 5 p.m. room
359

JLPP Meeting 5 p.m.,
room 355

Roberts Debate Webcast,
4p.m. room 382


Constitution Day, 6:30
p.m., Smathers Library
East

22 Senior Pictures, 8:30
a.m.-noon and 1-5 p.m.,
room 164

One Quick Question,
10:30 a.m. BG 244

Cariblaw Meeting, 4 p.m.,
room 345

25 ABA Olympics, 1 p.m.,
Norman Field


8 FLA LAW


CALENDAR







College of Law
Administration
* Robert H. Jerry, II, Dean
* George L. Dawson,
Associate Dean for
Academic Affairs
* Stuart R. Cohn,
Associate Dean for
International Studies
* Lyrissa Barnett Lidsky,
Associate Dean for
Faculty Development
* Michael K. Friel,
Associate Dean & Director,
Graduate Tax Program
* M. Kathleen "Kathie" Price,
Associate Dean for Library
and Technology
* Gail E. Sasnett,
Associate Dean for
Students, Professionalism
and Community Relations
* J. Patrick Shannon,
Associate Dean for
Administrative Affairs
* Linda Calvert Hanson,
Assistant Dean for
Career Services
* Jennifer Cope, Interim
Assistant Dean for Students
* Adrian Jones,
Assistant Dean for Diversity
and Community Relations
* J. Michael Patrick,
Assistant Dean for
Admissions
* Donald J. Hale,
Senior Director of
Development and
Alumni Affairs
* Debra D. Amirin,
Director of Communications
* Tim Lockette,
Editor, FlaLaw
* Linda Johns,
Graphic Designer
* Kristen Hines,
Photographer

Send Us Your News
Flalaw is published each week
school is in session by the Levin
College of Law Communications
Office. Submit news of interest
to the law school community
by 10 a.m. Tuesday for the
following Monday's issue to
Flalaw editor Tim Lockette
at lockette@law.ufl.edu or
273-0650.

UNIVERSITY OF
FLORIDA


Coping with Crisis
BY NICOLE STERN


Chances are, you or someone
you know has been affected by
the recent tragedy caused as a
result of Hurricane Katrina.
Often when
something like
this occurs,
we don't quite
know how to
deal with what
Stern has happened,
or how to be
of help. Here are some ideas
that may be helpful to you when
dealing with people who may be
in crisis.
If you are a friend or family
member of a survivor, there are
many things you can do to help
the person through the process
of recovery. When you speak
to the survivor, it can be most
helpful to them for you to show
you care by using sincere words
and actions. It is important to
accept the person, in whatever
state they are in, without judg-
ing them, trying to make things
better, giving advice, or trying
to solve their problem. Simply
being there and listening with
open ears and a closed mouth
can help the person cope and


accept their loss, and aid them
in the recovery process.
When people experience a
crisis, there is often a deep sense
of loss and grief. Grieving people
go through the stages of denial,
anger, bargaining, depression
and acceptance. Knowing these
stages can be helpful since they
are a natural part of the experi-
ence of the person who has
suffered the loss.
Denial acts as a natural
defense that allows one to do
what is necessary to find a way
to cope. Anger, the next stage of
grief, is often accompanied by
envy and resentment of others
who didn't suffer as much loss.
Bargaining, the third stage, oc-
curs when people make promises
to themselves or others (i.e.
God) in exchange for what they
need. This can be a positive way
to deal with stress, as it provides
comfort, helps people get a han-
dle on the crisis, and helps them
cope with feelings of sadness.
The fourth stage, depression,
happens when people see no
hope. A person suffering from
depression may show changes
in eating or sleeping patterns,


moodiness, irritability, lack of
energy, and feelings of helpless-
ness or hopelessness. When this
passes and all of the stages have
been worked through com-
pletely, people get to the final
stage of grief, acceptance. In this
stage, the person often becomes
stronger than before the disaster
occurred because they have
learned to manage through the
pain and face the present.
People who cope well have the
ability to realistically assess and
confront their situation without
blaming themselves or others
for what has happened. They
have learned to ask for help and
recognize their limits. Also, they
are more able to talk about their
fears, anxieties, and sorrows.
If you are experiencing loss
due to this recent tragedy,
use the resources available to
you, such as close friends and
family, as they can be of great
value through this time. Also,
a weekly support group to help
you through this process is now
available. Contact me at stern@
law.ufl.edu for more informa-
tion.


September
19 ICAM Meeting 6 p.m.,
room 359

20 EASLS Meeting, noon,
room 285B

ACS Meeting, noon,
faculty dining room

Senior Pictures, 1-5 p.m.,
room 164

21 The Call-Back Interview,
noon, room 285B


Senior Pictures, 8:30 a.m.-
noon and 1-5 p.m., room
164

JLSA Lunch and Learn,
noon, Bailey Courtroom

ILS Meeting, 5 p.m. room
359

JLPP Meeting 5 p.m.,
room 355

Roberts Debate Webcast,
4p.m. room 382


Constitution Day, 6:30
p.m., Smathers Library
East

22 Senior Pictures, 8:30
a.m.-noon and 1-5 p.m.,
room 164

One Quick Question,
10:30 a.m. BG 244

Cariblaw Meeting, 4 p.m.,
room 345

25 ABA Olympics, 1 p.m.,
Norman Field


8 FLA LAW


CALENDAR