<%BANNER%>
HIDE
 Announcements
 Career Services
 Alumni Reflections: Carol...
 Meet the Faculty
 Scholarship and acitivities


UF UFLAW



Fla law newsletter of the University of Florida College of Law
ALL VOLUMES CITATION SEARCH THUMBNAILS PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00072281/00102
 Material Information
Title: Fla law newsletter of the University of Florida College of Law
Portion of title: Flalaw
Physical Description: Serial
Creator: Levin College of Law
Publisher: s.n.
Place of Publication: <Gainesville FL> College of Law Communications Office 1997-
Creation Date: February 9, 2004
Frequency: weekly
completely irregular
 Subjects
Genre: periodical   ( marcgt )
serial   ( sobekcm )
 Notes
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol.1, no. 1 (Oct. 6, 1997)-
General Note: Weekly during the school year with a biweekly insert, numbered separately called: The Docket.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved, Board of Trustees of the University of Florida
Resource Identifier: aleph - 002311766
notis - ALR5129
System ID: UF00072281:00102

Table of Contents
    Announcements
        Page 1
    Career Services
        Page 2
    Alumni Reflections: Carol Browner
        Page 2
        Page 3
    Meet the Faculty
        Page 4
        Page 5
        Page 6
    Scholarship and acitivities
        Page 7
        Page 8
Full Text












Sla aw


Explore New Cultures & Learn
the Law Through Study Abroad
-By Megan Sladek (2L)
While others endured another sweaty
Gainesville summer, reported to work in an office
or dreamed away their time, some UF College of
Law students spent last year's break exploring
new countries and cultures.
"Studying abroad is a great way to spend a
summer. I got to travel and earn credit at the same
time," said David Dodd, who went to France last
year.
Career Services staff recommend that students
study abroad as early in their law school years as
possible, so they can concentrate later on their job
search.
"I went to South Africa my first summer, but
this summer I am focusing on getting a job after
graduation," said Edrene Johnson.
The Levin College of Law offers ABA-
accredited summer study abroad programs in
Montpellier, France; Capetown, South Africa; and
San Jose, Costa Rica. To participate this summer,
students must submit an application and $150
deposit by March 15.
Montpellier, France
You don't have to speak French to study law
in France summer study abroad classes at the
University of Montpellier are taught in English.
The coursework focuses on comparative business
law and students can earn up to six hours of credit
(with grades that transfer to UF). The program is
five weeks long, which leaves plenty of time for


'Ugly Man on Campus' Contest
The Association for Public Interest Law
(APIL) invites you to stop by the "Ugly Man on
Campus" table this week to vote for the "Ugliest
Man" by putting money in his jar. (Contestants
aren't really ugly, just "dressed up" for a good
cause.) Contest proceeds will be used to fund


relaxation, additional travel in Europe or even a
summer externship. In theory, a student could earn
eight hours of credit in one summer (six hours in
classes at Montpellier and two hours from a four-
week externship).
During the week, students stay in France's
equivalent of an extended-stay motel. The pro-
gram allows for three-day weekends, enabling stu-
dent to travel to places such as Paris, Barcelona,
Nice and other towns along France's picturesque
southern coast. Long weekends also make family
time possible. One UF student spent time with her
young son, and another brought along his wife.
(Continued Page 6)


APIL Summer 2004 Fellowships for UF law
students who take unpaid jobs with public interest
organizations such as Legal Aid, public defenders
and non-profit groups. To get involved in APIL
or learn more about Summer 2004 Fellowships,
e-mail ufpublicinterestlaw@yahoo.com.
(Announcements Continue Page 5)


Law Conferences
This Month & Next
* Public Interest
Environmental Law
Conference, "Shaping
Florida's Future: A
Decade of Protecting an
Eternity," Feb. 19-21,
Gainesville. More infor-
mation online at http://
grove.ufl.edu/~els/.
* Law and Technology
Conference, Feb. 20,
Orlando. For informa-
tion: Barbara DeVoe
(devoe@law.ufl.edu or
392-8070).
* "Beyond Brown:
Children, Race and
Education," March 25-
27, Gainesville. Co-
sponsored by Center on
Children & the Law and
Center for the Study of
Race & Race Relations.
More information online
at http://lic.law.ufl.edu/
ccl/. (Also see page 8.)





Inside
* Alumni Reflections:
Carol Browner (Pg. 2)
* Faculty Profile:
Kenneth Nunn (4)
* Statewide Participation
in First Lambda
Conference (8)


UNIVERSITY OF
0FLORIDA
Fredric G. Levin College of Law


* ANNOUNCEMENTS *











* CAREER SERVICES *


Help With Taxes
Volunteer Income Tax
Assistance (VITA) is a pro
bono project that provides
free electronic tax prepa-
ration assistance to stu-
dents and low-income tax-
payers who cannot afford
to pay for professional
assistance. VITA will oper-
ate Tuesdays-Thursdays,
5-9 p.m., Feb. 10-April 15
(closed March 8-12) in the
student organization office
in Rv,,,,tnnX.aar ull Thka


Mandatory Externship Meeting
Students interested in a summer or fall extem-
ship must attend a mandatory externship meeting.
Students who missed last Friday's meeting must
either attend a meeting this Wednesday, Feb. 11, at
5 p.m. in the Bailey Courtroom, or sign up on
TWEN (see your Westlaw rep for assistance) for
an externship small group session. Small group
signups are limited to 10 students each and are
first come, first served. Externship small group
sessions will be held outside Career Services
today, Feb 9, 11 a.m.-noon; Thursday, Feb. 12, 2-3
p.m.; and Tuesday, Feb. 17, 10-11 a.m.

Externship Deadlines
* The deadline to submit extership application
materials to Career Services for Professor Seigel's


summer extemships with the U.S. Attorney's
Office is 5 p.m. Tuesday, Feb. 10.
* The deadline to turn in all other extership
applications is noon Friday, Feb. 27.
* Student Initiated Extership Proposal Forms are due
to Career Services by noon Friday, March 19. Any
student proposing a new extership is required to
meet with Laura Traynham and complete the New
Externship Proposal Form.
* All students applying for any summer or fall
extership are required to submit an Extership
Registration & Acknowledgement Form signed by
the student, the field placement supervisor and the
faculty supervisor beginning March 29 and no later
than 5 p.m. April 19.
(Career Services Continues Page 3)


earliest VITA can assist
foreign non-resident filers
is March 15.)
Clients may chose E-
FILE services (returns are
filed electronically and
taxpayers have the option
of receiving a direct
deposit refund) or to
receive a check via regular
mail. To use the service,
you must bring:
* Picture ID
* Social security cards for
taxpayer, spouse, children
and other dependents or
official print-out of num-
bers from Social Security
Administration. (A hand-
written list of Social A a f .
Security numbers will not t p p
suffice.)
* W-2s, 1098s, andlor 1099s
for the taxpayer, spouse
and dependents.
* Dependent care information.
* Cost-basis information for
stock sales, if applicable.
* Bank routing number and
account number if direct
refund deposit is desired.
* Tax return for 2002, if
taxpayer has a copy.
For more information,
call 352-392-8835 or visit
VITA during operating
hours. (Note: VITA will not
give out tax advice over
the phone, only general
information about services
and needed documents.)











* CAREER SERVICES *


Help With Taxes
Volunteer Income Tax
Assistance (VITA) is a pro
bono project that provides
free electronic tax prepa-
ration assistance to stu-
dents and low-income tax-
payers who cannot afford
to pay for professional
assistance. VITA will oper-
ate Tuesdays-Thursdays,
5-9 p.m., Feb. 10-April 15
(closed March 8-12) in the
student organization office
in Rv,,,,tnnX.aar ull Thka


Mandatory Externship Meeting
Students interested in a summer or fall extem-
ship must attend a mandatory externship meeting.
Students who missed last Friday's meeting must
either attend a meeting this Wednesday, Feb. 11, at
5 p.m. in the Bailey Courtroom, or sign up on
TWEN (see your Westlaw rep for assistance) for
an externship small group session. Small group
signups are limited to 10 students each and are
first come, first served. Externship small group
sessions will be held outside Career Services
today, Feb 9, 11 a.m.-noon; Thursday, Feb. 12, 2-3
p.m.; and Tuesday, Feb. 17, 10-11 a.m.

Externship Deadlines
* The deadline to submit extership application
materials to Career Services for Professor Seigel's


summer extemships with the U.S. Attorney's
Office is 5 p.m. Tuesday, Feb. 10.
* The deadline to turn in all other extership
applications is noon Friday, Feb. 27.
* Student Initiated Extership Proposal Forms are due
to Career Services by noon Friday, March 19. Any
student proposing a new extership is required to
meet with Laura Traynham and complete the New
Externship Proposal Form.
* All students applying for any summer or fall
extership are required to submit an Extership
Registration & Acknowledgement Form signed by
the student, the field placement supervisor and the
faculty supervisor beginning March 29 and no later
than 5 p.m. April 19.
(Career Services Continues Page 3)


earliest VITA can assist
foreign non-resident filers
is March 15.)
Clients may chose E-
FILE services (returns are
filed electronically and
taxpayers have the option
of receiving a direct
deposit refund) or to
receive a check via regular
mail. To use the service,
you must bring:
* Picture ID
* Social security cards for
taxpayer, spouse, children
and other dependents or
official print-out of num-
bers from Social Security
Administration. (A hand-
written list of Social A a f .
Security numbers will not t p p
suffice.)
* W-2s, 1098s, andlor 1099s
for the taxpayer, spouse
and dependents.
* Dependent care information.
* Cost-basis information for
stock sales, if applicable.
* Bank routing number and
account number if direct
refund deposit is desired.
* Tax return for 2002, if
taxpayer has a copy.
For more information,
call 352-392-8835 or visit
VITA during operating
hours. (Note: VITA will not
give out tax advice over
the phone, only general
information about services
and needed documents.)











(Career Services, Continued)
On-Campus Interviewing
Selections from Phase 2 bidding are expected
by 5 p.m. Tuesday, Feb. 10. Interview signups
begin at noon Wednesday, Feb. 11, for selections
received at that point. Students should sign up for
Phase 2 interviews by Saturday, Feb. 14, at mid-
night.
Phase 3 Bidding opens Thursday, Feb. 12, and
continues through midnight Wednesday, Feb. 18.

Types of Available Clerkships
* Summer Associates/Summer Clerks are employed as paid
law clerks or associates during the summer. These positions
often lead to permanent employment upon graduation.
National Association of Law Placement guidelines prohibit
firms from interviewing or considering first-year candidates
prior to December 1, since first-semester, first-year students
need to primarily focus on course work. Students who wish to
apply for summerjobs are advised to be prepared to submit
resumes right after the first of the year, as the competition can
be challenging. If you are interested in summer clerking "back
home," consider using spring break while you are at home to
network and obtain information about potential openings and
firms that hire law students. Reciprocity services can be set up
in advance with law schools in the area you will be staying
that will enable you to use the resources in their career
resource centers. Also, be sure to check the handout provided
at Career Services, "Welcome Orientation for 1L's," that lists
Florida law firms that hire 1L's.
* Law clerks are paid to work -often on a part-time basis
for a legal employer and gain first-hand experience. (Also can
be unpaid.) Positions vary depending on type and needs of the
legal employer, although legal research is a common assign-
ment. In smaller firms, law clerks perform legal research,
write memoranda, draft pleadings and discovery requests and
may be permitted by the employer to attend hearings, deposi-
tions and trials.
* The 2004 Summer Law Clerk EarthJustice Legal Defense
Fund is looking for law clerks with excellent research, writ-
ing and oral advocacy skills; solid academic records, and a
demonstrated commitment to the environment. Clerks partici-
pate as full staff members and are expected to perform legal
and factual research, draft research memoranda and legal doc-
uments, attend court hearings and client meetings, and partici-
pate in press conferences and other activities as case loads
demand. These are paid positions; however, applicants are
asked to apply for work-study, grants and fellowships to sup-
plement the budgeted amount. 1L, 2L or 3L's can apply online
at www.earthjustice.org, type "internships" in search list.
* Part-time law clerk positions are often available on
eAttomey job bank, such as this recently listed position with a
Gainesville firm: "Moody & Salzman seeks 2L or 3L asap for
research, preparation of discovery materials, drafting/editing
motions & pleadings. Will work more as assistant rather than
traditional researcher. Must be able to work four days per
week, two-three hours per shift (10-15 hours /week). Flexible
schedule, will work around student's school schedule. Must
possess solid writing/editing skills. Excellent learning oppor-
tunity for students interested in family law. Call 373-6791."
* Judicial clerkships are prestigious paid positions for law
graduates. The clerks are employed by a judge to assist with
research, writing, and review of opinions and orders, usually
for one or two years. The judicial clerk often will have first


completed a judicial internship for the judge, who then hires
the student for the position upon graduation. A judicial clerk-
ship is a great way to begin a legal career and opens many
employment doors upon completion. Information on federal
clerkships is available at https: lawclerks.ao.uscourts.gov/
web/jobSearch, including this position posted for a district
A 'ITC. n. 1 VtTULI tdW VI X


JUU ge nom nee: .. s ou aw er
District of Florida (Pensacola). Application dead
31, term dates are 9/1/04-8/31/06. Prefer applicar
20% of their class, law review or other journal ei

Upcoming Programs
This Week
* Interviewing From a Multicultural Pei
today, Feb. 9, 4 p.m.,faculty dining room
sponsored with Office for Diversity and
Development.
* Life As a Prosecutor, Tuesday, Feb. 10,
faculty dining room, co-sponsored with
Featuring Harry Shorestein, State Attoi
the Fourth Circuit.
* Externship Orientation, Wednesday, Fe
p.m., Bailey Courtroom.
* Public Interest Symposium, Friday, Fel
p.m., cafeteria, co-sponsored with APIL.
about different opportunities available
through the Pro Bono Project and othe
nity service organizations.

Next Week
* Lobbying & Government Practice, Tue
Feb. 17, noon, faculty dining room.
* Careers in Family Law, Tuesday, Feb.
faculty dining room, co-sponsored with
Law Society.
* Careers in Insurance Law, Tuesday, M
noon, 283 Holland Hall, co-sponsored w
Litigators.
* View From the Judicial Bench, Tuesda
16, noon, faculty dining room, co-sponsore
LAW. O


line March Workshop on
nts in top
experience. Conservation of
Private Lands
All are invited to a free
workshop Thursday, Feb.
respective, 19, on "Conservation of
co- Private Lands: Financial
C y and Regulatory Incentives,"
Community -5 p.m. in 284 j. Wayne
Reitz Union. The workshop
noon, immediately precedes the
CLA. Public Interest
rney for Environmental Conference.
(For conference informa-
tion and registration, go
b. 11, 5 online to http://grove.ufl.
edu/~els.) If seating capaci-
. 13, 1 ty is exceeded, attendance
Learn will be limited to those
who pre-register via e-mail
to students to Ashley Cross-Rappaport
r commu- (elusiveash@yahoo.com).
Many of Florida's most
important natural
resources are held by
esday, private landowners, and a
variety of financial and
4, noon, regulatory incentives are
available to encourage con-
Family servation of these lands.
The Levin College of Law's
arch 2, Center for Governmental
ith Future Responsibility,
Environmental Defense and
Alachua Conservation Trust
y, March are hosting the workshop
d with to explore the potential
for increasing the use of
financial and regulatory
incentives for private land
-. conservation in Florida;
inform private landowners,
land trusts, environmental
activists and government
officials about the avail-
ability of incentive pro-
grams; present case studies
of their use; and discuss
Sthe potential for expanded
u usage in Florida.










LSR Speaker Feb.
12 Honors Black
History Month
The Law School
Republicans (LSR) will
host justin Landon, who
at 18 was the youngest
city councilman ever
elected in Florida, on
Lincoln's Birthday,
Thursday, Feb. 12. Landon
also is the first African-
American elected to the
Williston City Council, and
first in a series of speak-
ers sponsored by the
LSR's in honor of Black
History Month.
Landon will speak at
2 p.m. in 283 Holland
Hall about his experience
running as a Republican,
the direction of the
party, and issues facing
black Americans. First-
semester students unable
to attend are encouraged
to attend a reception
prior to the event at 1:30
p.m. in 190B Holland Hall.
Food and refreshments
will be served.
The next LSR meeting
on Tuesday, Feb. 17, at 9
a.m. (room TBA) will
focus on upcoming speak-
ers, events and campaign
developments. Donuts
and bagels will be served.
The LSRs continue to
promote involvement in
GEAR-UP, the Alachua
County school system's
mentoring program for
middle and high school
students. If you want to
help local kids and earn
community service hours,
e-mail VP Adria Toledo at
atoly@ufl.edu.


Journals Available
The Fall 2003 Univer-
sity of Florida journal of
Law & Public Policy and
December 2003 journal of
Technology Law & Policy
are available. For copies
or subscription informa-
tion, contact Victoria
Redd at 392-4980 or
reddva@law.ufl.edu.


MEET THE FACULTY *
View on the Profession
"I think the legal profession is a noble one,
but there is a tension within it between its capacity
for good and its capacity for evil. I think that is
why many people have a contradictory view of
lawyers they despise them, but they seek them
out when they have a problem. I also think that
this tension is why so many lawyers do not enjoy
the practice of law.
"In my view, these problems are reduced if
one approaches the profession as an art and not a
science. When law is viewed as an art form, you
understand that it is the relationships between peo-
ple that are really primary and that law is simply a
means to make those relationships meaningful.
The practice of law, then, is not about applying
rules or billing hours, nor is it about most of the
abstract concepts we learn in law school. It is
about justice and it is about fairness. Success as a
lawyer requires learning how to know justice when
you see it and how to craft solutions to problems
that are fair to all."

Education/Background
J.D., University of California at Berkley. A.B.,
Stanford University. Joined UF College of Law
faculty in 1990, and has served as advisor to the
Black Law Student Association and Trial Team
and as associate dean for Law Center Affairs.
Named Teacher of the Year in 1996 and Professor
of the Year in 1998.
Nunn previously was a deputy public defender
in San Francisco, CA.; staff attorney with the
Southern Africa Project, Lawyer's Committee for
Civil Rights Under Law, in Washington, D.C.; and
staff attorney with the Public Defender Service in
Washington, D.C.
He has published articles on civil rights, crim-
inal law and procedure, and race relations. His
book chapters include: "Rosewood," in When
Sorry Isn 't Enough: The Controversy Over
Apologies and Reparations for Human Injustices
(Roy L. Brooks, ed., 1999); "Joinder and
Severance," in Trial Manual, Vol. II, Chap. 19,
(Criminal Practice Institute, 1989) (with Thomas
Mason); "Juvenile Court," in Trial Manual, Vol. I,
Chap. 13, (Criminal Practice Institute, 1988) (with
Paige Kennedy). He also has appeared as a legal
commentator on television and radio programs,
and his comments on various legal topics have
been solicited by newspapers such as the New York
Times, Philadelphia Daily News and C i,. (,. *
Tribune.


Nunn has been a member of the Board of
Directors, Florida Institutional Legal Services,
Inc.; Gainesville Area ACLU Legal Panel;
Association of American Law Schools, Committee
on Recruitment and Retention of Minority Law
Teachers; Cooperating Attorney, NAACP Legal
Defense Fund; American Bar Association; ABA
Criminal Justice Section, Race and Racism in the
Criminal Justice System Committee (chair) and
Rules of Criminal Procedure and Evidence
Committee; National Association of Criminal
Defense Lawyers; Executive Committee, National
Association for Public Interest Law; and Bar of
the District of Columbia; State Bar of California.
He has received the Equal Opportunities in
Education Award, Equal Opportunities Law
Section of The Florida Bar; Francisco Rodriguez
Award for contribution toward advancing civil
rights in Florida, George Edgecomb Bar
Association; and Clyde Ferguson Award for out-
standing contributions toward promoting the inter-
ests of people of color in legal education and the
legal profession, American Association of Law
Schools, Section on Minority Groups.

What You May Not Know
Most people don't know that this is my sec-
ond sojourn in the state of Florida. I lived here for
five years in the early 1960s when my father was
stationed at Homestead A.F.B. So, in total, I have
spent almost 20 years in Florida. In fact, I have
lived here longer than I have lived anywhere else."
Go to http://www.law.ufl.edu/faculty/ for a
complete resume and list of publications.


I


B',LI








IUniversityofFlorida F G. Lv C l of La N e Februa


(Announcements, Continued)
Drug & Alcohol Crimes
Association Meets Wednesday
The Drug and Alcohol Crimes Law
Association meeting on Wednesday, Feb. 11, at
6:30 p.m. in 190B Holland Hall will focus on
planning events for the semester and a discussion
of the Gainesville Street Law Symposium to be
sponsored by the association on March 29 at 7:30
p.m. For additional information, e-mail President
Jon D. Gurney (gumey@ufl.edu).

Signature Drive for Article V,
Revision 7 Implementation Funds
The UF organization Law Students for the
Integrity of the Judicial System (LSIJS) is collect-


ing signatures for a petition to state lawmakers in
the process of reviewing the Governor's proposed
FY 2004-05 budget. LSIJS is asking the
Legislature to ensure that the Florida State Courts
System receives full funding for implementation of
Revision 7.
In 1998, Florida voters amended Article V of
the Florida constitution to require the state to
assume a greater portion of the costs of operating
trial courts. This amendment, known as Revision
7, was intended to eliminate disparities in funding
of essential court services among Florida's coun-
ties and becomes effective July 1, 2004.
For more information on how you can join the
LSIJS campaign, go to www.lsijs.org.

JMBA Meeting Today, Social Friday


JMBA general board meeting, today, Feb. 9, 7-8
p.m., 190A Holland Hall. All students are welcome.
JMBA Valentine's Day Social, this Friday, Feb. 13.
Look for flyers or come by the JMBA office for
information.

EASL Meets Tuesday
S The Entertainment, Arts, and Sports Law
Society will meet Tuesday, Feb. 10, at noon in the
auditorium. For information, e-mail EASL
President Charlie Jimerson at charliejimerson@
yahoo.com.

' "CLA Meetings This Semester
The Criminal Law Association will meet at
5:30 p.m. in 190C Holland Hall today, Feb. 9, Feb.
23, and March 15 and 29 (elections for 2004-05).
.l (Announcements Continue Page 7)
I I,'T4,1I IS! lt ll[l lii~l iili,.I


Facing Your Fear of Interviews By.
All students must eventually transition into the
world of work. One part of this transition is the
employment interview. Fear of upcoming interviews is
common and natural. An important tool in coping with
this fear is preparation. Preparation involves knowing
what you want to present, being ready to respond to
questions, and becoming familiar with the interview
process.
Knowing what you want to present includes know-
ing what your supporting documents say. Studying your
resume, introduction letters, etc. helps you feel that
you have a grasp on how you want to show yourself to
the interviewer.
To ready yourself for questions, think of some you
anticipate hearing in the interview. Do not forget to
include those questions that you dread answering.
Create honest, appropriate answers to each question
and memorize them or get to know their main points
very well.
Becoming familiar with the interview process


Resource Counselor lim Porter
requires not only experience in real interviews, but also
pre-interview rehearsals.
Find a friend, career counselor or
other counselor who is willing to
role-play interviews with you. Going
through the motions actually
improves your performance while
decreasing your anxiety.


Resource Counselor Jim Porter
is available to all UF College of Law
students for free and confidential
counseling andlor personal life
coaching during office hours:
Monday (8-11 a.m.), Tuesdays (8-1 I
a.m.) and Thursdays (8 a.m.-I p.m.)
in the Center for Career Services
(244 Bruton-Geer Hall). For individ-
ual appointments, call 392-0499 or
e-mail pacifist@ufl.edu. O


Challenge Signups
Start Today
The Office of
Diversity and Community
Development and Black
Law Students Association
(BLSA) invite the law
school community to join
them in wearing all black
Wednesday, Feb. 25,
from 8 a.m.-2 p.m.
According to organiz-
ers, "Black will represent
the silence that sur-
rounds some of the most
compelling challenges
confronting people of
color silence that
keeps solutions at bay."
Participants are
asked to select a cause
or challenge and sign up
for the event today-
Thursday, Feb. 9-12, in
346 Holland Hall or by
e-mailing tnfewell@
ufl.edu. Stickers reading
"Black for a reason: Ask
me why" will be avail-
able Monday, Feb. 23, in
the BLSA office or 346
Holland. When asked,
wearers can respond by
sharing their challenge,
issue or cause.
Participants will
gather at I p.m. in
Holland auditorium Feb.
25 to share and gain
motivation on positive
solutions for change.


Community Relations
Committee Formed
Dean Robert Jerry
distributed a memo Feb.
5 proposing revitaliza-
tion of the law school's
Community Relations
Committee, which is
charged with reviewing
and recommending solu-
tions to concerns voiced
by some members of the
college community. The
committee will draft and
implement an action
plan aimed at maintain-
ing an equitable, sup-
portive and harmonious
environment for all stu-
dents, faculty and staff.










Dinh
Gives
Dunwody
Lecture
Feb. 27
Georgetown Professor
and co-architect of the
U.S. Patriot Act Viet Dinh
(above) will give the
Dunwody Lecture Friday,
Feb. 27, at 10 a.m. in
Holland Hall auditorium.
All are welcome at the
event, which is presented
free-of-charge by Florida
Law Review.
His lecture will be
particularly timely, since a
federal judge in California
recently ruled a portion of
the Patriot Act unconsti-
tutional.


LexisNexis News
* For Lexis ID's or
research help, call
I-800-45-LEXIS 24
hours a day.
* For training session
information, check signs
posted on campus or go
to http://myschool.
lexis.com/myschool.
phtml?452.
* If you are interested in
online training, go to
http://www.lexisnexis.
com/lawschool/resourcel.
* Information on training,
research, Ultimate
Rewards Points and UF
announcements are
online at http://www.
lexisnexis.com/lawschool.
* Lexis Tip of the Week:
You can copy portions
of your search docu-
ment and have Lexis
include the citiation
information for you.
Highlight the text and
click "Copy w/ cite" to
paste your selection and
its citation to a clip-
board where it can be
copied and pasted into
a document.


(Summer Programs, Continued)
Of the three two-hour classes offered, two are
taught by UF professors who travel with the stu-
dents to France, and one is always taught by a
French professor, usually on a European Union
topic. Program Director Professor George Dawson
usually teaches a business law course.
Another unique aspect of the program is that
UF students get to take classes with French
students at Montpellier.
"The French students were so hospitable,"
said Dodd.
When a French student heard that UF students
couldn't find housing for a trip to the Pyrenees,
she called her father and arranged for them to stay
at her family's vineyard.
"People don't do that in America," said Dodd,
who is still impressed at the gesture.

Cape Town, South Africa
In South Africa, students stay in apartments,
and the experience is molded by the program's
focus on international human rights. Professor
Winston Nagan, who is originally from South
Africa, is director of the program and his many
years of experience and the relationships he has
built with members of the South African govern-
ment and community ensure that students get a
well-rounded cultural and legal education.
Professor Don Peters teaches Consensual Dispute
Resolution, drawing on cross-cultural experiences
students enjoy living and studying in Cape Town.
In Cape Town, as in Montpellier, classes meet
four days a week. This leaves three-day weekends
for planned excursions to governmental and judi-
cial offices as well as other locations of interest.

San Jose, Costa Rica
UF's joint summer program with the


... .....


University of Costa Rica lasts five weeks, and
focuses on environmental and comparative law.
This program like the others makes for a
unique law school experience because students are
able to put what they learn in context by taking
field trips to places around the country. (When
asked to identify the most impressive natural phe-
nomenon she had ever seen, summer study partici-
pant Erika Zimmerman said it was the active vol-
canoes she visited while studying in Costa Rica.)
For those learning about international law, the
Interamerican Court for Human Rights serves as a
real life reminder of how the law impacts others.
For those focusing on environmental law, Costa
Rica's rich landscape adds dimension to classroom
discussions of natural ecosystems, as does partici-
pation in the Conservation Clinic, directed by Tom
Ankersen.
Students who want to improve their Spanish
can participate in the Home-Stay program and live
with a Costa Rican family during the program and
take Spanish courses.

Study abroad programs are available to stu-
dents who have at least a 2.0 GPA and have com-
pleted at least 28 hours of credit. (Student Affairs
also coordinates ABA-approved summer programs

worldwide through other law schools, and can set
up individual programs under ABA guidelines for
students who want to study in locations without
formal programs.)
For general program information, course
descriptions and applications, go online to
http://www.law.ufl.edu/students/abroad/, e-mail
Student Affairs Coordinator Noemar Castro at
castro@law.ufl.edu, or contact the program direc-
tor for each area: Costa Rica, Tom Ankersen
(ankersen@law.ufl.edu); France, George Dawson
(dawson@law.ufl.edu); South Africa, Winston
Nagan (nagan@ufl.edu). O


~W~










SCHOLARSHIP & ACTIVITIES *
* Professor Clifford Jones will speak on spreading of antitrust law around the
"The Future of Private Antitrust globe as well as recent reforms of
Litigation" at a conference on "The Future European competition law. It has 60
of Private Rights of Action in Antitrust" at academic members from 16 countries.
Loyola University Law School in Chicago J Rm Legal Skills Professor Teresa J. Reid
Feb. 20. He also was selected to the Rambo has been recognized in Who's
Executive Board of Directors of the Who Among America's Teachers for the
Academic Society for Competition Law third year in a row.
(ASCOLA), a new international academic Stephen C. O'Connell Professor
society, at its organizational meeting in Christopher Slobogin published "What
Munich Nov. 21. Kones is one of only three U.S. Atkins Could Mean for People with
representatives on the board, and his attendance was Mental Illness," in a symposium issue of
made possible by funding from the UF Warrington New Mexico Law Review (Vol. 33: 293-
College of Business' Center for International 314) devoted to discussion of the Supreme
Business Education and Research. ASCOLA was Court case that prohibited execution of
established in response to the increasing globaliza- people with mental retardation. O
tion of the economy and internationalization and


(Announcements, Continued)
It will hold its end of year reception and panel
discussion April 16 in the faculty dining room.
For information, e-mail gatorcrimlawassoc@
yahoo.com.

Black History Month Events
The W. George Allen Chapter of the Black
Law Student Association has organized the follow-
ing in honor of Black History Month:
* Professor Michelle Jacobs, "Tools African-
American Lawyers Need to Succeed in Today's
Legal Profession," Tuesday, Feb. 10, 6 p.m., 190A
Holland Hall.
* Black History Trivia, every Monday, 9 a.m.-3
p.m., Holland Hall concourse. Test your knowledge
and win prizes.
* Classic Movie Matinee, every Thursday, 1-4 p.m.,
Bailey Courtroom. Co-sponsored by JMBA.
* Donation Drive for Peaceful Paths, until Feb. 14.
Co-sponsored by APIL & LAW.
For information: BLSA Historian Erica
Williams (ericakarol@yahoo.com).

Environmental & Land Use Law
Discussion Tuesday
The College of Law has a diverse array of
courses, extra-curricular opportunities and
resources available to students interested in envi-
ronmental and land use law, including a certificate
program for J.D. students who concentrate in these
fields. Faculty members with expertise in this area
can help you plan a course of study that will best


prepare you for a career in environmental and land
use law, including guidance on cross-registration
opportunities in other colleges on campus. Few
other programs can match the rich variety of
opportunities available, such as the annual student-
organized Public Interest Environmental
Conference, a diverse curriculum, the
Conservation Clinic, summer study abroad in
Costa Rica, summer externships, the environmen-
tal moot court competition and the Environmental
and Land Use Law Society.
All are invited to attend a discussion
Tuesday, Feb. 17, at noon in 283 Holland Hall
on these and other topics. (To receive e-mail
notices of events, e-mail Program Assistant Marla
Wolfe at elulp@law.ufl.edu.)

MLSA Meets Wednesday
The Military Law Students Association
(MLSA) will meet Wednesday, Feb.11, at noon in
283 Holland Hall.
For information, e-mail MLSA Acting
President Bill Lucier at blucierl@bellsouth.net.

Career Development Conference
The 2004 Career Development Conference
will be held Feb. 28 at the Paramount Hotel in
Gainesville, and will offer panel discussions by -
and networking sessions with practicing
attorneys. Students will have the opportunity to
learn more about an area of law they are interested
in and explore new interests. For information or to
get involved in organizing the conference, e-mail
Nick Dancaescu at vnickdd@hotmail.com. O


- -
Diversity Events
All are welcome at the
following events organized
by the UF College of Law's
Office of Diversity and
Community Development:
"Interviewing From a
Multicultural
Perspective" Workshop
(including race, ethnicity,
gender and religious
considerations), Monday,
Feb. 9, 4-5 p.m., faculty
dining room. Co-
sponsored with Career
Services.
Brown Bag, Willie Lynch
letter, Feb 17, 1-3 p.m.
Brown Bag, "Minorities
in Higher Education:
Trials and Triumphs,"
Tuesday, Feb. 24, noon-I
p.m., cafeteria.



News for Seniors,
Apps Due for
Scholarships
Graduation will be May
14 at 2 p.m. in the
O'Connell Center. Senior
information is now on
the Student Affairs web-
site, and the Senior
Survey can be picked up
in Student Affairs. The
sign-up sheet for senior
photos also is in
Student Affairs, and the
dates for those are Feb
12, noon-4:45, and Feb
13, 8 a.m.-4:45 p.m.
Applications for
Continuing Student
Scholarships for second-
and third-year law stu-
dents must be turned in
to Student Affairs by
Wednesday, Feb. II.
Note: The Academic
Success Workshop sched-
uled for today, Feb. 9, has
been postponed. More
information will be avail-
able shortly.








FlaSaS I University of Floria F dric G. L ne o Lw N t F


Submit News
for FlaLaw
FlaLaw is published
each week school is in
session. All are encour-
aged to submit news of
interest to the law school
community by 10 a.m.
Tuesday for the following
Monday's newsletter to
Editor Debra Amirin,
Director of Institutional
Information & Publications,
amirin@law.ufl.edu,
Dean's Office (264 HOL),
392-9238, Fax 392-8727.


Fredric G. Levin
College of Law
Administration

* Stuart R. Cohn,
Associate Dean for
International Studies
* Michael K. Friel, Associate
Dean for Academic Affairs
* William H. Page,
Associate Dean for
Faculty Development
* M. Kathleen "Kathie" Price,
Associate Dean for Library
and Technology
* Gail E. Sasnett, Associate
Dean for Students,
Professionalism and
Community Relations
* J. Patrick Shannon,
Associate Dean for
Administrative Affairs
* Donald J. Hale, Senior
Development Director
* Linda Calvert Hanson,
Assistant Dean for
Career Services
* Richard L. Ludwick,
Assistant Dean for Students
* J. Michael Patrick, Assistant
Dean for Admissions







UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA
Honoring lhe pst, shaping the future


First Lambda Legal Alliance Conference

Draws Statewide Audience

Speakers and an estimated 100 participants from throughout Florida con-
'LAMBDA I verged at the law school Jan. 24 for the Lambda Legal Alliance's first GLBT
LIE CL ^aw and Public Policy Conference, "Reframing the Debate: Legal and Social
Implications of Lawrence v. Texas."
The conference featured a keynote address by Karen M. Doering, staff
attorney for the National Center for Lesbian Rights, and three separate discus-
sion panels focused on the areas of same-sex marriage, Florida's homosexual
Same-sex marriage panelists adoption ban, and U.S. military policy. Panels were composed of practicing
(from left) Karen Doering, attorneys, law and social science professors, a member of the clergy and
Reverend Grant Ford, justin
R rend Grant Ford, Jstn GLBT activists and researchers. Speakers included Gary Scott Edinger of the
Flippen and Professor Berta
Hernandez-Truyol. North Florida Chapter of the ACLU; Dr. Scott Ryan, Florida State University
assistant professor of social work; Pastor Grant Ford of the Sunshine
Cathedral; Dr. Aaron Belkin, assistant professor in political science at UC Santa Barbara; Jeff Cleghorn,
director of the Military Education Initiative; Alison Nathan, associate with Wilmer, Cutler & Pickering in
Washington, D.C. (representing Servicemembers Legal Defense Network); and UF law professors
Barbara Woodhouse, Berta Hernandez-Truyol, Diane Mazur and Danaya Wright. The conference
received support from a number of community and university groups, including the Law College
Council, Board of College Councils and UF Student Government, and is planned as an annual event.
"The students worked really hard on this conference and pulled together some fabulous people," said
Faculty Advisor Danaya Wright. "It was an interesting look
at what the legacy of the Lawrence decision might be."
For information about Lambda Legal Alliance, e-mail
LambdaUF@aol.com. EO
Lambda Legal Alliance members (from left) Rachel Harvey (3L),
President Diane L. Dick (2L), Faculty Advisor Associate Professor
Danaya Wright, justin Flippen (3L), Sherry Jones (IL) and Ken Farmer
(IL). Treasurer Tammi Driver (2L) and Jerrett Brock (2L) not shown.


Register for Race & Education Conference
Students and faculty can attend the conference "Beyond
Brown: Children, Race and Education" March 25-26 in
Gainesville free-of-charge if they register by March 5 (lunch
provided only for paid attendees).
The event is co-hosted by the UF Center on Race and Race
Relations and Center on Children and the Law and supported
by the Institute for Child and Adolescent Research and
Evaluation (ICARE) and College of Education. It marks the 50th
anniversary of Brown v. Board of Education, in which the
Supreme Court held that educating children in racially segregat-
ed schools violated Constitutional equal protection guarantees.
Students are encouraged to submit seminar papers or com-
ments relating to the legacy and promise of this landmark case
to Debbie Kelley in 309 Holland Hall or via e-mail to
kelley@law.ufl.edu by March 15. The papers will be showcased
on the conference website and authors invited to participate in
workshops at the conference.
The conference will include a special showing of the docu-
mentary, "The Intolerable Burden," followed by a Q&A with
producer Constance Curry. Speakers will include UF faculty and
Richard Banks (Stanford Law School); Peggy Cooper Davis (NYU
Law School); Edgar Epps (University of Wisconsin School of
Urban Education); and Leland Ware (University of Delaware
School of Public Affairs). CLE credit is available.
Visit the conference website at www.law.ufl.edulchildconfer-
ence for details about the agenda, speakers and registration. O1


See Event & Academic Calendars online
at www. law. ufl. edu
February
9 Externship Small Group Session, II a.m.-noon,
outside Career Services
Interviewing From a Multicultural Perspective,
4 p.m., faculty dining room
CLA Meeting, 5:30 p.m., 190C HOL
IMBA Board Meeting, 7-8 p.m., 190A HOL
10 Faculty Enrichment, Rainer Nickel, U. of Frankfort,
"The New European Constitution," noon, faculty
dining room
Life as a Prosecutor, noon, faculty dining room
EASL Meeting, noon, auditorium
Professor Michelle lacobs on "Tools African
American Lawyers Need to Succeed in Today's
Legal Profession," 6 p.m., 190A HOL
11 MLSA Meeting, noon, 283 HOL
Externship Meeting, 5 p.m., Bailey Courtroom
Drug & Alcohol Crimes Association Meeting,
6:30 p.m., 190B HOL
12 Externship Small Group Session, 2-3 p.m., outside
Career Services
ILPP Writing Competition Meeting, 5 p.m.,
190A HOL
LSR Speaker Councilman lustin Landon, 2 p.m.,
283 HOL
13 Deadline to Apply for Fall Exchange Programs
Public Interest Symposium, I p.m., cafeteria
IMBA Valentine's Day Social


I I


I