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 Faculty profile: Teresa Rambo
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 UF Law calendar


UF UFLAW



Fla law newsletter of the University of Florida College of Law
ALL VOLUMES CITATION SEARCH THUMBNAILS PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00072281/00122
 Material Information
Title: Fla law newsletter of the University of Florida College of Law
Portion of title: Flalaw
Physical Description: Serial
Creator: Levin College of Law
Publisher: s.n.
Place of Publication: <Gainesville FL> College of Law Communications Office 1997-
Creation Date: November 1, 2004
Frequency: weekly
completely irregular
 Subjects
Genre: periodical   ( marcgt )
serial   ( sobekcm )
 Notes
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol.1, no. 1 (Oct. 6, 1997)-
General Note: Weekly during the school year with a biweekly insert, numbered separately called: The Docket.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved, Board of Trustees of the University of Florida
Resource Identifier: aleph - 002311766
notis - ALR5129
System ID: UF00072281:00122

Table of Contents
    Main
        Page 1
    Career Services and resources
        Page 2
        Page 3
        Page 4
    Events and opportunities
        Page 5
        Page 6
    Faculty profile: Teresa Rambo
        Page 7
    Faculty scholarship and activities
        Page 8
    UF Law calendar
        Page 8
Full Text










Law


2004 Election Panel Today
UF law professors and attorneys will participate in a
panel discussion on issues surrounding the 2004 election
11 a.m.-1 p.m. Monday, Nov. 1, in 355C. All are invited
to the event, which is hosted by the American Constitution
Society and will include the following presentations:
* "Election 2004," with Professors Joseph Little,
Clifford Jones and Center for Governmental
Responsibility/Dean Emeritus Jon Mills, moderated
by Professor Winston Nagan, 11-11:55 a.m.
* "Judicial Nominations and What's at Stake,"
discussion on the important role our next president will have in appointing justices to the
federal judiciary, both in the lower federal courts and the Supreme Court. Professors Fletcher
Baldwin, Sharon Rush, Michael Wolf, and Berta Esperanza Hernandez-Truyol, moderated by
Professor Danaya Wright, noon-1 p.m.
Other speakers to be announced. Refreshments will be served before and after the event. For infor-
mation, e-mail Sarah Gartell at garty@ufl.edu or Felix A. Felicier at felixfelix08@yahoo.com. Food and
refreshments will be served. O


Vote 2004
You can find your
polling place for Nov.
2 online at http://
www.mypollingplace.
com/find.php.
Just type in the
street address where
you are registered.


Externing at the Carter Center -ByKirstenAnderson
Note from Associate Dean for Students, tion. A voter-initiated
Professionalism and Community Relations recall of the president had
Gail Sasnett (Externship Faculty Supervisor): never been attempted
Kirsten Anderson (at right, with President Jimmy before in any country, so
Carter) externed at the Carter Center this sum- the Venezuelan referendum
mer, where she did amazing things and interacted experience was new and
with dignitaries from all over the country. In par- challenging for everyone involved.
ticular she remarked on the high voter turnout in As an extern, I was given tremendous respon-
Venezuela, a reminder to all of us to remember to sibility and very interesting work. I researched and
vote in our own elections this week. (Continued Page 4)
A legal externship in addition to being a I- . i Inside
way to earn academic credit in exchange for prac- I*- l IS Career Services:
tical legal experience can also be a life-chang- --- What Do New
ing event. This past summer, I did an externship in | l- or Lawyers Do? (2)
Atlanta, Georgia, at the Carter Center, a non-profit -* l Events &
organization headed by former President Jimmy *, ^ ^ *; l I ,o, Opportunities (5)
Carter with democracy, development and health I Faculty Profile:
-* r .* [. -i e. li'1llTracy Rambo (7)
programs all over the world. Tracy Ramholarship
S-. S 0 0 g Faculty Scholarship
I worked in the America's Program, almost & Activites (8)
exclusively on the upcoming electoral mission to e *. -
Venezuela for the historic presidential recall refer-
endum. Just as in California, citizens in Venezuela 5- UNIVE RSITY OF
may petition and then remove their leader from FLORIDA
power through a recall provision in their constitu- '* l ^ Fredric G. Levin College of Law

















New Consumer

Law Externships
Assistant Professor
Christopher L. Peterson,
Three Rivers Legal
Services and the Center
for Career Services
have organized a new
Consumer Law externship
for students.
Externs will have the
opportunity to work with
counsel on consumer
law issues, including: car
repossessions, home
mortgage foreclosures,
creditor harassment,
consumer fraud, warranty
claims, mobile home litiga-
tion, and more. Students
will conduct research and
writing, assist with prepa-
rations of interrogatories
and depositions, draft
pleadings, and occasion-
ally may appear in court.
Peterson has agreed
to be faculty supervisor for
the new externships. For
more information, contact
Carol Kuczora in Career
Services (392-0499).


Career Services & Resources
What Do New Lawyers Do?
Newly released NALP data reveals "What
New Lawyers Do. After the JD First Results
of a National Study of Legal Careers," a joint
project of the NALP Foundation for Law Career
Research and Education and the American Bar
Foundation. The data comes from a longitudinal
study of 5,000-plus lawyers first admitted to the
bar in 2000, which is tracking their first 10 years
after law school.
Characteristics identified in the October 2004,
Career Moves for Law Students, "What are Your
Expectations?" include:

Work Responsibilities
* It is a fact of life that newer attorneys should be
prepared to work on routine matters. However,
the study notes that today's employers seem
more aware of the need to provide attorneys with
"progressively challenging work" to best develop
professionally. Lawyers who can be counted on to
perform well on routine work assignments more
typically are "rewarded with variety and challenge
in subsequent legal work assignments."
* Associates in smaller firms tend to report a lot of
responsibility on relatively small cases with greater
independence.
* Associates in larger firms tended to have a lesser
roles on bigger cases and are more frequently
assigned routine work.
* Government and public interest lawyers reported
high levels of autonomy in their work as well as a
relatively high level of overall job satisfaction.

Specialization vs. generalist
* Generally, new lawyers (private, government and
public) are developing specialization earlier in their
career as they become more associated with a par-
ticular topic common to their practice group or from
spending much of their time in one area. "The good
news is that most firms use client-industry teams
to better respond to the complex issues of their
clients." This provides "a wide array of interesting,
challenging work and ample opportunity to hone
your legal skills accordingly."

Number of hours worked
* The average number of hours worked by a national
sample of junior associates for a typical work week
is 49 hours per week.
* Government and public interest lawyers typically
average 45 hours per week.
* Only about 20 percent overall reported working 60
or more hours a week.
* Associates working in the largest firms were some-
what more likely to report work weeks of 60 or more
hours.


* Young attorneys in the government and public
service, public interest, business and nonprofit
jobs were least likely to work more than 60 hours a
week.
* Overall, it appears that legal employers are sin-
cerely interested in helping associates balance
the demands of work with their personal interests
and commitments. The hours expectation is often
accompanied by unparalleled flexibility.

On Campus Interview Survey
The Center for Career Services is seeking stu-
dent input on the best date to begin OCI next fall
(2005). Absent hurricanes, OCI traditionally runs
for five weeks, with the first two weeks being the
heaviest interview period.
* In Fall 2003, OCI began at UF law Sept. 15. Some
employers commented that it was too late in the hir-
ing season and disadvantaged UF law students.
*This fall, OCI began at UF law Aug. 16, the week
before classes commenced, due to construction,
while most Florida law schools began OCI the day
after Labor Day, Sept. 7.
* All Georgia law schools conduct OCI throughout the
month of August.
* Fall 2005 UF law classes begin Aug.16.
To be more competitive, eliminate parking
challenges, and minimize class disruptions, the
CCS is asking students to indicate if they would
prefer to participate in interviews:
* the week before classes begin,
* the first week of classes,
(Continued Next Page)


I










(Career Services, Continued)
* on one or two Saturdays around the first week of
classes in August (with 20-30 employers visiting),
* the week before Labor Day (Aug. 29-Sept. 2),
and/or
* the week of Labor Day (Sept 6-9).
To share your opinion, complete the survey in
the JMBA office or in Career Services.

Upcoming Receptions
Thinking of practicing in Washington, D.C.,
Tallahassee, Alachua County or Miami? Be sure
to attend one of these upcoming alumni receptions
to meet alums and network:
* Nov. 5, 6-8 p.m., Washington D.C.,
Emerging Markets Partnership, 2001
Pennsylvania Ave., Suite 1100
* Nov. 18, Tallahassee, Governor's Club on
202 1/2 S. Adams St., 5:30-7:30 p.m.
* Dec., Alachua County holiday reception,
Dean Jerry's home, 6-8 p.m.
* Jan. 20, mid-year Florida Bar reception,
Miami, the Miami Hyatt
To RSVP, e-mail careers@law.ufl.edu. Space
is limited, and 3L's have top priority.

Program Tips & Tricks

Preparing For The Final Mile:
Bar Application & Exani
The presentation. Preparing For The
Final Mile. Bar Application & Exam," was
presented to a group of interested students
by Assistant Dean Linda Calvert Hanson and
PMBR Regional Rep. Aart, Surtani. They
recommend that students.
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This program was taped and can be
viewed in Media Services. or stop by CCS to
pick up a copy of the handout.


Programs
* MANDATORY Career Services Orientation
for 1L's, Monday, Nov. 1, 11 a.m. for Section
ONE students and Wednesday, Nov. 3, noon
for Section TWO students. The Center for
Career Services welcomes all first semester
UF law students. Come meet the staff and
find out what assistance is available.
* One Quick Question, Tuesday, Nov. 2,
9:30-11 a.m. Ask Director Jessie Howell
Wallace at the CCS table in the courtyard
about resumes, cover letters, the pro bono
project, externships, OCI, job searches,
interviews, receptions or other career related
issues.
* Resume and Cover Letter Workshop,
Friday, Nov. 5, noon, 355D. Join Career
Services Director Jessie Howell Wallace
and Assistant Director Carol Kuczora for this
interactive workshop on the "basics" and
specific challenges students face in creating
a stellar resume and cover letter. This work-
shop is geared toward all class years and
will benefit students who need to create or
update a resume or cover letter. O


The Practice of Criminal La%%
Assistant State Attorney Francine Turney.
Assistant Public Defender Arthur Jones and
student extern Edrene Johnson joined Career
Services for a candid discussion on a day in
the life of a criminal law attorney Oct. 22. The
event was co-sponsored by Career Services
and the Criminal Law Association iCLAi.
which provided pizza for participants.
Panelists discussed their respective career
paths, why they chose the criminal law arena
and their daily experiences in and outside of
the courthouse.
Johnson discussed her role as a student
extern and how other experiences assisted her
in choosing a career path, and Turney and
Jones shared suggestions on which classes
to take or externships to participate in during
law school.
Students interested in exploring this area
of law are welcome to stop by the Center for
Career Services to pick up the handouts from


thiS program.
and encour-
aged to make
an appointment
with a CCS
coLInselor to
discuss career
development. L


r


Make Your

Voice Heard
The Princeton
Review is giving you the
opportunity to voice your
opinions of academics,
career preparation, and
social life at the College
of Law.
The "Students Say"
profiles on Princeton
Review.com and in its pub-
lications are written directly
from survey responses to
help readers understand
what life at your school is
like and to assist poten-
tial students in finding a
school best suited to their
educational and personal
needs.
Participation is quick
and easy. Just go online to
http://survey.review.com/.
Log in to the student sur-
vey with your Gatorlink e-mail
address. You will have the
option to receive information
and offers from The Princeton
Review. To decline, indicate
this on the login page before
entering the survey.
The Princeton Review
protects your privacy, and will
not share your personal infor-
mation with any third party
without permission. To read
the full privacy policy, click on
"Privacy Policy" on the survey
log in page.










(Carter Center Extern, Continued)
wrote memos about the legal and political issues
surrounding the upcoming recall referendum.
I was also responsible for monitoring current
legal and political news and developments, and
Bar Exam I wrote weekly briefings that were distributed to -
all members of the electoral mission, including
President Jimmy Carter. As a final project, I wrote *
Making plans to
take the Bar plans to a paper about recall referendum provisions in other
wondering where countries that represented the culmination of two
wodein wCher


you will come up
with financing for
these out-of-pocket
expenses? There are
private companies
that offer Bar Exam
loans to students in
their final year of law
school. These loans
can be used for liv-
ing expenses while
you study for the Bar
and take Bar prep
classes or for other
Bar Exam-related
expenses.
For more informa-
tion regarding these
private loans, contact
Financial Aid Director
Carol Huber in the
Office of Student
Affairs at 392-0421,
or contact lenders
directly at:
* Access Group
800-282-1550
www.accessgroup.
org

* Key Education
Resources
800-539-5363
www.key.com/
educate/grad

* LawLoans
800-984-0190
www.salliemae.com


Months ofI CompUllativel CoUISlLtULltUlil IresealCIh.
The highlight of my externship came at the
very end, when I traveled with the Carter Center
to Venezuela as a part of an international delega-
tion to observe the recall referendum. I was deeply
involved in preparation of the electoral mission,
and ultimately was credentialed as an elections
observer by the Venezuelan government and had
the opportunity to observe the voting process in
Caracas, the capital of Venezuela.
My day started at 5 a.m. Aug. 15, the day of
the referendum, when I went to my first voting
center to observe the opening of the polls. Even at
that early hour, with polls not scheduled to open
until two hours later, there were already hundreds
of people in the streets, waiting in lines. By the
time I left that first polling center at 7:30 a.m.,
there were thousands of people in the streets wait-
ing to vote.







a ..* -- ....

T- h of d a









As an elections observer, we had access to
polling centers and were able to talk to elections
officials, party representatives and the military
(who are actually present in the centers during the
voting process). The Carter Center had deployed
teams all over the country to collect both qualita-
tive and quantitative data to be reported through-
out the day to our central office. The information
was used to brief the leadership of the mission,


especially President Carter, who met with party
leadership and elections officials throughout the
day. Venezuela was implementing the use of
touch-screen voting machines for the first time, in
addition to thumb-print capture machines, to pre-
vent fraud. This new voting process, in addition to
several other factors, led to excessive delays, with
many Venezuelans having to wait in line for up to
10 hours just to vote.
The spirit of democracy among the
Venezuelan people was both extraordinary and
moving. I spoke with people who had been wait-
ing in line all day in the hot sun, but told me ada-
mantly that they would not leave until they had
voted, because it was their "constitutional right."
Voter turnout that day approached 80 percent of
the electorate, more than 11 million Venezuelans
voting, some not able to do so until almost 3 a.m.,
when the last polling centers closed.
The results were certified by the Carter
Center the next day, in favor of keeping President
Chavez in power. The center faced much criticism
from an increasingly hostile opposition that was
convinced the results must have been fraudulent,
although an audit and the center's observers
found no evidence of tampered results.
This experience made me realize that elec-
tions work is controversial and grueling. On the
other hand, I know we made the process more
transparent, fair and worthwhile for people who
stood in line for 10 hours, so they could know
their votes counted.
My externship not only enabled me to learn
about electoral and constitutional law in other
countries, it also made me realize that the most
fundamental right in a democracy is the right to
vote. And in a democracy, I have realized that if
there are doubts about the voting process, then
the entire legitimacy of the system is shaken.
After watching people who would wait in
line all day just to exercise that right, I could not
wait until November 2 to be able to cast my vote
in our own presidential election. O


I





'Toys for Tots' UInderivaN
Siipport Soldiers & Spouses

'Tos for Tots'
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Care Packauge for Sold iers

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C. \ItfliIrhc iti Halther Bi.iinnci lit li br[innenioL emiihlink nIt L


Career Services, in
the lobby next to the
JMBA Office, and
in the cafeteria. For
information, e-mail
brookebornick@
yahoo.com.





Legal Research
& Writing
Teaching
Assistant
Positions Open
Applications for
Spring 2005 teaching
assistant positions are
available in the Legal
Research, Writing and
Appellate Advocacy
Office.
For information,
contact Director/Legal
Skills Professor Henry T.
Wihnyk at 392-2198.


Events & Opportunities

End of Life Planning and
Probate Practice Information
A brief informational session will be held at
5 p.m. Nov. 8 in 285C on "End of Life Planning
and Probate Practice from the Perspective of a Coat Drive
Practicing Attorney." Information also will be
available on student opportunities in the Estates for Local
and Trusts Practice Certificate Program and Homeless
through the Estates, Trusts and Elder Law Society, The Center
probate externships, and volunteering in the Center for Governmental
for Estate and Elder Law Planning under the direc- Responsibility and
tion of Professor C. Douglas Miller. Refreshments Phi Delta Phi are col-
will be served. lecting winter coats,
sweaters and boots
Pro Bono Dependency Courts & through Wednesday,
Nov. 3, for distribu-
Spanish Programs tion to the homeless
Cariblaw and SALSA will host a meeting at the "Breakfast
for students interested in participating in pro on the Park" event
bono dependency courts and Spanish programs held by the Alachua
Wednesday, Nov. 3, at 5 p.m. in 355C. Hearing County Coalition
Officer H. Steven Pennypacker will discuss the for the Homeless
and Hungry. Bring
dependency process. ontinudPag 6) items to collec-
tion boxes outside









(Events &
Trade
Lectu
All
both fror
Spring 2005
as part o
Pre-Registration taught b)
Spring 2005 pre- Berta He
registration is Oct. 25- Thursda
Nov. 9. Appointment
times are available sut
on ISIS (www.isis.ufl. partner
edu). You must have Future
your gatorlink user Thursda
name and password Dennis
to access the system. McCoy,
Prior planning is Intemat
essential. Check the
discuss
schedule of classes
on the law school issues.
website prior to reg- Volun
istering, as well as
the College of Law Voll
Handbook for any a pro bor
pre-requisites. If you low-inco
experience problems returns.
during pre-registra- unteerinj
tion, immediately Brooke I
contact Registrar Kim
Thomas in the Office Nov. 24.
of Student Affairs A A
(392-0421, Bruton- A
Geer Hall). The
Division
Note to the Fall 2004 basketba
Entering Class: You outdoor
will be automatically The
registered for your tournami
Spring 2005 required register
c e register I
classes.
names ol
don't pla
the game
prizes do
Haitian Relief
The American JTLP
Constitution Society The
(ACS) and Caribbean Technolo
Law Students Association Write-O
(CARIBLAW) are co- mti
sponsoring a Haitian relief maton
effort to help the hundreds packet m
of thousands of victims deadline,
whose lives were devas- guideline
tated by Hurricane Jeanne. online at
Collection boxes will be Or go to
set up next to the JMBA ufl.edu,
office and in the breezeway O
near 180A through Friday, Organiz
Nov. 5. fifth-se


Opportunities, Continued)
, Labor & Environment
res
are invited to guest lectures Nov. 4 & 18,
n 5-7 p.m. (rooms TBA) and presented
f a Trade, Labor & Environment seminar
SGovernor Buddy MacKay and Professor
mandez-Truyol.
ly, Nov. 4: Former Chief Judge, WTO
Resolution, Jim Bacchus, now a managing
with Greenberg Traurig in Orlando, on "The
)f WTO."
y, Nov. 18: Dean & retired U.S. Ambassador
Jett, UF International Center; Dr. Terry
UF Center for Latin American Studies; and
ional Trade Program Director Steve Powell
current trade, labor and environmental


teer Income Tax Assistance
nteer Income Tax Assistance (VITA) is
no organization that assists students and
me residents in filing their income tax
To receive more information about vol-
Sfor the Spring 2005 tax season, contact
3ornick at brookeborick@yahoo.com by


Basketball Tournament
American Bar Association-Law Student
will host its semiannual three-on-three
11 tournament this Sunday, Nov. 7, at the
courts of the Southwest Recreation Center.
deadline for registering to play in the
ent is 3 p.m. Wednesday, Nov. 3. (You can
y e-mailing bufhouse@ufl.edu with the
f the players on your team.) Even if you
y, all are welcome to come out and watch
s, enjoy free pizza and drinks, and win
nated by local Gainesville establishments.

Write-On Competition
University of Florida Journal of
'gy Law and Policy (JTLP) Fall 2004
i Competition will not include infor-
essions or hard copy packets. Instead,
materials including competition rules,
s, selected cases, contact information and
;s for how to write a case comment are
http://dogwood.circa.ufl. edu/-techlaw/.
the law school home page, www.law.
lick on Student Affairs, then Student
Itions, then JTLP. All third-, fourth- and
Lester students who have received an S or


S+ in Legal Research and Writing and have a GPA
of 2.0 or higher are eligible to compete. Every
comment of publishable quality will be selected,
and the "Best Comment" will be published in the
journal. For information, e-mail Student Works
Editor Michael Bachman at bachman@ufl.edu.

Sign Up For State Prison Tour
The Criminal Law Association is organiz-
ing tours of Florida State Prison for Tuesday,
Nov. 16, and Thursday, Nov. 18, both at 1:15
p.m. To participate, sign up via e-mail to
gatorcrimlawassoc@yahoo.com as soon as
possible, since there is usually a waiting list.

JMBA Champagne & Jazz
The John Marshall Bar Association (JMBA)
will host its annual Champagne & Jazz social
Saturday, Nov. 6, 8 p.m.-midnight, at the Samuel P.
Ham Museum of Art. Tickets are on sale now, and
are $15 for JMBA members, $25 for non-members.

Improve Skills at Toastmasters
The Florida Law Toastmasters Public
Speaking Organization will meet at 5 p.m.
Wednesday, Nov. 3, in 345. Observers and new-
comers are welcome. For information, e-mail
Florida Law Toastmasters President Ray Dominick
at r12345@ufl.edu. O










Faculty Profile:

Teresa Rambo By Whitney Untied (3L)
Who has the best seats in the Swamp on foot-
ball game Saturdays?
Unless you long for an air-conditioned box,
the answer is, undoubtedly: Teresa "Tracy" Rambo
and her husband. You can find them along the
sidelines of the student section, chatting with the
players, cheering on the Gators, and checking the
atmospheric conditions.
Rambo's husband, Keith, a lightening expert,
is the Gators' official gameday weatherman
- it's his job to call a timeout during hazardous
weather. (Remember the Eastern Michigan game?)
Professor Rambo works right alongside her hus-
band, checking the computer screens for nearby
lightning strikes and monitoring the skies.
"On a cloudy, bad-weather day, we're sitting
there staring at the screens for little white dots, or
I'm out looking at the clouds," Rambo said. "If it
comes within six miles of the stadium, we have to
stop the game."
During the week, however, Rambo usually can
be found in the Legal Research and Writing office
or in front of a class of first-year law students.
After several years in California, Rambo returned
to her roots as a Florida Gator and chose a career
teaching legal writing because she sees those skills
as essential to a lawyer's professional success.
Success is something Rambo knows some-
thing about. A Native American, she spent her
formative years outside, learning to shoot a bow
and arrow, building playhouses, climbing trees, and
discovering an appreciation of nature.
After graduating at the top of her high school
class and excelling at the University of Florida
- where she earned a 4.0 GPA as a Four Year
Scholar Rambo moved to California with her
husband and attended the University of Santa Clara
Law School on scholarship. She graduated first in
her law school class, and joined a prestigious San
Francisco firm to work on high-profile environ-
mental cases.
Although Rambo enjoyed her job and believed
she was doing good work, she and her husband
ultimately decided to return to Florida to raise their
family. Rambo says her two sons, Thomas, age 16,
and Matthew, 13, are the most important accom-
plishments of her life above all else, she says,
she is a mother. Her family is her top priority.
Rambo's pride in her family extends to her
law school "family," and she delights in the suc-
cesses of the students she teaches. "I love my


S


students," she says. "I know that sounds corny,
but they're wonderful. I'm hard on them, but they
know I love them."
Rambo combines legal theory and practical
skills in her classroom, where she teaches stu-
dents through lectures, class discussion, and the
occasional fencing analogy. That's right, fencing.
Rambo's third love, just behind her family and the
Gators, is a sport of deft maneuvers and high pre-
cision which fits in nicely with a discussion on
building the case and attacking the adverse party's
arguments.
"There's so much more to law than what you
get out of the books," Rambo says. "You really
have to develop the full person. I try to teach my
students that, too."
Like her other commitments, Professor Rambo
takes her job seriously. She hopes her students will
look back fondly on their days at the Levin College
of Law. Rambo encourages her students to try their
best in all they do, and over the course of a year
she helps them develop their research and writing
skills and often a top-notch writing sample to
show potential employers.
For complete faculty resumes and publications, go
to www.law.ufl.edu, click on 'faculty. U


Conferences
* Music Law
Conference, Jan. 29,
J. Wayne Reitz Union.
Student-produced.
Contact Aisha Salem
at aisha@musiclaw
conference.com.
* Richard E. Nelson
Symposium, Feb. 11,
Hilton UF Conference
Center. Organized
by Professor Michael
Allan Wolf.
* Public Interest
Environmental
Conference, Feb.
24-26, J. Wayne Reitz
Union. Coordinated
by Environmental and
Land Use Law Society.
Contact Ashley
Cross-Rappaport at
cross711 @ufl.edu
or Adam Regar at
aregar@ufl.edu.
* Law & Technology
Conference, Feb. 24-
25, Sheraton World
Resort, Orlando.
Organized by
Intellectual Property
Law Program Director
Thomas Cotter.
* Race and Law
Curriculum
Workshop, Feb.
24-26, Hilton UF
Conference Center.
Organized by Center
for the Study of Race
and Race Relations.
* Conference on Legal
and Policy Issues in
the Americas, Spring
2005, Gainesville.
Organized by Center
for Governmental
Responsibility.
* "Multi-Disciplinary
Collaboration: What
Does It Mean and
How Does It Work?"
2005. Center on
Children and Families
fourth annual
conference.
Look for informa-
tion in future FlaLaws,
or contact Director of
Conference Planning
Barbara DeVoe
(devoe@ law.ufl.edu
or 392-9238).








a Unvrst of Flria Fredri G. Levi sn Colg of La Nesete Noeme 1, 2004


Submit News

for FlaLaw
FlaLaw is published
each week school is in
session. Submit news of
interest to the law school
community by 10 a.m.
Tuesday for the following
Monday's issue to Debra
Amirin, amirin@law. ufl.
edu, Levin College of Law
Communication's Office,
Phone 392-9586.


College of Law

Administration

* Robert H. Jerry, II, Dean
* Stuart R. Cohn,
Associate Dean for
International Studies
* George Dawson, Associate
Dean for Academic Affairs
* Michael K. Friel, Associate
Dean & Director, Graduate
Tax Program
*William H. Page,
Associate Dean for
Faculty Development
* M. Kathleen "Kathie" Price,
Associate Dean for Library
and Technology
* Gail E. Sasnett, Associate
Dean for Students,
Professionalism and
Community Relations
* J. Patrick Shannon,
Associate Dean for
Administrative Affairs
* Linda Calvert Hanson,
Assistant Dean for
Career Services
* Richard L. Ludwick, Assistant
Dean for Students
* J. Michael Patrick, Assistant
Dean for Admissions
* Donald J. Hale, Senior
Development Director
* Debra D. Amirin, Director of
Information & Publications


Faculty Scholarship & Activit
Professor Juan Francisco Perea has
been elected to membership in the
American Law Institute.
Stephen C. O'Connell Professor
Christopher Slobogin taught a continuing
education course on mental health law
S in West Palm Beach in late October, and
was keynote speaker in a judicial educa-
tion program at Brooklyn Law School
entitled "Science for Judges."

In the Newc


a Professor Fletcher Baldwin was quoted
in the Gainesville Sun Oct. 19 on obscen-
ity and probable cause in article about a
war activist's suit against Gainesville; and in Orlando
Weekly Sept. 15 on a case concerning public nudity.
m Associate Professor Jonathan Cohen was quoted in
the Daily Mail (London) Oct. 8 on the importance of
apologizing in article about apologies.
Professor Thomas Cotter was quoted on the
Recording Industry Association of America's argu-
ment in an article about piracy lawsuits.
Assistant professor Mark Fenster was cited in the
Newark Star-Ledger, The Biloxi Sun Herald, and
Austin-American Statesman in mid-October on the
president's power to control and manipulate informa-
tion in an article about "October theory."
Legal Skills Professor and local homeless advocate
Joe Jackson was quoted in The Gainesville Sun
Oct. 8 on city policies concerning the homeless.
Professor Michelle Jacobs was quoted in an
Associated Press national wire story, on KCTV-TV
CBS 5 Kansas City, in the Belleville News-Democrat
(Illinois), Columbia Daily Tribune (Missouri), Jefferson
City News Tribune (Missouri), Kansas City Star and
Springfield News-Leader (Missouri) about a Kansas
City mother charged in the deaths of her children.
Visiting Professor Clifford Jones was interviewed on
WRUF AM 850 Sept. 16 on the Nader ballot issue.
Professor Joseph Little was quoted by the
Associated Press, Gadsden Times (Alabama),
Herald-Tribune (Southwest Florida), The Ledger
(Lakeland), Winter Haven News Chief and on
WKMGTV CBS 6 Orlando Oct. 8 on the probability of
lawsuits after the election in an article about mount-
ing Florida election-related lawsuits.
Research Foundation Professor Diane Mazur was
quoted in the San Francisco Chronicle Oct. 12 and
in the Knoxville News-Sentinel Oct. 13 about mili-
tary voting and civilian control of the military; in the
Mobile Register (Alabama) Oct. 5 and San Francisco
Chronicle, Scripps Howard News Service, and
Knoxville News-Sentinel Oct.12 on civilian control
of the military; and in the Danville Register & Bee


November
1 1L Section 1, Career Services Orientation, 1
1 a.m., 180A
*ACS Panel on Elections, 11 a.m.-1 p.m., 355C
2 *VOTE
Career Services 1 Quick Question, 9:30-11
a.m., courtyard
3 1L Section 2, Career Services Orientation,


(Virginia), Tampa Bay Online, The McDowell News
(North Carolina), WBTW-TV Channel 13 (North
Carolina), WRBL-TV CBS 3 Columbus, and The
Tampa Tribune Oct. 4 on military voting patterns.
* Professor and former Governor Kenneth "Buddy"
MacKay was cited in the Lakeland Ledger Sept. 23
as first speaker in Florida Southern College lecture
series.
* Center for Governmental Responsibility Director/Dean
Emeritus Jon Mills was quoted in the Gainesville Sun
in October about an amendment allowing write-ins
in primary elections; his op-ed on computers and the
election was published in the Tallahassee Democrat
Sept. 27; he was quoted in The Ledger Oct. 1 on an
amendment allowing write-ins in primary elections;
and he was quoted in the Broward Daily Business
Review, Miami Daily Business Review, and Palm
Beach Daily Business Review Sept. 29, along with fel-
low Florida Constitution Revision Committee member
Andrew Adkins, director of the Legal Technology
Institute, on identity thieves and legal requirements of
posting paper documents in Internet form.
* Affiliate Professor James C. Nicholas was referred to
as a technical consultant reviewing community devel-
opment project costs in New Mexico Business Weekly
Oct. 18.
* Assistant Professor Christopher L. Peterson was
interviewed on his book, Taming the Sharks: Towards
a Cure for the High Cost Credit Market, by WAKR-
1590, Fanny Brown Show, Ohio, Oct. 17; was quoted
in the Daytona Beach News-Journal Oct. 2 on finan-
cial fallouts related to the recent hurricanes; and
spoke on AM 850 WRUF and Classic 89 WUFT Public
Radio in late September on financial impact of recent
hurricanes.
* International Trade Law Program Director Stephen
Powell was cited in The Independent Florida Alligator
Oct. 14 on World Trade Organization regulations and
the need for global energy at a global level at a UF
forum focused on conservation costs.
* Professor Mike Seigel's op-ed on the Martha Stewart
case and white-collar crime was published in the
Orlando Sentinel Oct. 13; he was quoted in the
Gainesville Sun Oct. 10 on bond reduction in a local
murder trial and in the Orlando Sentinel Oct. 6 as an
expert on legal ethics in article about a judge and
Code of Judicial Conduct; and his op-ed on Kerry's
presidential campaign was published in the Orlando
Sentinel Sept. 22.
* Stephen C. O'Connell Professor Christopher
Slobogin was quoted in the The Atlanta Journal-
Constitution Sept. 29 on effects of excessive DeKalb
County vehicle tag checks, and in the Tallahassee
Democrat Oct. 3 on change of venue.


4 Former Chief Judge, WTO Dispute
Resolution Jim Baccus, 5-7 p.m.
5 Resume and Cover Letter Workshop, noon,
355D
6 JMBA Champagne & Jazz, 8 p.m., Harn
7 ABA-LSD Basketball Tournament
7-8 CGR Board of Advisors Meeting
8 Career Services: Walk-in Resume Review,
0-"n A Qn nDm OAA 074 B_


o..Ju- -t.Ju pJ.III. I 1 UUIII L't :
:p.m. oom
noon, 180A End of Life Planning & Probate Practice
Pro Bono Dependency Courts & Spanish Information Session, 5 p.m., 285C
Programs, 5 p.m., 355C 9 Career Services: Walk-in Resume Review,
Toastmasters, 5 p.m., 345 8:30-10:30 a.m. 244 Bruton-Geer


LI-IUF AW CALE AR -


Get RaLaw in
full color via e-mail
each Friday before
Monday's publication.
Send your request to
amirin@law.ufl.edu.
-1








a Unvrst of Flria Fredri G. Levi sn Colg of La Nesete Noeme 1, 2004


Submit News

for FlaLaw
FlaLaw is published
each week school is in
session. Submit news of
interest to the law school
community by 10 a.m.
Tuesday for the following
Monday's issue to Debra
Amirin, amirin@law. ufl.
edu, Levin College of Law
Communication's Office,
Phone 392-9586.


College of Law

Administration

* Robert H. Jerry, II, Dean
* Stuart R. Cohn,
Associate Dean for
International Studies
* George Dawson, Associate
Dean for Academic Affairs
* Michael K. Friel, Associate
Dean & Director, Graduate
Tax Program
*William H. Page,
Associate Dean for
Faculty Development
* M. Kathleen "Kathie" Price,
Associate Dean for Library
and Technology
* Gail E. Sasnett, Associate
Dean for Students,
Professionalism and
Community Relations
* J. Patrick Shannon,
Associate Dean for
Administrative Affairs
* Linda Calvert Hanson,
Assistant Dean for
Career Services
* Richard L. Ludwick, Assistant
Dean for Students
* J. Michael Patrick, Assistant
Dean for Admissions
* Donald J. Hale, Senior
Development Director
* Debra D. Amirin, Director of
Information & Publications


Faculty Scholarship & Activit
Professor Juan Francisco Perea has
been elected to membership in the
American Law Institute.
Stephen C. O'Connell Professor
Christopher Slobogin taught a continuing
education course on mental health law
S in West Palm Beach in late October, and
was keynote speaker in a judicial educa-
tion program at Brooklyn Law School
entitled "Science for Judges."

In the Newc


a Professor Fletcher Baldwin was quoted
in the Gainesville Sun Oct. 19 on obscen-
ity and probable cause in article about a
war activist's suit against Gainesville; and in Orlando
Weekly Sept. 15 on a case concerning public nudity.
m Associate Professor Jonathan Cohen was quoted in
the Daily Mail (London) Oct. 8 on the importance of
apologizing in article about apologies.
Professor Thomas Cotter was quoted on the
Recording Industry Association of America's argu-
ment in an article about piracy lawsuits.
Assistant professor Mark Fenster was cited in the
Newark Star-Ledger, The Biloxi Sun Herald, and
Austin-American Statesman in mid-October on the
president's power to control and manipulate informa-
tion in an article about "October theory."
Legal Skills Professor and local homeless advocate
Joe Jackson was quoted in The Gainesville Sun
Oct. 8 on city policies concerning the homeless.
Professor Michelle Jacobs was quoted in an
Associated Press national wire story, on KCTV-TV
CBS 5 Kansas City, in the Belleville News-Democrat
(Illinois), Columbia Daily Tribune (Missouri), Jefferson
City News Tribune (Missouri), Kansas City Star and
Springfield News-Leader (Missouri) about a Kansas
City mother charged in the deaths of her children.
Visiting Professor Clifford Jones was interviewed on
WRUF AM 850 Sept. 16 on the Nader ballot issue.
Professor Joseph Little was quoted by the
Associated Press, Gadsden Times (Alabama),
Herald-Tribune (Southwest Florida), The Ledger
(Lakeland), Winter Haven News Chief and on
WKMGTV CBS 6 Orlando Oct. 8 on the probability of
lawsuits after the election in an article about mount-
ing Florida election-related lawsuits.
Research Foundation Professor Diane Mazur was
quoted in the San Francisco Chronicle Oct. 12 and
in the Knoxville News-Sentinel Oct. 13 about mili-
tary voting and civilian control of the military; in the
Mobile Register (Alabama) Oct. 5 and San Francisco
Chronicle, Scripps Howard News Service, and
Knoxville News-Sentinel Oct.12 on civilian control
of the military; and in the Danville Register & Bee


November
1 1L Section 1, Career Services Orientation, 1
1 a.m., 180A
*ACS Panel on Elections, 11 a.m.-1 p.m., 355C
2 *VOTE
Career Services 1 Quick Question, 9:30-11
a.m., courtyard
3 1L Section 2, Career Services Orientation,


(Virginia), Tampa Bay Online, The McDowell News
(North Carolina), WBTW-TV Channel 13 (North
Carolina), WRBL-TV CBS 3 Columbus, and The
Tampa Tribune Oct. 4 on military voting patterns.
* Professor and former Governor Kenneth "Buddy"
MacKay was cited in the Lakeland Ledger Sept. 23
as first speaker in Florida Southern College lecture
series.
* Center for Governmental Responsibility Director/Dean
Emeritus Jon Mills was quoted in the Gainesville Sun
in October about an amendment allowing write-ins
in primary elections; his op-ed on computers and the
election was published in the Tallahassee Democrat
Sept. 27; he was quoted in The Ledger Oct. 1 on an
amendment allowing write-ins in primary elections;
and he was quoted in the Broward Daily Business
Review, Miami Daily Business Review, and Palm
Beach Daily Business Review Sept. 29, along with fel-
low Florida Constitution Revision Committee member
Andrew Adkins, director of the Legal Technology
Institute, on identity thieves and legal requirements of
posting paper documents in Internet form.
* Affiliate Professor James C. Nicholas was referred to
as a technical consultant reviewing community devel-
opment project costs in New Mexico Business Weekly
Oct. 18.
* Assistant Professor Christopher L. Peterson was
interviewed on his book, Taming the Sharks: Towards
a Cure for the High Cost Credit Market, by WAKR-
1590, Fanny Brown Show, Ohio, Oct. 17; was quoted
in the Daytona Beach News-Journal Oct. 2 on finan-
cial fallouts related to the recent hurricanes; and
spoke on AM 850 WRUF and Classic 89 WUFT Public
Radio in late September on financial impact of recent
hurricanes.
* International Trade Law Program Director Stephen
Powell was cited in The Independent Florida Alligator
Oct. 14 on World Trade Organization regulations and
the need for global energy at a global level at a UF
forum focused on conservation costs.
* Professor Mike Seigel's op-ed on the Martha Stewart
case and white-collar crime was published in the
Orlando Sentinel Oct. 13; he was quoted in the
Gainesville Sun Oct. 10 on bond reduction in a local
murder trial and in the Orlando Sentinel Oct. 6 as an
expert on legal ethics in article about a judge and
Code of Judicial Conduct; and his op-ed on Kerry's
presidential campaign was published in the Orlando
Sentinel Sept. 22.
* Stephen C. O'Connell Professor Christopher
Slobogin was quoted in the The Atlanta Journal-
Constitution Sept. 29 on effects of excessive DeKalb
County vehicle tag checks, and in the Tallahassee
Democrat Oct. 3 on change of venue.


4 Former Chief Judge, WTO Dispute
Resolution Jim Baccus, 5-7 p.m.
5 Resume and Cover Letter Workshop, noon,
355D
6 JMBA Champagne & Jazz, 8 p.m., Harn
7 ABA-LSD Basketball Tournament
7-8 CGR Board of Advisors Meeting
8 Career Services: Walk-in Resume Review,
0-"n A Qn nDm OAA 074 B_


o..Ju- -t.Ju pJ.III. I 1 UUIII L't :
:p.m. oom
noon, 180A End of Life Planning & Probate Practice
Pro Bono Dependency Courts & Spanish Information Session, 5 p.m., 285C
Programs, 5 p.m., 355C 9 Career Services: Walk-in Resume Review,
Toastmasters, 5 p.m., 345 8:30-10:30 a.m. 244 Bruton-Geer


LI-IUF AW CALE AR -


Get RaLaw in
full color via e-mail
each Friday before
Monday's publication.
Send your request to
amirin@law.ufl.edu.
-1