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 Election focus of presentations...
 Career Services, resources and...
 Events and opportunities
 New environmental and land use...
 Trial team members shine in Final...
 Faculty scholarship and activi...
 UF Law calendar


UF UFLAW



Fla law newsletter of the University of Florida College of Law
ALL VOLUMES CITATION SEARCH THUMBNAILS PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00072281/00121
 Material Information
Title: Fla law newsletter of the University of Florida College of Law
Portion of title: Flalaw
Physical Description: Serial
Creator: Levin College of Law
Publisher: s.n.
Place of Publication: <Gainesville FL> College of Law Communications Office 1997-
Creation Date: October 25, 2004
Frequency: weekly
completely irregular
 Subjects
Genre: periodical   ( marcgt )
serial   ( sobekcm )
 Notes
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol.1, no. 1 (Oct. 6, 1997)-
General Note: Weekly during the school year with a biweekly insert, numbered separately called: The Docket.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved, Board of Trustees of the University of Florida
Resource Identifier: aleph - 002311766
notis - ALR5129
System ID: UF00072281:00121

Table of Contents
    Election focus of presentations and volunteer efforts
        Page 1
    Career Services, resources and programs
        Page 2
    Events and opportunities
        Page 3
        Page 4
    New environmental and land use law courses
        Page 5
        Page 6
        Page 7
    Trial team members shine in Final Four
        Page 8
    Faculty scholarship and activities
        Page 8
    UF Law calendar
        Page 8
Full Text












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Election Focus of Presentations & Volunteer Efforts


Speaker on Election Preparation
Florida Law Review will host UF Political
Sciences Professor Richard Scher for a presenta-


the American Constitution Society and will
include the following presentations:
* "judicial Nominations and What's at Stake," with
s rosseforP Fletcher Baldwin Sharon Rush and Michael


tion on the circumstances
tion on the circumstances Wolf, moderated by Professor Danaya Wright.
leading to Florida's problems "Election 2004," general discussion, with Professors
in the 2000 elections and dis- Joseph Little, Clifford Jones and Center for
cussion on whether the state Governmental Responsibility/Dean Emeritus Jon Mills,
is prepared for the 2004 elec- moderated by Professor Winston Nagan.
tions. All are invited to attend Other speakers to be announced. Remember to
the discussion, which begins Refreshments will be served before and after the
at 11 a.m. this Friday, Oct. event. For information, e-mail Sarah Gartell at Vo te
29, in the Ceremonial garty@ufl.edu.
Classroom (180). Help Protect the Right to Vote
Election Panel Nov. 1 The UF Chapter of the National Lawyer's
UF law professors and Guild (NLG) and W. George Allen Chapter of the
attorneys will participate in a Black Law Student Association (NBLSA) are
panel discussion on issues recruiting volunteers to help monitor polls on
surrounding the 2004 elec- Election Day.
tion at 11 a.m. Monday, Nov. UF law student volunteers who can earn
1, in 355A. All are invited to pro bono credit for their efforts will be taken
the event, which is hosted by (Continued Page 4)


Respond to Online Survey
The Princeton Review is giving you the
opportunity to voice your opinions of aca- Inside
demics, career preparation, and social life at Career Services (2)
the College of Law. The "Students Say" pro- Events &
files on Princeton Review.com and in its pub- Opportunities (3)
locations are written directly from survey New Environmental &
responses to help readers understand what Land Use Courses (5)
life at your school is like and to assist poten- Florida Supreme Court
tial students in finding a school best suited Justices judge Moot
to their educational and personal needs. Court, Advise
Participation is quick and easy. just go Students (6)
online to http:llsurvey.review.coml. Spring Pre-Registration
Begins Today (6)
Log in to the student survey with your Trial Team Members
Gatorlink e-mail address. You will have the Shine in Final Four (8)
option to receive information and offers from Faculty Scholarship (8)
The Princeton Review. To decline, indicate this
on the login page before entering the survey.
The Princeton Review protects your priva-
cy, and will not share your personal information UNIVERSI OF
with any third party without permission. To
read the full privacy policy, click on "PrivacyRIDA
Policy" on the survey log in page. O Fredric G. Levin College of Law








Fla-aw S University- l e o L -e S O e


Career Services, Resources


New Consumer
Law Externships
Assistant Professor
Christopher L. Peterson,
Three Rivers Legal
Services and the Center
for Career Services have
organized a new
Consumer Law externship
for students.
Externs will have the
opportunity to work with
counsel on consumer law
issues, including: car
repossessions, home mort-
gage foreclosures, creditor
harassment, consumer
fraud, warranty claims,
mobile home litigation,
and more. Students will
conduct research and
writing, assist with prepa-
rations of interrogatories
and depositions, draft
pleadings, and occasional-
ly may appear in court.
Three Rivers is hoping
to expand their consumer
protection practice, and
would like to involve UF
law students in their
efforts. Peterson has
agreed to be faculty
supervisor for the new
externships. For more
information, contact Carol
Kuczora in Career Services
(392-0499).


'Five Truths for New Lawyers'
Feedback from recent law grads who partici-
pated in focus groups was highlighted in the NALP
Foundations' April 2004 Career Moves for Law
Students. In distinguishing the "Five Truths for
New Lawyers," the common theme revealed by
this group of new attorneys was that it takes more
than legal knowledge to thrive.
* Truth #1. Successful new lawyers are adaptive
and flexible, important traits in transcending
from law student to practicing attorney. Just
because that's the way you did it before or as a
student doesn't mean that it is the most effective
way to do it in practice.
* Truth # 2. Successful new lawyers work hard and
expect to do so. You may not realize that attitude
and a strong work ethic are critical. It is "not only
whether you do the work and do it well, but how
you relate to the demands of the work that can make
a difference in your success....Work ethic is a cultur-
al norm that places value on doing an exemplary job
and doing it with willingness, curiosity, eagerness or
enthusiasm."
* Truth #3. Successful new lawyers are realistic
about their value. The compensation paid to a new
associate is "not about value, it's about potential."
The training and development of a new lawyer is
costly, and it takes several years before an employer
will realize a return on their investment.
* Truth #4. Successful new lawyers are lifelong
learners. Your law school education has prepared
you well for the challenge of learning to be a
lawyer. But you need more. "Skills training, profes-
sional development and mentoring will introduce
you to the complex ratio of knowledge, understand-
ing and experience that it takes to be a great


& Programs
lawyer." You will learn on the job from secretaries,
paralegals, office administrators, senior associates
and partners. Learning is a process that never ends.
Truth #5. Successful new lawyers build lasting
relationships. The adage "it's not what you know
but who you know" is significant in the legal com-
munity. Do not treat others as competitors. "Treat
everyone like you would want to be treated and
offer your help, patience and understanding when
appropriate to do so. Make respect, civility and
courtesy the dominate forces that characterize your
professional persona."

Programs This Week
The Day to Day Life of an Elder Law Attorney, today,
Oct. 25, 2 p.m., 285D. Co-sponsored by ETELS. Guest
speaker Lauchlin Waldock (UF jD 78) from the
Tallahassee firm McConnaughhay, Duffy, Coonrod, Pope
& Weaver, P.A. will discuss topics such as being board
certified, wills, trusts, guardianships, probate, special
needs trusts and long term care in addition to gift
tax consequences surrounding these areas.
Attorney General Charlie Crist, today, Oct. 25, 3 p.m.,
Bailey Courtroom. Crist will discuss and promote the
Governmental Honors Program, a paid internship pro-
gram he created to involve law students and young
lawyers in state government.
Practicing Law at the State Attorney's Office In the
Domestic Violence Division: today, Oct. 25, 5:30 p.m.,
355A. Co-sponsored by UF's Criminal Law Association.
Guest speaker Theresa Drake.
One Quick Question, Tuesday, Oct. 26, 9:30-11 a.m.
Ask Assistant Director Carol Kuczora at the CCS table
in the courtyard about resumes or cover letters, pro
bono, externships, OCI, job searches, interviews,
receptions or other career related issues.
Opportunities in Environmental Law, Wednesday, Oct.
27, noon, 355D. Professors Alyson Flournoy and Mary
Jane Angelo will discuss career development, differ-
ences between state and federal positions, areas of
growth and opportunity, and how to develop a
competitive edge and find positions. O










Events & Opportunities

Music Law Conference Scheduled
The student-produced Music Law Conference
will be held Saturday, Jan. 29, 2005, at the J.
Wayne Reitz Union. The confer-
ence will include a full day of
panel discussions and music
showcases throughout downtown
Gainesville that night.
To participate, assist with the
event or learn more, e-mail Aisha
Salem at aisha@musiclawconference.com.
Phi Delta Phi 'Tables' Oct. 26
Phi Delta Phi members will man a table on
the law school concourse Tuesday, Oct. 26, noon-4
p.m., to offer new member applications and infor-
mation on upcoming events. You also can sign up
for the Phi Delta Phi pumpkin carving table at the
Boys and Girls Club Halloween Carnival, where
you can help children create fun and scary pump-
kin faces. The event begins at 3:30 p.m.
Wednesday, Oct. 27, and was a great success last
year. A Phi Delta Phi social at the Mellow
Mushroom on University Avenue will follow the
pumpkin carving at 7 p.m. Wednesday. All Phi
Delta Phi members, friends, and guests are invited
to meet other members, unwind and socialize.
Dhi T 1lf Dhbi O ; rlifi A o rt i A, Vrldr


Student Organizations, then JTLP. All third-,
fourth- and fifth-semester students who have
received an S or S+ in Legal Research and Writing
and have a GPA of 2.0 or higher are eligible to
compete. Every comment of publishable quality
will be selected, and the "Best Comment" will be
published in the journal. For information, e-mail
Student Works Editor Michael Bachman at
bachman@ufl.edu.
Join Family Law Society
Students interested in pursuing a career in
Family Law or helping to make a difference in the
lives of Alachua County children are invited to
join the Family Law Society at its first general
meeting of the semester at noon Wednesday, Oct.
27, in 345.

Sign Up For State Prison Tour
The Criminal Law Association is organizing
tours of Florida State Prison for Tuesday, Nov. 16,
and Thursday, Nov. 18, both at 1:15 p.m. The
prison is near Starke, about an hour from
Gainesville. To participate, sign up via e-mail to
gatorcrimlawassoc@yahoo.com as soon as
possible, since there is usually a waiting list.
(CLA will need your driver's license number and
gender for registration purposes.)
(Continued Page 4)


Journal Available
The University of
Florida journal of Law
and Public Policy will be
available Nov. I for sub-
scribers and single issue
requests. Articles in this
issue focus on civil liber-
ties and human rights of
minorities, specifically
Native Americans and
homosexuals.
Anna-Marie Tabor's
article focuses on Native
American sovereignty and
the sovereign's power to
tax. The balance of the
articles constitute a sym-
posium issue dedicated
to the Lawrence v. Texas
decision, which struck
down a Texas statute
criminalizing homosexual
intimacy. In January
2004, UF's Lambda Legal
Alliance hosted its first
Law and Policy


I fl,,u l V1IL Lu|JmJ,,uCL,, uu.- I Luay, Conference to examine
Nov. 5, so make sure you have placed your signed the legal and social impli-
application in the blue Phi Delta Phi box in the cations of the Lawrence
Office of Student Affairs by the deadline. ....................... ruling. In this issue are
S articles from UF law
IPTLA Speaker on Pharmaceutical Professors Danaya C.
Intellectual Property Rights Wright and Diane H.
All are invited to hear Jack Abid speak and Mazur, Professor of Social
Work Scott D. Ryan, a
lead a discussion on his work, "A Comparative work by Sameera Dalvi,
Analysis of Pharmaceutical Intellectual Property and note by Diane
Rights in Canada and the United States." The pres- Lourdes Dick, who won
entation will be made at the Intellectual Property the Barbara W. Makar
& Technology Law Association (IPTLA) meeting Writing Award for
Outstanding Note of
at 6 p.m. this Tuesday, Oct. 26, at the Alehouse. Outstanding Note
Spring 2004.
JTLP Write-On Competition For copies or
The University of Florida Journal of subscription information,
contact Staff Editor
Technology Law and Policy (JTLP) Fall 2004 Victoria A. Redd
Write-On Competition will not include informa- (pictured at top) at
tion sessions or hard copy packets. Instead, packet 352-392-4980 or
materials including competition rules, dead- .. reddva@law.ufl.edu.
lines, selected cases, contact information and
guidelines for how to write a case comment are
online at http://dogwood.circa.ufl. edu/-techlaw/.
Or go to the law school home page,
www.law.ufl.edu, click on Student Affairs, then







Fl-a University of Florida FredriceG. e oem- 2


*X



Bar Exam Loans
Making plans to take
the Bar and wondering
where you will come up
with financing for these
out-of-pocket expenses?
There are private compa-
nies that offer Bar Exam
loans to students in their
final year of law school.
These loans can be used
for living expenses while
you study for the Bar and
take Bar prep classes or
for other Bar Exam-
related expenses.
For more information
regarding these private
loans, contact Financial
Aid Director Carol Huber
in the Office of Student
Affairs at 392-0421, or
contact lenders directly
at:
* Access Group
800-282-1550
www.accessgroup.org
* Key Education Resources
800-539-5363
www. key.comled ucatel
grad
* LawLoans
800-984-0190
www.salliemae.com








LexisNexis Help
LexisNexis can help
with your seminar
research with immediate
help specific to your
research topic. See stu-
dent representatives dur-
ing office hours or LEXIS
Representative Bonita
Young on campus
Wednesday, Oct. 27, 1-3
p.m. For details, contact
Young at 379-0232 or
bonita.young@ lexisnexis.
com.


(Events & Opportunities, Continued)
See 'Fahrenheit 9/11'
You are invited to view and discuss the film
"Fahrenheit 9/11" with the Caribbean Law
Students Association and International Law
Society at 4 p.m. Thursday, Oct. 28, in 285D.
Refreshments will be served. For information,
e-mail Loreal Belfon at msbelfon@hotmail.com.

Support Your Class Gift
The Class Gift Committee will be available to
answer questions and/or accept gifts or pledges
toward the Fall 2004 Graduating Class Gift from
10 a.m.-3 p.m. Tuesday-Thursday, Oct. 26-28.
Stop by to learn how you can support areas of
your choice while "giving back." For information,
e-mail Lauren Cury at LaurenCury@ taol.com or
Edrene Johnson at eaj@ufl.edu.
Oelrich Presentation
The Law School Republicans and
Criminal Law Association will co-host
Alachua County Sheriff Steve Oelrich
(left) Thursday, Oct. 28, at 4 p.m. in
180A. The sheriff will discuss issues
facing the county, and will take ques-


(Election Protection, Continued)
via chartered bus Nov. 2 to watch polls in Orlando.
(Food will be provided throughout the day.)
Alachua County has not seen any voting rights
violations, but it is reported that elderly African
American citizens in Orlando have been subjected
to voter intimidation and that there have been
irregularities in getting absentee ballots and voter
registration cards.
Thousands of law students, lawyers, and legal
workers already have volunteered to monitor polls
and staff a 24-hour hotline (1-866-OUR-VOTE) to
answer voting-related questions. It is expected that
4,000 law students will volunteer nationwide in
the effort.
The "Election Protection" program is a non-
partisan effort sponsored by the Lawyers'
Committee for Civil Rights Under Law, People for
the American Way, American Bar Association, and
National Bar Association (NBA). The groups
researched the most "at-risk" polling sites based
on voting rights violations and voting problems
during past elections.
The program's significance was highlighted
Aug. 31 during the Florida primary, when a two-
day trial run of the Election Protection system was
conducted. Over 350 volunteers including more


tions on police practices and policies and other
law enforcement issues. Pizza will be served.

JMBA News & Events
* Annual John Marshall Bar Association (JMBA)
Halloween Party, 9 p.m., Thursday, Oct. 28, at
Fat Tuesdays. $3 for JMBA members, $5 for
others. Wear your best halloween costume and
arrive early, since tickets will only be sold at the
door. For information, e-mail Ali at aliml3@
ufl.edu or Steve at sdebate5@yahoo.com, or
stop by the JMBA office.
* Champagne & Jazz, Saturday, Nov. 6, 8 p.m.-
midnight, at the Samuel P. Ham Museum of Art.
Tickets on sale now.
Note to church parking decal holders: Students
found speeding in the church parking lot will have
their decals recalled and could face other penal-
ties. JMBA reminds you that there is a daycare
center in this area, and drivers must be cautious.
Support for Soldiers, Spouses, Kids
* The Military Law Students Association (MLSA) is
sponsoring a Care Package Drive for as long as
items continue to be donated. A list of needed items
(Continued Page 5)


than 120 legal volunteers -
participated in monitoring 60
polling sites in Duval, Broward,
Miami-Dade, Leon and Orange
counties, and provided advice
and assistance to 700-plus Florida voters. The
Election Protection Coalition addressed problems
such as police presence/
intimidation at the polls; wrongful denial of the
right to vote due to misapplication of identification
requirements; moved, closed or poorly designated
precincts; refusal to provide affidavits or provi-
sional ballots; and poorly trained poll workers.
To participate, register at the Election
Protection table on the law school concourse, then
e-mail UF law student Steckley Lee at
c.ckllu7\ laoo coil to reserve a seat on the bus.
Poll watcher training on the basics of Florida elec-
tion law and structure of the Election Protection
Program will be offered at 1 p.m. Saturday, Oct.
30, in the Bailey Courtroom. For those who miss
the session, a training video will be shown
Monday, Nov. 1, after the ACS Panel on Voting
Rights (time and place TBA).
For more information, go online to
www.Unity04.net, www.lawyerscommittee.org,
and/or www.electionprotection2004.org. O


I











New Environmental & Land Use Law Courses


Several new or infrequently taught courses
will be offered this spring. Some may not appear
on the schedule at the time of registration, so
watch for late additions to the schedule.
ENVIRONMENTAL ISSUES IN REAL ESTATE
& BUSINESS TRANSACTIONS
Course will familiarize law students with environ-
mental issues that arise in business transactions -
including the purchase and sale of real property, pur-
chase and sale of business organizations, and redevel-
opment of property where redevelopment is hindered
by actual or perceived contamination issues. Adjunct
Professors Terry Zinn and Enola Brown will co-teach
this course drawing on their practice experience in
dealing with these issues. Students intending to prac-
tice corporate or real property law will benefit from
this course, as will those planning to practice environ-
mental or land use law.
ANIMAL RIGHTS & THE LAW SEMINAR
This seminar is taught by Adjunct Professor David
Hoch, and considers philosophical arguments in support
of moral rights and ethical considerateness toward ani-
mals, as advocated by such renowned thinkers as
Descartes and Voltaire, with greater emphasis on mod-
ern philosophers like Peter Singer and Tom Regan. The
course also considers if animals should be afforded
moral consideration and how that entitlement is both
recognized in and denied by the law. The work of ani-
mal rights attorney/scholars will be considered, along
with specific problems involved in representing ani-
mals, such as their status as property, obtaining stand-
ing, and extending the measure of damages for injury
to animal companions beyond market value.
COMPARATIVE & INTERNATIONAL PROPERTY LAW
This course will feature visiting faculty from
Australia, Peru, Brazil and South Africa addressing their
domestic property law, particularly as it relates to


(Events & Opportunities, Continued)
is available at drop off points or from any MLSA
member. MLSA will consolidate items, then mail
them to soldiers serving in the "War on Terrorism."
(If you know someone who is deployed and would
like a care package, e-mail Matt Brannen at
brannenm@ufl.edu.)
* MLSA's Deployed Spouses Support Operation
provides services such as child care, yard work,
shopping and moving. If you know of someone in
the area whose spouse is deployed and who needs
help or more information, contact Brannen or any
MLSA member.
* "Toys for Tots" kicks off in November. Look for a
drop box at the law school to donate a new,
unwrapped toy to help kids have a great Christmas.
This is a national effort assigned to the Marine
Corps Reserves, and a great opportunity to help


indigenous territory and communally titled land. The
course will also examine land titling and registration as
a tool in international development policy, along with
the international law of property and its relationship
to trade and human rights. The course will be coordi-
nated by ELULP Professor Danaya Wright and
Conservation Clinic Director Tom Ankersen, and cross-
listed with Professor Grenville Barnes in the UF IFAS
School of Forest Resources and Conservation.
WATER LAW
The Environmental and Land Use Law Program
added this course in Spring 2004. Taught from a
national perspective, it examines the three main types
of state systems for the allocation of the right to use
water: riparianism, the prior appropriation doctrine,
and regulated riparianism (using Florida as an exam-
ple). The course will also consider groundwater and
federal doctrines that impact state water law.
CAPSTONE COLLOQUIUM
This one-credit course is designed primarily for
students in the ELUL Certificate Program. (Others per-
mitted to enroll if seats are available.) This will be a
small seminar in which students and faculty from the
ELULP will read and have critical discussions of the
work of a series of presenters, including several distin-
guished visiting
scholars and ELULP
faculty members.
For information, or
if you are a non-
certificate student
and would like to
enroll pending
availability of space,
contact Maria
Wolfe at elulp@law.
ufl.edu. O



those less fortunate. For information about MLSA
and its projects, e-mail C. Matthew or Heather
Brannen at g8rbrannen@earthlink.net.

ELULS Moot Court Team Chosen
The Environmental and Land Use Law
Society is pleased to announce that Nicholas
Beninate, Noah Kaufman and Erica Williams have
been selected for the 2004-05 Environmental Moot
Court Team, and will compete in the National
Environmental Law Moot Court Competition in
New York in February 2005.

Improve Skills at Toastmasters
Florida Law Toastmasters Public Speaking
Organization will meet at 5 p.m. Wednesday, Oct.
27, in 345. Observers and newcomers welcome.
For information, e-mail Florida Law Toastmasters
President Ray Dominick at r12345@ufl.edu. O


JMBA Casino Night
Benefits Charity
The John Marshall Bar
Association (JMBA) raised
$2,914 for charity from
ticket sales, business
sponsorships and private
contributions at their
recent Casino Night
fundraiser, thanks to
hard work by JMBA rep-
resentatives, officers and
other volunteers and the
more than 200 law stu-
dents, faculty and friends
who participated. The
money will be divided
equally between the
American Red Cross
Hurricane Relief Fund and
Three Rivers Legal
Foundation.
"We'd like to thank
JLSA and ABA for their
help, as well as the many
students who pitched in
to make this first-time
event a great success,"
said JMBA President Julie
Miller. "We also congrat-
ulate the winner of the
poker tournament, first-
semester law student
Alex Denault."


Writing Workshop
on Punctuation
Writing Professor Lois
Randoph will offer a writ-
ing workshop on punctua-
tion at II a.m. Friday,
Oct. 29, in 285D.


./ey
h1.4_rft6._
















Spring 2005
Pre-Registration
Begins Today
Spring 2005 pre-regis-
tration is Oct. 25-Nov. 9.
Appointment times are
available on ISIS
(www.isis.ufl.edu).
You must have your
gatorlink user name and
password to access the
system. For assistance,
contact the CIRCA help
desk at 392-help. (Set up
a gatorlink account or
check your account at
www.gatorlink.ufl.edu.)
Prior planning is
essential. Check the sched-
ule of classes on the law
school website prior to
registering, as well as the
College of Law Handbook
for any pre-requisites.
If you experience prob-
lems during pre-registra-
tion, immediately contact
Registrar Kim Thomas in
the Office of Student
Affairs (392-0421, Bruton-
Geer Hall).
Note to the Fall 2004
Entering Class: You will be
automatically registered
for your Spring 2005
required classes.


Florida Supreme Court Justices

Judge Moot Court Final Four,

Advise Students ByD. Cupples (3L)
It has become a UF law tradition: every fall,
Florida Supreme Court justices come to campus to
judge Moot Court's Final Four competition. Judging
the competition this year were Florida Supreme
Court Justices Barbara Pariente, Charles Wells,
Harry Anstead, Fred Lewis, Peggy Quince, and
Raoul Cantero, along with Florida Fourth DCA
Judge Fred Hazouri.
"Most lawyers won't get a chance to argue in
front of the Florida Supreme Court during their
whole career," said Moot Court President Ryan
Morgan. "Having the justices here for the Final Four
is a great chance for the entire student body to inter-
act with them."
The Justice Campbell Thomal Moot Court's
Final Four argued the case of fictional lawyer/
accountant Mike Diamond before the panel of jus-
tices of the state's highest court. Diamond worked
for an energy-trading company, and was convicted of
conspiracy and fraud relating to an Enron-style
accounting scheme. He then appealed, challenging
his 35-year prison sentence as unconstitutionally
determined.
"We've been writing the problem and planning
the competition since April," said Moot Court
Intramural Competition Chair Cara Muroff (3L).
Arguing for Petitioner Diamond were Kimberly
Lorenz (2L) and Brady Ward (2L). Amy Fletcher
(2L) and Christine Fuqua (2L) carried the respon-
dent's banner, and Anne Zerbe (2L) was alternate.
"Being an alternate was great, because I had to
know both positions very well," Zerbe said. "It was
interesting to see which issues the justices focused
on and that some of the issues we had discussed
were important to them as well."


Trade, Labor &
Environment
Lectures
All are invited to
guest lectures Nov. 4 &
18, both from 5-7 p.m.
(rooms TBA), and pre-
sented as part of a Trade,
Labor & Environment
seminar taught by
Governor Buddy MacKay
and Professor Berta
Hernandez-Truyol.


This year's Final Four competition had another
interesting facet: all five team members were
women.
"I don't know the last time we had an all-
woman Final Four team," said Moot Court Publicity
Chair Megan Sladek (3L). "It might be a first."
During the competition, each side presented oral
arguments and answered rapid-fire questions from
the justices before the court filed out of the auditori-
um to deliberate. Before announcing the results,
Chief Justice Barbara Pariente praised the competi-
tors, "All of you did an excellent job, better than
some of the lawyers who argue before us."
The award for Best Team went to Respondents
Fletcher and Fuqua, meaning that Diamond would
wear prison-gray for the next 35 years. Best Oralist,
Best Brief and Best Overall went to Christine Fuqua.
"It's a great honor to argue in front of Florida
Supreme Court Justices," Fuqua said. "The team and
our benching prepared us completely."
"It was an honor, because we were selected by
our peers," said Fletcher. "Competing in the Final
Four was the highlight of my law school experience,
and I'm excited to be part of the team."
"I was prepared for most of the justices' ques-
tions, but I was super nervous beforehand anyway',
said Ward. "Then Chief Justice Pariente smiled when
I stepped up, and I knew I could do it. The justices
were more approachable than I had expected."
"We all worked on this for a long time," said
Lorenz. "Arguing before the justices is a unique
opportunity, especially talking to them afterward and
getting their insights and advice."
(Continued Next Page)





important for you to hear about our backgrounds,"
said Chief Justice Barbara Pariente, the second
woman to serve as chief. Pariente is married to -
and once practiced law with Florida Fourth DCA
Judge Fred Hazouri.
An avid photographer while at George
Washington University Law School, Pariente partici-
pated in a legal clinic that fought for improved con-
ditions for renters. "Lawyers are the nation's prob-
lem solvers," Pariente said. "Some of the best
lawyers stay out of court."
Justice R. Fred Lewis grew up in a coal mining
town. "My vision of a lawyer was someone who
helped people in need," Lewis said. "That's why I
went to law school."
Lewis made friends and found mentors through
a clerkship during his first year of law school at the


University of Miami. Before joining the court, he
represented both plaintiffs and insurance companies.
"Somewhere in your career, you have to figure out
why you want to be a lawyer," Lewis said.
Former Justice Steven Grimes went to business
school before law school, both at UF. After 13 years
on Florida's Second DCA, Grimes served 11 years
on the Florida Supreme Court.
Justices Wells and Anstead also are Gators.
"I'm so old, I went to law school in another
part of the campus," said Anstead.
Judge Hazouri, a "Double Gator," grew up in
the same Jacksonville neighborhood as Anstead.
Lawton Chiles appointed Hazouri to the Fourth
DCA in 1995. "I liked the Warren Court's focus on
individual rights," Hazouri said.
After law school at Catholic University of
America, Justice Peggy Quince practiced in real
estate and domestic relations in the Washington,
D.C. area. "I moved to Florida for a man," she said.
Here, she focused on criminal appeals for 15 years
before Lawton Chiles appointed her to Florida's
Second DCA. In 1998, she was dual-appointed to
the Florida Supreme Court by Lawton Chiles and
Jeb Bush.
Born in Spain, Justice Raoul Cantero majored
in english and business at FSU, later graduating
from Harvard Law School. His practice areas were
appeals and class-action litigation, though he wanted
to be a writer. "I did work on my novel while prac-
ticing, but after my first child born, I didn't have
time to write anymore," he said. O


t.rouugIh Nov. 5. Needed
items include: water, rice,
canned goods (milk, tuna,
sardines, etc.), beans,
powered milk, cooking oil,
spam, spaghetti, salt,
flour, band-aids, peroxide,
alcohol, cotton, gauze,
first aid kits, matches,
blankets, tools, diapers,
clothing, candles,
batteries and flashlights.




Coat Drive for
Local Homeless
The Center for
Governmental
Responsibility and Phi
Delta Phi are collecting
winter coats, sweaters
and boots through
Wednesday, Nov. 3, for
distribution to the home-
less at the "Breakfast on
the Park" event held by
the Alachua County
Coalition for the Homeless
and Hungry. Bring items
to collection boxes out-
side Career Services, in
the lobby next to the
JMBA Office, and in the
cafeteria. For information,
e-mail brookebornick@
yahoo.com.


(Moot Court, Continued)
"All the participants were entirely well prepared
and handled themselves professionally:' said Moot
Court Co-Faculty Advisor Leanne Pflaum. "They
were a real credit to the law school."
"We are so grateful to our sponsor,
Zimmerman, Kiser & Sutcliffe,"said Co-Faculty Haitian Relief
Advisor Henry Wihnyk. "They're really giving back The American
and providing an invaluable experience for students. Constitution Society (ACS)
And we send special thanks to Dr. Rihle and Hank and Caribbean Law
Sorenson for funding a scholarship for the competi- Students Association
tors." (CARIBLAW) are co-spon-
In years past, the justices would arrive with scoring a Haitian relief
effort to help the hun-
Marshall Barnes and hold a question-and-answer dreds of thousands of vic-
session open to all students before judging the Moot tims whose lives were
Court competition. devastated by Hurricane
This year, the justices took center stage in Jeanne. Your assistance is
Professor Davis' Contracts class and Professor gravely needed.
Collection boxes will
Little's Torts class, which was joined by Professor be set up next to the
Jackson's writing class. . JMBA office and in the
"This court is very diverse, so I think it's breezeway near 180A








Al 0 University of Florid Fredric G. Le n C e o Law Ne O


Submit News
for FlaLaw
FlaLaw is published
each week school is in
session. Submit news of
interest to the law school
community by 10 a.m.
Tuesday for the following
Monday's issue to Debra
Amirin, amirin@law.
ufl.edu, Levin College of
Law Communication's
Office, Phone 392-9586.


College of Law
Administration
* Robert H. Jerry, II, Dean
* Stuart R. Cohn,
Associate Dean for
International Studies
* George Dawson, Associate
Dean for Academic Affairs
* Michael K. Friel, Associate
Dean & Director, Graduate
Tax Program
* William H. Page,
Associate Dean for
Faculty Development
* M. Kathleen "Kathie" Price,
Associate Dean for Library
and Technology
* Gail E. Sasnett, Associate
Dean for Students,
Professionalism and


Trial Team Members Shine in Final Four ByWhitney Uned(3L)


The UF Trial Team held its Fall 2004 Final
Four competition Oct. 15 in the Bailey
Courtroom. Fourth-semester student Najah Gibson
and third-semester student Loreal Belfon repre-
sented the plaintiff, and third-semester students
Teesha McCrae and Sara Holliday-Tobias repre-
sented the defendant in Tina Lay v. Los Diablos
Police Department and Terry Hooper. The compe-
tition was the culmination of this semester's Trial
Team tryouts. The four new members with the
highest tryout scores, along with four new mem-
bers acting as witnesses, prepared for seven days
before participating in the mock trial.
"Sara and I worked extremely hard preparing
our case. We practiced every night for hours,"
McCrae said. "Preparing for Final Four was a
team effort."
The fact pattern used in tryouts and the Final
Four competition was a negligence action for
wrongful death. In Final Four, competitors pre-
sented motions in limine, opening statements,
direct and cross examinations, and closing state-
ments. Trial Team Senior Vice President for
Intramurals Pennie Mays (3L) was impressed with
the Final Four competitors.


"The Final Four is a perfect indicator of the
caliber of people who join Trial Team," Mays said.
"Since they are only coached for a few weeks by
current team members; making sure that our new
team members have natural talent is important."
"The UF Trial Team is regarded as one of the
best in the nation, so any opportunity to be
involved with the best is a personal honor,"
Gibson said, adding she was excited to develop
her litigation skills and to get to know the team.
Top Final Four awards Teesha McCrae
(Best Advocate), and McCrae and Sara Holliday-
Tobias (Best Team) were announced at a ban-
quet at the Savannah Grande in honor of new
members and Final Four competitors.
"I just tried to do my very best throughout the
competition, and I was pleased to find out all my
hard work had paid off," McCrae said. O


Faculty Scholarship & Activities
i Professor Christine A. Klein published, "On Integrity: i CGR
Some Considerations for Water Law," 56 Alabama Associate
Law Review (2005). in Law
Associate Professor Cally Jordan was recently asked Research
by the World Bank to assist the Chinese government Richard Hamann and Legal Skills Professor Tom
in drafting a new Company Law for the People's Ankersen were named statewide extension specialists
Republic of China. The drafting committee invited in the area of coastal and marine law at Florida
Professor Jordan to Beijing later this year to present SeaGrant's annual meeting in Fort Lauderdale. O
her comments.


Community Relations L
* J. Patrick Shannon,
Associate Dean for October IPTLA Speaker on IP rights, 6
Administrative Affairs p.m., Alehouse
25 Career Services and ETELS: The
* Linda Calvert Hanson, Day to Day Practice of an Elder 27 Career Services: Environmental
Assistant Dean for Law Attorney, 2 p.m.,285D Law Opportunities, noon, 355D
Career Services e Career Services, Attorney Family Law Society meeting,
* Richard L. Ludwick, General Charlie Crist, noon, 345
Assistant Dean for Students Government Honors Program, 3 Toastmasters, 5 p.m., 345
* J. Michael Patrick, Assistant p.m., Bailey Courtroom "Meditation in the Fishbowl," 5:15
Dean for Admissions Career Services & CLA presenta- 6 p.m., 103 Bruton Geer
* Donald J. Hale, Senior tion, Practicing Law at the State 28 LSR/CLA, w/ Alachua County 6 S
Development Director Attorney's Office Domestic Sheriff Oelrich, 4 p.m., 180A
* Debra D. Amirin, Director Violence Division, 5:30 p.m., Fahrenheit 9/11, 4 p.m., 285D
of Information & 355A IMBA Halloween Party, 9 p.m.,
Publications Advanced registration for Spring Fat Tuesdays
2005 Semester begins, ends 29 Florida Law Review Speaker on
Nov. 5 Election, 11 a.m., 180
26 Career Services One Quick 30 Election Protection Poll
Question, 9:30 11 a.m., court Watcher Training, 1-3p.m.,
yard Bailey Courtroom








Al 0 University of Florid Fredric G. Le n C e o Law Ne O


Submit News
for FlaLaw
FlaLaw is published
each week school is in
session. Submit news of
interest to the law school
community by 10 a.m.
Tuesday for the following
Monday's issue to Debra
Amirin, amirin@law.
ufl.edu, Levin College of
Law Communication's
Office, Phone 392-9586.


College of Law
Administration
* Robert H. Jerry, II, Dean
* Stuart R. Cohn,
Associate Dean for
International Studies
* George Dawson, Associate
Dean for Academic Affairs
* Michael K. Friel, Associate
Dean & Director, Graduate
Tax Program
* William H. Page,
Associate Dean for
Faculty Development
* M. Kathleen "Kathie" Price,
Associate Dean for Library
and Technology
* Gail E. Sasnett, Associate
Dean for Students,
Professionalism and


Trial Team Members Shine in Final Four ByWhitney Uned(3L)


The UF Trial Team held its Fall 2004 Final
Four competition Oct. 15 in the Bailey
Courtroom. Fourth-semester student Najah Gibson
and third-semester student Loreal Belfon repre-
sented the plaintiff, and third-semester students
Teesha McCrae and Sara Holliday-Tobias repre-
sented the defendant in Tina Lay v. Los Diablos
Police Department and Terry Hooper. The compe-
tition was the culmination of this semester's Trial
Team tryouts. The four new members with the
highest tryout scores, along with four new mem-
bers acting as witnesses, prepared for seven days
before participating in the mock trial.
"Sara and I worked extremely hard preparing
our case. We practiced every night for hours,"
McCrae said. "Preparing for Final Four was a
team effort."
The fact pattern used in tryouts and the Final
Four competition was a negligence action for
wrongful death. In Final Four, competitors pre-
sented motions in limine, opening statements,
direct and cross examinations, and closing state-
ments. Trial Team Senior Vice President for
Intramurals Pennie Mays (3L) was impressed with
the Final Four competitors.


"The Final Four is a perfect indicator of the
caliber of people who join Trial Team," Mays said.
"Since they are only coached for a few weeks by
current team members; making sure that our new
team members have natural talent is important."
"The UF Trial Team is regarded as one of the
best in the nation, so any opportunity to be
involved with the best is a personal honor,"
Gibson said, adding she was excited to develop
her litigation skills and to get to know the team.
Top Final Four awards Teesha McCrae
(Best Advocate), and McCrae and Sara Holliday-
Tobias (Best Team) were announced at a ban-
quet at the Savannah Grande in honor of new
members and Final Four competitors.
"I just tried to do my very best throughout the
competition, and I was pleased to find out all my
hard work had paid off," McCrae said. O


Faculty Scholarship & Activities
i Professor Christine A. Klein published, "On Integrity: i CGR
Some Considerations for Water Law," 56 Alabama Associate
Law Review (2005). in Law
Associate Professor Cally Jordan was recently asked Research
by the World Bank to assist the Chinese government Richard Hamann and Legal Skills Professor Tom
in drafting a new Company Law for the People's Ankersen were named statewide extension specialists
Republic of China. The drafting committee invited in the area of coastal and marine law at Florida
Professor Jordan to Beijing later this year to present SeaGrant's annual meeting in Fort Lauderdale. O
her comments.


Community Relations L
* J. Patrick Shannon,
Associate Dean for October IPTLA Speaker on IP rights, 6
Administrative Affairs p.m., Alehouse
25 Career Services and ETELS: The
* Linda Calvert Hanson, Day to Day Practice of an Elder 27 Career Services: Environmental
Assistant Dean for Law Attorney, 2 p.m.,285D Law Opportunities, noon, 355D
Career Services e Career Services, Attorney Family Law Society meeting,
* Richard L. Ludwick, General Charlie Crist, noon, 345
Assistant Dean for Students Government Honors Program, 3 Toastmasters, 5 p.m., 345
* J. Michael Patrick, Assistant p.m., Bailey Courtroom "Meditation in the Fishbowl," 5:15
Dean for Admissions Career Services & CLA presenta- 6 p.m., 103 Bruton Geer
* Donald J. Hale, Senior tion, Practicing Law at the State 28 LSR/CLA, w/ Alachua County 6 S
Development Director Attorney's Office Domestic Sheriff Oelrich, 4 p.m., 180A
* Debra D. Amirin, Director Violence Division, 5:30 p.m., Fahrenheit 9/11, 4 p.m., 285D
of Information & 355A IMBA Halloween Party, 9 p.m.,
Publications Advanced registration for Spring Fat Tuesdays
2005 Semester begins, ends 29 Florida Law Review Speaker on
Nov. 5 Election, 11 a.m., 180
26 Career Services One Quick 30 Election Protection Poll
Question, 9:30 11 a.m., court Watcher Training, 1-3p.m.,
yard Bailey Courtroom








Al 0 University of Florid Fredric G. Le n C e o Law Ne O


Submit News
for FlaLaw
FlaLaw is published
each week school is in
session. Submit news of
interest to the law school
community by 10 a.m.
Tuesday for the following
Monday's issue to Debra
Amirin, amirin@law.
ufl.edu, Levin College of
Law Communication's
Office, Phone 392-9586.


College of Law
Administration
* Robert H. Jerry, II, Dean
* Stuart R. Cohn,
Associate Dean for
International Studies
* George Dawson, Associate
Dean for Academic Affairs
* Michael K. Friel, Associate
Dean & Director, Graduate
Tax Program
* William H. Page,
Associate Dean for
Faculty Development
* M. Kathleen "Kathie" Price,
Associate Dean for Library
and Technology
* Gail E. Sasnett, Associate
Dean for Students,
Professionalism and


Trial Team Members Shine in Final Four ByWhitney Uned(3L)


The UF Trial Team held its Fall 2004 Final
Four competition Oct. 15 in the Bailey
Courtroom. Fourth-semester student Najah Gibson
and third-semester student Loreal Belfon repre-
sented the plaintiff, and third-semester students
Teesha McCrae and Sara Holliday-Tobias repre-
sented the defendant in Tina Lay v. Los Diablos
Police Department and Terry Hooper. The compe-
tition was the culmination of this semester's Trial
Team tryouts. The four new members with the
highest tryout scores, along with four new mem-
bers acting as witnesses, prepared for seven days
before participating in the mock trial.
"Sara and I worked extremely hard preparing
our case. We practiced every night for hours,"
McCrae said. "Preparing for Final Four was a
team effort."
The fact pattern used in tryouts and the Final
Four competition was a negligence action for
wrongful death. In Final Four, competitors pre-
sented motions in limine, opening statements,
direct and cross examinations, and closing state-
ments. Trial Team Senior Vice President for
Intramurals Pennie Mays (3L) was impressed with
the Final Four competitors.


"The Final Four is a perfect indicator of the
caliber of people who join Trial Team," Mays said.
"Since they are only coached for a few weeks by
current team members; making sure that our new
team members have natural talent is important."
"The UF Trial Team is regarded as one of the
best in the nation, so any opportunity to be
involved with the best is a personal honor,"
Gibson said, adding she was excited to develop
her litigation skills and to get to know the team.
Top Final Four awards Teesha McCrae
(Best Advocate), and McCrae and Sara Holliday-
Tobias (Best Team) were announced at a ban-
quet at the Savannah Grande in honor of new
members and Final Four competitors.
"I just tried to do my very best throughout the
competition, and I was pleased to find out all my
hard work had paid off," McCrae said. O


Faculty Scholarship & Activities
i Professor Christine A. Klein published, "On Integrity: i CGR
Some Considerations for Water Law," 56 Alabama Associate
Law Review (2005). in Law
Associate Professor Cally Jordan was recently asked Research
by the World Bank to assist the Chinese government Richard Hamann and Legal Skills Professor Tom
in drafting a new Company Law for the People's Ankersen were named statewide extension specialists
Republic of China. The drafting committee invited in the area of coastal and marine law at Florida
Professor Jordan to Beijing later this year to present SeaGrant's annual meeting in Fort Lauderdale. O
her comments.


Community Relations L
* J. Patrick Shannon,
Associate Dean for October IPTLA Speaker on IP rights, 6
Administrative Affairs p.m., Alehouse
25 Career Services and ETELS: The
* Linda Calvert Hanson, Day to Day Practice of an Elder 27 Career Services: Environmental
Assistant Dean for Law Attorney, 2 p.m.,285D Law Opportunities, noon, 355D
Career Services e Career Services, Attorney Family Law Society meeting,
* Richard L. Ludwick, General Charlie Crist, noon, 345
Assistant Dean for Students Government Honors Program, 3 Toastmasters, 5 p.m., 345
* J. Michael Patrick, Assistant p.m., Bailey Courtroom "Meditation in the Fishbowl," 5:15
Dean for Admissions Career Services & CLA presenta- 6 p.m., 103 Bruton Geer
* Donald J. Hale, Senior tion, Practicing Law at the State 28 LSR/CLA, w/ Alachua County 6 S
Development Director Attorney's Office Domestic Sheriff Oelrich, 4 p.m., 180A
* Debra D. Amirin, Director Violence Division, 5:30 p.m., Fahrenheit 9/11, 4 p.m., 285D
of Information & 355A IMBA Halloween Party, 9 p.m.,
Publications Advanced registration for Spring Fat Tuesdays
2005 Semester begins, ends 29 Florida Law Review Speaker on
Nov. 5 Election, 11 a.m., 180
26 Career Services One Quick 30 Election Protection Poll
Question, 9:30 11 a.m., court Watcher Training, 1-3p.m.,
yard Bailey Courtroom