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 New business law organization
 Announcements
 Career Services
 Meet the Faculty
 Scholarship and activities


UF UFLAW



Fla law newsletter of the University of Florida College of Law
ALL VOLUMES CITATION SEARCH THUMBNAILS PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00072281/00099
 Material Information
Title: Fla law newsletter of the University of Florida College of Law
Portion of title: Flalaw
Physical Description: Serial
Creator: Levin College of Law
Publisher: s.n.
Place of Publication: <Gainesville FL> College of Law Communications Office 1997-
Creation Date: January 20, 2004
Frequency: weekly
completely irregular
 Subjects
Genre: periodical   ( marcgt )
serial   ( sobekcm )
 Notes
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol.1, no. 1 (Oct. 6, 1997)-
General Note: Weekly during the school year with a biweekly insert, numbered separately called: The Docket.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved, Board of Trustees of the University of Florida
Resource Identifier: aleph - 002311766
notis - ALR5129
System ID: UF00072281:00099

Table of Contents
    New business law organization
        Page 1
    Announcements
        Page 1
    Career Services
        Page 2
        Page 3
    Meet the Faculty
        Page 4
        Page 5
        Page 6
    Scholarship and activities
        Page 7
        Page 8
Full Text












laLaw


New Business Law Organization


Members of the Business Law Section of The
Florida Bar visited the Levin College of Law last
November to promote establishment of a student
organization oriented toward this important legal
area. Law students Doug Bates (3L) and David
Gay (3L) took the lead in the effort, and as a
result the new business law organization will hold
its first meeting this Thursday, Jan. 22, at 5 p.m.
in 190B Holland Hall.
"Many competing institutions have similar
programs," said Bates. "UF is the state's flagship
university, and it's only fitting that we express our
commitment to business law through a student
organization."
The two had help from Associate
Dean for International Studies/Professor
Stuart Cohn and Gerald A. Sohn
Scholar/Professor Jeffrey Davis, who
Cohn serve as the group's faculty advisors and
help it work toward building a relation-
ship with the Bar's Business Law
Section. With a membership of 4,000-
plus lawyers statewide, the section
Davis reviews and drafts legislation, sponsors
educational programs, and proposes changes in
the way business law is practiced in Florida.
A true "win-win," students in the new organi-
zation will benefit from exposure to opportunities
and business issues, while the section receives


ANNOUN
Organization Fair Wednesday
"Students can benefit greatly by taking a few
moments to get information, get acquainted and
get involved at the Student Organization Fair,"
said Student Affairs Coordinator Noemar Castro.
A number of groups will be represented at the
event this Wednesday, Jan. 21, 10 a.m.-2 p.m. on
the Holland Hall concourse, including:
* The Law School Republicans (LSR), who will
have officers and members available to welcome
new students to the law school and provide


help with vari-
ous projects.
"The range
of possibilities
is wide open,"
said Davis.
"Students might
work on the sec-
tion's legislative
projects, help
with a publica-
tion in Business Law Quarterly, or work on other
projects that may result in personal contacts with
business lawyers."
Davis is a member of the section's Executive
Council and Legislation Committee, and chairs a
special committee investigating proposed changes
to Florida's garnishment statute. A former chair
and vice chair of the Bankruptcy UCC
Committee, he was chief draftsman of the bill that
created Florida's Statutory Lien Law.
According to Cohn, "The Business Law
Section of The Florida Bar has been exploring
for several years how they can establish closer
relationships with law schools and students. This
group will provide an excellent opportunity for
making personal contacts, assisting in projects
and getting students interested in law reform
(Business Law Continues Page 7)


CEMENTS *
information about their organization.
The Entertainment, Arts and Sports Law Society
(EASL), which encourages interested students to
stop by its booth for more information on benefits
of involvement.
For information on the fair: Justin Flippen
(Gatorlaw78 @aol.com) or the LCC Office.
Law Review Writing Competition
Nearly half of Florida Law Review members
qualify for membership in the prestigious organi-
(Announcements Continue Page 3)


UF Lambda Legal
Alliance Law &
Policy Conference
Lambda Legal Alliance
will hold its first annual
conference on gay,
lesbian, bisexual and
transsexual issues this
Saturday, jan. 24, at 9:30
a.m. in the Levin College
of Law auditorium.
The program this
year, "Re-Framing the
Debate: Legal and Social
Implications of Lawrence
v. Texas in the Areas of
Gay Marriage, Florida's
Gay Adoption Ban, and
U.S. Military Policy," is
free and open to the
public, with breakfast and
lunch provided at no
cost.
Panels will be
composed of practicing
attorneys, law and social
science professors, GLBT
activists and researchers.
Audience members will
have an opportunity to
ask questions after each
panel. For more informa-
tion: UF Lambda Legal
Alliance (LambdaUF
@aol.com).













F UNIVERSrTY OF
FLORIDA
Fredric G. Levin College of Law
















laLaw


New Business Law Organization


Members of the Business Law Section of The
Florida Bar visited the Levin College of Law last
November to promote establishment of a student
organization oriented toward this important legal
area. Law students Doug Bates (3L) and David
Gay (3L) took the lead in the effort, and as a
result the new business law organization will hold
its first meeting this Thursday, Jan. 22, at 5 p.m.
in 190B Holland Hall.
"Many competing institutions have similar
programs," said Bates. "UF is the state's flagship
university, and it's only fitting that we express our
commitment to business law through a student
organization."
The two had help from Associate
Dean for International Studies/Professor
Stuart Cohn and Gerald A. Sohn
Scholar/Professor Jeffrey Davis, who
Cohn serve as the group's faculty advisors and
help it work toward building a relation-
ship with the Bar's Business Law
Section. With a membership of 4,000-
plus lawyers statewide, the section
Davis reviews and drafts legislation, sponsors
educational programs, and proposes changes in
the way business law is practiced in Florida.
A true "win-win," students in the new organi-
zation will benefit from exposure to opportunities
and business issues, while the section receives


ANNOUN
Organization Fair Wednesday
"Students can benefit greatly by taking a few
moments to get information, get acquainted and
get involved at the Student Organization Fair,"
said Student Affairs Coordinator Noemar Castro.
A number of groups will be represented at the
event this Wednesday, Jan. 21, 10 a.m.-2 p.m. on
the Holland Hall concourse, including:
* The Law School Republicans (LSR), who will
have officers and members available to welcome
new students to the law school and provide


help with vari-
ous projects.
"The range
of possibilities
is wide open,"
said Davis.
"Students might
work on the sec-
tion's legislative
projects, help
with a publica-
tion in Business Law Quarterly, or work on other
projects that may result in personal contacts with
business lawyers."
Davis is a member of the section's Executive
Council and Legislation Committee, and chairs a
special committee investigating proposed changes
to Florida's garnishment statute. A former chair
and vice chair of the Bankruptcy UCC
Committee, he was chief draftsman of the bill that
created Florida's Statutory Lien Law.
According to Cohn, "The Business Law
Section of The Florida Bar has been exploring
for several years how they can establish closer
relationships with law schools and students. This
group will provide an excellent opportunity for
making personal contacts, assisting in projects
and getting students interested in law reform
(Business Law Continues Page 7)


CEMENTS *
information about their organization.
The Entertainment, Arts and Sports Law Society
(EASL), which encourages interested students to
stop by its booth for more information on benefits
of involvement.
For information on the fair: Justin Flippen
(Gatorlaw78 @aol.com) or the LCC Office.
Law Review Writing Competition
Nearly half of Florida Law Review members
qualify for membership in the prestigious organi-
(Announcements Continue Page 3)


UF Lambda Legal
Alliance Law &
Policy Conference
Lambda Legal Alliance
will hold its first annual
conference on gay,
lesbian, bisexual and
transsexual issues this
Saturday, jan. 24, at 9:30
a.m. in the Levin College
of Law auditorium.
The program this
year, "Re-Framing the
Debate: Legal and Social
Implications of Lawrence
v. Texas in the Areas of
Gay Marriage, Florida's
Gay Adoption Ban, and
U.S. Military Policy," is
free and open to the
public, with breakfast and
lunch provided at no
cost.
Panels will be
composed of practicing
attorneys, law and social
science professors, GLBT
activists and researchers.
Audience members will
have an opportunity to
ask questions after each
panel. For more informa-
tion: UF Lambda Legal
Alliance (LambdaUF
@aol.com).













F UNIVERSrTY OF
FLORIDA
Fredric G. Levin College of Law










*CAREER SERVICES


Real Property,
Probate & Trust
Law Reception
The Real Property,
Probate and Trust Law
(RPPTL) Section of The
Florida Bar will sponsor a
panel/reception for stu-
dents interested in these
practice areas at 5:30
p.m. this Wednesday, Jan.
21, in the faculty dining
room. Six local attorneys
from the Young Lawyers
Division will serve on a
panel to share their expe-
riences with law students.
Panelists include John
Campo (Robertson Group),
Michael Faehner (presi-
dent-elect of The Florida
Bar Young Lawyers
Division), Robert Lash
(Moody & Salzman), James
Burnett Kelly, III (Salazar
& Kelly) and Glorimil
Rosario Walker (Three
Rivers Legal Services).
Attorney Chung-de Cambre
coordinated the event and
will serve as moderator.


Phase 2 of On-Campus Interviews
On-Campus Interviewing Phase 2 Bidding
opens next Monday, Jan. 26, for Phase 2 employ-
ers. Bidding will close at midnight Feb. 2 (the first
day of interviewing for Phase 1 employers). Those
who missed OCI orientation can watch the video
in the Media Center. Come to Career Services if
you need an ID and/or password for eAttorney or
have questions.

First-Year Minority Scholarship
Baker & Hostetler established the Paul White
Scholarship Program to facilitate the recruitment
and employment of minority attorneys. The pro-
gram offers a paid summer associate clerkship and
$5,000 cash award. Applications are available in
Career Services and the Office of Diversity and
Community Development for interested first-year
(fall entrants only) minority law students, and are
due by next Monday, Jan. 26.

Apply Now for Summer Fellowships
Applications for Florida Bar Foundation
Summer Legal Services Fellowships must be
postmarked by Monday, Jan. 26. For information
on fellowship opportunities, visit the Fellowship
Corner at www.pslawnet.org and www.equaljus-
ticeworks.org or visit Career Services.

Washington, D.C. Tax Fair
The deadline to bid on employers and upload
resumes for the Washington, D.C. Tax Fair (for
LL.M. in Taxation students only) is 5 p.m. this


Student Musician
Needed to Assist
With Recital
Dean Robert Jerry
needs a law student with
good musical aptitude to
assist in organizing a
"Schubert-style evening,"
in which students and
faculty will present for
each other a music
recital, with refreshments
appropriate to the occa-
sion. Interested students
should provide their
music-related credentials
and contact information
to Doris Perron in the L
Dean's Suite (perron@
law.ufl.edu).


Friday, Jan. 23. All bidding must be completed by
this time. Interview selections will be available on
eAttorney Feb. 5. Students must sign up for inter-
views by Feb. 11 to attend the job fair, and inter-
views not scheduled by 5 p.m. will be cancelled.

ISIP New York job Fair Alternates
Alternates will be notified today if their alter-
nate slot has turned into an interview slot.

Upcoming Programs
* What I Did Last Summer, today, Jan. 20, noon,
faculty dining room, pizza courtesy of Lexis
* Real Property Forum, Wednesday, Jan. 21, 5:30
p.m., faculty dining room, co-sponsored with
ETELS
* Dress for Success, Tuesday, Jan. 27, noon,
cafeteria, co-sponsored with JMBA
* Interviewing Workshop, Friday, Jan. 30,
noon, Bailey Courtroom
* Unlicensed Practice of Law, Tuesday, Feb. 3,
noon, auditorium, co-sponsored with BLSA
* Trial Techniques Expert Witness,
Thursday, Feb. 5 (tentative)
* Externship Informational Meeting, Friday,
Feb. 6, noon, Bailey Courtroom
* Interviewing From a Multicultural Perspective,
Monday, Feb. 9, 4 p.m., room TBA, co-sponsored
with Office for Diversity and Community
Development
* Life As a Prosecutor, Tuesday, Feb. 10, noon,
faculty dining room, co-sponsored with CLA










Former Florida Bar Fellow Recommends Experience to Others


Law students can have a career in public inter-
est and balance their student loans at the same time,
according to recent graduate Samantha Vacciana
(UF JD 03), who recently was selected as a Equal
Justice Works Fellow. What gave her the confidence
to pursue this career path, she says, was what she
learned as a Florida Bar Foundation Fellow.
"It's the best experience I've ever had," she
said. "That summer is when I realized I wanted to
be in public interest work after graduation."
To make her dream a post-graduation reality,
Samantha formulated a proposal to serve a specific
group of abused women in the West Palm area:
immigrants who lacked legal status in the U.S. Her
work in the coming two years will enable women
who are victims of domestic violence to remain in
the United States without having to tolerate abuse
from their spouses. In addition, Greenburg Traurig,
the firm that is sponsoring her, will pay her a
stipend and cover her student loans for two years.
The Florida Bar Foundation Fellowship is one
of the few paying non-firm jobs within the grasp of
first- and second-year law students. The criteria are
flexible, but students who show an extraordinary
commitment to public service usually fare better in
the selection process.
Before applying, Samantha spent a semester in
the Pro Se Clinic and was a Certified Legal Intern
by the time her fellowship began. In addition, she
spent the previous summer assisting prisoners with
class action issues as an extem with Florida
Institutional Legal Services (FILS), did pro bono
work in Gainesville, and competed in the Frederick
Douglas National Moot Court Competition.
Showcasing your commitment to public service
is important, but equally important is putting togeth-
er a professional application.
Career Services Associate Director Jessie
Howell advises students to write well-crafted


(Announcements, Continued)
zation through its semiannual Open Writing
Competition. All third-semester students who have
successfully completed Legal Research & Writing
and Appellate Advocacy and have a cumulative
GPA of 2.0 or higher are invited to participate. The
first informational meeting will be held next
Tuesday, Jan. 27, at 6:30 p.m. in 290 Holland Hall.
All eligible students are strongly encouraged to
attend to learn more.

JMBA News and Events
* "JMBA Night Out," this Thursday night, Jan. 22.
Look for flyers or visit the JMBA Office for details.
* First-semester representative elections will be


answers to why they would be the best candidate,
and Samantha recommends typing it and having
someone in Career Services look it over.
i '...!ic..IJ.lli i in the application process
reflects how you will perform if selected," said
Howell. "Typos won't impress anyone."
Once selected, fellows kick off the summer
with a three-day orientation in Ft. Lauderdale,
where they meet and train with 20 other students
who will be selected to work at sites throughout the
state. The foundation covers reasonable costs of
travel to and from orientation, then pays a stipend of
$4,000 to 1L's and $5,000 to 2L's for the remaining
11 weeks of work on location. Tasks range from
representing clients in court (a possibility for
Certified Legal Interns) to assisting with research,
conducting client interviews and drafting pleadings.
Students should read program descriptions care-
fully before ranking site selections. Samantha rec-
ommends explaining in the application not only why
you would like to be a fellow, but also why you
would like to be a fellow at your first-choice loca-
tion. Since the type of work handled at each location
varies from housing issues to domestic violence to
prisoner's rights, this explana-
tion may help distinguish you
as an especially well-suited
candidate for a particular site.
Applications for the
Florida Bar Foundation
Fellowship are online at
ww- j!, .'j,, r'/, i. rg and must
be postmarked by Jan. 26.
Visit Career Services for more
information on fellowships,
extemships and pro bono
opportunities. mat, c
By Megan Sladek (2L)



held Monday, Jan. 26, 7-8 p.m., at the general board
meeting in 190A Holland Hall. All first-semesters
are encouraged to run. (There is no general board
meeting this week due to the holiday.)
All are invited to the JMBA/Career Services "Dress
for Success" presentation Tuesday, Jan. 27, at noon
in the cafeteria. Representatives from The Men's
Warehouse and Casual Comer will demonstrate
how to build the perfect interview look, transform
interview suits into suits for all occasions and build
a versatile wardrobe while saving money. VIP dis-
count cards will be distributed to those in atten-
dance. Lunch will be served and door prizes raffled.
For information: Frank Garcia (garciafr@iufl.edu).
(Announcements Continue Page 4)


Singley Speaks at
UF Law Thursday
Bernestine Singley
(UF jD 74, pictured above
with her book and canine
companion) will speak
this Thursday, Jan. 22, 5
p.m., 190C Holland Hall.
Her visit is hosted by the
UF College of Law justice
Campbell Thornal Moot
Court Team, Office for
Diversity and Community
Development and ACCENT.
Her appearance is free
and open to the public.
Singley is a mediator,
consultant and author of
When Race Becomes
Real: Black and White
Writers Confront Their
Personal History. She has
been an assistant attor-
ney general in both
Massachusetts and Texas
and contributed to a
number of anthologies,
including Children of the
Dream. At her UF law
graduation, she was one
of only four African
American women.
For more information:
jaDawnya C. Butler,
justice Campbell Thornal
Moot Court Team (256-
6294 or jbutler@uf.edu)
or Desta Meghoo-Peddie,
Director, Diversity &
Community Development
(392-9238 or meghoo@
law.uf.edu).










* MEET THE FACULTY *


Help With Music
Law Conference
Music Law Conference
organizers will hold a
meeting today, Jan. 20, at
5:30 p.m. in 296 Holland
Hall for those interested
in volunteering.
The conference will be
held Jan. 30-31 at the
Reitz Union, and will fea-
ture a full day of panels
on topics of both law and
music and two nights of
band showcases at venues
throughout Gainesville.
To attend, download a
registration form from
www.musiclawconfer-
ence.com. For informa-
tion, contact Jason Gordon
at jason@musiclawcon-
ference.com.



Key Patriot Act
Player Gives
Dunwody Lecture
Feb. 27
All are invited to a
presentation by
Georgetown Law Professor
and former
U.S.
Assistant
Attorney
General for
Legal Policy
Viet Dinh
(pictured),
who will give the keynote
speech at Florida Law
Review's Dunwody Lecture
Feb. 27. A noted legal
scholar, Dinh played a key
role in implementing the
controversial Patriot Act
after the September I I
terrorist attacks. Born in
Saigon, Vietnam, he came
to America as a refugee in
1978 and went on to
graduate magna cum
laude from Harvard
College and Law School.


View on the Profession
"I've been involved in the legal profession
since I was 19: as a runner, secretary, legal
assistant, office manager, lawyer and now skills
professor. The profession has been my life.
"Every individual has the potential to change
society, and lawyers are even more able to do so
- for good or bad. Your reputation is all you
have; it's the most important thing. Be good peo-
ple first and lawyers second. Life is short: do it
today, be careful of what you do, and don't take
shortcuts.
"Over the years, I've seen changes in the
profession, but lawyer jokes aside, I've been
fortunate in knowing and working with many good
people incredible people."

Education/Background
B.S.B.A. (Finance, with high honors), J.D.,
University of Florida (with honors), Order of the
Coif, editor-in-chief and senior research editor,
Florida Law Review. Became a sole practitioner in
1994 after working in the Gainesville firm of
Henry L. Gray, PA. Began teaching at UF College
of Law in 1996. Executive Board: American Inns
of Court. Board of Directors: Eighth Judicial Bar
Association. Officer: Eighth Judicial Bar
Association; Florida Association for Women
Lawyers, Eighth Circuit Chapter. Member: Florida
Blue Key, UF College of Law Alumni Council,


(Announcements, Continued)
join Committee to Cut Loans
If you could choose any career you wanted
without regard for paying back your law school
loans, what would you do? The Association for
Public Interest Law (APIL) wants to give gradu-
ates the opportunity to find out. APIL invites
applications for the Loan Repayment Assistance
Program (LRAP) Committee for 2004. The LRAP
Committee will consist of a small group of stu-
dents from all semesters who will work together to
develop a program like those at Georgetown,
Columbia and Stanford that assist students in pay-
ing back their law school loans. No experience in
or knowledge of LRAP programs is necessary, but
dedication to developing an LRAP program is.
This is a great opportunity to get involved in
something that will have a positive impact for gen-
erations to come. For more information or an
application, contact Jessie Howell in Career


'-



National Alumni Association, Beta Gamma Sigma
(Business School Honors Society), Phi Kappa Phi,
Golden Key, Florida Law Review Alumni
Association, Legal Writing Institute.

What You May Not Know
Tomlinson lives with four dogs and two par-
rots. An avid fan of jazz and rock 'n roll, she still
loves the Beatles (especially Paul). Last year, she
discovered Play Station 2, and particularly enjoys
Need for Speed, ATV and Pac Man. Her late hus-
band was Jim Tomlinson, Eighth Circuit Judge.


Go to http://www.law.uf. edu/faculty/ for a
complete resume and list of publications.


Services or e-mail Jill Mahler atjillmahler@
hotmail.com. Applications are due Jan. 31.

FJIL Informational Meeting
The Florida Journal ofInternational Law
(FJIL) will hold an informational meeting for stu-
dents interested in writing a comment to get onto
the Journal today, Jan. 20, at noon in 292 Holland
Hall. A second meeting will be held Wednesday,
Jan. 28, at 5 p.m. in 190B Holland Hall for those
who can't attend the first meeting. The comment
competition is open to all third-, fourth-and fifth-
semester students. For information: FJIL
Executive Student Works Editor Damon Gasser
(damongasser@hotmail.com).

Career Development Conference
The 2004 Career Development Conference
will be held Feb. 28 at the Paramount Hotel in
Gainesville, and will consist of panel discussions
(Announcements Continue Page 5)


I










(Announcements, Continued)
by practicing attorneys. Students will have the
opportunity to learn more about an area of law
they are interested in and possibly discover new
interests in the process. The conference also will
feature a networking reception and opportunity to
meet and speak with attorneys from firms across
the southeast. For information or to get involved in
organizing the conference, e-mail Nick Dancaescu
(vnickdd@thotmail. cor).

First Family Law Society Meeting
The Family Law Society will hold its first
meeting of the semester Friday, Jan. 22, 1-2 p.m.
in 190B Holand Hall. If you are unable to attend
or want more information, contact Rachel at
yff u I oli .. 'i....
Enter Trial Team Competition
All third- and fourth-semester students are
invited to strengthen their litigation skills by par-
ticipating in Trial Team's Spring 2004 Intramural
Competition. Learn how at a meeting Wednesday,
Jan. 21, 6 p.m., in the auditorium. Information will
be provided on Trial Team's purpose, how to
become a member of this nationally recognized
organization and rules for participating in the
spring competition. Competition packets will be
available for $5 at the informational meeting. For
more information, visit the Trial Team Web site
(http://grove.ufl. i.hi, -niiai ... i ioid).

'Nuptials for the New Age'
The Christian Legal Society and the
Blackstone Fellowship will present "Nuptials for
the New Age: Does Lawrence v. Texas Justify
Same-Sex Marriage?" Wednesday, Jan. 21, at 5


p.m. in the Bailey Courtroom. Senior Vice
President of the Alliance Defense Fund Jeffery J.
Ventrella, Esq. will lecture on the current state of
constitutional law with respect to the legalization
of same sex marriage, with emphasis on the poli-
cy/philosophical reasons why same sex marriage
should not be legalized. A question/answer session
will follow. For information: Jonathan D. "J.D."
Simpson (379-3496).

Moot Court Try Outs
The Justice Campbell Thornal Moot Court
Team holds try outs for eligible third- and fourth-
semester students each semester. To be eligible,
students must be in good academic standing and
have already completed Appellate Advocacy. The
team is a proven way to hone research, writing and
oral skills. To learn more about the team and the
try out process, attend an informational meeting at
5 p.m. Friday, Jan. 23, 190B Holland Hall.

Donations Needed
CGR Public Interest fellows will collect
travel-size toiletries for St. Francis House residents
Jan. 20-30. Collection boxes are in Career Services
and Student Affairs and outside the JMBA Office.

Law School Republicans Meet
The Law School Republicans (LSR) will hold
their first meeting of the semester Thursday, Jan.
22, at 1 p.m. in the auditorium. Discussions will
focus on upcoming events and projects and the
election. All interested law students are welcome.
Pizza will be served.
The LSR's also continue to promote law
student involvement in GEAR-UP, the Alachua
(Announcements Continue Page 6)


Making the Best of Your Worst Behavior By Resource Counselorlim Porter
If you do not like the way you behave in certain situations, try using the "trigger-
emotion-response" model to change your behavior.
First, think of a situation in which you behaved in an unsatisfactory fashion. That
situation is your "trigger." Write it down on a piece of paper. Skip a line. Then write
down what you did in that situation. That is your "response." Finally, in the skipped
line, name the emotion you felt just before your response and just after your trigger.
You have just analyzed your behavior. You are ready to change it. On the piece of
paper, write about five to ten other responses you could have to that emotion. We
respond to our emotions, not to our triggers. Make sure your responses are concrete
actions.
Next, pick the response that you think would work best whenever you are feeling
that emotion. Now rehearse that emotion followed by the response repeatedly,
like an actor. The emotion does not have to feel real. Fake the emotion and follow it
with your newly chosen response until the new response seems to flow naturally from
the old emotion. You may be surprised at the results.
Contact Resource Counselor Jim Porter (pacifist@ufl.edu or call 392-0499) for
personalized coaching that is free and confidential to UF College of Law students. O


People Awareness
Week Jan. 26-30
The University of
Florida will celebrate
People Awareness Week
2004 the week of Jan. 26
to celebrate and demon-
strate the value of diver-
sity through art, dance,
food, film and music.
Events also will encour-
age acceptance, respect
and appreciation of
diversity in relation to
race, gender, age, ethnic-
ity, sexual orientation,
disability, socioeconomic
status and religious
affiliation.
For information: Beth
Waltrip (bethw@union.
ufl.edu or 392-1655).











Submit News for
The Docket
The Docket which
is inserted in FlaLaw
every other week is a
forum for the views of law
students at the Levin
College of Law and accepts
articles, opinions and
commentaries from read-
ers. (The Docket does not
republish articles from
other news mediums.)
Submissions should be
Word compatible, 750
words or less, and include
contact information. The
deadline for the first
Docket is noon Tuesday,
Jan. 27. E-mail entries or
questions to jmbadocket
@yahoo.com or contact
editors Kristen Simmons
and Stephanie Mickle.















Study in the
Netherlands
Leiden University in
the western part of the
Netherlands enables UF
law students to spend a
semester overseas. The
Faculty of Law at Leiden
University has long pur-
sued an international ori-
entation, recognizing the
need to train lawyers to
confront problems tran-
scending national fron-
tiers. The faculty is the
largest in the Netherlands,
and more than 4,000 stu-
dents are enrolled in its
many programs and insti-
tutes. It offers 50-plus
courses in Public
International Law,
European Community Law
and Comparative Law
divided into four themes:
Foreign and Comparative
Law, International and
European Community Law,
Legal History and Free
Subjects.
UF students must
apply for the UF-Leiden
Exchange Program for Fall
semester by 4 p.m. Friday,
Feb. 13. For an application
or more information, visit
the Office of Student
Affairs, contact Noemar
Castro (392-0421 or
castro@law.ufl.edu) or go
online to http://www.Iaw.
ufl.edu, click on Student
Affairs, then Study Abroad.


Call for Submissions
Articles, notes, com-
ments and reviews are
sought for the Indigenous
Law Journal. Student
papers are eligible for cash
prizes of up to $500.
Articles should be received
by 4 p.m. jan. 30. Go
online to www.indigenous-
lawjournal.orglapply.htm
for more information.


(Announcements, Continued)
County school system's volunteer program that
provides mentoring and support to area middle
and high school students. Volunteers are needed,
and this is an excellent opportunity to help local
kids and earn community service hours.
For more information: VP Adria Toledo
(atoly@ufl.edu) or go online to iutlillwp cn.

Volunteers Sought for New Legal
Services Landlord/Tenant Clinic
A new Three Rivers Legal Services (TRLS)
landlord/tenant clinic will be held the second and
fourth Tuesday of every month at the TRLS
Gainesville office. Training for law students inter-
ested in volunteering at the clinic will be held in
the Bailey Courtroom this Thursday, Jan. 22, 1-
3:30 p.m. Space is limited, so pre-register by
Wednesday, Jan. 21, via e-mail to rhonda.decam-
bre@trls.org. For more information: Kathleen
Arnold (372-0519) or visit www.trls.org.

Unlicensed Law Practice Issues
Director of The Florida Bar's Unlicensed
Practice of Law Division Lori Holcomb will speak
Tuesday, Feb. 3, noon, in Holland Hall auditorium.
Holcomb provides practical advice on how
students can avoid problems in areas such as busi-
ness cards and titles on correspondence, and types
of activities students can legally undertake without
conducting the unauthorized practice of law. Her
presentation is particularly valuable for part-time
law clerks, clinic or pro bono program partici-
pants, summer associates or certified legal interns.

Enter Essay Contest by Jan. 30
Students must submit their entries to The
Florida Bar's Law Student Professionalism Essay
Contest to Associate Dean for Students,
Professionalism and Community Relations Gail
Sasnett in Student Affairs by Friday, Jan. 30.
Essays will be judged on caliber (relating to pro-
fessionalism issues/topics), creativity, organiza-
tion, writing style and technical expertise.
The Bar's Law School Subcommittee of the
Standing Committee on Professionalism selects
the winner, who receives $1,000 and expenses
paid to an award ceremony at the Florida Supreme
Court. The winning essay is published in the
Florida Bar Journal and News and on the Bar
Web site. The winner's law school receives a tro-
phy, "The Lion of Justice," which is housed at the
law school and passed on each year. For informa-
tion: Student Affairs (392-0421) or visit The
Florida Bar Web site (www.flabar.org).


Mediation Clinic students trained
"peer mediators" at Jordan Glen
School last lall


&.4


Audition Today for Black
History Month Play
Actors are needed for the Office of Diversity
and Community Development's Black History
Month presentation of "A Lesson Before Dying,"
written by Ernest J. Gaines and adapted by
Romulous Linney. Auditions will take place today,
Jan. 20, at 7 p.m. at 12 West University Avenue,
Suite 204. All races welcome. The play will be
presented Wednesday, Feb. 4, at 5 p.m. in Holland
Hall auditorium. O








I r of r d Le ofLawNewsletterJanuary2 2


* SCHOLARSHIP & ACTIVITIES *
esenters at AALS Stephen C. O'Connell Professor
of UF College of Law Christopher Slobogin participated in three
nted programs at the panels, "Errors in the Jury Box: The
American Law Schools Implications of Cognitive Psychology for
ig in Atlanta Jan. 2-6, Jury Decisionmaking" (moderator and pre-
sented a paper, "Ten Proposals for Reform
gy Institute Director of the Jury System"); "Murder and
S Memory" on amnesia, multiple personality


AndreIW Z/. AdkinsI111, 1 ilt Ef Ict;LIVe
Road Warrior: Accessing Your Office
While on the Road," Section on
Institutional Advancement.
* Senior Development Director Donald
Hale, panel, "Making the Most of Your
Board," Section on Institutional
Advancement. Hale also was elected to
the Executive Committee for the AALS
Section on Institutional Advancement,
where he will be one of only about a
dozen members charged with represent- '
ing fund-raising programs at all 183
accredited law schools.
* Stephen C. O'Connell Professor Jeffrey
Harrison, panels on "The Ethical
Dimensions of Teaching Economics" and Noa
"The Future of Socio-Economics."
* Levin, Mabie & Levin Professor Berta
Esperanza Hernandez-Truyol, panel on
international family law organized by
Sections on International Law and Family ****
Law. Her paper, "Asking the Family
Question," will be published in Family Law Quarterly.
* Office of Student Affairs Assistant Dean Richard L.
Ludwick, panel, "Can We be Too Accommodating?
Probing the Outer Limits of the ADA."
* Associate Professor Pedro Malavet, i'!li, i.ii .ii in
Classroom," Workshop on Technology and Pedagogy.
* Professor Amy Mashburn, panel, "The Ethical
Dimensions of Teaching Economics."
* Publications Coordinator Jennifer Piascik, panel,
"Website Challenges," Section on Institutional
Advancement.


(Business Law, Continued)
developments at the heart of the Bar's work."
Cohn serves on the section's Executive
Council and Legislation Committee and is
involved in redrafting Florida's Limited
Partnership statute. A former chair of the
Corporations and Securities committee, he has
been involved in drafting or re-writing fundamen-
tal business laws, including Florida's Corporate
Code, Partnership Statute and LLC Statute.
The new student organization has yet to be


disorder and criminal responsibility (mod-
--ma erator); and "What Evidence and Criminal
ul Procedure Scholarship and Law Have to
Learn From One Another" (presented a
paper, "Evidentiary Exclusionary Rules
and Exclusionary Rules in Criminal
Procedure").

Publications and Activities
An article based on a talk former UF law
Visiting Professor Albrecht Cordes
from the University of Frankfurt gave
H when he was here has been published in
the Oxford University Comparative Law
Forum. (Note: We welcome Dr. Rainier
Nickel, who is here this semester from
Frankfurt.)
University of Florida Research
Foundation Professor Diane H. Mazur
published an editorial, "Serious Debate
About Military Weakens With Demise of
Draft," in the Detroit News Jan. 6 and
"Draft Essential to Military-Civil Ties" in The Sun
News, Myrtle Beach, South Carolina, Jan. 8. Her
editorials on the draft also were published in the
( ,.., ,. Tribune Dec. 28, Newsday Jan. 2, Stars
and Stripes Jan. 7 and Gainesville Sun Jan. 7.
SCenter for Governmental Responsibility Research
Associate Barbara Noah will publish "Bioethical
Malpractice: Risk and Responsibility in Human
Research," 7 J. Health Care Law & Policy (forth-
coming June 2004). O


named or have its mission defined, since its
founders plan to solicit input from new and
prospective members at the first meeting.
"That's one of the great things about getting
in on the ground floor, being able to shape the
direction and character of the organization," said
Gay. "Especially with the Bar's intent to support
interactions students will find most beneficial."
For information: Doug Bates (538-0979 or
ufbusinesslawd@hotmail.com).
ByD. Cupples (2L)


UF Law Prn
A number
personnel prese
Association of
(AALS) meeting
including:
* Legal Technolo
A .l ...... r A il1


Faculty Enrichment
A new list of Faculty
Enrichment workshops and
other scholarly events is
online at http://www.Iaw.
ufi.edulfacultylenrich-
ment.shtml, including a
new Environmental Law
Workshop Series (indicated
by a darker shade of
blue).



















LEXIS News
* Career Services and
LEXIS are co-sponsoring
"What I did last sum-
mer" today, Jan. 20, at
noon in the faculty din-
ing room. Pizza served.
* Free LEXIS Printing is
available. Go to
www.lexisnexis.com/
lawschool and type in
the citation of the case
you want the brief for.
Click on the blue print
link, select the Bruton-
Geer Hall Media Lab
printer from the pull
down box and click
print.
* LEXIS will hold training
for students taking a
seminar today, Jan 20,
2-4 p.m., in Bruton-Geer
Computer Lab.
LEXIS student
representatives Tanya
Cunningham (2L), Duane
Kaizer (2L) and Shana
Bridgeman (3L) are avail-
able to help you Monday
through Friday. Their lab
schedules are posted in
the Bruton-Geer
Computer Lab and
Holland Hall Library.








Fla-aw University of Florida Fredric G. Levin C e o w N I r 2 0


Submit News
for FlaLaw
FlaLaw is published
each week school is in
session. All are encour-
aged to submit news of
interest to the law school
community by 10 a.m.
Tuesday for the following
Monday's newsletter to
Editor Debra Amirin,
Director of Institutional
Information & Publications,
amirin@law.ufl.edu,
Dean's Office (264 HOL),
392-9238, Fax 392-8727.





Ge M~w-i


Fredric G. Levin
College of Law
Administration
* Robert H. Jerry, II, Dean
* Stuart R. Cohn,
Associate Dean for
International Studies
* Michael K. Friel, Associate
Dean for Academic Affairs
* William H. Page,
Associate Dean for
Faculty Development
* M. Kathleen "Kathie" Price,
Associate Dean for Library
and Technology
* Gail E. Sasnett, Associate
Dean for Students,
Professionalism and
Community Relations
SJ. Patrick Shannon,
Associate Dean for
Administrative Affairs
* Donald J. Hale, Senior
Development Director
* Linda Calvert Hanson,
Assistant Dean for
Career Services
* Richard L. Ludwick,
Assistant Dean for Students
* J. Michael Patrick, Assistant
Dean for Admissions







UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA
Holon-g the pist, siuipfng the fitud


What Are You Doing This Summer? Consider Study Abroad


You may wonder about the benefits of studying
overseas and worth of spending a summer traveling
and studying versus clerking. According to some UF law
Summer Abroad Law Program participants, benefits
include the opportunity to obtain more credit hours
in a shorter period of time, take classes with distin-
guished faculty and travel to a different country for
the summer.
There are approximately 150 different ABA-
approved summer abroad law programs available to
any law student currently in good standing who has
completed a full year of law school. Locations include
almost any continent around the globe and the focus
of study is as varied and diverse as the participants
themselves.
Learn more and meet the faculty at the following
informational meetings on three UF law programs:
* Costa Rica, Wednesday, jan. 28, I p.m., auditorium
* France, Thursday, jan. 29, II a.m., auditorium
* South Africa, Tuesday, jan. 27, noon, 190C Holland
Hall
For more information and applications, contact
Student Affairs Coordinator Noemar Castro (392-0421
or castro@law.ufl.edu) or go online to www.Iaw.
ufl.edu, click on Student Affairs, then Study Abroad. O1


Attend Meeting Today to Apply for

ABA Mediation Competition Team
Students interested in gaining valuable experience
by entering the Fourth Annual Representation in
Mediation Competition sponsored by the American Bar
Association (ABA) Dispute Resolution Section must
attend a mandatory meeting today, Jan. 20, at 6 p.m. in
190A Holland Hall. They also must submit an application
and updated resume no later than Friday, Jan. 23, in a
manila envelope marked "Representation in Mediation
Competition" to Debbie Kelly in the Center for Children
and the Law (309 Holland Hall).
The competition is open to students taking or who
have completed a Negotiation, Mediation or Civil Clinic
course; are willing to practice 20 hours for the competi-
tion; and are able to attend the competition March 12-14
in New Orleans, LA. Regional winners will go on to com-
pete at the national competition in conjunction with the
annual meeting of the Section of Dispute Resolution in
New York, NY, April 15-17.
The team faculty advisor is Institute for Dispute
Resolution Associate Director/Legal Skills Professor
Alison Gerenscer, and B.J. Whisenant is competition
chairman. Students may sign up in
teams or individually, since the ---
competition director will pair sin-
gles with others. For information:
http: www.abanet org/
dispute/mediationcomp.html. O


Apply for France by Feb. 13
UF College of Law students can study a semester
at Montpellier University in the sunny region of
southern France, only six miles from the
Mediterranean coast and around 60 miles from the
Pyrenees' mountains. The program runs September-
December. Students pay UF tuition and can transfer
up to 14 credit hours. Fluency in French is strongly
recommended, but not
required. The application dead-
line is 4 p.m. Friday, Feb. 13.
The Montpellier Faculty of
Law, established in the 12th
Century, took part in drafting
the Napoleonic Civil Code, which
serves as a model for all coun-
tries governed by Civil Law. It offers a wide choice
of subjects, especially in business law and political
sciences. The school also is engaged in international
relationships comprising more than 70 nationalities,
mostly European.
Applications are available in Student Affairs.
For more information: Coordinator Noemar Castro
(392-0421 or castro@law.ufl.edu) or go online to
www.Iaw.ufl.edu and click on Student Affairs.


M L L A D


See Event & Academic Calendars
Online at www.law.ufl.edu
January
20 Career Services Presentation, "What I Did Last
Summer," Noon-1 p.m., Faculty Dining Room
FIIL Meeting, Noon, 292 HOL
Sign Up Meeting for ABA Mediation Team,
6 p.m., 190A HOL
21 Student Organization Fair, 10 a.m.-2 p.m.,
Concourse
APIL/NLG Meeting With North Florida ACLU
President, Noon-2 p.m., Auditorium
Career Services and ETELS Real Property Forum,
5:30 p.m., Faculty Dining Room
"Nuptials for the New Age: Does Lawrence v.
Texas Justify Same-Sex Marriage?," 5 p.m., Bailey
Courtroom
a Trial Team Competition Meeting, 6 p.m.,
Auditorium
22 Law School Republicans Meeting, I p.m., Auditorium
Family Law Meeting, 1-2 p.m., 190B HOL
Business Law Organization Meeting, 5 p.m.,
190B HOL
Bernestine Singley (see page 3), 5 p.m., 190C HOL
IMBA Night Out, Details TBA
23 Faculty Enrichment, Professor lames Nicholas,
"Market Based Approaches to Environmental
Protection," Noon, Faculty Dining Room
Moot Court Try Outs Meeting, 5 p.m., 190B HOL
24 Lambda Legal Alliance GLBT Law & Policy
Conference, 9:30 a.m., Auditorium
26 LCC-Executive Board Meeting, 6-8 p.m., 190 HOL
IMBA First-Semester Elections & Board Meeting,
7-8 p.m., 190A HOL
27 Faculty Enrichment, Vicki Been, NYU Law School,
"Lucas vs. The Green Machine: The Problems of
Cost-Internalization," Noon, Faculty Dining Room
Career Services & IMBA Presentation, Dress for
Success, Noon-1 p.m., Cafeteria


I