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 Announcements
 Career services
 Alumni profile: Todd Levine
 IP certificate attracts students...
 Meet the Faculty
 Scholarship and activities


UF UFLAW



Fla law newsletter of the University of Florida College of Law
ALL VOLUMES CITATION SEARCH THUMBNAILS PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00072281/00108
 Material Information
Title: Fla law newsletter of the University of Florida College of Law
Portion of title: Flalaw
Physical Description: Serial
Creator: Levin College of Law
Publisher: s.n.
Place of Publication: <Gainesville FL> College of Law Communications Office 1997-
Creation Date: March 29, 2004
Frequency: weekly
completely irregular
 Subjects
Genre: periodical   ( marcgt )
serial   ( sobekcm )
 Notes
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol.1, no. 1 (Oct. 6, 1997)-
General Note: Weekly during the school year with a biweekly insert, numbered separately called: The Docket.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved, Board of Trustees of the University of Florida
Resource Identifier: aleph - 002311766
notis - ALR5129
System ID: UF00072281:00108

Table of Contents
    Announcements
        Page 1
    Career services
        Page 2
    Alumni profile: Todd Levine
        Page 2
        Page 3
        Page 4
        Page 5
    IP certificate attracts students to UF
        Page 6
    Meet the Faculty
        Page 7
    Scholarship and activities
        Page 8
Full Text












- I I S


BLSA Health Fair April 1
The W. George Allen Chapter of the Black
Law Students Association will present Health Fair
2004, "Get Hip on Your Health!" Thursday, April
1, 10 a.m.-2 p.m., on Holland Hall concourse. The
event will feature free blood pressure checks;
refreshments; information on diabetes, high blood
pressure and cancer; and prizes to be awarded in a
health trivia game. Bring medications and pre-
scriptions you have questions about with you, and
UF pharmacy students will be available to discuss
them and your options.
Avert Court Funding Crisis
Help prevent a severe funding shortage for
the court system by calling Legislators in
Tallahassee 1-3 p.m. Tuesday, March 30, from the
Holland Hall courtyard. Cell phones will be avail-


(and those of your friends, neighbors and rela-
tives) and bring in books you can part with for
this worthy cause.
Finally, all are invited to a CLA end of year
reception 6-7:30 p.m. April 15 in the faculty din-
ing room in Bruton-Geer Hall. It will feature guest
speakers on the topic, "Putting Our Kids on the
Chain Gang: A Round Table Discussion on Youth
Serving Adult Sentences." Refreshments will be
served, and all guest speakers from previous CLA
meetings will be invited.
For more information about the book drive or
reception, e-mail gatorcrimlawassoc@yahoo.com.
'JAG to Civilian' Panel April 1
The Military Law Student Association
(MLSA) and Center for Career Services will co-
(Announcements Continue Page 4)


Judge Susan Black
to Speak at UF
Law Graduation
The Honorable Susan
Harrell Black (UF jD 67)
- Florida's first female
federal judge will speak
at Levin
College of Law
commence-
ment May 14.
Black, who
announced at
Black
the early age
of eight her intention to
pursue a law career, was
appointed to the U.S.
Court of Appeals, I Ith
Circuit by President Bush
in 1992. She became the
state's first female federal
judge when President


able. Learn more online at www.lsijs.org. Carter appointed her to
the U.S. District Court for
CLA Meets Today, Book Drive Underway Florida's Middle District,
New Criminal Law Association (CLA) execu- where she was chief jus-
tive board members for next year are president tice 1990-92. She was
Kelli Herring, Vice President Nicole Bloom, named a University of
Florida Distinguished
Secretary Colette Duke and Treasurer Jennifer Alumna in 1982, and is UF
Friedberg. The final CLA meeting of the semester Law Center Association
is 5:30 p.m. today, March 29, in 190C Holland trustee emeritus; College
Hall, and will feature speaker Sonya Yapita from for New Florida Circuit
Three Rivers Legal Services. Refreshments and County judges dean,
served. and on the faculty of the
National judicial College.
CLA's book drive for prison inmates is under- National judicial College.
way, and books will be collected until April 19 in
Student Affairs, Career Services and on the con- Inside
Alumni Profile: Todd
course. (Books will be used by male inmates.) Levine (Page 2)
Note that law books or magazines cannot be New Florida Supreme
accepted, but other academic books (geography, Court Externs (3)
oceanography, meteorology, astronomy, history,.* IP Certificate Attracts
Students to UF Law (6)
etc.), science fiction, performance books, men's Meet the Faculty:
fiction, African American interest, books written Tom Cotter (7)
in Spanish and other appropriate books are appre- Free Symposiums on DUI
ciated. In addition, a new program for inmates to and Housing Law (8)
read children' books to their own children on UNIVERSITY OF
tape has resulted in a need for blank tapes and I FLORIDA
children's books. Dig through your bookshelves Fredric G. Levin College of Law


* ANNOUNCEMENTS *










* CAREER SERVICES *


Time's Running
Out: Apply Now
for 2004-05 Aid
* Students should apply
now for aid for 2004-05,
and are encouraged to
do so online to save
processing time and
reduce errors through
the system's built-in
editing format. Go to
FAFSAIRenewal FAFSA on
the Web (www.FAFSA.
ed.gov) and follow
instructions. You can
then check the status of
your application andlor
make corrections online.
* Apply by Thursday, April
I, for financial aid this
summer. To be consid-
evre udno msti'e hkvA a


Get Your Externship Number
Exteming this summer? Stop by Career
Services for your Externship Registration Number.
The number is issued to students who complete an
Extemship Acknowledgment Form make sure
yours is turned in before Summer/Fall registration
begins to enable them to register for the proper
amount of extemship credits. For information,
contact Carol Kuczora in Career Services.

Spring Entrant Meeting April 5
There will be a mandatory Center for Career
Services meeting for Spring 2004 entrants
Monday, April 5, at noon in the auditorium.
Students will be introduced to Career Services
staff, counselors and services. Summer options to
make your resume stand out from the rest for the
fall recruiting season also will be discussed at the
meeting, which is co-sponsored by Lexis.

Mock Interview Program
Practice your interviewing techniques with
attorneys from the community who are volunteer-


ing their time to help you prepare for the recruit-
ing season. Attorneys will interview you for 20
minutes and provide 10 minutes of feedback. Sign
up on Westlaw's TWEN, first come, first served
(there was a waiting list last semester). 1Ls are
particularly encouraged to participate. Contact
Career Services if you have questions.

Job Bank & Resume Collects
The Center for Career Services sends e-mails
through the Career Hotline to announce jobs with
short deadlines to give students every opportunity
to submit information to the requesting employer.
Students are reminded to check actual listings on
eAttorney to make sure they are submitting the
correct material.
It is important to note that unless the e-mail
says the firm is planning to visit campus, they are
not On-Campus Interview (OCI) employers. They
are "resume collect" employers or regular job list-
ings. Both can be found on eAttorney. Under the
(Career Services Continues Page 3)


completed 2003-04 Free
Application for Federal
Student Aid (FAFSA) on
file with UF and have
indicated there that you
will be enrolled for
Summer 2004 Term for
a minimum of three
credits for j.D. students
and four credits for
graduate students. The
yearly limit on federal
Stafford loans is
$18,500. Some students
may be unable to meet
expected summer p .
enrollment costs with
their remaining eligibili-
ty for this type loan.
Other options include
limited Perkin's loan p .
funds, private student
loans and Federal Work
Study.
For information or
to review aid options,
contact Financial Aid
Coordinator Carol Huber
in the Office of Student
Affairs (call 352-392-0421
or visit 164 Holland Hall).










* CAREER SERVICES *


Time's Running
Out: Apply Now
for 2004-05 Aid
* Students should apply
now for aid for 2004-05,
and are encouraged to
do so online to save
processing time and
reduce errors through
the system's built-in
editing format. Go to
FAFSAIRenewal FAFSA on
the Web (www.FAFSA.
ed.gov) and follow
instructions. You can
then check the status of
your application andlor
make corrections online.
* Apply by Thursday, April
I, for financial aid this
summer. To be consid-
evre udno msti'e hkvA a


Get Your Externship Number
Exteming this summer? Stop by Career
Services for your Externship Registration Number.
The number is issued to students who complete an
Extemship Acknowledgment Form make sure
yours is turned in before Summer/Fall registration
begins to enable them to register for the proper
amount of extemship credits. For information,
contact Carol Kuczora in Career Services.

Spring Entrant Meeting April 5
There will be a mandatory Center for Career
Services meeting for Spring 2004 entrants
Monday, April 5, at noon in the auditorium.
Students will be introduced to Career Services
staff, counselors and services. Summer options to
make your resume stand out from the rest for the
fall recruiting season also will be discussed at the
meeting, which is co-sponsored by Lexis.

Mock Interview Program
Practice your interviewing techniques with
attorneys from the community who are volunteer-


ing their time to help you prepare for the recruit-
ing season. Attorneys will interview you for 20
minutes and provide 10 minutes of feedback. Sign
up on Westlaw's TWEN, first come, first served
(there was a waiting list last semester). 1Ls are
particularly encouraged to participate. Contact
Career Services if you have questions.

Job Bank & Resume Collects
The Center for Career Services sends e-mails
through the Career Hotline to announce jobs with
short deadlines to give students every opportunity
to submit information to the requesting employer.
Students are reminded to check actual listings on
eAttorney to make sure they are submitting the
correct material.
It is important to note that unless the e-mail
says the firm is planning to visit campus, they are
not On-Campus Interview (OCI) employers. They
are "resume collect" employers or regular job list-
ings. Both can be found on eAttorney. Under the
(Career Services Continues Page 3)


completed 2003-04 Free
Application for Federal
Student Aid (FAFSA) on
file with UF and have
indicated there that you
will be enrolled for
Summer 2004 Term for
a minimum of three
credits for j.D. students
and four credits for
graduate students. The
yearly limit on federal
Stafford loans is
$18,500. Some students
may be unable to meet
expected summer p .
enrollment costs with
their remaining eligibili-
ty for this type loan.
Other options include
limited Perkin's loan p .
funds, private student
loans and Federal Work
Study.
For information or
to review aid options,
contact Financial Aid
Coordinator Carol Huber
in the Office of Student
Affairs (call 352-392-0421
or visit 164 Holland Hall).










Four UF Law Students Named Supreme Court Externs
Center for Governmental Responsibility Research Associate/Florida Supreme Court Externship Program
Coordinator Tim McLendon has selected four Levin College of Law students for the prestigious positions: John
Adams (placed Fall '04), Meredith Fields (Summer '04), Howard Goldfarb (Summer '04) and Eric Roberson (Fall '04).
"This is a tremendous opportunity to apply the great education we receive at the College of Law. It is an
honor to be chosen for this position from a pool of exceptionally qualified candidates," said Roberson.
"While we received many resumes from qualified applicants, these students possess the outstanding creden-
tials the court has come to expect from UF law students," said Assistant Director for Career Services Carol M.
Kuczora, who coordinates externship programs at the law school. "Florida Supreme Court externships have
become a cornerstone of our externship program. Utilizing skills they garner from their unique and valuable expe-
rience, these externs have gone on to post-graduate judicial clerkships at both the state and federal level, as well
as prestigious associate positions with law firms, corporations and government agencies."
Adams said, "I am excited about representing the Levin College of Law at the Florida Supreme Court. This
externship is one of the best opportunities available to students at our law school."


ETELS Banquet &
Speaker March 31
The Estates, Trusts &
Elder Law Society invites
you to its Spring 2004
Banquet. The event will
be held at noon
Wednesday, March 31, in


"I think this externship program will be a great experience for 283 Holland Hall, and will
my second summer," said Fields. "I'm looking forward to making lots feature leading estate
of contacts contacts which will hopefully last through my profes- planning attorney Carla
sional career. What an opportunity!" DeLoach Bryant (above, at
back right, with Director
CGR Research Associate Tim McLendon (from left), Supreme Court of the Estates and Trusts
Externs Meredith Fields and Howard Goldfarb, Career Services Assistant Practice Program
Director Carol Kuczora, and Externs Eric Roberson and John Adams. Professor Douglas Miller
at an earlier presenta-
(Career Services, Continued) tion). DeLoach is a gradu-
e t fr ate of the UF Graduate
Career Tab, the fourth option is Job Bank. The Job Tax Program and founder
Bank does not include OCI employers, but job of a boutique tax, estate
listings the center receives directly from employ- and business planning law
ers. Each listing includes the desired "Response firm with offices in Winter
Method" for applying. If the listing says "No i Park and Gainesville.
During a routine client
Phone Calls," do not call the employer. During a routine client
,. .B interview to make
To make your online job search more effi- .... changes to a new client's
cient, first click on Job Bank, where you will be .will, she became suspi-
prompted for more information. Select the Job cious, and upon investi-
Details tab, which will bring up another "fill in the gation uncovered a
blank" prompt, and enter your class year (1L, 2L ...... $400,000 fraud perpetrat-
ed on her client, resulting
or 3L). This will bring up all available jobs for in two arrests. The inci-
someone in your class. To make this experience .... dent drew wide media
and future visits to eAttorney Job Bank easier, attention, with live televi-
click on "Date Listed" at the top of available job sion coverage by local
listings to order them in reverse chronological affiliates of ABC, CBS and
FOX. A video of the news
order, so the next time you check the Job Bank 'l. coverage will boe shown.
you will only have to look at recent listings (at the ,. All students welcome.
top) rather than having to scroll through and try to .. ..... .Lunch and beverages pro-
remember if you've looked at them or not. Contact vided. For information,
Career Services if you have questions. e-mail Kristen Simmons
at keb8@ufl.edu.
Programs, Dates and Deadlines
* Tuesday, March 30, Judicial Externships &
Clerkships, noon, 283 Holland Hall.
* Wednesday, March 31, Last Day of Spring OCI.
* Thursday, April 1, MLSA and Career Services ..
present JAG: Transition to Practice, 1 p.m., .. Lexis I L Training
Bailey Courtroom. Lexis IL training will
be offered March 22-23
* Friday, April 2, Quarles & Brady presents be offered March 223
and March 31-April 2. For
"How to be a Successful Summer Clerk," .. details go to Lexis.com or
noon, Bailey Courtroom. e-mail Duane Kaizer at
dkaizer@ufl.edu.







Flailaw 1 Ui111sit o 1l Ida Fredril! L leg of Law N st March 2, 2004i .I

Professor Butler i i & If iois
Gives CSRRR s t ,t
Inaugural Spring pm nd et Iw and
Lecture April 12 2 inferece.Meln
The CSRRR's inaugural
Spring Lecture will feature
George Washingtonl Llta I 1
University Law School
Professor Paul n
Butler, who will
speak on, "Much
Respect: Toward (
a Hip-Hop Theory Butler
of Punishment,"
based on his forthcoming l followi n.1
article in Stanford Law
Review (2004). A Darticu-


larly provocative and inci-
sive legal scholar, Butler
is one of the 50 most
cited law professors who
entered teaching since
1992, and his scholarship
has been the subject of
numerous newspaper and
magazine articles and tel-
evision programs.
A reception will be
held for Butler 2-3 p.m.
in the faculty dining
room. The lecture
will follow at 4 p.m. in
the teaching classroom in
Emerson Alumni Hall. All
are welcome.








CSRRR Brown Bag
The Center for the
Study of Race and Race
Relations (CSRRR) will
host Professors Nancy
Dowd and Kenneth Nunn
as they report on
research findings from
their article, "Diversity
Matters: Race, Gender,
and Ethnicity in Legal
Education," today, March
29, from noon-I p.m. in
the faculty dining room.
All are welcome.
View the complete
article in the UF journal
of Law and Public Policy
online at http://www.law.
ufl.edulfaculty/pdfl
diversity matters.pdf.


(Announcements, Continued)
host a panel, "Transitioning From JAG to Civilian
Life," Thursday, April 1, at 1 p.m. in the Bailey
Courtroom. (Note: This is not a recruiting event.)
Panelists will discuss their experiences as
Army JAG officers and how it compares to and
helps their civilian legal careers. Speakers will
include retired Army Lieutenant Colonel and cur-
rent Alachua County Attorney David Wagner and a
Florida National Guard JAG officer who also
works as a private attorney. For information,
e-mail Steve Berlin at berlinsd@yahoo.com.

Honor Commitee Elections
The Levin College of Law Honor Committee
will hold elections for first- and third-semester
positions all day Tuesday, March 30, in conjunc-
tion with JMBA elections. The Honor Committee
administers the law school's Honor System, which
represents a commitment by students to adhere to
the highest degree of ethical integrity.
Students may vote only for candidates running
in their respective semester (first-semester students
can only vote for other first-semester candidates;
third-semester students can vote only for third-
semester candidates). Candidates are prohibited
from campaigning or asking other students to cam-
paign or solicit votes on their behalf, though they
may encourage other students to vote.

BLSA Reunion Weekend April 2-4
The W. George Allen Chapter of the Black
Law Student Association (BLSA) will host its 15th
Annual Alumni Reunion Weekend, "Emerging into
a Triumphant Era," April 2-4 in Orlando at the
Wyndham Orlando Resort. BLSA will host free
seminars Saturday, April 3, for students on alterna-
tive careers in law and the first few years of prac-
tice. Panelists will include a representative from
Career Services and practicing attorneys. Students


also are invited to attend the April 3 luncheon and
awards gala ($40 per person). For information or
a student registration form, e-mail
blsa_arw2004@thotmail.com.

JMBA News & Events
The John Marshall Bar Association (JMBA)
encourages all law students to participate in:
* JMBA general board meeting, today, March 29,
7-8 p.m., 190A Holland Hall. All are welcome.
* JMBA elections for general board representa-
tives and executive board members, Tuesday,
March 30.
* JMBA Barrister's Ball, Friday, April 2, 8 p.m.-1
a.m., Sweetwater Branch Inn. Tickets are $25 for
JMBA members and $30 for non-JMBA members.
For information, e-mail Bonnie Bolz at
bonnie6263@aol.com.

Columnist Speaks at LSR Meeting
Alligator Columnist Hunter Williams will
speak at the next Law School Republicans (LSR)
meeting Thursday, April 1, at 1 p.m. in 190B
Holland Hall. Williams will talk about his experi-
ence at the Alligator and conservatism on campus.
Other topics will include political issues and
developments in the national 2004 campaigns.
(Juice and donuts may be served, but then again, it
is April Fools Day.)
Officer elections for next year will be held
during the final LSR meeting of the semester
Thursday, April 8, at 1 p.m. in 190B Holland Hall.
To run for office or nominate someone, e-mail
uflawgop@hotmail.com.
The LSRs continue to promote law student
involvement in GEAR-UP, the Alachua County
school system's volunteer program that provides
mentoring and support to area middle and high
school students. If you want to help local kids and
(Announcements Continue Page 5)


I










(Announcements, Continued)
earn community service hours, e-mail VP Adria
Toledo at atoly@ufl.edu.
Sign up for the LSR listserve and check out
information and links at uflawgop.com. (The LSR
blog has many interesting discussion topics.
Contact the listserve to participate.)

CLS Helps Elderly
The Christian Legal Society will work on arts
and crafts with residents of Palm Garden (an elder
care facility on 62nd Blvd near the mall) Thursday,
April 1, 2:15-4 p.m. To participate, e-mail molly-
metzler @aol.com.

APIL Speaker, LawLawPalooza April 1
The Association for Public Interest Lawyers
(APIL) is hosting Public Interest Awareness Week
March 29-April 1. Events include a Donate-a-Day
fundraiser, where students pledge a day's worth of
summer salary to APIL's scholarship program for
UF law students doing unpaid pro bono work over
the summer, and a talk by Kathleen Arnold, an
AmeriCorps attorney working with Three Rivers
Legal Services, who will speak about her career in
public interest law and AmeriCorps 6-7 p.m.


Thursday, April 1, in the faculty dining room. Also
that evening is APIL's annual LawLawPalooza
fundraiser (location TBA). For more information,
e-mail Meredith Fields at meredith fields @thot-
mail.com.

Toastmasters Club Meets Tuesday
Set aside one hour a week to develop your
public speaking skills. The Law School
Toastmasters public speaking organization will
meet Tuesday, March 30, at 5 p.m. in 292 Holland
Hall. Observers always welcome. For information,
e-mail Ray Dominick at r12345@ufl.edu.

EASLS Speaker April 1
The Entertainment, Arts and Sports Law
Society (EASLS) will host music, Internet and
media lawyer Jay Willingham April 1 as part of the
EASLS Spring 2004 Lecture Series. Also sched-
uled are President of So So Def Sports and
Entertainment, super agent Hadley Englehardt on
April 6, sports, entertainment and music lawyer and
head of The Florida Bar Entertainment, Arts and
Sports Law Section Darryl Cohen on April 8, and
music and entertainment lawyer Laurie Ashton Anton
(details TBA). O


Change Your Thinking, Improve Your Life By Resource Counselor imPorter


Did you know the way you think can make your
problems feel worse than they are? Cognitive psycholo-
gists have described "cognitive distortions" humans
tend to use, including:
* Dichotomous thinking. This refers to black vs. white,
all vs. nothing thinking, which ignores the nuances of
reality. For example, "Second place is the first loser."
This type of thinking sabotages your ability to
appreciate the good things in life.
* Selective abstraction. This is when you see only
evidence that supports your negative feelings. For
example, you conveniently forget all compliments you
receive from people, but remember a single criticism.
This distorts your ability to use input accurately.
* "Catastrophizing." If you "catastrophize," you exag-
gerate an event to make yourself fearful. It might
sound like this, "This job interview could make or
break me." Catastrophizing feeds your jitters.
* Overgenerallzation. This distortion occurs when you
take a negative event and create a rule from it. A
statement such as, "I gave a wrong answer in class
today. I have no right to speak out in class," is an
example of overgeneralization. This thinking inhibits
your ability to make reasonable plans for behavior.
* (Mis-)labeling. Some people will say, "I'm a failure,"
when it would be more accurate to say, "I wanted to
get a much higher grade on that exam." This thought
habit unnecessarily equates your identity with the
outcome of an event in your life.


* Magnificationlminimization. This is when you accentu-
ate the negative and de-emphasize the positive. For
example, you might remember a single error you
made in an otherwise wonderful job interview, or
tend to think that satisfactory performance is just
not good enough. This can undermine your ability to
set realistic goals.
* Personalization. You are personalizing when you take
responsibility for an event over which you have no
control. For example, "I jinxed the Gators by tuning
in to the game late." This unrealistically magnifies
your sense of guilt.
If you catch yourself making
these "thought errors," correct
them immediately and repeated-
ly. Doing so may help prevent
anxiety and depression and
empower you to make the best
of every situation.


Information for this article
comes from Theories of
Psychotherapy & Counseling by
Richard a Sharf (Ed.).
Contact Resource Counselor
Jim Porter at 352-392-0499 or
e-mail him at pacifist@ufl.edu. O


Title Examination
Workshop April 3
Student Affairs will
host a Title Examination
Workshop Saturday, April
3, 9 a.m.-noon, in 190C
Holland Hall. Attorneys'
Title Insurance Fund
Educational Representative
David Mesnekoff, Esq. will
teach the workshop. The
Fund has presented this
workshop at the law
school for years. If you're
planning a real estate law
practice or on buying real
estate, don't miss this
highly rated workshop.
Materials will be supplied
at no charge. To partici-
pate or for more informa-
tion contact Student
Affairs at 352-392-0421.




Last Docket,
Editors Needed
The Docket is written
and produced by UF law
students and inserted in
FlaLaw every other week.
Submit news for the last
spring Docket the
April 12 issue to co-
editors Stephanie Mickle
and Kristen Simmons by
noon Tuesday, April 6.
Submissions must be
Word compatible and no
more than 750 words.
Include contact informa-
tion and author's name.
JMBA may edit for style,
format and length, and
will not republish articles.
Also, if you are interested
in becoming the next
Docket editor, submit
your name, semester,
experience and why you
are interested by noon
Wednesday, March 31.
E-mail news, information
andlor questions to
jmbadocket@yahoo.com.








UnvrstyofFordaFrdicG.LeinC llgeofLw ew letr S March 29, 2004


UF Law Supporters
Recognized in
Annual Report
The 1,800-plus alumni
and friends whose finan-
cial support makes many
Levin College of Law
programs, facilities and
activities possible are rec-
ognized in the 2002-03
Law Center Association
Annual Report, now
online as a link from the
College of Law home page
at www.law.ufl.edu. For a
hard copy or more infor-
mation, contact the UF
law Office of Development
and Alumni Affairs at 352-
392-9296.







Apply to CSRRR
for Fellowship and
Summer Assistant
Position
* Apply by June I to the
Center for the Study of
Race and Race Relations
(CSRRR) for the 2004-05
Evan Yegelwel Fellow-
ship. The award is
$2,000, and supports
student research and
scholarship toward
reducing crime motivat-
ed by hate, prejudice or
stereotyping. Details are
on the CSRRR website at
www.law.ufl.edulcenters/
csrrrl.
* CSRRR needs a summer
research assistant to
assist staff on multiple
projects. Ten hours per
week commitment.
Strong computer skills
including webpage
and database design -
desired. "This is excit-
ing, important work -
come grow with us!"
said Assistant Director
Melissa Bamba. To
apply, submit your
resume and cover letter
to Pat Hancock in 340
Holland Hall.


IP Certificate Attracts Students to UF Law ByWhitneUntiedt(2L)


Interested in science and technology? Looking
for a way to combine a chemistry and law degree?
Thinking about law in the entertainment or publishing
field?
Think IR
IP intellectual property law is a growing
legal field as borders disappear and technology
advances in the 21st century.
Under direction of Professor Thomas F. Cotter
(see page 7), the Levin College of Law offers an IP
certificate program for students interested in special-
ized training in this area. IP encompasses a variety of
legal specializations, from patents and trade secrets to
copyrights and trademarks. IP certificate courses also
cover fields such as media law, commercial law and
cyberlaw.
To earn the IP certificate, students must complete
a writing requirement and 96 credit hours, at least 15
of which must be earned from the IP core curriculum.
The program encourages students to learn about this
area of the law in-depth through specialized course-
work and IP-related seminars. (Details online at
www.law.ufl.edu/academics/ip/.)
Because the certificate requires students to take
eight credit hours above minimum graduation require-
ments, many students such as Tracey Owens, a
sixth-semester student working on her IP certificate
- stay at law school an extra semester.
"I decided IP was an excellent career choice for
me to still utilize my bachelor's degree in science',
said Owens, who will graduate in December 2004.
"Also, IP is a field where you can actually help your
clients in a positive way by pursuing patent pro-
tection for their new inventions, for example."
The IP Program's popularity has grown since it
was established in 1998 by Cotter and then-Dean
Richard Matasar. About 10 students graduate with an
IP certificate each year, and many more take classes
in the field. Cotter estimated that about 60 students
enroll in core courses such as copyrights and trade-
marks, and a specialized class will attract 15 to 20
students a semester. Students also participate in inde-
pendent study opportunities, which can culminate in a
publishable paper or large project.
According to Cotter, the program also has made
the UF College of Law attractive to incoming stu-
dents with science and technology backgrounds look-
ing for a way to combine their undergraduate and law
degrees in a career.
"I'll get calls from students going through the
admissions process or thinking of applying to law
school who want to know more about our program,
and who might come here as opposed to somewhere
else because of our IP program," said Cotter.
While students interested in patent prosecution
need a science or engineering background, students
with other undergraduate degrees also are encouraged


to consider a career in intellectual property law. IP
litigation does not require a hard science degree, and
law graduates can carve out an IP specialization after
practicing with a general firm.
"To do patent litigation or copyright law or
trademark law or trade secret law there is no
requirement to have a technical background," Cotter
said. "All other things being equal, it's easier to get
the initial job if you have the technical background,
but there are plenty of opportunities for those without
it."
Florida's IP program is supported in part by
practicing attorneys who volunteer to teach special-
ized courses and the Gainesville law firm of
Saliwanchik, Lloyd & Saliwanchik, which created an
Intellectual Property Fund that has enabled Cotter and
the law school to expand IP offerings and fund events
such as the Third Annual Law and Technology
Conference recently held in Orlando. More than 70
practitioners, faculty and law students participated,
and the keynote speaker was James Rogan, former
director of the United States Patent and Trademark
Office, who reviewed recent national reforms in
patent law.
"We had speakers from a number of law firms
speaking about different aspects of intellectual prop-
erty and, more generally, law and technology," Cotter
said.
(IP Continues Page 3)










MEET THE FACULTY *
Professor Thomas F. Cotter is the first to
admit that his office is a wreck. Books are piled
from the floor practically to the ceiling. Chairs
and tables are overcome with heaps of loose
papers and notebooks. Bookshelves are full of
thick, austere, legal-looking books. A little path is
cleared from the doorway, which is usually open
when Cotter is around, to the desk.
This is where the magic happens.
Cotter has, it seems, a million-and-one proj-
ects. He's working on a book, editing student
works, teaching classes, and organizing legal sem-
inars. His eyes light up when he talks about his
work, and suddenly the stacks of books and
papers seem to make sense a sort of haphazard
filing system, minus the cabinets.
He has been at the University of Florida's law
school since 1994, rising in 10 short years from
assistant professor to a tenured position as law
professor and director of the Levin College of
Law's Intellectual Property (IP) Law Program, a
field he says interested him "mostly by accident."
"I actually never took any of these (intellectu-
al property) courses when I was in college," said
Cotter. "It wasn't such a big deal when I went to
law school, back in the 1980s."
Cotter earned his B.S. (with distinction), M.S.
and J.D. Magnaa cum laude) from the University
of Wisconsin, and was a member of the Order of
the Coif. His expertise is in intellectual property
(domestic and international), and law and eco-
nomics. He is recipient of the Ladas Memorial
Award and Teaching Improvement Program
Award.
As an associate with the Chicago law firm
Jenner & Block in the early 1990s, Cotter got his
first taste of IP law litigating a trademarks case for
L'Oreal his students read about the case in
their IP textbooks which prompted a law
review article on trademark law, which got him
hooked. A year after Cotter started teaching at the
law school, former Professor Roy Hunt retired,


(IP, Continued)
Although practicing lawyers made up the
majority of the conference's attendees, faculty
and/or students from the Levin College of Law,
Florida A&M Law School and FSU Law School
also attended.
"As a student, I attended the conference to
utilize the opportunity to network and learn about
prominent IP individuals, firms and companies,"
said Owens.


and Cotter took over the copyright and patent law
survey course.
And the rest, as they say, is history.
With more than 20 articles under his belt and
a book pending, Cotter has become a leader in the
fast-growing field of IP law.
In addition to teaching and writing about IP
issues, Cotter stays involved with students. He
advises the law school's Journal of Technology
Law and Policy, works with students on scholarly
papers for publication, and directs the Intellectual
Property Law Certificate Program (see page 6),
which offers specialized coursework for students
interested in IP law careers.
"So you can see why my office looks the way
it does I am literally always under some dead-
line," Cotter said. "It's hard work, but enjoyable."
-By Whitney Untiedt (2L)



Go to http://www.law.ufl.edulfacultyl for a
complete resume and list of publications.


The law firm of MillerMitchell PC. of
Princeton, New Jersey, sponsored the conference
breakfast, and Feldman Gale & Webber of Miami
sponsored the lunch. Plans are now underway for the
2005 Law & Technology Conference, which also
will be held in Orlando.
For more information about the Intellectual
Property Law Program, contact Professor Cotter
at cotter(ilaw.ufl.edu or 352-392-2235. O


Help Others
During UFCC
Campaign
Planning for the 2004
University of Florida
Community Campaign
(UFCC) is underway. The
UFCC aids 44 organiza-
tions in their efforts to
help those in need and
assist public causes in
Alachua County, and is
affiliated with United
Way of Alachua County,
which assists 30-plus
additional organizations.
"As you involve your-
self in the community, I
urge you to become
aware of the needs that
exist and of the good
these organizations
accomplish," said
Professor Joseph Little,
who coordinates the
UFCC drive at the law
school. "You will be hear-
ing more about how you
might participate in the
2004 campaign, especially
when it goes into high
gear in late summer."
For information,
e-mail Professor Little at
Little@law.ufl.edu.







UF Stakeholders
Weekend April 16-17
The University of
Florida Foundation is
hosting the first-ever UF
Stakeholders Weekend
April 16-17 to spotlight
the vital role private giv-
ing plays in UF's success.
Events include an infor-
mation session April 17,
II a.m.-noon, Emerson
Alumni Hall President's
Room, with UF President
Bernie Machen and UF
Foundation representa-
tives; and an endowment
luncheon April 17, 12:30-
2:30 p.m., Florida Gym.
(Details available online
at www.uff.ufl.edul
stakeholders.)








Fl a S Universit of Florida Fredric G. Levin Co e o Lw Ne M


Submit News
for FlaLaw
FlaLaw is published
each week school is in
session. All are encour-
aged to submit news of
interest to the law school
community by 10 a.m.
Tuesday for the following
Monday's newsletter to
Editor Debra Amirin,
Director of Institutional
Information & Publications,
amirin@law.ufl.edu,
Dean's Office (264 HOL),
392-9238, Fax 392-8727.








M I~/l!Ili


Fredric G. Levin
College of Law
Administration
* Robert H. Jerry, II, Dean
* Stuart R. Cohn,
Associate Dean for
International Studies
* Michael K. Friel, Associate
Dean for Academic Affairs
* William H. Page,
Associate Dean for
Faculty Development
* M. Kathleen "Kathie" Price,
Associate Dean for Library
and Technology
* Gail E. Sasnett, Associate
Dean for Students,
Professionalism and
Community Relations
* J. Patrick Shannon,
Associate Dean for
Administrative Affairs
* Donald J. Hale, Senior
Development Director
* Linda Calvert Hanson,
Assistant Dean for
Career Services
* Richard L. Ludwick,
Assistant Dean for Students
* J. Michael Patrick, Assistant
Dean for Admissions





W,

UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA
Honoring he pst, shaping the fiutur


* Director of Institutional Information and
Publications Debra Amirin and other mem-
bers of her Florida Public Relations
Association Community Relations Committee
earned a top Image Award in FPRA's
Gainesville-Ocala Award Competition in
recognition of the effectiveness and commu-
nity service of the seminar, "TechoTools,
What's New, What Works," they organized
for local nonprofit organizations.
* Professor/IP Program Director Thomas
Cotter published a book review for The
Antitrust Source (online at www.antitrust-
source.com), and presented a paper, "An
Economic Analysis of Enhanced Damages
and Attorneys' Fees for Willful Patent
Infringement," at a March 19 symposium on
Willful Patent Infringement at George
Washington University Law School jointly
sponsored by the law school and Oracle
Corporation.
* Chesterfield Smith Professor Nancy Dowd
published "From Genes, Marriage and
Money to Nurture: Redefining Fatherhood,"
10 Cardozo Women's L.J. 132 (2003).
* Chesterfield Smith Professor Michael W.
Gordon was interviewed on WUFT AM on
the North American Free Trade Agreement
and Outsourcing. During Spring Break he
was the guest of the universities of
Edinburgh and Aberdeen, where he spoke


Free, Public Symposiums Spotlight DUI,
Housing Law Today and Wednesday
Center for Governmental Responsibility
Public Interest Law Fellows will sponsor the
following symposiums both free and open to
the public at 7 p.m. in the Alachua County
Health Department Conference Center (224 SE
24th St., Gainesville):
* Street Law Symposium, "Driving Under the
Influence" (DUI), today, March 29. Learn more
about police and citizen encounters during a traffic
stop from a criminal defense attorney and represen-
tatives from the State Attorney's Office and
Alachua County Sheriff's Office Traffic Unit.
* "Housing Law: Understanding the Florida
Residential Landlord-Tenant Act and How it
Affects You," Wednesday, March 31. Learn more
about your rights and responsibilities as a tenant
from representatives at Three Rivers Legal
Services. Refreshments served.
Center for Governmental Responsibility
Public Interest Law Fellows are sponsored by The
Florida Bar Foundation. O


on international civil litigation to the
faculty and graduate students, and at
Trinity College, Dublin.
* Clarence j. TeSelle Professor Martin j.
McMahon, Jr. presented a day-long work-
shop on "United States judicial Anti-
Avoidance Doctrines" at the University of
Cambridge, Faculty of Law, Centre for Tax
Law Workshop in Cambridge, England,
March 12 for British tax professors, prac-
titioners, Inland Revenue administrators
and judges.
* Professor Kenneth Nunn and Irving Cypen
Professor Sharon Rush are doing a CLE
for The Florida Bar April 3.
* Professor and Director of the Center for
the Study of Race and Race Relations
Katheryn Russell-Brown was invited by
the Sociology Department at Northern
Illinois University to give a presentation,
"Race and Perceptions of Crime and
justice," March 18.
* Stephen C. O'Connell Professor
Christopher Slobogin participated in a
panel discussion on "Video Surveillance:
Legal and Technological Challenges," at
Georgetown Law School, moderated a UF
College of Law workshop at the Brown v.
Board of Education conference, and par-
ticipated in a UF law Professionalism
Symposium panel on criminal law. O


1S ES LatAaWa CAEND1IIAR Ia


See calendar online at www.law.ufl.edu
March
29 CSRRR brown bag, Professors Nancy Dowd and Ken Nunn,
noon-1 p.m., faculty dining room
CLA meeting, 5:30 p.m., 190C HOL
"Street law symposium, 7 p.m., Alachua Cty. Health Dept.
IMBA board meeting, 7 8 p.m., 190A HOL
30 Faculty enrichment, lames Chen, University of Minnesota
Law School, noon, faculty dining room
Judicial externships and clerkships, noon, 283 HOL
LSIJS phonathon to Legislators, 1-3 p.m., Holland Hall
courtyard
IMBA & Honor Committee elections
Toastmasters, 5 p.m., 292 HOL
31 ELELS banquet & speaker Carla DeLoach Bryant,
noon, 283 HOL
Housing law symposium, 7 p.m., Alachua Cty. Health Dept.

April
I BLSA health fair, 10 a.m.-2 p.m., concourse
APALSA Day, 11:30 a.m.- p.m., concourse
LSR meeting & speaker Hunter Williams, I p.m., 190B HOL
"JAG to Civilian Life" Panel, I p.m., Bailey Courtroom
CLS arts & crafts with Palm Garden residents, 2:15-4 p.m.
APIL speaker Kathleen Arnold, 6-7 p.m., faculty dining
room, and LawLawPalooza (details TBA)
EASLS speaker Jay Willingham (details TBA)
2 The successful summer clerk, noon, Bailey Courtroom


I I


* SCHOLARSHIP & ACTIVITIES *


I