• TABLE OF CONTENTS
HIDE
 Front Cover
 Front Matter
 Table of Contents
 A message from the president
 Introduction from the vice president...
 University of Florida overview
 Financial statements
 Supplementary information
 Financial aid administered
 Back Matter
 Back Cover






Group Title: University of Florida Annual Financial Report. 2000-2001.
Title: University of Florida Annual Financial Report
ALL VOLUMES CITATION
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00072278/00002
 Material Information
Title: University of Florida Annual Financial Report
Series Title: University of Florida Annual Financial Report. 2000-2001.
Physical Description: Serial
Language: English
Creator: Finance and Accounting Division, University of Florida
Affiliation: University of Florida -- Office of Administrative Affairs -- Finance and Accounting Division
Publisher: Office of Administrative Affairs, University of Florida
Publication Date: 2001
 Subjects
Subject: University of Florida.   ( lcsh )
Spatial Coverage: North America -- United States of America -- Florida
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00072278
Volume ID: VID00002
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: George A. Smathers Libraries, University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved, Board of Trustees of the University of Florida

Table of Contents
    Front Cover
        Front cover
    Front Matter
        Front matter
    Table of Contents
        Page 1
    A message from the president
        Page 2
    Introduction from the vice president for administrative affairs
        Page 3
    University of Florida overview
        Page 4
        Mission
            Page 4
        History
            Page 5
            Page 6
            Page 7
        Facilities
            Page 8
        Programs
            Page 9
        Students
            Page 10
        Faculty
            Page 11
        Sports and recreation activities
            Page 12
            Page 13
    Financial statements
        Page 14
        Page 15
        Combined balance sheet
            Page 16
            Page 17
        Combined statement of changes in fund balances
            Page 18
            Page 19
        Statement of current funds revenues, ependitures, and other changes
            Page 20
        Summary of significant accounting policies
            Page 21
            Page 22
            Page 23
        Notes to the financial statements
            Page 24
            Page 25
            Page 26
            Page 27
            Page 28
            Page 29
            Page 30
            Page 31
            Page 32
            Page 33
            Page 34
            Page 35
    Supplementary information
        Page 36
        Financial summary of current programs
            Page 36
            Page 37
        Direct support organizations
            Page 38
            Page 39
    Financial aid administered
        Page 40
    Back Matter
        Page 41
    Back Cover
        Page 42
Full Text























































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University of Florida

Board of Trustees


Carlos Alfonso
Tampa

Roland Daniels
Gainesville


W.A. "Mac" McGriff III
Jacksonville


Cynthia O'Connell
Tallahassee


Louise Courtelis
Micanopy

John Dasburg
Miami

Joelen Merkel
Boca Raton


Albert W. Thweatt Sr.
Petersburg, VA


Marshall M. Criser, Jr.
Jacksonville

Manny A Fernandez
Ft. Myers

Dianna Fuller Morgan
Lake Buena Vista

Alfred C. Warrington, IV
Houston, TX


Marc Adler
Student Trustee




Executive Officers


Charles E. Young
President


Kenneth I. Berns
Vice President
for Health Affairs


David R. Colburn
Provost and Vice President
for Academic Affairs


Michael V. Martin
Vice President for Agriculture
and Natual Resources


Winfred M. Phillips
Vice President for Research
and Dean of the Graduate School


John E. Poppell
Vice President for
Administrative Affairs


Paul A. Robell
Vice President for Development
and Alumni Affairs


James E. Scott
Vice President for
Student Affairs


Principal Finance and Accounting Officials


John P. Kruczek
University Controller


James F. Ferrer, Jr.
Associate Controller for General
Accounting, Property, PIaj'oll, Tax,
and Disbursement Services


Stuart E. Hoskins
Associate Controller for University
Financial Services, Accounting Controls,
Construction Accounting, and Insurance


Kathy W. Jones
Associate Controller for Contract
and Grant Accounting Services


Gail F. Baker
Vice President for
Public Relations








2000-2001


flnnual


Financial


Report

:. UNIVERSITY OF ..
FLORIDA ...



Table of Contents

A Message from the President 2
Introduction from the Vice President for Administrative Affairs 3
University of Florida Overview 4
Mission, History and Facilities
Programs, Students and Faculty
Sports and Recreational Activities
An Excellent Value
Financial Statements 16
Combined Balance Sheet
Combined Statement of Changes in Fund Balances
Statement of Current Funds Revenues, Expenditures,
and Other Changes
Summary of Significant Accounting Policies
Notes to the Financial Statements
Supplementary Information 36
Financial Summary of Current Programs
Direct Support Organizations
Financial Aid Administered







II2000-I00


A Message from the President

This annual report chronicles the success enjoyed by the University of Florida during the
past academic year. We now move forward with a newly appointed Board of Trustees. With
this new governance system, UF has the potential to advance within the elite tier of American
institutions.

Already the university has signaled its ability to reach the top. In the past year, the
University of Florida greatly surpassed its original capital campaign goal of $500 million by
achieving a tally of more than $850 million. This impressive display of generosity would not
have occurred without the unbridled optimism of our patrons who believe in the university's
ability to convert funds into results. They won't be disappointed.

UF is committed to updating facilities and equipment to make this campus a model of 21st
century technological advancement. No brick is placed without careful consideration of
enhancing the utility, efficiency and beauty of the facility. However, all great universities are
much more than buildings and bike racks. It is faculty, staff and students who breathe life into the University of Florida and give
it purpose. Our faculty research reflects the needs of a new age. Breakthrough results have occurred in a vast array of research
endeavors, some of which are highlighted in this report. In all, UF research garnered more than $379 million in funding, which
is an increase of nearly 12% over the previous year.

The University of Florida continues to attract top students from this state and beyond. The freshman class of 2001 brought
stellar qualifications to the university including an overall 3.9 grade point average and exceptional college entrance examination
scores. Further, once students come to this campus they tend to stay. Freshman-to-sophomore retention rates consistently exceed
90%. Among the reasons for continuing studies at UF is a selection of 5,600 challenging academic courses in 300 undergraduate
and graduate degree programs. The University of Florida also offers a wide variety of intramural and club sports, an impressive
list of student organizations and the outstanding cultural programs offered by our Samuel P. Harn Museum of Art, the Florida
Museum of Natural History and the Curtis M. Phillips Center for the Performing Arts.

The accomplishment of our student athletics program is nothing short of remarkable. Once again, the UF intercollegiate
sports program led its conference in overall success of its men's and women's athletics and capped the sports season with a national
championship trophy for our men's golf team.

As we enter a new age, the promise of extraordinary discoveries will be realized through our dynamic community of faculty,
staff and students. With the continued support of Floridians and others forwarding the cause of higher education, the 21st century
promises to be the most exciting time in UF's history.






Charles E. Young
President













Introduction from the Vice President for Administrative Affairs

I am pleased to present the 2000-2001 Annual Financial Report for the University of Florida,
including the general-purpose financial statements for the fiscal year ended June 30, 2001. The
financial statements are prepared in accordance with generally accepted accounting principles.
The information in the 2000-2001 Annual Financial Report is intended to provide a broad
understanding of the university's core mission and to present fairly its financial position and
.cti iriS, I hope that it will provide a useful measure of accountability and stewardship to all
h- ha c an interest in the University of Florida.

S The financial highlights for fiscal year 2000-2001 include a $73.5 million increase in current
4..dc," iu' venuess to $1.3 billion, a six percent increase from the prior year. Significant compo-
!1 c[, this increase include a $29.8 million, or eight percent, growth in contracts and grants,
1 h 1 0 million, or six percent, increase in state appropriations and a $12.5 million, or nine
F,' r.e growth in total student tuition and fees. These increases are indicative of the university's
%tr. .i, growth in sponsored research and of a continuing growth in student enrollment. During
2uuu-2001, total current funds expenditures and mandatory transfers rose by $85.6 million to
$1.4 billion, a seven percent increase from the prior year.

On July 1, 2000, the Follett Higher Education Group took over operation of the University of Florida Bookstore. This
explains the slight decrease in total Auxiliary Enterprises revenues and expenditures from the prior year. Plans are to construct a
new and modern bookstore in the near future.

Service to our students is the heart of our mission. During 2000-2001 the university administered $254.8 million of financial
aid to its students. This total was comprised of federal, state, institutional and custodial programs. These financial aid programs
consisted of loans, scholarships, grants and fee waivers. Federal programs such as the William D. Ford Federal Direct Loan, the
Perkins Loan, and the Health Professions Student Loan Programs funded approximately 93 percent of the 22,616 student loans,
totaling $122.1 million. Scholarships and grants totaled $109.6 million. Institutional grants of $35.4 million were disbursed to
23,409 students and custodial scholarships of $6.1 million were disbursed to 4,010 students. Fee waivers totaling $23.1 million
were provided to 15,570 students.

During the fiscal year, work was completed on a total renovation ofAnderson Hall and Flint Hall. These historical landmarks
were modernized and brought to full usefulness, while still preserving their original beauty and charm. Work began on the new
$29 million Health Professions/Nursing/Pharmacy Complex at the J. Hillis Miller Health Science Center. This complex will
provide over 173,000 square feet of teaching, administrative and faculty office space for the three colleges. Construction also has
begun on the $21 million Hume Residence Hall Complex, which will provide on campus living space for over 600 students. In
September, we submitted an update of the University of Florida Five-Year Campus Master Plan to the Florida Board of
Education, Division of Colleges and Universities.

In Administrative Affairs, we stand ready to meet the challenges of adapting to our new governance system and working closely
with the new Board of Trustees and the Florida Board of Education. We are excited about the opportunity to embrace new
technologies, improve the delivery of service to the University of Florida community, and become more efficient and effective in
the accomplishment of our core mission.

S I



Ed Poppell
Vice President for Administrative Affairs






II2000-I00


University of Florida Overview


Perhaps no institution is as geographically, economically and

intellectually positioned to lead this nation into the world of the 21st

century as is the University of Florida. Located in one of the most

dynamic states in the union, the university is at the crossroads of the

Americas. Indeed, as the University of Florida prepares to explore the

unknown opportunities of the new age, it already has established


pioneering credentials. Research conducted by the university faculty and students

continues to open doors of understanding

of the vast expanse of the universe, the

microscopic intricacies of cells and the

wonders of the human mind. The new

century has the potential to be an exciting

world of dreams and each day the

University of Florida brings those dreams

to life.


Mission
The University of Florida under-
stands the critical role of higher
education to achieve societal goals. As
its state's largest and most compre-
hensive university, the University of
Florida recognizes its unique respon-
sibility to the people of its state.
Moreover, in a time of increasing
social and technological change, few


institutions are more needed to
accept the duties of leadership than
the University of Florida.
As a major public, land-grant
research university, it is one of the
most comprehensive institutions of
higher education in the United
States. Recognized as a Carnegie
Institute Research Extensive Institu-
tion, the University of Florida also is






II2000-I00


University of Florida Overview


Perhaps no institution is as geographically, economically and

intellectually positioned to lead this nation into the world of the 21st

century as is the University of Florida. Located in one of the most

dynamic states in the union, the university is at the crossroads of the

Americas. Indeed, as the University of Florida prepares to explore the

unknown opportunities of the new age, it already has established


pioneering credentials. Research conducted by the university faculty and students

continues to open doors of understanding

of the vast expanse of the universe, the

microscopic intricacies of cells and the

wonders of the human mind. The new

century has the potential to be an exciting

world of dreams and each day the

University of Florida brings those dreams

to life.


Mission
The University of Florida under-
stands the critical role of higher
education to achieve societal goals. As
its state's largest and most compre-
hensive university, the University of
Florida recognizes its unique respon-
sibility to the people of its state.
Moreover, in a time of increasing
social and technological change, few


institutions are more needed to
accept the duties of leadership than
the University of Florida.
As a major public, land-grant
research university, it is one of the
most comprehensive institutions of
higher education in the United
States. Recognized as a Carnegie
Institute Research Extensive Institu-
tion, the University of Florida also is











a member of the prestigious Associa-
tion of American Universities (AAU). .
Its faculty and staff are dedicated to i
the common pursuit of the *i
university's threefold mission:
education, research and service.
Teaching the undergraduate and
graduate through the doctorate level *L
student is the fundamental purpose o ,r
of the university. Research and
scholarship are integral to the educa- History
tion process and to unlocking the Florida's oldest university, the
secrets of the natural world, the mind University of Florida traces its
and the senses. The term, "service," beginnings to 1853 when the state- l
addresses the university's obligation funded East Florida Seminary
to share the benefits of its knowledge acquired the private Kingsbury
to benefit the public good. These Academy in Ocala. After the Civil
three interlocking elements span all War, the institution moved to
of the University of Florida's aca Gainesville. It was consolidated with
demic disciplines and multi- the state's land grant Florida Agricul-
demic disciplines and multi- i
disciplinary centers, and represent the tural College, then in Lake City, and
university's mission to lead and serve was renamed as the University of a
the needs of the nation, all of Florida. In that year of 1906, UF had
Florida's residents, as well as the an enrollment of 102 male students.
public and private educational system During World War II, the university
of Florida. entered into agreements to establish
training programs for U.S. service
personnel, such as those in U.S.
Army Air Force aircrew training.
Until 1947, the University of Florida
was designated for men only and one
of only three state universities.
Others were Florida State College for
Women (now Florida State Univer-
sity) and Florida A&M. However,
women had, under certain circum-
stances, attended UF as early as 1916.
When the legislature removed all
barriers for female enrollment at UF
in 1947, the University of Florida
student body numbered 8,177 men
and 601 women. By the beginning of







II2000-I00


- f- -'

r s *


the 21st century, in terms of enroll-
ment, the university grew to become
one of the five largest universities in
the nation, with an enrollment of
more than 46,000 students, divided
almost equally between female and
male students. At the end of June
2001, the governance structure of UF
changed when the Florida Board of
Regents for the 11-member State
University System was dissolved and


replaced by separate boards of
trustees appointed to each state
university.
Beginning with the 2002-2003
academic year, the University of
Florida will celebrate its sesquicen-
tennial, recognizing 150 years of
outstanding service to the people of
the Sunshine State.


2000 1999 1998 1997 1996
Accounting 800 875 887 974 945
Agriculture and Life Sciences 3,642 3,776 3,799 3,808 3,343
Building Construction 541 520 535 550 465
Business Administration 6,357 5,631 5,074 4,632 3,667
Dentistry 368 378 373 372 362
Design, Construction and Planning 1,003 1,019 934 950 994
Division of Continuing Education* 414 368 382 460 579
Education 1,885 1,897 1,996 2,006 1,878
Engineering 6,244 5,915 5,775 5,594 5,323
Fine Arts 1,126 1,079 1,071 958 927
Forest Resources and Conservation 124 129 135 120 143
Health and Human Performance 1,899 1,889 1,858 1,870 1,600
Health Professions 1,219 1,181 1,062 971 868
High School 8 13 12 7 25
Journalism and Communications 3,352 3,063 3,005 2,844 2,481
Law 1,264 1,270 1,319 1,313 1,288
Liberal Arts and Sciences 12,368 11,942 11,992 11,804 12,658
Medicine 712 673 657 641 640
Natural Resources and Environment 202 190 158 166 131
Nursing 837 894 894 875 897
Pharmacy 366 289 321 381 680
Pharmacy Doctor 952 787 596 281
Physician Assistant Program 122 117 116 117 116
Veterinary Medicine 416 381 376 359 362

Total 46,221 44,276 43,327 42,053 40,372

* Includes Continuing Education and correspondence students not enrolled in a college.















TblSe 2 IN-T TIE ENRO BY COUNTY
FAL 00


4,879 Hamilton 18 Okeechobee 47
27 Hardee 22 Orange 2,055
278 Hendry 50 Osceola 218
73 Hernando 158 Palm Beach 2,467
1,244 Highlands 116 Pasco 425
4,238 Hillsborough 2,193 Pinellas 2,314
21 Holmes 20 Polk 684
172 Indian River 243 Putnam 121
209 Jackson 77 St. Johns 397
537 Jefferson 12 St. Lucie 340
411 Lafayette 13 Santa Rosa 174
170 Lake 326 Sarasota 788
3,341 Lee 783 Seminole 1,448
27 Leon 705 Sumter 52
15 Levy 93 Suwannee 92
1,799 Liberty 4 Taylor 30
482 Madison 16 Union 36
95 Manatee 355 Volusia 811
4 Marion 706 Wakulla 18
25 Martin 297 Walton 22
60 Monroe 137 Washington 11
9 Nassau 87
10 Okaloosa 512 Total 37,619


.Ta l D E A -m m: D -


Bachelors
Masters
Doctor of Philosophy
Juris Doctor
Doctor of Medicine
Doctor of Dental Medicine
Doctor of Pharmacy
Doctor of Veterinary Medicine
Doctor of Education *
Engineer **
Specialist in Education **


2000-2001 1999-2000 1998-99 1997-98 1996-97
7,660 7,655 7,430 6,654 6,676
2,470 2,224 2,113 1,940 1,711
574 516 445 456 406
353 381 412 381 375
120 115 117 117 114
79 79 78 78 70
203 169 106 119 90
73 80 78 76 77


* Included in Ph.D. figures since 1997-98.
** Included in Masters figures since 1997-98.


Alachua
Baker
Bay
Bradford
Brevard
Broward
Calhoun
Charlotte
Citrus
Clay
Collier
Columbia
Dade
Desoto
Dixie
Duval
Escambia
Flagler
Franklin
Gadsden
Gilchrist
Glades
Gulf


-t







II2000-I00


UF Sponsored Research
Funding Federal and
Non-Federal Sources
In Millions

S Nn Federal Federa





ioolilll
o N Fd- F-


Facilities
On 2,000 acres, most of it within
the limits of a 100,000-population
urban area, the University of Florida
operates out of more than 900
buildings, with more than 170 of
them with classrooms and laborato-
ries. UF's facilities have a book value
of more than $900 million, with a
replacement value of approximately
$2.1 billion. The northeastern area
of the campus is listed as a Historic
District on the National Register of
Historic Places. The 23 single-
student residence areas house some
7,000 students and five family
housing villages house more than
2,200 married and graduate stu-
dents.
The university hosts an impres-
sive array of facilities dedicated to
honoring the arts, humanities and
the sciences. The Florida Museum
of Natural History is the largest
natural history/anthropology
museum in the Southeast, and
among the top 10 in the nation. Its
natural science collections contain
more than 10
million specimens.
SIn 2001, the
museum received a
........ $4.2 million gift to
create an impres-
sive lepidoptera
center, able to
house one of the
world's largest
butterfly collec-
tions and a live butterfly exhibit.
Scheduled for January 2002 is the


touring display of the unique replica-
tion of "Sue," the famous Tyranno-
saurus Rex find. The Samuel P. Harn
Museum of Art, with more than
26,000 square feet of exhibit space, is
one of the largest museums in the
region. In 1999, the Harn Museum
acquired an important work by the
19th century French Impressionist
Claude Monet titled the Champ
d'avoine as a gift to the museum.
Recently, the Harn Museum received
a $3.2 million gift to construct a
20,000-square-foot sculpture atrium.
The Phillips Center for Performing
Arts attracts world-class symphony
orchestras, Broadway plays, operas,
and large-scale ballet productions to
Gainesville, with the 2001-2002
season promising to be one of the
most spectacular yet. During 2000,
the University of Florida opened the
$1.58 million Baughman Center, a
serene facility designed to provide an
intimate setting for musical recitals,
seminars, and meditative and con-
templative uses. A $10.3 million
two-phase renovation program is
underway to expand and modernize
Rhines Hall, providing 40,000 square
feet of new labs and offices.
Other notable facilities include the
world's largest citrus research center,
the University Art Gallery, a
microkelvin laboratory capable of
producing near zero degrees Kelvin
- the coldest temperature in the
universe, a world class brain institute,
an engineering research center for
particle science and technology, a
100-kilowatt training and research


UF Technology Transfer
Income FY 1991-2001
In Millions

5 -

5-

5OI2M




























reactor, the second largest academic the main research library and six
computing center in the South, one branch libraries throughout campus,
of the nation's few self-contained along with the Health Science Center
intensive care hyperbaric chambers, a Library and the Legal Information
public television and radio station, Center. They form the largest
and two commercial radio stations. information resource system in the
The university's Institute of Food state, containing more than 3 million
and Agricultural Sciences (IFAS) is volumes within its 10 million docu-
an extensive operation with facilities ment holdings. Library collections are
throughout Florida. In 1999, a accessed through the computerized
$12.1 million project consolidated LUIS online system.
three IFAS facilities into a new
building in Apopka, Florida. The Programs
building consists of 40,000 square One of only 18 land-grant univer- *
feet of labs and offices, 11,000 square sities in the esteemed higher educa-
feet of teaching spaces, and 115,000 tion organization, the AAU, the i
square feet of greenhouse and other University of Florida offers more
environmental space. Further, $2.95 programs on a single campus than all
million was recently spent to totally but a few U.S. universities. The
renovate the university's Aquatic University of Florida is a doctoral/ e
Food Products Pilot Plant Facility. research extensive institution as
Finally, a $3.9 million grant from the categorized by the Carnegie Founda-
U.S. Department of Agriculture to tion. It has 21 colleges and schools
establish the Center for Agroforestry and more than 100 research, service
was part of the record $66.9 million and education centers, bureaus and
in funding UF/IFAS was awarded institutes. These bring together
during 2000-2001. faculty and student scholars from
The University Libraries consist of various academic programs to pro-







II2000-I00


vide research and development
services in all areas of state interest.
More than 100 undergraduate majors
are offered. More than 1,900 fresh-
men and sophomores participate in
the honors program, which offers 90-
100 honors courses per semester. The
graduate school coordinates almost
200 graduate programs. Professional
degree programs include those
offered in dentistry, law, medicine,
pharmacy and veterinary medicine.
As Florida's land-grant university, UF
has a distinguished record of develop-
ing Florida agriculture into a national
leader through research and extension
services, stretching the influence of
the university into every county of
the state and beyond.


Students
Enrollment for fall semester 2000
totaled 46,107 students, including
37,619 in-state students representing
all Florida counties with approxi-
mately 2,500 international students
representing over 100 countries, with
the remainder representing all 49 of
the other states, the District of
Columbia, Puerto Rico, and the


Other
$8.7M


Industry
$59.2M


Federal -
$227.1M


State/Local
$43.2M


Virgin Islands. The ratio of women
to men currently is 52:48. Seventy-
four percent of enrolled students are
undergraduates, 19
percent are graduate
students and 7
percent are in profes-
sional degree pro-
grams (including
dentistry, law,
medicine, pharmacy
and veterinary
medicine). Approxi-
mately 23 percent of
the UF student body
members are minorities with 7.2
percent of the student population
consisting of African American
students, 9.5 percent Hispanic/
Latino students, and 6.7 percent
Asian-American or Pacific Islander
students.
University of Florida students are
among the best in the nation. Ap-
proximately 90 percent of all entering


Federal Awards
by Agency
NIH 93.5
NSF 28.2
USDA 30.6
DOD 14.7
Education 13.3
HRS Administration 10.5
Energy 6.8
Veteran's Affairs 6.7
DOT 3.9
Commerce 4.2
EPA 2.6
NASA 4.9
Other Federal 3.1
Other HHS 2.1
US AID 1.3
Dept. of Labor 0
HHS .7
Total 227.1 M


freshmen score above the national
average on standardized college
entrance exams taken by college-
bound students. The University of
Florida ranks third in the nation
among public universities and sixth
among all universities in the number
of freshmen National Merit Scholars
in attendance. Florida also ranks
second among all public universities
and sixth among all institutions in
the number of National Achievement
Scholars in attendance. UF also ranks
in the top 15 for all universities
nationally in awarded doctorates and
Ph.D.s awarded to African Ameri-
cans. Aiding student development,
UF has invested extensively in
campus computing infrastructure and
in classroom renovations and tech-
nology upgrades in the last five years
to meet the needs of modern educa-
tion in an age of rapidly changing
technology. Further, UF's freshmen
retention rate of 91 percent speaks to


Research Awards by Sponsor FY 2000-2001
In Millions











the outstanding quality of the arts and humanities awards.
university's entire academic experi- The University of Florida has been
ence, from counseling to online awarded national scientific centers to
programs to aid include the i
self-tracking of McKnight Brain
academic progress Institute for the
and class registra- study of neurologi-
tion. cal disease; the
In addition to Engineering
being academi- Research Center
cally motivated, for Particle Sci-
students lead a rich social and extra- ence; and the National High Mag-
curricular life. They belong to more netic Field Laboratory in Tallahassee
than 450 student organizations on under the auspices of the University
campus, attend more than 2,000 of Florida, Florida State University
campus concerts, art exhibits and and Los Alamos National Laboratory.
theatrical productions, guest lectures, A short listing of honored faculty,
sports contests, and other events a past and present, includes: Pulitzer
year. UF students participate in an Prize-winners in editorial writing and
average of two out-of-class seminars poetry; a recognized pioneer in
and lectures a day, and enjoy a variety aviation engineering; a leading *
of outdoor activities throughout the scholar on econometrics; three
year. winners of NASA's top award for
research; one of the four charter
Faculty members of the Solar Hall of Fame; f
A distinguished faculty of more and a winner of the Smithsonian
than 4,000 attracted $379.5 million Institution's award for conservation.
in research and training grants in UF is a recognized leader in a wide
2000-2001, up 11.8 percent from the variety of specialties and areas, from l HI H
previous record-breaking year. The pediatric dentistry and public rela-
University of Florida now has 54 tions to counseling education and
Eminent Scholar Chairs. More than nuclear engineering. During 2000-
two-dozen faculty members have
been selected to the National Acad-
emies of Science and/or Engineering,
the Institute of Medicine or a coun-
terpart in another nation. Also, in a
national ranking of total Fulbright
awards as of 2000, the University of
Florida stands fourth among all
public universities, with 14 of these







II2000-I00


2001, UF scientists and researchers
made significant discoveries in cancer
and other health-related areas,
astronomy, education, agriculture,
and the economy among others
fields. During this period, UF and
the University of Chicago were
selected to lead an $11.9 million
initiative to lay the groundwork for a
computer grid of unprecedented
speed and power. One UF invention,
an indoor air cleaning system origi-
nally developed to zap dust mites and
mold spores, also destroys airborne
anthrax and other pathogenic mi-
crobes. In all, UF ranks third among
AAU-member public universities and
fourth for all public universities in
patents awarded.

Sports and Recreational Activities
The University of Florida has
enjoyed significant success with its
varsity sports program with a national
championship earned in 2001 by the
UF men's golf team. The university
has made a strong commitment to
support each
varsity sport it
fields and to
provide exciting
athletic competi-
tion for fans and
student-athletes
alike. In 2000-
2001, for the
tenth consecu-
tive year, the
University of Florida earned the SEC
All Sports trophy, currently awarded
by The New York Times Regional


Newspaper Group, and presented to
the student-athlete program that has
achieved overall conference excellence
in both men's and women's sports. In
all, UF has captured 24 national team
championships, 151 total conference
titles and, since 1980, 2,432 All-
America honors. Providing such
effective management of the
university's sports program is the
University Athletic Association, a
direct support organization serving as
one of several component units of the
university.
Aside from varsity sports, Univer-
sity of Florida students, faculty and
staff enjoy first-class recreational
facilities located at convenient spots
on the campus, with numerous
recreational and fitness programs
offered. The Stephen C. O'Connell
Center and the J. Wayne Reitz
Union provide space for a myriad of
activities. A thousand people can
participate simultaneously in eight
different recreational activities in the
O'Connell Center, which seats
12,000 for concerts and other events.
The O'Connell Center also is home
to the Gator basketball, volleyball,
swimming and gymnastics teams.
Thousands use the Reitz Union daily
for dining, meeting, games, hotel












accommodations and more. The areas, shady nooks, and even an 81-
Student Recreation and Fitness acre wildlife sanctuary and lake on I
Center was the first facility dedicated campus provide venues to enjoy *
to recreation at the university when it Florida's year-round outdoor life.
opened in 1991, and now offers more
than 100 fitness classes per week. The An Excellent Value
Southwest Recreational Center is a The University of Florida has
64,000-square-foot facility located on earned a national reputation for
the corner of a 26-acre site that being an excellent value. In the last
features lighted outdoor basketball few years, UF has drawn the atten-
courts, tennis courts and a tourna- tion of various publications. For
ment-grade four-field softball com- example, UF ranked 10th in Money
plex. Recent additions to the recre- magazine's 1998 College Guide,
ation complex included $1.48 which described UF's program as
million for s among
recre- "the elite
national values in *
fields and college
support educa-
building i tion
space. The today." *
university Kiplinger's
also hosts Personal
40 sports Finance
clubs, maga-
from Aikido to water skiing and zine in
wheelchair basketball, and its intra- 2001 ranked UF 12th in its "Top
mural sports attracted 25,302 partici- 100 Values in Public Universities."
pants during the past academic year. The 2001 U.S. News and World
Open spaces, small ponds, picnic Report rated UF nineteenth among


UF Foundation Total Assets UF Foundation Endowment Assets
In Millions In Millions







a1 1 a A i LM h 4 4 M I ,- R 17 W 301
ma F" o f e








II2000-I00


Revenues and Expenditures of Current Operating Funds
Year ended June 30, 2001


Current Funds Revenues


State Appropriations
39% Legislative appropriations from the State of Florida providing
general revenues for current operations of the university.
Gifts, Grant and Contracts
29% Educational, research and public service agreements of
government agencies and private gifts, grants and contracts.
Student Tuition and Fees
10% Revenues from tuition and fees assessed against students for
educational purposes.
Auxiliary Enterprises
7% Revenues of self-supporting enterprises providing facilities and
services for students, faculty and staff.
Other Sources
5% Includes endowment income, sales and service of educational
activities and other miscellaneous revenues.
Federal Appropriations
1% Appropriations received from the Federal government used
primarily by the Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences.
Transfers of Primary Government
from Component Units
9% Represents net amount of operating transfers received by the
university from its nearly 30 affiliated component units.
100% Total Current Funds Revenues


Transfers of Primary
Government from
Component Units


Federal Appropnation
Other Sources A


Auxiliary Enterprises


Student Tuition and Fees


State Appropriations


Current Fund Expenditures


Instruction
31% Expenditures associated with credit and non-credit courses for
academic, occupational and vocational instruction for all
semester and continuing education.
Research
23% Expenditures associated with activities specifically organized to
produce research outcomes.
Public Services
8% Expenditures associated with non-instructional services
beneficial to individuals and groups external to the institution.
Auxiliary Enterprises
6% Expenditures of self-supporting enterprises that furnish services
to students and employees for a fee related to the cost of the
service.
Academic Support
7% Expenditures for support services for the university's primary
mission instruction, research and public service; includes
libraries, museums, and academic administration.
Institutional Support
5% Expenditures of financial operations, executive management,
personnel services, administrative computing support and
security.
Operation & Maintenance of Plant
5% Expenditures for building and grounds maintenance, fire and
property insurance, utilities and general services.
Scholarships and Fellowships
13% Expenditures for scholarships and fellowships in the form of
outright grants to students selected by the institutions and
financed in the form of current funds, restricted and unrestricted.
Student Services
2% Expenditures for offices of admissions and the registrar and for
activities with the primary purpose of contributing to students'
emotional and physical well-being.
100% Total Current Funds Expenditures


Gifts, Grants and Contracts


Student Services


Scholarships and Fellowships


Operations & Maintenance of Plant

Institutional Support

Academic Support

Auxiliary Enterprises

Public Service


Instruction










all public universities. "Critical discoveries in science, technology,
Comparisons," a college assessment healthcare, education and other areas. -
service performed by educational In the last ten years, more than 50 j I
professionals gave the University of UF-affiliated companies have been
Florida its 1997 "Good Work" created, while support of the univer-
Award. Moreover, few organizations sity by its benefactors reached new l
provide a return on investment like heights in 2000-2001. In its recently *
the University of Florida. For each completed capital campaign, UF [,
tax dollar invested on the university, shattered its original goal of $500 f
UF generated $5.20 total spending in million with a final total of more .i i
the state economy, with direct than $850 million. .if l-fl
benefits to Florida citizens with l ll


While an uncertain o .
economy makes t. .m
financial predictions a M ~..
challenge, the University .
of Florida previously ,
made adjustments to i
effectively adapt to our changing times. The university
recently completed a highly successful capital campaign
that should provide strong financial support for
university initiatives. Further, the university has proved
to be prudent in diversifying its funding resources,
balancing governmental funding with that from industry.
And with planning and strong financial support have
come results. In a banner year, the University of Florida -m-
excelled in each area of its mission of teaching, research -. .. -
and service. All in all, while few institutions can match .,- ..
the recent performance of the University of Florida, its
potential in our new age of discovery is limitless.



















CURRENT FUNDS


PLANT FUNDS


RENEWAL AND RETIREMENT OF INVESTMENT
UNRESTRICTED RESTRICTED UNEXPENDED REPLACEMENT INDEBTEDNESS IN PLANT


Assets
Cash and Temporary Investments (Notel)
Investments (Note 3)
Net Receivables (Note 4)
Accrued Interest Receivable
Inventories (Note 5)
Unexpended General Revenue Appropriations
Due from Other Fund Groups
Due from Other SUS Universities/BOR
Due from Primary Government/Component Units
Deposits
Deferred Charges/Prepaid Expenses
Investment in Plant:
Net Investment in Direct Financing Agreements
Land
Land Improvements
Buildings
Furniture and Equipment
Library Books
Leased Property Under Capital Lease (Note 7D)
Construction-In-Progress
Other


Total Assets


$ 4,477 $
215,043
9,274
1,326
3,579
67,200
61,187
5,913


360 $
127,690
41,710
788
20

12,457


$
34,934
70,257
186

4,343
430
29,024


$
5,531

20


200


6 $
2,426

7


4,540



1,051


9,529
41,520
905,369
447,458
183,991
3,000
96,889
6,693


$ 368,837 $ 183,025 $ 139,174 $ 5,751 $ 6,979 $ 1,695,500


Liabilities
Accounts Payable
Accrued Salaries and Wages Payable
Due to Other Fund Groups
Due to Other SUS Universities/BOR
Due to Primary Government/Component Units
Deferred Credits
Due to Depositors
Long-Term Liabilities:
Revenue Certificates and Bonds Payable (Note 7A)
Loans from the Florida Department of
Management Services (Note 7B)
Installment Purchase Agreements Payable (Note 7C)
Obligations under Capital Lease (Note 7D)
Compensated Absences Liability (Note 8)
Liability for Future Self-Insured Claims (Note 9)
Other Long-Term Liabilities


Total Liabilities


$ 13,966 $
12,849
22,437
112

5,851


5,724 $
4,957
57,954


13,577 $


23.112


3.487 108.532


633
142
1,777


99,493
32,427


$ 187,135 $ 68,635 $ 36,689 $


- $ 3,487 $ 111,084


Fund Balances
Reserved for Encumbrances
Reserved for Future Self-Insured Claims (Note 9)
Federal Government Grants Refundable
Amount Expected to be Financed in Future Years
Restricted Fund Balance
Unrestricted Fund Balance
Net Investment in Plant
Component Unit Fund Balance

Total Fund Balances


Total Liabilities and Fund Balances


$ 30,604 $ 26,709 $
38,556


(99,319)

211,861


87,681


70,343 $



32,142


223 $



5,528


3,492


1,584,416


$ 181,702 $ 114,390 $ 102,485 $ 5,751 $ 3,492 $ 1,584,416

$ 368,837 $ 183,025 $ 139,174 $ 5,751 $ 6,979 $ 1,695,500


The accompanying Summary of Significant Accounting Policies and Notes are an integral part of the financial statements.


II2000-I00


Combined Balance Sheet
June 30, 2001, with Comparative Totals for 2000
(amounts expressed in thousands)








COBIE BAAC HE


TOTAL
UNIVERSITY FUNDS
(MEMORANDUM ONLY)


DIRECT


COMPONENT UNITS (FYE 2000)

T HEALTH S


COMBINED TOTALS
(MEMORANDUM ONLY)


HANDS


SUPPORT SCIENCE CENTER HOSPITAL
2000 ORGANIZATIONS AFFILIATES AND OTHERS


$ 696 $
10,432
32,014
1,779


172


1,002 $
14,468
2,227
49


3,794


6,541 $
410,524
155,482
4,155
3,599
71,543
82,780
34,937


1,889


9,529
41,520
905,369
447,458
183,991
3,000
96,889
6,693

$ 45,093 $ 21,540 $ 2,465,899 $


47 $

2,366

10,581

8,546


33,314 $
17,806
82,780
112
10,581
5,851
8,546

135,131

c3z3


2,905 $
345,020
142,696
3,514
5,224
77,569
59,885
44,659

16
2,380

20
9,044
40,754
842,730
422,160
170,597
3,000
88,415
6,081

2,266,669 $


26,184 $
16,633
59,885
79
8,577
5,016
5,206

139,636

7QQ


54,374 $
954,252
42,979
2,513
1,128



86,677

3,259


9,481
51,627
4,636
3,062


1
21,046

1,235,035 $


14,408 $
712


55,898
63,170
401

28.400


142 377
1,777 1,969 49
99,493 96,294 931
32,427 29,553
36,487

$ 23 $ 21,540 $ 428,593 $ 390,197 $ 200,456 $


$

28,517

16,553


$ 45,070 $


-$ 127,879 $
38,556
28,517
(99,319)
145,396
211,861
1 QA AI C


98,762 $
34,365
27,686
(96,188)
147,509
178,201
1 AQC 1 q7


S I,~Jt~,-ItI I,-tu l-
1,034,579

-$ 2,037,306 $ 1,876,472 $ 1,034,579 $


11,882 $
13,817
52,628
284




15,508

24,770


98
1,525
6,617
9,009



2,017

138,155 $


7,593 $
10,320


4,185
29


15,995



1,154
10,893

16,279

66,448 $


71,707

71,707 $


17,765 $
178,914
99,468





1,641

79,285


90,562 $
1,557,507
350,557
6,952
4,727
71,543
82,780
34,937
103,826

109,203


11,467 30,575
1 94,673
275,414 1,192,036
90,356 549,885
183,991
-3,000
4,117 101,007
29,756

758,428 $ 4,597,517 $


68,766 $



3,465
4
16

268,974


2,942
6,434


50,089

400,690 $


357,738

357,738 $


124,081 $
28,838
82,780
112
74,129
69,054
8,963

448,500

633
3,084
9,414
111,317
32,427
102,855

1,096,187 $


127,879 $
38,556
28,517
(99,319)
145,396
211,861
1,584,416
1,464,024

3,501,330 $


$ 45,093 $ 21,540 $ 2,465,899 $ 2,266,669 $ 1,235,035 $ 138,155 $ 758,428 $ 4,597,517 $ 4,182,000


LOAN
FUNDS


AGENCY
FUNDS


69,600
1,321,051
347,503
5,894
5,901
77,569
59,885
44,659
61,948
16
115,669

20
31,424
94,727
1,131,206
523,344
170,597
3,000
91,018
26,969

4,182,000


134,800
28,031
59,885
79
40,928
70,936
5,566

460,126

788
4,337
8,382
107,355
29,553
77,855

1,028,621


98,762
34,365
27,686
(96,188)
147,509
178,201
1,486,137
1,276,907

3,153,379








II2000-I00


Combined Statement of Changes in Fund Balances
For the Year Ended June 30, 2001, with Comparative Totals for 2000
(amounts expressed in thousands)


CURRENT FUNDS


Revenues and Other Additions:
Unrestricted Current Funds Revenue
Auxiliary Enterprises
Federal Appropriations-Restricted
State Appropriations-Restricted
Gifts, Grants, and Contracts-Restricted:
Federal
Other Governmental
Private
Investment Earnings-Restricted
Interest on Loans Receivable
Expended for Plant Facilities
Retirement of Indebtedness
Resources Received from Other SUS
Universities/BOR
Other Additions
Component Unit Revenue:
Fees, Dues and Charges
Grants, Contributions and Donations
Sales of Goods and Services
Investment Income
Other
Total Revenues and Other Additions


Expenditures and Other Deductions:
Educational and General
Auxiliary Enterprises
Refunded to Grantors
Loan Cancellations and Write-Offs
Administrative and Collection Costs
Expended for Plant Facilities
Retirement of Indebtedness
Interest on Indebtedness
Disposal of Plant Facilities
Other Expenditures and Deductions
Resources Remitted to Other SUS
Universities/BOR
Total Expenditures and Other Deductions


Transfers Among Funds-Additions/(Deductions)
Mandatory:
Principal and Interest
Renewals and Replacements
Non-Mandatory:
Interfund Transfers
Primary Government to/from Component Units


UNRESTRICTED RESTRICTED UNEXPENDED


$ 784,827 $
89,448


PLANT FUNDS
RENEWAL AND RETIREMENT OF INVESTMENT
REPLACEMENT INDEBTEDNESS IN PLANT


7,326
7,326


49,466
49,466


291,498
32,857
63,322
4,515


2,063

2,563


134,329
4,261


20,722


4,082


$ 874,275 $ 420,240 $ 58,174 $


$ 871,636 $
76,486
55


251 $


320 $ 138,590


407,861 $

92


63,070



91


$ 948,177 $ 407,953 $ 63,161 $




$ (7,888) $ $ (43) $


6,849 (11,915) 5,324
109,945 19,387 5,279


2

2,344
5,443

5


119 $ 7,794 $ 40,311




-$ 7,931 $


1,015


Total Transfers Among Funds

Net Increase (Decrease)

Fund Balance at Beginning of Year

Fund Balance Adjustments

Fund Balance at End of Year


$ 108,906 $ 7,472 $ 10,560 $ 1,015 $ 6,999 $-

$ 35,004 $ 19,759 $ 5,573 $ 1,147 $ (475) $ 98,279

$ 146,698 $ 94,631 $ 96,912 $ 4,604 $ 3,967 $ 1,486,137

$ -$ -$ -$ 1 $ $

$ 181,702 $ 114,390 $ 102,485 $ 5,751 $ 3,492 $ 1,584,416


The accompanying Summary of Significant Accounting Policies and Notes are an integral part of the financial statements.





0


40,291
20


(932)








COMINE STEMN OFC4NE0N UDBLNE


TOTAL
UNIVERSITY FUNDS
(MEMORANDUM ONLY)


LOAN
FUNDS 2001

$ $ 784,827 $
89,448
7,326
49,466

617 292,193
34,920
134 63,456
669 8,240
1,062 1,062
134,329
4,261


300 25,104






$ 2,782 $ 1,494,632 $


$ 1,279,497 $
76,486
213
600
230
63,189
2,344
5,443
40,291
116


2000

730,24
92,42
7,59
41,66

276,85
23,64
56,22
5,48
1,02
111,56
4,01

37
20,90






1,372,01


COM

DIRECT
SUPPORT
ORGANIZATIONS

6 $
5
5
3

1
4
3
7
4
7
1

5
2

2,913
166,121
37,129
117,538
S 37,931
3 $ 361,632


1,191,378 $
80,961
329
838
279
41,402
2,029
3,393
62,119
64


144,992


PONENT UNITS (FYE 2000)

HEALTH SHANDS
SCIENCE CENTER HOSPITAL
AFFILIATES AND OTHERS

$ -$


265,500
4,781

1,431
7,947
$ 279,659


195,919


608,636
3,356

19,957
14.053
$ 646,002



$ 5








595,026


COMBINED TOTALS
(MEMORANDUM ONLY)


2001

$ 784,827
89,448
7,326
49,466

292,193
34,920
63,456
8,241
1,062
134,329
4,261


25,104

877,049
174,258
37,129
138,926
59 931
$ 2,781,925


$ 1,279,497 $
76,486
213
600
230
63,189
2,344
5,443
40,291
936,053


2000

$ 730,246
92,425
7,595
41,663

276,851
23,644
56,223
5,487
1,024
111,567
4,011

375
20,902

847,534
154,599
42,147
86,663
64,763
$ 2,567,719


1,191,378
80,961
329
838
279
41,402
2,029
3,393
62,119
914,865


$ 894 $ 1,468,409 $ 1,382,792 $ 144,992 $ 195,919 $ 595,026 $ 2,404,346 $ 2,297,593




$ -$ -$ -$ -$ -$ -$ -$


(341)


(341) $

1,547 $

43,523 $


45,070 $
45,070 $


134,611

134,611 $

160,834 $

1,876,472 $


2,037,306 $
2,037,306 $


115,737

115,737 $

104,958 $

1,771,514 $


1,876,472 $
1,876,472 $


(36,437)

(36,437) $

180,203 $

854,376 $


1,034,579 $
1,034,579 $


(93,779)

(93,779) $

(10,039) $

81,746 $


71,707 $
71,707 $


(34,023)

(34,023) $

16,953 $

340,785 $


357,738 $
357,738 $


(29,628)

(29,628) $

347,951 $

3,153,379 $


3,501,330 $
3,501,330 $


(38,180)

(38,180)

231,946

2,921,433



3,153,379








II2000-I00


Statement of Current Funds Revenues, Expenditures, and Other Changes
For the Year Ended June 30, 2001, with Comparative Figures for 2000
(amounts expressed in thousands)


UNRESTRICTED
FUNDS


CURRENT FUNDS
RESTRICTED
FUNDS


Revenues
Educational and General
Student Tuition and Fees
Federal Appropriations
State Appropriations
Gifts, Grants and Contracts:
Federal
Other Governmental
Private
Sales and Services of Educational Activities
Other Sources:
Investment Income
Other
Total Educational and General Revenues


Auxiliary Enterprises
Sales and Services Operations
Student Fees
Investment Income
Total Auxiliary Revenues


$ 146,751 $

549,368


22,545
12,419
36,885

12,402
4,457
$ 784,827 $


$ 71,055 $
14,370
4,023
$ 89,448 $


$ 146,751
7,326 7,326
-549,368


285,585
32,191
62,037
20,042


680
407,861


285,585
54,736
74,456
56,927

12,402
5,137
$ 1,192,688


$ 71,055
14,370
4,023
$ 89,448


134,231
7,595
518,022


278,554
39,852
66,662
62,453

5,829
3,014
$ 1,116,212


$ 77,360
12,796
2,269
$ 92,425


Total Revenues


$ 874,275 $ 407,861 $ 1,282,136 $ 1,208,637


Expenditures and Mandatory Transfers
Educational and General
Instruction
Research
Public Services
Academic Support
Student Services
Institutional Support
Operation and Maintenance of Plant
Scholarships and Fellowships
Total Educational and General Expenditures

Auxiliary Enterprises
Expenditures
Mandatory Transfers for Principal and Interest
Total Auxiliary Enterprises

Total Expenditures and Mandatory Transfers


Other Transfers and Additions/(Deductions)
Excess of Restricted Receipts Over Transfers to Revenues
Refunded to Grantors
Interfund Transfers
Primary Government from Component Units
Total Other Transfers and Additions/(Deductions)


$ 393,586
140,082
78,423
87,513
22,519
69,222
65,210
15,081
$ 871,636


$ 31,651
179,586
32,161
2,985
2,368
687
1,020
157,403
$ 407,861


76,486
7,888
84,374


425,237
319,668
110,584
90,498
24,887
69,909
66,230
172,484
1,279,497


394,496
284,092
97,238
87,799
25,491
68,737
63,524
170,001
1,191,378


76,486
7,888
84,374


80,961
5,914
86,875


$ 956,010 $ 407,861 $ 1,363,871 $ 1,278,253


$
(55)
6,849
109,945
$ 116,739


$ 12,379
(92)
(11,915)
19,387
$ 19,759


$ 12,379
(147)
(5,066)
129,332
$ 136,498


$ 386
(251)
(5,782)
111,429
$ 105,782


Net Increase/(Decrease) in Fund Balances


$ 35,004 $


19,759 $


54,763 $


36,166


The accompanying Summary of Significant Accounting Policies and Notes are an integral part of the financial statements.







0


TOTAL


FISCAL YEAR
2000
TOTAL














University of Florida

Summary of Significant Accounting Policies
For the period ending June 30, 2001

The significant accounting policies followed by the University of Florida are described below to enhance the usefulness of the financial statements.


REPORTING ENTITY
The University is considered a separate entity for financial reporting
purposes; however, for the period ending June 30, 2001, it is a part of the
State University System (SUS). The SUS is a part of the State Board of
Education, Department of Education, Division of Universities, the Board of
Regents (BOR) directing the latter. The BOR is primarily responsible for
adopting system-wide rules and policies, planning for and coordinating the
future programmatic, financial and physical development needs of the
system, reviewing and evaluating the universities' teaching, research, and
service programs, and monitoring fiscal performance. The Chancellor, who
is appointed by the BOR, performs duties as assigned by the Board, includ-
ing serving as the chief administrative officer of the Board. The University
President, also appointed by the BOR, serves as the chief administrative
officer of the University and is responsible for the operation and administra-
tion of the University.
Although one of the primary purposes of financial reporting is to account
for resources received and used, there are several instances where University
resources are accounted for and reported by other entities. For example,
Unexpended Plant Funds construction projects, committed to the Univer-
sity but financed from statewide sources, are accounted for and reported by
the BOR. When the construction projects are substantially completed, they
are then included in the University's Investment in Plant Funds.
The University's financial statements do not include the professional fee
clearing funds established to account for professional fees generated by
physicians and dentists engaged in the practice of medicine and dentistry at
the J. Hillis Miller Health Center. Some of these monies are subsequently
deposited in the University's agency funds and grants, contracts, and dona-
tions trust funds to support University programs.


Component Units

Direct Support Organizations
The University's "direct support organizations," as provided for in Sec-
tion 240.299, Florida Statutes, and Board of Regents Rule 6C-9.011,
Florida Administrative Code, are considered component units of the Uni-
versity. The financial operations and financial position of these direct
support organizations are included in the financial statements of the Univer-
sity by discrete presentation. These are separate, not-for-profit corporations
organized and operated exclusively to assist the University in achieving
excellence by providing supplemental resources from private gifts, bequests,
and valuable education support services. These organizations are authorized
to receive, hold, invest, and administer property and to make expenditures
to, or for the benefit of, the University. Annual post audits of each
organization's financial statements are conducted by independent certified


public accountants. The annual reports are submitted to the Auditor
General and the BOR for review. These not-for-profit corporations and
their purposes are explained as follows:
Gator Boosters, Inc. supports athletic activities at the University.
University of Florida Foundation, Inc. solicits, collects, manages, and di-
rects contributions to the various academic departments and programs of the
University and assists the University in fund raising and maintenance of
alumni records.
University of Florida Law Center Association, Inc. supports the College of
Law.
Florida Foundation Seed Producers, Inc. supplies Florida farmers and
producers with crop seed and nursery stock. This organization stocks
foundation seed of the best-known varieties acceptable to Florida climate
and soils in adequate quantities and at reasonable prices.
Florida 4-H Foundation, Inc. promotes the educational objectives of the
Florida Cooperative Extension Service.
University of Florida Research Foundation, Inc. promotes, encourages, and
assists research activities of the University through income derived from or
related to the development and commercialization of intellectual properties,
which include inventions, discoveries, processes, and work products.
University Athletic Association, Inc. conducts various inter-collegiate ath-
letic programs for and on behalf of the University.
Southwest Florida Research and Education Foundation, Inc. provides
research and educational support to the University of Florida Southwest
Florida Research and Education Center.
Florida Association of Basic Medical Scientists, Inc. provides scholarships
to students.
University of Florida Research and Development Park, Inc. promotes,
encourages, and assists the research activities of the faculty, staff, and stu-
dents of the University and facilitates the transfer of their discoveries,
inventions, processes, and work products to public use, all through the
development of the University's research and development park. (Inactive)
University of Florida Tissue Bank, Inc. procures, develops, processes, and
distributes human tissue for transplantation, in support of the education,
research, and service programs of the Department of Orthopedics, College
of Medicine.
Florida Leadership and Education Foundation, Inc. was formed to further
agriculture and natural resource education and related activities, promote
agriculture and natural resources leadership, and make contributions to and
confer benefits upon the University.
Treasure Coast Agricultural Research Foundation, Inc. supports, encour-
ages, and fosters research, education, and extension at the Institute of Food
and Agricultural Sciences of the University on issues related to the citrus
industry within the Indian River region.
Citrus Research and Education Foundation, Inc. expedites citrus produc-
tion, propagates new plant materials and environmental impact research
data, and provides research and education support to the University of
Florida Citrus Research and Education Center at Lake Alfred.








II2000-I00


Health Science Center Affiliates
The financial operations and financial position of several corporations
closely affiliated with the University of Florida J. Hillis Miller Health
Science Center (HSC) are considered to be component units of the Univer-
sity and are included in the University's financial statements by discrete
presentation. The first six corporations listed are "Faculty Practice Plans," as
provided for in the Florida Administrative Code Rule 6C-9.017. The
Faculty Practice Plans provide educationally-oriented clinical practice set-
tings and opportunities through which faculty members provide health,
medical, and dental care to patients as an integral part of their academic
activities and their employment as faculty. Because these faculty practice
activities generate income, the colleges are authorized to regulate fees gener-
ated from faculty practice and maintain Faculty Practice Plans for the
orderly collection and distribution of fees. These organizations provide
significant support for the clinical instruction function of the HSC. Univer-
sity of Florida Health Services, Inc. and University of Florida Jacksonville
Healthcare, Inc., "Health Services Support Organizations," as provided for
in the Florida Administrative Code Rule 6C-9.020, engage in strategic
alliances and partnerships with non-academic entities, effecting managed
care contracting and provider network development for the HSC. Faculty
Clinic, Inc. was originally organized to operate a multi-specialty clinic.
However, effective January 1, 1995, Faculty Clinic, Inc. was restructured to
operate as a facilities management company. Jacksonville Health Education
Programs, Inc. operates the Borland Medical Library in Jacksonville, Florida.
Family Practice Medical Group, Inc. is a non-profit medical group operated
by arrangements with the University of Florida College of Medicine and
Shands at Alachua General Hospital (related parties). The physicians are
residents or faculty members of the College of Medicine and are not
employees of the corporation. Family Practice Medical Group, Inc. acts as a
billing and collecting agent for Florida Clinical Practice Association, Inc.

* Florida Clinical Practice Association, Inc. and University of Florida
(UF) College of Medicine Academic Enrichment Fund (AEF)

* Faculty Associates, Inc. and UF College of Dentistry AEF

* Florida Health Professions Associations, Inc. and UF College of Health
Professions AEF

* UF College of Nursing Faculty Practice Association, Inc. and UF
College of Nursing AEF

* UF College of Pharmacy Faculty Practice Association, Inc. and UF
College of Pharmacy AEF

* UF Jacksonville Physicians, Inc.

* UF Health Services, Inc. (dissolved)

* UF Jacksonville Healthcare, Inc.

* Faculty Clinic, Inc. d.b.a. UF Faculty Clinic/Jacksonville

* Jacksonville Health Education Programs, Inc.

* Family Practice Medical Group, Inc. (dissolved)


Shands Hospital and Others
Shands Teaching Hospital and Clinics, Inc. was incorporated October
15, 1979, as a not-for-profit corporation. Shands, a major tertiary care
teaching institution, is a leading referral center in the State of Florida and the
southeast United States and facilitates medical education programs at the
University.
Shands entered into a contractual agreement, as of July 1, 1980, with the
State Board of Education of the State of Florida, as subsequently restated
and amended, which provides for the use of hospital facilities at the Univer-
sity of Florida Health Center through December 31, 2030, with renewal
provisions. The contractual agreement also provides for the transfer to
Shands of all other assets and liabilities arising from the operation of the
hospital facilities prior to July 1, 1980. At termination of the contractual
agreement, the net assets of Shands revert to the State Board of Education.
Legal title to all buildings
and improvements trans-
ferred to Shands remains
with the State of Florida
during the term of the con-
tractual agreement. The
contractual agreement pro-
vides for a 12-month grace
period for any event of de-
fault, other than the bank-
ruptcy of Shands. In addition, the contractual agreement limits the right of
the State Board of Education to terminate the contractual agreement solely
to the circumstance in which Shands declares bankruptcy and, in such event,
requires net revenues derived from the operation of the hospital facilities to
continue to be applied to the payment of Shands' debts.
Under the terms of the contractual agreement, Shands is obligated to
manage, operate, maintain, and insure the hospital facilities in support of the
programs of the Health Center at the University of Florida and further
agrees to contract with the State Board of Education for the provision of
these programs.

Baby Gator Child Care Center, Inc. was incorporated October 19,
1970, under Florida Statutes, Chapter 240.531, to establish and operate an
educational research center for child development, for children of University
of Florida students, faculty, and staff. The Center is funded primarily
through fees paid by parents and an annual allocation of funds from the
Capital Improvement Trust Fund established by the BOR of the State of
Florida. In addition, the Center receives other governmental assistance.
The Center uses a facility owned by the University without charge. The
University also provides other services and support for the Center, some also
without charge. The Center's policy is to not record contributed facilities,
services, and other support in its financial statements.

The University of Florida Health Education Insurance Company is
blended into the University's financial statements. Although this entity is
legally separate from the University, the BOR owns all shares of stock, and
their sole purpose is to assist in providing liability protection.







SUMAR 0F SINFCN CONTN OICE


BASIS OF ACCOUNTING
The University's fiscal and accounting operations are essentially struc-
tured around the recommendations of the National Association of College
and University Business Officers (NACUBO), constituting generally ac-
cepted accounting principles, as published under the title of Financial
Accounting and Reporting Manual for Higher Education. Financial state-
ments were prepared in accordance with instructions provided by the BOR.
Financial statements have been prepared on the accrual basis of account-
ing; however, depreciation of fixed assets is not recognized. Revenue is
recognized in restricted current funds when expenditures are made for
current operating purposes. The reserve for encumbrances portion of the
fund balance is a representation of purchase commitments for which the
merchandise or services have not been received. Notes receivable from
students are reported in the loan fund at net present value.
The Statement of Current Funds Revenues, Expenditures, and Other
Changes is a statement of financial activities of current funds related to the
current reporting period. It does not purport to present the results of
operations or the net income or loss for the period as would a statement of
income or a statement of revenues and expenses.
To the extent that current funds are used to finance plant assets, the
amounts provided are accounted for as:
* expenditures, in the case of normal replacement of moveable equipment
and library books;

* mandatory transfers, in the case of required provisions for debt amorti-
zation, interest, and equipment renewal and replacement; and

* transfers of a non-mandatory nature for all other cases.

Physical plant and equipment are recorded at cost at the date of acquisi-
tion or at appraised value at the date received in the case of gifts or purchases
from the State Division of Surplus Property.


FUND ACCOUNTING
In order to ensure observance of limitations and restrictions placed on
the use of resources available to the University, the financial records and
accounts are maintained in accordance with the principles of fund account-
ing. This is the procedure by which resources for various purposes are
classified for accounting and reporting purposes into funds that are in
accordance with activities or objectives specified. Separate accounts are
maintained for each fund; however, in the accompanying financial state-
ments, funds that have similar characteristics have been combined into one
of the following fund groups:


Current Funds
This fund group includes those economic resources of the University
which are expendable for operational purposes in performing the primary
objectives of the University. Resources restricted by donors or other outside
agencies for specific current operating purposes are reported as restricted
current funds; resources not so restricted are reported as unrestricted current
funds.


Loan Funds
This fund group consists of loans to students and of resources available
for such purposes. The terms of the loan agreements usually specify that the
money operate on a revolving basis, i.e., repayments of principal and interest
are loaned to other eligible students.


Endowment Funds
This fund group consists of financial resources for which donors or
outside agencies have stipulated, as a condition of the gift, that the principal
is to be maintained inviolate and in perpetuity and invested for the purpose
of producing present and future income which may be either expended or
added to the principal.


Plant Funds
This fund group consists of four separate self-balancing fund subgroups
for which separate accountability and reporting are required. These fund
subgroups are as follows:
* Unexpended Plant Funds account for unexpended resources received
directly by the University from various sources to finance the acquisition
or construction of long-lasting plant assets and the associated liabilities.

* Renewal and Replacement Plant Funds provide for the renewal and
replacement of plant fund assets as distinguished from additions and
improvements to plant assets.

* Retirement of Indebtedness Funds account for the accumulation of
resources received directly by the University for interest and principal
payments and other debt-service charges including contributions for
sinking funds relating to plant fund indebtedness.

* Investment in Plant Funds include all long-lasting assets in the service of
the University, including construction-in-progress and the associated
liabilities. Long-lasting assets which are held as investments in endow-
ment funds are excluded from the investment in plant funds.

Agency Funds
This fund group consists of funds held by the University as custodian or
fiscal agent for others.


Component Units
This fund group consists of organizations for which the University is
financially accountable or for which the nature and significance of their
relationship with the University are such that exclusion would cause the
financial statements to be misleading or incomplete.


OTHER SIGNIFICANT ACCOUNTING

POLICIES
Other significant accounting policies are set forth in the financial state-
ments and notes thereto.








II2000-I00


UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA
NOTES TO THE FINANCIAL STATEMENTS
June 30, 2001



1. CASH AND CASH EQUIVALENTS

The amount reported as cash and cash equivalents consist of cash
on hand and cash in demand accounts. Cash in demand accounts,
except for amounts held in foreign banks, is held in banks quali-
fied in accordance with the provisions of Chapter 280, Florida
Statutes, as a public depository. Deposits are fully insured and
collateralized by a mutual collateral pool. Revolving funds autho-
rized by the State Comptroller for deposit in banks in Italy and
Zimbabwe totaled $190,000. As ofJune 30, 2001, actual deposits
in foreign banks totaled $86,675.

2. CASH HELD BY PAYING AGENT

Expenditures for the payment of long-term debt are recognized
when the University makes payment to the paying agent, rather
than when the paying agent pays the matured debt. Accordingly,
any cash balances held by agents at year-end are not included as an
asset of the Retirement of Indebtedness Funds.


3. Uninsured and unregistered, with securities held by the
counterpart or by its trust department or agent but not in
the University's name.

The University participates in investment pools through the State
Treasury and the State Board of Administration in accordance
with the provisions of Sections 18.125 and 215.49, Florida Stat-
utes. Collateral for public money on deposit is arranged through
the State Treasurer under Chapter 280, Florida Statutes. Invest-
ments consist of the instruments listed in Sections 18.10 and
215.47, Florida Statutes. The investments are recorded at cost;
any difference between market value and the cost of investments
is negligible. These pooled investments cannot be categorized
because the participant's ownership is not evidenced by specific,
identifiable investment securities of the pools. The University of
Florida Health Education Insurance Company has a variety of
investments managed by several different banks.

In addition, the University has received donations of marketable
securities. These securities are held by the University and are
therefore categorized in the first risk category. The book value and
market value of these locally held securities at June 30, 2001, is
$23,608. A summary of these investments is shown below in
Table 1.


3. INVESTMENTS 4. ALLOWANCE FOR DOUBTFUL RECEIVABLES


Generally accepted accounting principles require that credit risk
of investments be classified into three categories:

1. Insured or registered, or securities held by the University or
its agent in the University's name.
2. Uninsured and unregistered, with securities held by the
counterpart's trust department or agent in the University's
name.


The University provides allowances for uncollectible accounts
and notes receivable based upon management's best estimate of
uncollectible accounts and notes at the balance sheet date, consid-
ering type, age, collection history of receivables, and any other
factors as considered appropriate. Notes receivable are reported
net of an allowance for uncollectible notes of $5,084,927, which
is 14 percent of total related notes receivable. Accounts receivable
are reported net of an allowance of $5,598,150, which is 10
percent of total related, accounts receivable.


Value of
Marketable
Funds Securities


Investments of the
Health Education
Insurance Company


Unrestricted Current
Restricted Current
Loan
Unexpended Plant
Renewal and Replacement
Retirement of Indebtedness
Agency
Total


$ 23,608 $ 67,240,614 $ 147,778,481
127,690,299
10,431,905
34,934,499
5,530,996
2,425,694
14,468,412
$ 23,608 $ 67,240,614 $ 343,260,286


$ 215,042,703
127,690,299
10,431,905
34,934,499
5,530,996
2,425,694
14,468,412
$ 410,524,508


Investments
Made Through
the State


Total Book
Value of
Investments










































7. LONG-TERM DEBT


Inventories have been categorized into the following two types:

Departmental Inventories Those inventories maintained by
departments and not available for resale. Departmental invento-
ries are comprised of such items as classroom and laboratory
supplies, teaching materials, and office supply items, which are
consumed in the teaching/work process. These inventories are
normally expensed when purchased and therefore are not re-
ported on the balance sheet.

Merchandise Inventories Those inventories maintained which
are available for resale to individuals and/or other University
departments and are not expensed at the time of purchase. These
inventories are reported on the balance sheet.

Two different inventory valuation methods were used to value
inventories. They were the moving average method and the first-
in, first-out method.

6. MUSEUM AND ART COLLECTIONS

The Florida Museum of Natural History, which is part of the
University, maintains a depository of biological, geological, ar-
chaeological, and ethnographic materials. The Museum's collec-
tions contain approximately 10,000,000 individual items, more
than half of which is catalogued, either individually or in lots.
While many of the collections are undoubtedly quite valuable and
irreplaceable, the University has not placed a dollar valuation on
these items and, accordingly, the financial statements do not
include these assets in the investment in plant fund.


The University's long-term indebtedness is reported in the Invest-
ment in Plant Fund, Retirement of Indebtedness Fund and Unex-
pended Plant Fund and is classified according to the following
types of indebtedness:

A. Revenue Certificates and Bonds Payable

Bonds and revenue certificates were issued to construct uni-
versity facilities including parking garages, student housing,
academic and student service facilities. Bonds and revenue
certificates outstanding, which include both term and serial
bonds, are secured by a pledge of housing rental revenues,
traffic and parking fees and various student fee assessments.
The building fee and capital improvement fee collected as a


0OE 0OTEFNNILSAEET


5. INVENTORIES








II2000-I00


part of tuition and remitted to the Board of Regents is used to
retire the revenue certificates for the academic and student
service facilities.

A summary of pertinent information related to the University's
bond indebtedness follows in Table 2


B. Loans from Florida Department of Management Services

The University was granted advances from the Florida De-
partment .- Ii 1,--.. 1. r Services for the construction of two
parking garages. Payments are made from proceeds of parking
fees collected. A summary of pertinent information related to
the loan follows in Table 3.


Series
Student Housing Bonds:
1959E
1959F
1962
1984
1993
1998
2000
Subtotal


Parking Garage Bonds:
1993
1998
Subtotal


Amount of
Original
Issue


$ 3,730,000
1,500,000
400,000
3,500,000
13,000,000
26,155,000
30,695,000
$ 78,980,000



$ 19,545,000
10,000,000
$ 29,545,000


Academic and Student Services Facilities Bonds:
1991 $ 5,686,923
1993 22,548,089
1997 11,349,317
1997A 4,723,765
1998 13,783,839
Subtotal $ 58,091,933


Total Bonds


$ 166,616,933


Total
Retired


3,107,000
975,000
380,000
1,520,000
1,551,121
1,236,852
594,153
9,364,126



6,247,538
428,974
6,676,512



5,644,533
7,072,172
1,399,906
190,893
1,138,886
15,446,390


31,487,028


Maturity
Date


2005
2011
2002
2014
2023
2028
2029


Bonds
Interest Payable at
Rate June 30, 2001


3.00%
3.00%
3.50%
3.00%
4.625 to 5.50%
4.00 to 6.00%
5.00 to 7.00%


2014 4.20 to 5.00%
2019 3.65 to 4.75%


2003
2013
2022
2016
2023


6.00 to 6.50%
4.50 to 5.375%
7.00%
3.95 to 4.50%
4.00 to 5.00%


$ 623,000
525,000
20,000
1,980,000
11,448,879
24,918,148
30,100,847
$ 69,615,874



$ 13,297,462
9,571,026
$ 22,868,488



$ 42,390
15,475,917
9,949,411
4,532,872
12,644,953
$ 42,645,543


$ 135,129,905


Principal and interest requirements on the above revenue certificates and bonds are as follows:


Year
2001-02
2002-03
2003-04
2004-05
2005-06
Later Years
Subtotal
Less: Bond Discount


Principal
$ 4,818,884
5,463,627
5,688,537
5,854,922
5,993,178
109,005,737
136,824,885
(1,694,980)


Interest
6,856,472
6,627,005
6,353,570
6,082,812
5,952,100
57,444,954
89,316,913


$ 135,129,905 $ 89,316,913


Total
$ 11,675,356
12,090,632
12,042,107
11,937,734
11,945,278
166,450,691
226,141,798
(1,694,980)


$ 224,446,818




















Original
Loans
$ 1,310,325
2,356,695


$ 3,667,020


Outstanding
Loans At
June 30, 2001
$ 193,510
439,135


$ 632,645


Principal and interest requirements:


Principal
$ 159,689
164,132
126,638
85,650
85,650
10,886


$ 632,645


Interest
$ 11,611
7,168
2,459
0
0
0


$ 21,238


Total
$ 171,300
171,300
129,097
85,650
85,650
10,886


$ 653,883


C. Installment Purchase Agreements

The University has entered into several installment purchase
contracts for the purchase of equipment. Table 4 is a schedule
of future minimum payments remaining under the contracts
at fiscal year end:

D. Obligations Under Capital Lease

The Division of Bond Finance issued the 1974 Series Univer-
sity of Florida Housing System Revenue Bonds in the amount


Tabl 4 Intlmn Pu-s Agrement


Year
2001-02
2002-03
2003-04
2004-05
2005-06
Total Minimum Payments
Less: Interest


Total Present Value


Amount
$ 67,938
41,859
29,782
14,722


$ 154,301
(11,964)


$ 142,337


of $2,880,000 for the acquisition and conversion of buildings
and facilities to house married students and their families. The
Board of Regents entered into a lease-purchase agreement
(capital lease) with the Division of Bond Finance for these
facilities. The University of Florida makes lease-purchase pay-
ments to the State Board of Administration, agent for the
Division of Bond Finance.

These payments, together with an annual federal subsidy, are
sufficient to pay the principal, interest and related administra-
tive costs of maturing revenue bonds as well as maintaining
reserves at the required levels. Accordingly, all capital lease
payments are determined by the amount needed by the State
Board of Administration to service the bonded debt. During
the 2000-2001 fiscal year the federal subsidy collected was
$78,330.

On June 8, 1994, the Board of Regents, on behalf of the
University of Florida, entered into a lease agreement with the
University of Florida Foundation, Inc. (the Foundation), a
direct-support organization (component unit) of the Univer-
sity of Florida under Section 240.299, Florida Statutes. Under
the terms of the agreement, the University of Florida agreed to
lease from the Foundation a 607-space parking garage (the
garage) located near the Health Center Administrative Offices
for a period of thirty years beginning July 1, 1994. Rent of


NOE TOTEFNNILSAEET


Loans
Garage I
Garage II


Interest
Rate
6.00%
0.00%


Year
2001-02
2002-03
2003-04
2004-05
2005-06
Later Years








II2000-I00


Outstanding
Interest Original Loans At
Loans Rate Loans June 30, 2001

1974 Married Student Housing Facilities 6.70 to 7.50% $ 2,880,000 $ 595,000
Shands Parking Garage 6.45% 1,382,470 1,182,182
Total $ 4,262,470 $ 1,777,182

Principal and interest requirements:

Year Principal Interest Total

2001-02 $ 208,749 $ 117,901 $ 326,650
2002-03 220,281 103,419 323,700
2003-04 241,912 88,138 330,050
2004-05 28,647 71,353 100,000
2005-06 30,495 69,505 100,000
Later Years 1,047,098 752,902 1,800,000
Total $ 1,777,182 $ 1,203,218 $ 2,980,400


$100,000 annually is due each July 1. The garage was simulta- I' 11
neously acquired by the Foundation from Shands Teaching
Hospital and Clinics, Inc. (Shands), also a component unit,
and financed by the Foundation through the issuance of a
promissory note secured by a nonrecourse mortgage contain-
ing payment terms similar to those in the lease agreement
between the Foundation and the University of Florida. An-
nual payments of $100,000 for thirty years from the Univer-
sity of Florida to the Foundation and from the Foundation to
Shands were based on an original construction cost of
$3,000,000 and 0% interest. For reporting purposes, the lease
is considered a capital lease under Statement of Financial
Standards No. 13, Accounting for Leases. The initial obligation
was discounted at an imputed interest rate of 6.45% and was
recorded at $1,382,470. The asset, "Leased Property Under
Capital Lease", was recorded at cost to Shands of $3,000,000.
The $1,617,530 difference was reported in the Investment in
Plant Fund Statement of Changes in Fund Balances as ex-
pended on plant facilities.

A summary of pertinent information related to the liability is
above in Table 5.

8. COMPENSATED ABSENCES LIABILITY

Employees earn the right to be compensated for annual leave
(vacation) and sick leave earned pursuant to Section 6C-5.920,
Florida Administrative Code, and pursuant to bargaining agree-
ments between the Board of Regents and the United Faculty of
Florida. Leave earned is accrued to the credit of the employee, and
records are kept on each employee's unpaid (unused) leave bal-







0OE 0OTEFNNILSAEET


ance. GASB Statement No. 16 requires that the University accrue
a liability in the current funds for employees' vested right to
receive compensation for future absences when certain conditions
are met, whereas State appropriations fund only the portion of
accrued leave that is used or paid in the current fiscal year.
Although the liability is expected to be funded primarily from
future appropriations, generally accepted accounting principles
do not permit the recording of a receivable in anticipation of
future appropriations. Consequently, the recording of the liability
for compensated absences without the corresponding recognition
of such future resources results in the appearance of a reduced
ability to meet current obligations. At June 30, the total estimated
liability for annual, sick, and compensatory leave is $49,014,837,
$49,964,357 and $339,996 respectively. A current compensated
absences liability of $174,233 has been established for the amount
of leave for the new participants in the Deferred Retirement
Optional Program (DROP) as of June 30, 2001, for which they
are eligible and elect to receive payment. The University's Current
Unrestricted Fund Balance at June 30, 2001 of $182,702,288
would have been $281,021,478 had the non-current portion of
the liability for compensated absences not been applied against it.

9. LIABILITY FOR SELF-INSURED CLAIMS / RESERVE
FOR SELF-INSURED CLAIMS

Claims settlement and adjustment expenses are accrued as ex-
penses and liabilities of the University of Florida J. Hillis Miller
Health Center Self-Insurance Program, inclusive of the UF
JHMHC Self-Insurance Program (Gainesville), the UFJHMHC/
Jacksonville Self-Insurance Program and University of Florida
Healthcare Education Insurance Company, for the estimated
settlement value of claims reported as a "Liability for Self-Insured
Claims" in the Current Unrestricted Funds. The estimated settle-
ment value of claims was determined on the basis of the judgment
and experience of management and the Self-Insurance Program
Councils through a case-by-case review. Estimated losses from
unreported incidents are accrued based upon the findings of
Tillinghast/Towers Perrin, casualty actuaries.

The Self-Insurance Program provides comprehensive liability pro-
tection, including professional liability, for the Florida Board of
Education in those amounts described in Section 768.28, Florida
Statutes, and protection for legislative claims bills subject to limits
of $1 million, inclusive of the specific limits of liability described


in Section 768.28, Florida Statutes. Pursuant to the authority of
Sections 240.213(1)(0, 240.513(3)(d), and 240.5135, Florida
Statutes, the Self-Insurance Program provides professional liabil-
ity protection for certain Florida Board of Education support
corporations in the amount of $2.5 million per claim or action.
The per-claim limit of liability protection for such support corpo-
rations does not exceed $2.5 million per claim in the event more
than one protected entity is involved in the same claim or action.

As part of the Self-Insurance Program, pursuant to the authority
granted to the Councils by the Florida Board of Education, the
Councils created the University of Florida Healthcare Education
Insurance Company on September 1, 1994. Although legally
separate from the Florida Board of Education, the company is
reported as if it is part of the primary government, because it is a
self insurance mechanism created pursuant to Section 240.213,
Florida Statutes, all shares of stock are owned by the Florida
Board of Education, and the company's sole purpose is to assist in
providing liability protection for the Florida Board of Education,
and affiliated individuals and entities.

The amount of "Liability for Self-Insured Claims" accrued for the
Self-Insurance Program for fiscal year 2000-2001 was $32,426,799
for compensatory losses and for allocated expenses. The "Liability
for Self-Insured Claims" was accrued at an undiscounted present
value.

The aggregate amount of claims liabilities for which annuity
contracts have been purchased in the claimants' names and for
which the related liabilities have been removed from the balance
sheet totals $62,000 for the Self-Insurance Program at June 30,
2001. These annuities have been assigned to third parties, and all
claimants have fully and completely released trust fund partici-
pants from all actual and contingent liability.

Changes in the balances of claims liabilities for the Self-Insurance
Program during the fiscal years 1999-2000 and 2000-2001 were
as follows in Table 6.

The Self-Insurance Program's fund balance, after accrual of the
"Liability for Self-Insured Claims", less the amount reserved for
encumbrances, was $38,555,768 at June 30, 2001. This balance is
reported as reserves for incurred but not reported losses or "Reserve
for Future Self-Insured Claims" in the Unrestricted Current Funds.


Claims
Liabilities
Beginning
ofYear


$ 27,890,739
$ 29,552,808


Current
Claims/
Changes in
Estimates


9,390,712 $
7,104,305 $


1999-2000
2000-2001


Claim
Payments


(7,728,643)
(4,230,314)


Claims
Liabilities
End of
Year


29,552,808
32,426,799








II2000-I00


10. RETIREMENT PLANS

A. Florida Retirement System

Pursuant to Chapter 121, Florida Statutes, the Florida Legisla-
ture established the Florida Retirement System to provide a
retirement and survivor benefit program for participating public
employees. Most employees working in regularly established
positions of the University are covered by the Florida Retire-
ment System, a State-administered cost-sharing multiple-em-
ployer public employee defined benefit retirement plan. Par-
ticipating employers include all State departments, counties,
district school boards, and community colleges. Many mu-
nicipalities and special districts have elected to be participating
employers.

Generally, regular employees' retirement pension benefits vest
after six years of service, and members are eligible for normal
retirement benefits at age 62 with ten years of service or at any
age after 30 years of service, which may include up to four
years of credit for military service. Benefits are computed on
the basis of age, average final compensation and service credit.
Members are also eligible for in-line-of-duty or regular disabil-
ity and survivors benefits.

The Deferred Retirement Optional Program (DROP) is a
program under which an eligible member of the Florida Re-
tirement System may elect to participate, deferring receipt of
retirement benefits while continuing employment with a Florida
Retirement System employer. The deferred monthly benefit
accrues on behalf of the participant, plus interest compounded
monthly, for the specified period of the DROP participation.
Upon termination of employment, the participant receives the
total DROP benefits and begins to receive previously deter-
mined retirement benefits.

The current schedule for employer contributions is based on
Chapters 112, 121, 122, and 238, Florida Statutes. All partici-
pating employers must comply. Except in those instances
where employees have elected to remain in pre-existing pro-
grams, employers pay all contributions. The University's li-
ability for any unfunded pension benefit obligation is limited
to the payment of the required contribution at the rates
established by law on future payrolls of the University.


7/1/01 7/1/00
Statutory Statutory


Membership Class
Regular
Senior Management
Special Risk
Deferred Retirement Optional Program


Rates*
6.36%
8.34%
17.50%


Rates*
8.21%
11.19%
19.35%


11.73% 11.56%


* Rates at 7/1/2001 and 7/1/2000 exclude contributions for health
insurance subsidy of 0.94% for each membership class (See Note
11). Retirement contribution rates were adopted by the 1998 Legis-
lative Session as recommended in the 1997 actuarial valuation ofthe
system.



The University's 2000-2001 fiscal year payroll for all employ-
ees totaled $725,795,691 including $319,683,603 paid to
9,663 employees who were members of the Florida Retire-
ment System. Required contributions made to the Florida
Retirement System in the 2000-2001 fiscal year totaled
$30,526,712, none from employee contributions, which rep-
resents 9.55 percent of the covered payroll.

Additional information on the Florida Retirement System,
including the ten-year historical trend information and the
total unfunded pension benefit obligation, is presented in the
annual financial report of the Florida Retirement System.

During the 2000-2001 fiscal year and as ofJune 30, 2001, the
Florida Retirement System held no securities issued by the
University.

B. Optional Retirement Program

Pursuant to Section 121.35, Florida Statutes, the Florida
Legislature created an Optional Retirement Program for eli-
gible State University System faculty and administrators. The
program, which became effective July 1, 1984, was expanded
in 1988 to include the State University System Executive
Service. The program is designed to aid the University system
in recruiting employees by offering more portability to those
employees who are not expected to remain in the Florida
Retirement System for ten or more years.

The Optional Retirement Program is a defined contribution
plan, which provides full and immediate vesting of all contri-
butions submitted to the participating companies on behalf of
the participant. Employees in eligible positions are allowed to
make an irrevocable election to participate in the Optional
Retirement Program rather than the Florida Retirement Sys-
tem, and to purchase retirement and death benefits through
contracts provided by certain insurance carriers. The employ-







0OE 0OTEFNNILSAEET


ing university contributes on behalf of the participant the
same percentage of the participant's salary as would have been
contributed to the Florida Retirement System. A portion of
the total contribution is transferred to the Florida Retirement
System Trust Fund to help amortize the unfunded actuarial
accrued liability of the Florida Retirement System, and an
additional small amount remains in the Optional Retirement
Program Trust Fund for program administrative costs. The
remaining contribution is invested in the company or compa-
nies selected by the participant to create a fund for the pur-
chase of annuities at retirement. The participant may contrib-
ute by salary deduction an amount not to exceed the percent-
age contributed by the University to his annuity account.
There were 4,140 University participants during the 2000-
2001 fiscal year.

Employer contributions made to the Optional Retirement
Program in the 2000-2001 fiscal year totaled $22,141,578.
Employee contributions totaled $10,921,338. These contri-
butions amount to 10.05 percent and 4.93 percent, respec-
tively, of the covered payroll, which totaled $221,413,824.

During the fiscal year and as of June 30, 2001, the Optional
Retirement Program held no securities issued by the Univer-
sity.

C. Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences Supplemental
Retirement

In 1984, the Florida Legislature enacted the Institute of Food
and Agricultural Sciences Supplemental Retirement Act to pro-
vide a supplement to the monthly retirement benefit being paid
under the Federal Civil Service Retirement system to retirees of
the Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences (IFAS) at the
University of Florida. The supplement is designated for IFAS
cooperative extension employees employed before July 1, 1983,
who are not entitled to benefits from either a State-supported
retirement system or social security based on their service with
IFAS. It was intended to compensate these IFAS employees for
the difference between their Civil Service benefit and the ben-
efits a Florida Retirement System (FRS) member receives, which
include a social security benefit. No additional persons can
become eligible for this supplement.


The employer and employee contributions were 27.62 per-
cent of the gross monthly salaries of eligible employees. Em-
ployee contributions were $618,147, and employer contribu-
tions were $1,344,288. For fiscal year 2000-2001, the
University's covered payroll was $7,106,171, and there were
134 employees covered.

D. Other Retirement Programs

Other retirement programs include the Florida Teacher's Re-
tirement System and the U.S. Civil Service Retirement Sys-
tem. Ten employees were covered by the Florida Teacher's
Retirement System during fiscal year 2000-2001. Employer
contributions were $71,723, and employee contributions were
$40,095 on a total payroll of $643,524.

Twenty-one employees were covered by the U.S. Civil Service
Retirement System during fiscal year 2000-2001. Employer
contributions were $106,351, and employee contributions
were $90,438 on a total payroll of $1,025,277.


OTHER POST-EMPLOYMENT BENEFITS


To assist retirees of all State-administered retirement systems in
paying health insurance costs, the Florida Legislature established
the Retiree Health Insurance Subsidy (HIS). During the 2000-
2001 fiscal year, the HIS program was funded by required contri-
butions consisting of 0.94 percent assessed against the payroll for
all active employees covered in State-administered retirement
systems.

Eligible retirees, spouses, or financial dependents under any State-
administered retirement system must provide proof of health
insurance coverage, which can include Medicare. During the
2000-2001 fiscal year, participants received an extra $3 per month
for each year of creditable service completed at the time of retire-
ment. If contributions fail to provide full subsidy benefits to all
participants, the subsidy payments may be reduced or canceled.

12. OPERATING LEASES

The University has long-term com-
mitments for assets leased under
operating lease agreements. These
leased assets and the related com-
mitments are not recorded on the
University's balance sheet. Lease
payments are recorded as expendi-
tures of the related funds when paid
or incurred. Outstanding commit-
ments resulting from these lease
agreements are not considered ma-
terial and are contingent upon fu- =nl
ture appropriations.








II2000-I00


13. INTERDEPARTMENTAL AUXILIARY SALES

Interdepartmental sales between auxiliary service departments
and other institutional departments have been eliminated from
expenditures and revenues for reporting purposes. The interde-
partmental transactions eliminated in the financial statement prepa-
ration totaled $73,122,442 and $70,722,829 for the years ended
June 30, 2001, and June 30, 2000, respectively.

14. FUNCTIONAL DISTRIBUTION OF EXPENDITURES

The educational and general expenditures on the Statement of
Current Funds Revenues, Expenditures, and Other Changes (Ex-
hibit C) are determined by applying the primary Program Classi-
fication Structure Code (PCS Code) assigned to each educational


and general department to the total expenditures for each depart-
ment.


CONSTRUCTION COMMITMENTS


The major construction commitments of the University for those
projects for which the estimated cost is $1 million or more at fiscal
year end are as follows in Table 8.

16. STUDENT FEES AND OTHER COLLECTIONS

Student and Other Fees Trust Fund collections are remitted
directly to the State Treasurer. Subsequently, these collections are
returned to the University by State appropriation. Pursuant to
generally accepted accounting principles, the total of budgeted


Project # Project Name


Allotment Expenditures


Amount Unspent
at Year End


SW Recreation Center Expansion
New Hume Hall
Quarantine Facility-Indian River REC
Hall of FL Fossils-Museum of Natural History
Reitz Union Expansion
Anderson/Flint Hall Renovations
Murphy Residence Hall Electrical Upgrade
IFAS North Florida Research Facility
Diamond Village Renovation
IFAS Gulf Coast REC Renovations and Repairs
Weil Hall Renovation
IFAS Relocation and Construction Trust Fund
1999-2000 Maint., Repairs and Renovations
Teaching Center Addition Indian River
Fraizer Rogers Hall Renovation
Utility Infrastructure Improvements
Pharmacy Building
IFAS Central Florida Resch & Educ Center
1999-00 Capital Renewal, ADA, & Fire Safety
Health Professions & Pharmacy Complex
2000-2001 Maint., Repairs and Renovations
WUFT-TV/FM Gainesville
Critical Deferred Maintenance
UMC-Shands Jacksonville Proton Beam Facility
M. E. Rinker, Sr. Hall School of Bldg. Const.
PKYonge Lab Sch'l Structural Emergency Ph I


$ 4,748,800
21,763,000
3,889,000
1,000,000
5,763,000
18,766,844
2,500,000
9,900,000
4,500,000
1,500,000
13,418,684
4,670,000
1,395,814
3,700,000
8,611,383
11,443,998
5,400,000
12,718,000
3,256,900
27,954,000
9,640,729
3,184,400
6,326,647
15,000,000
7,870,400
1,500,000


$ 3,085,718
5,337,115


182,592
2,240,157
15,529,405
784,654
6,241,754
315,127


1,242,006
458,096
1,017,605
1,410,727
7,587,900
5,706,008
2,956,682
10,860,163
1,672,069
1,091,565
1,259,565
416,456
3,075,820
1,153,649
463,601
573,588


$ 210,421,599 $ 74,662,022 $ 135,759,577


BR 101
BR 103
BR 104
BR 109
BR 112
BR 126
BR 127
BR 130
BR 131
BR 137
BR 142
BR 148
BR 149
BR 156
BR 159
BR 165
BR 166
BR 167
BR 168
BR 173
BR 177
BR 180
BR 182
BR 189
BR 191


1,663,082
16,425,885
3,889,000
817,408
3,522,843
3,237,439
1,715,346
3,658,246
4,184,873
1,500,000
12,176,678
4,211,904
378,209
2,289,273
1,023,483
5,737,990
2,443,318
1,857,837
1,584,831
26,862,435
8,381,164
2,767,944
3,250,827
13,846,351
7,406,799
926,412







0OE 0OTEFNNILSAEET


Total Budgeted


Total Actual


Requirement Collections


A. Educational and General
Student Tuition and Fees:
Matriculation
Out-of-State
Application
Late Registration
Total Student Tuition and Fees


$ 70,329,935
21,884,483
797,116
288,703
93,300,237


$ 72,694,139
22,725,996
871,741
486,883
96,778,759


Total Excess
(Deficit)



$ 2,364,204
841,513
74,625
198,180
3,478,522


Research Overhead

Other Revenues:
Library Fines
Miscellaneous
Total Other Revenues


Waivers Associated with 1999-2000 Veto
1999-2000 Corridor Adjustment
Library Resources
Redistribution of Student Fee Trust
Fund Authority within SUS
Prorate to Appropriation
Total for Educational and General

B. Special Units
Student Tuition and Fees:
Matriculation
Out-of-State
Total Student Tuition and Fees


651,391
246,875
2,894,661


64,449
(25,871)
$ 97,808,711


$ 9,746,238
354,555
10,100,793


(651,391)
(246,875)
(2,894,661)


(64,449)
25,871
$ 97,662,436 $ (146,275)


$ 9,670,857
203,708
9,874,565


$ (75,381)
(150,847)
(226,228)


Library Resources

Prorate to Appropriation

Redistribution of Student Fee Trust
Fund Authority within SUS


Total for Special Units $



revenues has been offset against total State appropriations re-
ported for the Unrestricted Current Funds. The revenue catego-
ries of the budgeted requirement and the actual collections are as
shown above in Table 9.

Student fees of $8,010,979 were collected prior to June 30, 2001,
for the 2001 summer semester, and were remitted to the State
Treasurer during fiscal year 2000-2001, but the appropriation
process considers these funds revenue of the 2001-2002 fiscal
year.


10,151,247 $ 9,874,565 $ (276,682)



Current Year (2000-2001) deficits were funded from cash on
hand in Student Fee Trust Funds at June 30, 2000.

In accordance with generally accepted accounting principles, stu-
dent tuition and fee revenues reported in the Unrestricted Cur-
rent Funds on the Statement of Current Funds Revenues, Expen-
ditures, and Other Changes have been adjusted to include the
value of tuition and fees waived. Also, instruction expenditures
reported have been increased to include $15,673,780 of graduate
student waivers; scholarship and fellowship expenditures reported
have been increased to include $7,392,788 of undergraduate
waivers (see Table 10).


434,746



196,288
45,935
242,223


434,746



211,629
237,302
448,931


15,341
191,367
206,708


53,275

(2,821)


(53,275)


2,821








II2000-I00


Fee
Matriculation
Out-of-State
Student Financial Aid
Activity and Service
Health
Building
Capital Improvement
Athletic
Housing
Material & Supply
Repeat Surcharge
Total


Amount Waived
$ 9,391,876
12,736,447
255,504
222,377
192,482
55,466
96,144
51,021
34,975
18,065
12,211
$ 23,066,568


Fee
Student Financial Aid
Activity and Service
Health
Women's Athletic
Athletic
Housing
Material & Supply
Late Payment and Registration
Total


Amount Collected
$ 6,153,969
9,311,221
8,042,056
1,711,340
611,445
910,074
878,900
486,189
$ 28,105,194


Table 11 shows student fees that were collected and retained by
the University.

In addition to the above, the following student fees were collected
and remitted directly to the State Treasurer on behalf of the Board
of Regents (see Table 12). Accordingly, these fees were recognized
as revenue by the Board of Regents and not the University. After


June 30, 2001, these fees will be remitted to the State Treasurer
on behalf of the Florida Board of Education (FBOE).

INSURANCE RISK EXPOSURE

Florida Administrative Code Chapter 6C-18.050(3) grants insti-
tutions of the State University System (SUS) ... authority to


Capital Improvement Fee
Building Fee (University
Capital Improvement)


Balance Due
to BOR
at 6/30/2000

$ 48,743


30,615
$ 79,358


Balance
Collected
2000-2001

3,000,745


1,943,132
4,943,877


Balance
Remitted
2000-2001

3,049,488


1,973,747
5,023,235


Accounts
Receivable
at 6/30/2001

$ 68,629


43,443
$ 112,072


.1I


Balance
Due to FBOE
at 6/30/2001

68,629


43,443
112,072







0OE 0OTEFNNILSAEET


purchase insurance as deemed necessary and appropriate for the
operation and educational mission of the institution. The SUS
institutions may also participate in insurance programs that are
provided by the State of Florida Department of Management
Services. Actions by the Legislature have resulted in the develop-
ment of State self-insurance funds providing hazard insurance for
property, and casualty insurance for State employees' workers'
compensation and employer's liability, federal civil rights liability
and employment discrimination, court awarded attorney fees,
fleet automotive liability and general liability. The University
participates in these programs. Property losses in excess of $2
million are commercially insured. Payments on tort claims are
limited to $100,000 per person and $200,000 per occurrence as
set by Chapter 768.28, Florida Statutes. Premiums are based on
reserve requirements of the program and are calculated on the
amount of risk exposure and past loss experience for each State
agency.


The J. Hillis Miller Health Center Self-Insurance Program and
the University of Florida J. Hillis Miller Health Center/Jackson-
ville Self-Insurance Program were established by the then Board
of Regents pursuant to the authority of Section 240.213, Florida
Statutes. The Self-Insurance Programs are used to account for a
program of general and professional liability protection for the
Florida Board of Education acting as the six health colleges of the
Health Science Center, including the Student Health Service
Auxiliary and the Veterinary Medical Teaching Hospital. Hospi-
tal professional liability protection is provided to Shands Teach-
ing Hospital and Clinics, Inc., Shands Jacksonville Medical Cen-
ter, Inc., the Shands community hospitals in Gainesville, Starke,
Lake City and Live Oak, and other Florida Board of Education
support corporations, which voluntarily participate in the Self-
Insurance Programs. The Health Science Center is protected for
losses, which are subject to Section 768.28, Florida Statutes,
including legislative claims bills, which in combination with the
waiver of immunity limits described in Section 768.28 do not
exceed $1 million per claim. The Self-Insurance Programs pro-
vide $2.5 million per-claim protection for the participants, which
are not subject to the provisions of Section 768.28. The Gainesville
Self-Insurance Program retains annual aggregate limits of liability
protection of $ 8.5 million and $9 million for Jacksonville.


Pursuant to the authority of Rule 6C-10.001(2), Florida Admin-
istrative Code, the University of Florida Self-Insurance Program
Councils have created the University of Florida Healthcare Edu-
cation Insurance Company (HEIC), a captive insurance company
which is wholly owned by the Florida Board of Education and
which is domiciled in the State of Vermont. HEIC is managed by
a Board of Directors created by the Florida Board of Education
for that purpose. HEIC provides $50,000,000 of per-claim and
annual aggregate claims coverage on a claims-made basis for
losses, which are in excess of the protections afforded by the Self-
Insurance Programs. The excess insurance is paid to claimants on
a first come-first serve basis. HEIC fully reinsures all risks under-
written. See Note 9.


CONTINGENT LIABILITIES


Pursuant to the complaint of a former University employee, the
U. S. Department of Justice investigated certain billing practices
and contractual relationships at the College of Medicine relating
to Medicare (HHS), Medicaid, Veterans Administration and
CHAMPUS health insurance programs. The parties settled the
case on August 8, 2001 with the payment by the Florida Clinical
Practice Association, Inc., on behalf of the Board of Regents, of
the sum of $8.6 million, to be satisfied over a period of years.

19. SUBSEQUENT EVENTS

Effective July 1, 2001, in accordance with the Education Gover-
nance Reorganization Implementation Act of 2001, the Governor
appointed for each university in the State University System a 12-
member board of trustees. In addition, a student body president
also serves as a voting member of the board of trustees. Trustees
are appointed for staggered 4-year terms and may be reappointed
for terms not to exceed 8 years of service.

The University of Florida Board of Trustees is a public body
corporate with all the powers of a body corporate. The board was
created to set policy for the university and serve as the institution's
legal owner and final authority. It must ensure the performance
of all duties assigned by law, the Florida Board of Education or
the Commissioner of Education.

The University of Florida
president serves as the ex-
ecutive officer and corpo-
rate secretary of the board
of trustees and is respon-
sible for all operations of
the university and for set-
ting the agenda for meet-
ings of the board in consul-
tation with the chair of the
board of trustees.








II2000-I00


Financial Summary of Current Programs
For the Year Ended June 30, 2001
(amounts expressed in thousands)


UNRESTRICTED


Revenues and Other Additions
Student Tuition and Fees $
Government Appropriations
State
Federal
Gifts, Grants, and Contracts:
Federal
Other Governmental
Private
Auxiliary Sales & Services Operations
Sales and Services of Educational Activities
Other Sources:
Investment Income
Other Income


151,247 $


335,170




11,879
5,103
65,531
16,506

10,856
1,802


- $ 151,247 $


200,952
11,991
24,884

9,749

3,691
680


335,170


200,952
23,870
29,987
65,531
26,255

14,547
2,482


9,874 $

99,813


72,840
14,925
19,410

9,435


859
5,031
5,524
18,462

5,443
117


- $ 9,874


99,813


72,840
15,784
24,441
5,524
27,897

5,443
117


Total Revenues and Other Additions

Expenditures and Other Deductions
Instruction
Research
Public Service
Academic Support
Student Services
Institutional Support
Operation and Maintenance of Plant
Scholarships/Fellowships
Auxiliary Expenditures
Resources Remitted to Other SUS
Universities/BOR
Total Expenditures and
Other Deductions

Transfers Among Funds
Mandatory
Nonmandatory
Refunded to Grantors
Primary Government from
Component Units

Total Transfers Among Funds


Net Increase/(Decrease) in
Fund Balance


598,094 $ 251,947 $ 850,041 $ 145,123 $ 116,610 $ 261,733


$ 213,360 $
36,868
4,486
67,099
21,070
37,134
53,185
14,795
63,482


5,674 $
79,882
2,285
2,621
2,368
113
174
155,911


219,034 $
116,750
6,771
69,720
23,438
37,247
53,359
170,706
63,482


$ 511,479 $ 249,028 $ 760,507 $ 291,207 $ 111,386 $ 402,593


$ (7,888) $
9,263
(55)

13,759

$ 15,079 $


$ 101,694 $


$ (7,888) $
3,313 12,576
(87) (142)

2,219 15,978


5,445 $


20,524 $


6,577 $ 100,148


8,364 $ 110,058 $ (52,513) $


EDUCATIONAL AND GENERAL FUNDS


RESTRICTED


TOTAL


UNRESTRICTED


HEALTH CENTER
RESTRICTED


TOTAL


159,866 $
27,480
44,817
20,414
1,449
23,969
20
286
12,906


25,638 $
65,503
18,562
191




1,492


185,504
92,983
63,379
20,605
1,449
23,969
20
1,778
12,906


,4'
(2,263)


95,834

93,571 $


(10,489)


17,066


(12,752)


112,900


11,801 $


(40,712)








II2000-I00


Financial Summary of Current Programs
For the Year Ended June 30, 2001
(amounts expressed in thousands)


UNRESTRICTED


Revenues and Other Additions
Student Tuition and Fees $
Government Appropriations
State
Federal
Gifts, Grants, and Contracts:
Federal
Other Governmental
Private
Auxiliary Sales & Services Operations
Sales and Services of Educational Activities
Other Sources:
Investment Income
Other Income


151,247 $


335,170




11,879
5,103
65,531
16,506

10,856
1,802


- $ 151,247 $


200,952
11,991
24,884

9,749

3,691
680


335,170


200,952
23,870
29,987
65,531
26,255

14,547
2,482


9,874 $

99,813


72,840
14,925
19,410

9,435


859
5,031
5,524
18,462

5,443
117


- $ 9,874


99,813


72,840
15,784
24,441
5,524
27,897

5,443
117


Total Revenues and Other Additions

Expenditures and Other Deductions
Instruction
Research
Public Service
Academic Support
Student Services
Institutional Support
Operation and Maintenance of Plant
Scholarships/Fellowships
Auxiliary Expenditures
Resources Remitted to Other SUS
Universities/BOR
Total Expenditures and
Other Deductions

Transfers Among Funds
Mandatory
Nonmandatory
Refunded to Grantors
Primary Government from
Component Units

Total Transfers Among Funds


Net Increase/(Decrease) in
Fund Balance


598,094 $ 251,947 $ 850,041 $ 145,123 $ 116,610 $ 261,733


$ 213,360 $
36,868
4,486
67,099
21,070
37,134
53,185
14,795
63,482


5,674 $
79,882
2,285
2,621
2,368
113
174
155,911


219,034 $
116,750
6,771
69,720
23,438
37,247
53,359
170,706
63,482


$ 511,479 $ 249,028 $ 760,507 $ 291,207 $ 111,386 $ 402,593


$ (7,888) $
9,263
(55)

13,759

$ 15,079 $


$ 101,694 $


$ (7,888) $
3,313 12,576
(87) (142)

2,219 15,978


5,445 $


20,524 $


6,577 $ 100,148


8,364 $ 110,058 $ (52,513) $


EDUCATIONAL AND GENERAL FUNDS


RESTRICTED


TOTAL


UNRESTRICTED


HEALTH CENTER
RESTRICTED


TOTAL


159,866 $
27,480
44,817
20,414
1,449
23,969
20
286
12,906


25,638 $
65,503
18,562
191




1,492


185,504
92,983
63,379
20,605
1,449
23,969
20
1,778
12,906


,4'
(2,263)


95,834

93,571 $


(10,489)


17,066


(12,752)


112,900


11,801 $


(40,712)







SUPLMNTR INFRMAIO


INSTITUTE OF FOOD AND AGRICULTURAL SCIENCES


UNRESTRICTED


RESTRICTED


TOTAL


TOTAL CURRENT PROGRAMS


UNRESTRICTED


RESTRICTED


- $ 161,121 $


114,385
7,326

17,706
15,748
21,313

2,775

949
2,539


549,368




22,545
12,419
71,055
36,885

16,424
4,458


- $ 161,121


7,326

291,498
32,857
63,322

20,042

4,515
680


549,368
7,326

291,498
55,402
75,741
71,055
56,927

20,939
5,138


$ 131,058 $



$ 20,360 $
75,734
29,120



8,119
12,005

98




$ 145,436 $



$ $
(151)


201 $


51,683 $ 182,741 $ 874,275 $ 420,240 $ 1,294,515


339 $
34,201
11,314
173

574
846


20,699 $
109,935
40,434
173

8,693
12,851

98


393,586 $
140,082
78,423
87,513
22,519
69,222
65,210
15,081
76,486


31,651 $
179,586
32,161
2,985
2,368
687
1,020
157,403


425,237
319,668
110,584
90,498
24,887
69,909
66,230
172,484
76,486


47,447 $ 192,883 $ 948,122 $ 407,861 $ 1,355,983


$
(4,739)
(5)

102

(4,642) $


(4,890)
(5)


$ (7,888) $
6,849
(55)


454 109,945


(4,441) $ 108,851 $


$ (7,888)
(11,915) (5,066)
(92) (147)


19,387


129,332


7,380 $ 116,231


(406) $ (14,583) $


TOTAL


114,385




9,807
2,285

1,917

125
2,539


7,326

17,706
5,941
19,028

858

824


$ (14,177) $


35,004 $


19,759 $


54,763








II2000-I00


Direct Support Organizations
For Fiscal Years Ended in 2000
(amounts expressed in thousands)


Assets
Current Assets $
Deferred Charges and Other Assets
Due from Primary Government/Component Units
Net Investment In Plant
Total Assets $


Liabilities
Current Liabilities $
Due to Primary Government/Component Units
Long-Term Liabilities
Total Liabilities $


Total Fund Balances $


Total Liabilities and Fund Balances $


Revenues and Other Additions
Fees, Dues and Charges $
Grants, Contributions and Donations
Sales of Goods and Services
Investment Income
Other
Total Revenues and Other Additions $


Total Expenditures and Other Deductions $


Transfers Between Primary Government
and Component Units $


Net Increase (Decrease) $


Fund Balances at Beginning of Year $


Fund Balance Adjustments $


Fund Balances at End of Year $


University
of Florida
Foundation
6/30/2000


952,505 $
586


33,255
986,346 $




3,419 $
46,220
36,487
86,126 $


900,220 $


986,346 $


112,364


100,476
5,926
218,766 $


46,083 $




(16,055)$


156,628 $


743,592 $


$


900,220 $


University
of Florida
Athletic
Association
6/30/2000


53,897 $
2,233
3,803
55,011
114,944 $




38,634 $


28,400
67,034 $


47,910 $


114,944 $


4,028
28,934
1,942
4,742
39,646


45,585




9,162


3,223


44,687





47,910


Gator
Boosters
6/30/2000


2,261 $
373
24,284
66
26,984 $




1,878 $
1,964


3,842 $


23,142 $


26,984 $



$
16,636


986


17,622 $


1,926 $




(14,920) $


776 $


22,366 $




23,142 $
23,142 $


University
of Florida
Research
Foundation
6/30/2000


35,441 $


50,173


85,614 $




29,715 $
7,180


36,895 $


48,719 $


85,614 $




1,012 $
32,129


13,697
25,465
72,303 $


39,146 $


(15,333)


17,824


30,895





48,719


University
of Florida
Law Center
Association
6/30/2000


620


4,992


5,612




3,103




3,103


2,509


5,612





519


205
67
791


880


(89)


2,598





2,509


Florida
Foundation
Seed
Producers
6/30/2000


$ 1,936
28


1,291
$ 3,255



$ 53
534


$ 587


$ 2,668


$ 3,255


23


500
49
613
1,185


898


(513)


(226)


2,894





2,668







SUPLMNTR INFRMAIO


Florida A
4-H Club B
Foundation
3/31/2000


$ 879 $
5
2,223


$ 3,107 $



$ 903 $


903


2,204


3,107


Florida Southwest
association of Florida Research
asic Medical & Education
Scientists Foundation
6/30/2000 6/30/2000


22 $





22 $


10 $



73
83 $


Citrus
Research &
Education
Foundation
6/30/2000


105 $





105 $


University
of Florida
Tissue Bank
6/30/2000


7,026
21


134
7,181


$ 1,655 $


49
$ 1,704 $


$ 5,477 $


$ 7,181 $


Florida Tre
Leadership & A
Education
Foundation F
12/31/2000


$ 486 $
14
1,201
14
$ 1,715 $


asure Coast
agricultural
Research
foundation
6/30/2000


257 $


257


1,458


1,715


$ 831 $
194
23
125
20
$ 1,193 $


$ 1,070 $


1 $
22
8


5 $


38


(18)


105


2,099





2,204


7,609
4


7,613


5,734


1,879


3,598





5,477


$ 1,037 $
229


52


$ 1,318 $


$ 1,173 $


(74) $


71 $


1,387 $



1,458 $
1,458 $


4 $


17
2
1
24 $


38 $




$


(14)$


76 $



6-$
62 $


-$ 2,913
166,121
37,129
117,538
1,097 37,931
1,097 $ 361,632


2,411 $ 144,992




1,314 $ (36,437)


-$ 180,203


-$ 854,376





$ 1,034,579
$ 1,034,579


University
of Florida
Alumni
Association
6/30/2000


59 $



8
67 $


Total


$ 1,055,247
3,260
86,676
89,852
$ 1,235,035




$ 79,622
55,898
64,936
$ 200,456


$ 1,034,579


$ 1,235,035








II2000-I00


UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA

Financial Aid Administered
For the Year Ended June 30, 2001


Federal Programs
Pell Grants
Supplemental Educational Opportunity Grants
Perkins Student Loans
Health Professions Student Loans
Direct Loans
Total Federal Financial Aid Administered

State Programs
Loans:
University of Florida Short Term Loans
Student Aid For Education (SAFE) Loans
University of Florida Long Term Loans
Total Loans Administered
Scholarships and Grants:
Racing Scholarships
State of Florida Financial Aid Programs
Lottery Trust Grants
Total Scholarships and Grants Administered
Total State Financial Aid Administered

Other Scholarships and Grants
Institutional Grants:
College Awarded Scholarships
Graduate Need-Based Scholarship Waivers
Graduate Tuition Remission Waivers
General Scholarships
Total Institutional Grants
Custodial Scholarships:
Tuition, Trusts, Clubs, Service Organizations, etc.
Total Other Scholarships and Grants

Fee Waivers
Non-Resident Tuition Waivers
Other Waivers
Total Fee Waivers Administered


7,322
2,252
1,612
69
19,356
30,611




863
120
596
1,579

483
28,673
719
29,875
31,454




10,062
17
9,094
4,236
23,409

4,010
27,419



4,772
10,798
15,570


$ 15,174,049
2,238,672
3,692,893
289,750
116,600,650
$ 137,996,014




$ 697,457
169,061
668,719
$ 1,535,237

$ 228,686
49,016,378
1,415,459
50,660,523
$ 52,195,760




$ 20,914,676
24,693
7,015,490
7,443,656
$ 35,398,515


6,095,437
41,493,952


$ 11,993,843
11,072,724
$ 23,066,567

$ 254,752,293


Total Financial Aid Administered


Number of
Recipients


Aid
Disbursed






















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