• TABLE OF CONTENTS
HIDE
 Front Cover
 Front Matter
 Table of Contents
 A message from the president
 Introduction from the interim vice...
 University of Florida overview
 Financial statements
 Supplementary information
 Financial aid administered
 Back Matter
 Back Cover






Group Title: University of Florida Annual Financial Report. 2000-2001.
Title: University of Florida Annual Financial Report
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Full Citation
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00072278/00001
 Material Information
Title: University of Florida Annual Financial Report
Series Title: University of Florida Annual Financial Report. 1999-2000.
Physical Description: Serial
Language: English
Creator: Finance and Accounting Division, University of Florida
Affiliation: University of Florida -- Office of Administrative Affairs -- Finance and Accounting Division
Publisher: Office of Administrative Affairs, University of Florida
Publication Date: 2000
 Subjects
Subject: University of Florida.   ( lcsh )
Spatial Coverage: North America -- United States of America -- Florida
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00072278
Volume ID: VID00001
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: George A. Smathers Libraries, University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved, Board of Trustees of the University of Florida

Table of Contents
    Front Cover
        Front cover
    Front Matter
        Front matter
    Table of Contents
        Page 1
    A message from the president
        Page 2
    Introduction from the interim vice president of administrative affairs
        Page 3
    University of Florida overview
        Page 4
        Mission
            Page 4
        History
            Page 5
        Facilitites
            Page 6
            Page 7
            Page 8
        Programs
            Page 9
        Students
            Page 9
            Page 10
        Faculty
            Page 11
        Sports and recreational activities
            Page 12
        An excellent value
            Page 13
    Financial statements
        Page 14
        Page 15
        Combined balance sheet
            Page 16
            Page 17
        Combined statement of changes in fund revenue
            Page 18
            Page 19
        Statements of current fund revenues, expenditures, and other changes
            Page 20
        Summary of significant accounting policies
            Page 21
            Page 22
            Page 23
        Notes to the financial statements
            Page 24
            Page 25
            Page 26
            Page 27
            Page 28
            Page 29
            Page 30
            Page 31
            Page 32
            Page 33
            Page 34
            Page 35
    Supplementary information
        Page 36
        Financial summary of current programs
            Page 36
            Page 37
        Direct support organizations
            Page 38
            Page 39
    Financial aid administered
        Page 40
    Back Matter
        Back matter
    Back Cover
        Back cover
Full Text







































































Y












The Board of Regents and Chancellor


Thomas F. Petway, III
Chairman
Jacksonville

Gwendolyn F. McLin
Vice Chairman
Okahumpka


James D. Corbin
Chattahoochee


James F. Heekin, Jr.
Orlando


Adolfo Henriques
Miami


Philip D. Lewis
Riviera Beach


Charlton B. Daniel, Jr.
Gainesville


Tom Gallagher
Commissioner ofEducation
Tallahassee


Elizabeth G. Lindsay
Sarasota


J. Collier Merrill
Pensacola


Jon C. Moyle
West Palm Beach


Steven J. Uhlfelder
Tallahassee


Welcom H. Watson
Fort Lauderdale


Natalie Copeland
Student Regent
Tampa


Adam Herbert
Chancellor


Executive Officers


Charles E. Young
President


David R. Colburn
Provost and Vice President
for Academic Affairs


Kenneth I. Berns
Vice President
for Health Affairs


Paul A. Robell
Vice President for Development
and Alumni Affairs


James E. Scott
Vice President for
Student Affairs


Gail F. Baker
Vice President for
Public Relations


Ed Poppell
Interim Vice President for
Administrative Affairs


Winfred M. Phillips
Vice President for Research
and Dean of the Graduate School


Michael V. Martin
Vice President for
Agriculture and Natural Resources


Principal Finance and Accounting Officials


John P. Kruczek
University Controller


Bonnie Cauthon
Associate Controller for General
Accounting, Property, PIajyoll, Tax,
and Disbursement Services

Kathy W. Jones
Associate Controller for Contract
and Grant Accounting Services


Stuart E. Hoskins
Associate Controller for University
Financial Services, Accounting Controls,
Construction Accounting, and Insurance










1999-2000


ANNUAL


FINANCIAL


REPORT


.UNIVERSITY OF
' FLORIDA








Table of Contents

A Message from the President 2
Introduction from the Vice President for Administrative Affairs 3
University of Florida Overview 4
Mission, History and Facilities
Programs, Students and Faculty
Sports and Recreational Activities
An Excellent Value
Financial Statements 16
Combined Balance Sheet
Combined Statement of Changes in Fund Balances
Statement of Current Funds Revenues, Expenditures,
and Other Changes
Summary of Significant Accounting Policies
Notes to the Financial Statements
Supplementary Information 36
Financial Summary of Current Programs
Direct Support Organizations
Financial Aid Administered















A Message from the President

Having completed the finest decade of performance in its history, the University of Florida is well
positioned to become one of the elite centers of excellence in higher education.

The tally of recent achievements is impressive. The university has raised more than $750 million
during our five-year capital campaign. This speaks well of our reputation and the generosity of our
supporters.

To a great degree, that support is in recognition of this institution's incredible achievements. The
University of Florida has made great strides on all academic fronts. Adding to our world-class Brain and
Genetics Institutes is the new multi-disciplinary UF Institute on Aging. UF hosts the Center for
Accounting and Research and the William and Grace Dial Center for Written and Oral Communica-
tion among an impressive list of research institutes.

The move towards interdisciplinary studies and research brings exciting synergistic possibilities to our
traditional programs. The Genetics Institute alone combines research from programs campuswide,
including medicine, pharmacy, veterinary medicine, agricultural sciences, and liberal arts and sciences. Innovation and productivity are
greatly enhanced through these joint endeavors as evidenced by the significant number of research findings published in scientific journals and
covered by the national news media.

These results stem from a desire to meet global needs through research, an enterprise supported by more than $315 million last year. The
competition for research dollars is intense, and through our success we are able to continually improve our reputation and attract exceptional
scholars of world-class accomplishment.

Our incoming student population reflects the standout quality of a University of Florida education. The 2000 freshman class entered the
university with a 3.9 grade point average and midpoint SAT scores nearly 75 points higher than in 1989. And the vast majority of students who
enroll at the UF will return, earning the university a superb freshman retention rate of better than 90 percent. There are many reasons for this
retention, including a curriculum that provides students with an impressive array of more than 5,500 academic courses in over 300
undergraduate and graduate degree programs. The students also enjoy a complete slate of intramural and club sports, an extensive and diverse
choice of student organizations, and the rich cultural programs of the Samuel P. Harn Museum of Art, the Florida Museum of Natural History
and the Phillips Center for the Performing Arts.

The University of Florida also takes great pride in the achievements of our student athletes. Our athletic program has earned its ninth
consecutive SEC All Sport Trophy, presented to the institution achieving the best sports accomplishments in both men and women conference
athletics. Further, the University of Florida has earned a Top 10 ranking in the Sears Trophy for top men's and women's varsity sports in the
nation for each of the last 17 years, being one of only two universities so recognized.

The strength of our academic programs, the expertise of our staff, the quality of our students and the pride and support of our alumni and
friends have brought us to this historic point of success and will carry us beyond.







Charles E. Young
President














Introduction from the Interim Vice President of Administrative Affairs

I am pleased to present to you the 1999-2000 Annual Financial Report of the
University of Florida, including the general-purpose financial statements for the fiscal year
ended June 30, 2000. The financial statements are prepared in accordance with generally
accepted accounting principles. The information in the 1999-2000 Annual Financial
Report is intended to provide a broad understanding of the University's core mission and
to present fairly its financial position and activities. I hope that it will provide a useful
Measure of accountability and stewardship to all who have an interest in the University of
Florida.

Financial highlights for fiscal year 1999-2000 include a $53.7 million increase in
current funds revenues to $1.2 billion, a five percent increase from the prior year.
Significant components of this increase include a $10.4 million, or eighteen percent,
growth in private contracts and grants, a $27.0 million, or five percent, increase in state
I appropriations and a $12.3 million, or ten percent, growth in total student tuition and
fees. These increases are indicative of the University's strong growth in sponsored research
and of a continuing growth in student enrollment. During 1999-2000, total current funds expenditures and mandatory
transfers rose by $78.0 million to $1.3 billion, a six percent increase from the prior year.

Service to our students is the core of our mission. During 1999-2000 the University administered $241.7 million of
financial aid to its students. This total was comprised of federal and state programs for loans, scholarships and grants,
institutional scholarships and grants, custodial scholarships and fee waivers. Federal programs such as the William D. Ford
Federal Direct Loan, the Perkins Loan, and the Health Professions Student Loan Programs funded approximately ninety-two
percent of the 23,009 student loans, totaling $123.8 million. Scholarships and grants totaled $97.7 million. Institutional
grants of $33.1 million were disbursed to 21,857 students and custodial scholarships of $5.2 million were disbursed to 3,332
students. Fee waivers totaling $20.3 million were provided to 14,652 students.

This year's completion of the Baughman Meditation Center provides the campus with a serene and beautiful facility,
carefully integrated with the natural environment at the edge of Lake Alice. Also during the past fiscal year, the university has
continued its efforts to remodel and upgrade classrooms and laboratories. In addition, the university is devoting significant
resources to the restoration of its historic buildings, restoring them to their original beauty and usefulness.

In Administrative Affairs, we are committed to fiscal accountability, a safe and secure campus, and quality facilities.
Through the performance of our talented staff, re-invention of our systems and the formation of partnerships, our goal to
provide the highest level of services to the University of Florida is being aggressively pursued.










Ed Poppell
Interim Vice President for Administrative Affairs











University of Florida Overview


At the dawning of a new age in information access, when

the data of much of human existence seemingly is at the

fingertip, the need for great centers of thought to

convert information into knowledge is as critical as

during any time of our past. With information

dissemination rapidly decentralizing, the academic

community faces ever-increasing challenges to meet

its social mandate to ensure such information

receives stringent assessment so as

to advance further inquiry into

the understanding of our

universe. Uniquely qualified to meet

those challenges stands the University

of Florida.


Mission
The University of Florida acutely
recognizes the central role of higher
education within the social fabric.
While all educational institutions
must shoulder significant social
responsibilities fulfilling that role, the
University of Florida appreciates that
it holds a particularly distinctive
obligation as its state's flagship


university. Particularly in a time of
fantastic technological change, the
university continues to resolutely
accept the duties of leadership.
The University of Florida is a
public, land-grant research university.
Today, it is one of the most compre-
hensive institutions of higher educa-
tion in the United States, encompass-
ing an impressive array of academic











University of Florida Overview


At the dawning of a new age in information access, when

the data of much of human existence seemingly is at the

fingertip, the need for great centers of thought to

convert information into knowledge is as critical as

during any time of our past. With information

dissemination rapidly decentralizing, the academic

community faces ever-increasing challenges to meet

its social mandate to ensure such information

receives stringent assessment so as

to advance further inquiry into

the understanding of our

universe. Uniquely qualified to meet

those challenges stands the University

of Florida.


Mission
The University of Florida acutely
recognizes the central role of higher
education within the social fabric.
While all educational institutions
must shoulder significant social
responsibilities fulfilling that role, the
University of Florida appreciates that
it holds a particularly distinctive
obligation as its state's flagship


university. Particularly in a time of
fantastic technological change, the
university continues to resolutely
accept the duties of leadership.
The University of Florida is a
public, land-grant research university.
Today, it is one of the most compre-
hensive institutions of higher educa-
tion in the United States, encompass-
ing an impressive array of academic











and professional disciplines. The
oldest and largest of Florida's public
universities, the University of Florida
is a member of the prestigious
Association of American Universities -
(AAU). Its faculty and staff are
dedicated to the common pursuit of
the university's threefold mission:
education, research and public
service.
Teaching the undergraduate and mission to lead and serve the needs of
graduate through the doctorate level the nation, all of Florida's residents,
is the fundamental purpose of the as well as the public and private
university. Research and scholarship educational system of Florida.
are integral to the education process
and to unlocking the secrets of the History
natural world, the mind and the Florida's oldest university, the
senses. The term, "public service," University of Florida traces its
addresses the university's obligation beginnings to 1853 when the state-
to share the benefits of its knowledge funded East Florida Seminary
in the public's interest. These three acquired the private Kingsbury
interlocking elements span all of the Academy in Ocala. After the Civil
University of Florida's academic War, the seminary was moved to
disciplines and multidisciplinary Gainesville. It was consolidated with
centers, and represent the university's the state's land grant Florida Agricul- *.
tural College, then in Lake City, to
become the University of Florida.
The university opened in 1906 with
an initial enrollment of 102 male
students. Until 1947, the
University of Florida was for
men only and one of only
three state universities.
Others were Florida State
College for Women (now
Florida State University) and
Florida A&M. In 1947, the
university of Florida student
body numbered 8,177 men and 601
women. Today, in terms of enroll-
ment, the University is among the 10
largest universities in the nation, with













an enrollment of more than 44,000
students, divided almost equally
between female and male students.


Facilities
On 2,000 acres, most of it within
the limits of a 100,000-population
urban area, the University of Florida
operates out of more than 900
buildings, more than 160 of them
with classrooms and laboratories.


UF's facilities have a book value of
more than $800 million, with a
replacement value of approximately
$2.1 billion. The northeastern area of
the campus is listed as a Historic
District on the National Register of
Historic Places. The 23 single-
student residence areas house some
7,000 students and five family
housing villages house more than
2,200 married students.


1999 1998 1997 1996 1995
Accounting 875 887 974 945 623
Agriculture and Life Sciences 3,776 3,799 3,808 3,343 2,562
Building Construction 520 535 550 465 369
Business Administration 5,631 5,074 4,632 3,667 2,820
Dentistry 378 373 372 362 348
Design, Construction and Planning 1.019 934 950 994 810
Division of Continuing Education* 368 382 460 579 722
Education 1,897 1,996 2,006 1,878 1,663
Engineering 5,915 5,775 5,594 5,323 4,236
Fine Arts 1,079 1,071 958 927 658
Forest Resources and Conservation 129 135 120 143 254
Health and Human Performance 1,889 1,858 1,870 1,600 1,192
Health Professions 1,181 1,062 971 868 493
High School 13 12 7 25 21
Journalism and Communications 3,063 3,005 2,844 2,481 1,709
Law 1,270 1,319 1,313 1,288 1,261
Liberal Arts and Sciences 11,942 11,992 11,804 12,658 17,776
Medicine 673 657 641 640 668
Natural Resources and Environment 190 158 166 131 30
Nursing 894 894 875 897 765
Pharmacy 289 321 381 680 496
Pharmacy Doctor 787 596 281
Physician Assistant Program 117 116 117 116 115
Veterinary Medicine 381 376 359 362 360
Total 44,276 43,327 42,053 40,372 39,951


*Includes Continuing Education and correspondence students not enrolled in a college.
























TIa, 2I IN I -S A H El R LL IBCO I .












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II' l I H Irl ril -l' 0 ) Iurii I1.
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"ii li ii I : .ii :i I Id iI i ,|





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-1 1I.5 I f i n

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Tal i DEG.i REES AWADE BY :GE l LEi..VEL






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:lil 141 II I I "

~llj~~ii I I~ij ,


Bachelors

Masters

Engineer

Specialist in Education

Doctor of Philosophy

Juris Doctor

Doctor of Dental Medicine

Doctor of Medicine

Doctor of Pharmacy

Doctor of Veterinary Medicine

Doctor of Education


1999-00 1998-99 1997-98 1996-97 1995-96

7,655 7,430 6,654 6,676 6,097

2,224 2,113 1,940 1,711 1,826

2 3

73 49

516 445 456 406 419

381 412 381 375 366

79 78 78 70 77

115 117 117 114 118

169 106 119 90 64

80 78 76 77 78

37 15












UF Sponsored Research
Funding Federal and
Non-Federal Sources
In Millions



4.l A


UF Technology Transfer
Income FY 1988-2000
In Millions





wll
I ll


The Florida Museum of Natural
History is the largest natural history/
anthropology museum in the
Southeast, and among the top 10 in
the nation. Its natural science
collections contain more than 10
million specimens. The Samuel P.
Harn Museum of Art, with more
than 26,000 square feet of exhibit
space, is one of the largest museums
in the region. In 1999, the Harn
Museum acquired an important
work by the 19th century French
Impressionist Claude Monet.
Acquisition of the 1890 painting,
titled the Champ d'avoine, was made
possible through a generous gift to
the university. Recently, the Harn
Museum received a $3.2 million
gift, which is eligible for state
matching funds, to construct a
20,000-square-foot sculpture
atrium. The Center for Performing
Arts attracts world-class symphony
orchestras, Broadway plays, operas,
and large-scale ballet productions to
Gainesville,
and the
2000-2001
season of
perfor-
mances
promises to
be the best
yet.
During
2000, the
University
of Florida
opened the $1.58 million
Baughman Center, a serene facility


designed to provide an intimate
setting for musical recitals, seminars,
and meditative and contemplative
uses. A $10.3 million two-phase


renovation program is underway to
expand and modernize Rhines Hall,
providing 40,000 square feet of new
labs and offices.
Other notable facilities include the
world's largest citrus research center,
the University Art Gallery, a labora-
tory capable of producing near zero
degrees Kelvin the coldest tem-
perature in the universe, a world class
brain institute, an engineering
research center for particle science
and technology, a 100-kilowatt
training and research reactor, the
second largest academic computing
center in the South, one of the
nation's few self-contained intensive
care hyperbaric chambers, a public
television and radio station, and two
commercial radio stations. The
university's Institute of Food and
Agricultural Sciences is an extensive
operation with facilities throughout
Florida. Last year, a $12.1 million
project consolidated three IFAS
facilities into a new building in
Apopka, Florida. The building
consists of 40,000 square feet of labs







m -



and offices, 11, 000 square feet of but a few U.S. universities. The
teaching spaces, and 115,000 square University of Florida is a doctoral/
feet of greenhouse and other environ- research extensive institution as
mental space. Approximately $2.95 categorized by the Carnegie Founda-
million was spent to totally renovate tion. It has 23 colleges and schools
the university's Aquatic Food Prod- and more than 100 research, service
ucts Pilot Plant Facility. and education centers, bureaus and
The University Libraries consist of institutes. These bring together
the main research library and six faculty and student scholars from
branch libraries throughout campus, various academic programs to pro-
along with the Health Science Center vide research and development
Library and the Legal Information services in all areas of state interest.
Center. They form the largest More than 100 undergraduate majors
information resource system in the are offered. More than 1,900 fresh-
state, containing more than 3 million men and sophomores partici-
volumes within its 10 million docu- pate in the honors program,
ment holdings. Library collections are which offers 90-100 honors
accessed through the computerized courses per semester. The
LUIS online system. graduate school coordinates
almost 200 graduate programs.
Programs Professional degree programs
One of only 17 public land-grant include those offered in
universities in the esteemed higher dentistry, law, medicine, pharmacy
education organization, the AAU, the and veterinary medicine. As Florida's
University of Florida offers more land-grant university, UF has a -
programs on a single campus than all distinguished record of developing
Florida agriculture into a national -- -
leader through research and extension
m services, stretching the influence of
the university into every county of
the state and beyond.

Students
Enrollment for fall semester 1999
totaled 44,276 students, including
36,049 in-state students representing
all Florida counties with approxi-
mately 2,000 international students
representing over 100 countries, with
the remainder representing all 49 of
the other states, the District of







m -



and offices, 11, 000 square feet of but a few U.S. universities. The
teaching spaces, and 115,000 square University of Florida is a doctoral/
feet of greenhouse and other environ- research extensive institution as
mental space. Approximately $2.95 categorized by the Carnegie Founda-
million was spent to totally renovate tion. It has 23 colleges and schools
the university's Aquatic Food Prod- and more than 100 research, service
ucts Pilot Plant Facility. and education centers, bureaus and
The University Libraries consist of institutes. These bring together
the main research library and six faculty and student scholars from
branch libraries throughout campus, various academic programs to pro-
along with the Health Science Center vide research and development
Library and the Legal Information services in all areas of state interest.
Center. They form the largest More than 100 undergraduate majors
information resource system in the are offered. More than 1,900 fresh-
state, containing more than 3 million men and sophomores partici-
volumes within its 10 million docu- pate in the honors program,
ment holdings. Library collections are which offers 90-100 honors
accessed through the computerized courses per semester. The
LUIS online system. graduate school coordinates
almost 200 graduate programs.
Programs Professional degree programs
One of only 17 public land-grant include those offered in
universities in the esteemed higher dentistry, law, medicine, pharmacy
education organization, the AAU, the and veterinary medicine. As Florida's
University of Florida offers more land-grant university, UF has a -
programs on a single campus than all distinguished record of developing
Florida agriculture into a national -- -
leader through research and extension
m services, stretching the influence of
the university into every county of
the state and beyond.

Students
Enrollment for fall semester 1999
totaled 44,276 students, including
36,049 in-state students representing
all Florida counties with approxi-
mately 2,000 international students
representing over 100 countries, with
the remainder representing all 49 of
the other states, the District of













Research Awards by Sponsor FY 1999-2000
In Millions


$46.5M
$46.5M\/ A


" ar -
$48.0M





$60.3M


Columbia, Puerto Rico, and the
Virgin Islands. The ratio of women
to men is currently 51:49. Seventy-
five percent of enrolled students are
undergraduates, 18 percent are
graduate students and 7 percent are
in professional degree
programs (including
dentistry, law, medicine,
pharmacy and veterinary
medicine). Approxi-
mately 22 percent of the
UF student body mem-
A bers are minorities, with
6.5 percent of the
student population
consisting of African-
American students, 9.4
percent Hispanic stu-
dents, and 6.0 percent
Asian-American or
Pacific Islander students.
University of Florida students are
among the best in the nation. Ap-
proximately 90 percent of all entering


$175.1M


Federal Awards
by Agency
NIH 69.7
NSF 20.7
USDA 13.3
DOD 12.1
Education 9.0
HRS Administration 8.9
Energy 7.9
Veteran's Affairs 5.5
DOT 5.2
Commerce 4.6
EPA 4.0
NASA 3.5
Other Federal 3.3
Other HHS 2.7
US AID 2.4
Dept. of Labor 1.3
HHS 1.0
Total 175.1M


freshmen score above the national
average on standardized college
entrance exams taken by college-
bound students. The University of
Florida ranks fifth in the nation
among public universities and
seventh among all universities in the
number of freshmen National Merit
Scholars in attendance. Florida also
ranks second among all public
universities and fifth among all
institutions in the number of Na-
tional Achievement Scholars in
attendance. Aiding student develop-
ment, UF has invested more than $7
million in campus computing
infrastructure and $9 million in
classroom renovations and technol-
ogy upgrades in the last three years to
meet the needs of modern education
in an age of rapidly changing tech-
nology. Further, UF's freshmen
retention rate of 91 percent speaks to
the outstanding quality of the
university's entire academic experi-




-*S






ence, from Faculty
counseling A distinguished faculty of more
to online than 4,000 attracted $339.4 million -
programs to in research and training grants in
aid self- 1999-2000. The University of
tracking of Florida now has 54 Eminent Scholar -.- .
academic Chairs. More than two-dozen faculty
progress members have been selected to the
and class National Academies of Science and/ 1
registration. or Engineering, the Institute of 1
In Medicine or a counterpart in another A
addition to nation. Also, in a national ranking of mI
being academically motivated, total Fulbright awards as of 1999, the
students lead a rich social and extra- University of Florida stands ninth
curricular life. They belong to more among all public universities, with 15
than 450 student organizations on of these arts and humanities awards. .,
campus, attend more than 2,000 The University of Florida has been
campus concerts, art exhibits and awarded national scientific centers to
theatrical productions, guest lectures, include the McKnight Brain Institute *
sports contests, and other events a for the study of neurological disease; -.
year. UF students participate in an the Engineering Research Center for
average of two out-of-class seminars Particle Science; and the National
and lectures a day, and enjoy a variety High Magnetic Field Laboratory in
of outdoor activities throughout the Tallahassee under the auspices of the .
year. University of Florida, Florida State



*I -. --.0Jfl .







.,, ,,iIt












University and Los Alamos National
Laboratory.
A small sampling of honored
faculty includes: Pulitzer Prize-
winners in editorial writing and
poetry; a recognized pioneer in
aviation engineering; a leading
scholar on econometrics; three
winners of NASA's top award for
research; one of the four charter
members of the Solar Hall of Fame;
and a winner of the Smithsonian
Institution's award for conservation.
In all, UF ranks fifth among AAU-
member public universities in patents
awarded.

Sports and Recreational Activities
The University of Florida has
enjoyed significant success with its
varsity sports program with a thrilling
run through the 2000 NCAA men's
basketball tournament to the champi-
onship game being the highlight of
another
successful
year. The
university has
made a
strong
commitment
to support
each varsity
sport it fields
and to
provide
exciting
athletic competition for fans and
student-athletes alike. In 1999-2000,
for the ninth consecutive year, the
University of Florida earned the SEC


All Sports trophy, currently awarded
by The New York Times Regional
Newspaper Group, and presented to
the student-athlete program that has
achieved overall conference excellence
in both men's and women's sports.
Providing such effective management
of the university's sports program is
the University Athletic Association, a
direct support organization serving as
one of several component units of the
university.
Aside from varsity sports, Univer-
sity of Florida students, faculty and
staff enjoy first-class recreational
facilities located at convenient spots
on the campus, with numerous
recreational and fitness programs
offered. The Stephen C. O'Connell
Center and the J. Wayne Reitz
Union provide space for a myriad of
activities. A thousand people can
participate simultaneously in eight
different recreational activities in the


pJf













O'Connell Center, which seats $1.48 million for recreational fields
12,000 for concerts and other events. and support building space. The
The O'Connell Center also is home university also offers a wide variety of ... -
to the Gator intramural sports
basketball, volley- and hosts 40 sports
ball, swimming clubs, from Aikido
and gymnastics to water skiing and
teams. More than wheelchair basket- .
25,000 use the ball.
Reitz Union daily Open spaces,
for dining, meet- small ponds, picnic
ing, bowling, pool areas, shady nooks,
and other table and even an 81- I -.
games, arts and acre wildlife
crafts, music sanctuary and lake
listening, televi- on campus provide *-
sion viewing, hotel accommodations venues to enjoy Florida's year-round -. .. 1 ,
and more. The Student Recreation outdoor life.
and Fitness Center was the first -
facility dedicated to recreation at the An Excellent Value - '
university when it opened in 1991, The University of Florida has .
and now offers more than 100 fitness earned a national reputation for
classes per week. The Southwest being an excellent value. UF ranked I-
Recreational Center is a 64,000- 10th in Money magazine's 1998 *
square-foot facility located on the College Guide, which described UF's - *.
corner of a 26-acre site that features program as among "the elite values in -
lighted outdoor basketball courts, college education today." Kiplinger's
tennis courts and a tournament-grade Personal Finance magazine in !
four-field softball complex. Additions September 1998 ranked UF fifth in -.
to the recreation complex included its "Top 100 Values in State ..


UF Foundation Total Assets UF Foundation Endowment Assets *
In Millions In Millions
$1000 $700
$900 $600. -. -

$700 $500 r
$600 $400-
$5$400 i
$4 $300

$2 -. ,- |

FY'FY'FYFY'FY'FY'FY'FY'FY'FY'FY'FY'FY'FY'FY'FY'FY'FY'FY'FY'FY FY FY FY FY FY FY FY FY FY FY FY FY FY FY FY FY FY FY FY FY FYm
80 81 82 83 84 85 86 87 88 89 90 91 92 9394 95 96979899 00 8081828384 85 868788899091 92 93 94 95 9697989900
Fiscal Year Fiscal Year














Revenues and Expenditures of Current Operating Funds
Year ended June 30, 2000


Current Funds Revenues


State Appropriations
40% Legislative appropriations from the State of Florida providing
general revenues for current operations of the University.

Gifts, Grant and Contracts
29% Educational, research and public service agreements of
government agencies and private gifts, grants and contracts.
Student Tuition and Fees
10% Revenues from tuition and fees assessed against students for
educational purposes.
Auxiliary Enterprises
7% Revenues of self-supporting enterprises providing facilities and
services for students, faculty and staff.
Other Sources
5% Includes endowment income, sales and service of educational
activities and other miscellaneous revenues.
Federal Appropriations
1% Appropriations received from the Federal government used
primarily by the Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences.
Transfers of Primary Government
to/from Component Units
8% Represents net amount of operating transfers received by the
university from its nearly 30 affiliated component units.
100% Total Current Funds Revenues


I. a L M ir
* = ** "n ail -


Transfers of Primary
Government to/from
Component Units

Wm r-mE m s


a0 ...


Current Fund Expenditures


Instruction
30% Expenditures associated with credit and non-credit courses for
academic, occupational and vocational instruction for all
semester and continuing education.
Research
22% Expenditures associated with activities specifically organized to
produce research outcomes.
Public Services
8% Expenditures associated with non-instructional services
beneficial to individuals and groups external to the institution.
Auxiliary Enterprises
7% Expenditures of self-supporting enterprises that furnish services
to students and employees for a fee related to the cost of the
service.
Academic Support
7% Expenditures for support services for the University's primary
mission instruction, research and public service; includes
libraries, museums, and academic administration.
Institutional Support
6% Expenditures of financial operations, executive management,
personnel services, administrative computing support and
security.
Operation & Maintenance of Plant
5% Expenditures for building and grounds maintenance, fire and
property insurance, utilities and general services.
Scholarships and Fellowships
13% Expenditures for scholarships and fellowships in the form of
outright grants to students selected by the institutions and
financed in the form of current funds, restricted and unrestricted.
Student Services
2% Expenditures for offices of admissions and the registrar and for
activities with the primary purpose of contributing to students'
emotional and physical well-being.
100% Total Current Funds Expenditures


an a am n 4A.


' | I is r
t ..M r ...



3r 1 *-V ^
Ner



r-. I -"rpwl


=-.1










Universities." The U.S. News and
World Report rated UF
eighteenth among all public
universities. "Critical ... i !
Comparisons," a college *
assessment service performed by
educational professionals gave the l
University of Florida its "Good
Work" Award in 1997. Given to
those schools "that are holding -.
e pi tan the line against spiraling tuition -- lf
costs while still managing to
provide very competitive levels of -. '. .
service, resources and safety," this
award was presented to just six
top research institutions out of .- 1 -
the 64 examined. I j|





Through the creativity, energy and resourcefulness of

its faculty, staff and students, the University of Florida *

has steadily emerged as a new force in higher

education. The university's emphasis in attracting

exceptional talent in all areas of endeavor is paying *

dividends. The university is now the institution of -.

choice for top research funding, bright scholars, and .. .

those seeking to become a partner with a great Ali.

institution poised to capture the imagination of the

people of a new age. With the ever-increasing level of. .

support it enjoys, the University of Florida will set the m.

new standard of performance for the 21st century. '*-















Combined Balance Sheet
June 30, 2000, with Comparative Totals for 1999
(amounts expressed in thousands)


CURRENT FUNDS


PLANT FUNDS


RENEWAL AND RETIREMENT OF INVESTMENT
UNRESTRICTED RESTRICTED UNEXPENDED REPLACEMENT INDEBTEDNESS IN PLANT


Assets
Cash and Cash Equivalents (Note 1) $
Investments (Note 3)
Net Receivables (Note 4)
Accrued Interest Receivable
Inventories (Note 5)
Unexpended General Revenue Appropriations
Due from Other Fund Groups
Due from Other SUS Universities/BOR
Due from Primary Government/Component Units
Deposits
Deferred Charges/Prepaid Expenses
Investment in Plant:
Net Investments in Direct Financing Agreements (Note 7)
Land
Land Improvements
Buildings
Furniture and Equipment
Library Books
Leased Property Under Capital Lease (Note 8D)
Construction In-Progress
Other


Total Assets


511 $
186,097
8,619
1,143
5,173
71,502
42,218
1,205


1,274


445 $
90,168
47,638
590
51

7,577


4


$
39,800
52,538
87

6,067
4,697
43,454


$
4,111

17


476


16 $
4,684

6


3,575



1,106

20
9,044
40,754
842,730
422,160
170,597
3,000
88,415
6,081


$ 317,742 $ 146,473 $ 146,643 $ 4,604 $ 8,281 $ 1,583,907


Liabilities
Accounts Payable
Accrued Salaries and Wages Payable
Due to Other Fund Groups
Due to Other SUS Universities/BOR
Due to Primary Government/Component Units
Deferred Credits
Due to Depositors
Long-Term Liabilities:
Revenue Certificates and Bonds Payable (Note 8A)
Loans from the Florida Department of
Management Services (Note 8B)
Installment Purchase Agreements Payable (Note 8C)
Obligations under Capital Lease (Note 8D)
Compensated Absences Liability (Note 9)
Liability for Future Self-Insured Claims (Note 10)
Other Long-Term Liabilities


$ 13,385 $
11,959
14,758
79

5,016







96,294
29,553


Total Liabilities


$ 171,044 $ 51,842 $ 49,731 $


- $ 4,314 $ 97,770


Fund Balances
Reserved for Encumbrances
Reserved for Future Self-Insured Claims (Note 10)
Federal Government Grants Refundable
Amount Expected to be Financed in Future Years
Restricted Fund Balance
Unrestricted Fund Balance
Net Investment in Plant
Component Unit Fund Balance

Total Fund Balances


Total Liabilities and Fund Balances


$ 30,320 $ 26,493 $
34,365


(96,188)

178,201


68,138


41,887 $



55,025


62 $



4,542


3,967


1,486,137


$ 146,698 $ 94,631 $ 96,912 $ 4,604 $ 3,967 $ 1,486,137

$ 317,742 $ 146,473 $ 146,643 $ 4,604 $ 8,281 $ 1,583,907


The accompanying Summary of Significant Accounting Policies and Notes are an integral part of the financial statements.


3,857 $
4,674
43,311


8,879 $

16

150



40.686


4.314


94.636


788
377
1,969








COBIE BAAC HE


TOTAL
UNIVERSITY FUNDS
(MEMORANDUM ONLY)


LOAN
FUNDS


$ 667 $
8,918
32,128
1,635


188


12


AGENCY
FUNDS


1,266 $
11,242
1,773
36


1,154


COMPONENT UNITS (FYE 1999)


DIRECT HEALTH
SUPPORT SCIENCE CENTER
1999 ORGANIZATIONS AFFILIATES


2,905 $
345,020
142,696
3,514
5,224
77,569
59,885
44,659

16
2,380


4,327 $
291,887
144,077
2,638
6,900
57,399
60,446
34,798
3,000
16
3,368


45,256 $
794,098
39,477
2,380
677



48,932

3,194


10,796 $
16,016
55,753





10,674

25,827


COMBINED TOTALS
(MEMORANDUM ONLY)


SHANDS
HOSPITAL
AND OTHERS


10,643 $
165,917
109,577





2,342

84,268


2000


69,600 $
1,321,051
347,503
5,894
5,901
77,569
59,885
44,659
61,948
16
115,669


20 39 20 39
9,044 7,877 11,427 113 10,840 31,424 29,279
40,754 31,683 52,402 1,570 1 94,727 80,606
842,730 802,799 4,841 7,335 276,300 1,131,206 1,064,020
422,160 430,278 3,849 10,024 87,311 523,344 534,110
170,597 157,535 170,597 157,535
3,000 3,000 3,000 3,000
88,415 67,190 2,603 91,018 88,069
6,081 5,703 19,744 1,144 26,969 22,108

$ 43,548 $ 15,471 $ 2,266,669 $ 2,114,960 $ 1,026,277 $ 139,252 $ 749,802 $ 4,182,000 $ 3,885,967


63 $

1,775

8,427

5,206


26,184 $
16,633
59,885
79
8,577
5,016
5,206

139,636

788
377
1,969
96,294
29,553


18,494 $
10,614
60,446
108
5,905
4,811
8,262

113,426

940
302
2,150
90,097
27,891


16,791 $
656


26,620
65,916
360

29,100




765

31,693


10,796 $
10,742


3,201



15,395




10,296

7,076


81,029 $



2,530
4


275,995


3,960
6,413


39,086


134,800 $
28,031
59,885
79
40,928
70,936
5,566

460,126

788
4,337
8,382
107,355
29,553
77,855


64,872
72,532
60,446
108
44,325
71,359
8,471

431,164

940
2,594
8,874
100,367
27,891
70,591


$ 25 $ 15,471 $ 390,197 $ 343,446 $ 171,901 $ 57,506 $ 409,017 $ 1,028,621 $ 964,534


-$ 98,762 $
34,365
27,686
(96,188)
147,509
178,201
1,486,137


$ 43,523 $


87,824 $
36,471
27,581
(90,097)
124,597
152,441
1,432,697


854,376


81,746


$ 98,762 $
34,365
27,686
(96,188)
147,509
178,201
1,486,137
340,785 1,276,907


$ 1,876,472 $ 1,771,514 $ 854,376 $ 81,746 $ 340,785 $ 3,153,379 $ 2,921,433


$ 43,548 $ 15,471 $ 2,266,669 $ 2,114,960 $ 1,026,277 $ 139,252 $ 749,802 $ 4,182,000 $ 3,885,967


1999


60,472
1,149,063
363,970
6,727
10,465
57,399
60,446
34,798
42,022
16
121,823


$

27,686

15,837


87,824
36,471
27,581
(90,097)
124,597
152,441
1,432,697
1,149,919















Combined Statement of Changes in Fund Balances
For the Year Ended June 30, 2000, with Comparative Totals for 1999
(amounts expressed in thousands)


CURRENT FUNDS


Revenues and Other Additions:
Unrestricted Current Funds Revenue
Auxiliary Enterprises
Federal Appropriations-Restricted
State Appropriations-Restricted
Gifts, Grants, and Contracts-Restricted:
Federal
Other Governmental
Private
Investment Earnings-Restricted
Interest on Loans Receivable
Expended for Plant Facilities
Retirement of Indebtedness
Resources Received from Other SUS
Universities/BOR
Other Additions
Component Unit Revenue:
Fees, Dues and Charges
Grants, Contributions and Donations
Sales of Goods and Services
Investment Income
Other

Total Revenues and Other Additions


Expenditures and Other Deductions:
Educational and General
Auxiliary Enterprises
Refunded to Grantors
Loan Cancellations and Write-Offs
Administrative and Collection Costs
Expended for Plant Facilities
Retirement of Indebtedness
Interest on Indebtedness
Disposal of Plant Facilities
Other Expenditures and Deductions
Resources Remitted to Other SUS
Universities/BOR

Total Expenditures and Other Deductions


Transfers Among Funds-Additions/(Deductions)
Mandatory:
Principal and Interest
Renewals and Replacements
Non-Mandatory:
Interfund Transfers
Primary Government to/from Component Units


UNRESTRICTED RESTRICTED UNEXPENDED


PLANT FUNDS
RENEWAL AND RETIREMENT OF INVESTMENT
REPLACEMENT INDEBTEDNESS IN PLANT


$ 730,246 $
92,425


7,595


276,398
23,094
55,537
3,155


41,663


550
507
1,325


111,567
4,011


20,573


$ 822,671 $ 386,352 $ 44,420 $


$ 805,412 $
80,961


157 $


385,966 $

251


41,099


535 $ 115,578







3

2,029
3,393
62,119
4 19


$ 886,373 $ 386,217 $ 41,140 $ 303 $ 5,429 $ 62,138


$ (5,914) $


10,492 (16,274)
84,842 26,587


$ (163) $


5,796
4,308


$ 6,077 $


1,096


(754)


Total Transfers Among Funds

Net Increase (Decrease)

Fund Balance at Beginning of Year

Fund Balance Adjustments

Fund Balance at End of Year


$ 89,420 $ 10,313 $ 9,941 $ 1,096 $ 5,323 $


$ 25,718 $ 10,448 $ 13,221 $ 950 $


429 $ 53,440


$ 120,980 $ 84,183 $ 83,691 $ 3,654 $ 3,538 $ 1,432,697

$ -$ -$ -$ 4 $ $

$ 146,698 $ 94,631 $ 96,912 $ 4,604 $ 3,967 $ 1,486,137


The accompanying Summary of Significant Accounting Policies and Notes are an integral part of the financial statements.








COMINE STEMN OFC4NE0N UDBLNE


TOTAL
UNIVERSITY FUNDS
(MEMORANDUM ONLY)


COMPONENT UNITS (FYE 1999)


COMBINED TOTALS
(MEMORANDUM ONLY)


LOAN
FUNDS 2000

$ $ 730,246
92,425
7,595
41,663

453 276,851
23,644
179 56,223
413 5,487
1,024 1,024
111,567
4,011

375
231 20,902


1999

686,372
87,342
7,269
42,435

278,411
24,167
47,570
5,231
981
103,581
3,752


DIRECT
SUPPORT SC
ORGANIZATIONS

$ $


HEALTH SHANDS
IENCE CENTER HOSPITAL
AFFILIATES AND OTHERS

$


23,399


2,587
140,307
42,147
69,026
34,587

$ 2,300 $ 1,372,013 $ 1,310,510 $ 288,654 $


268,694
6,304

1,352
9,095

285,445


576,25
7,98

16,28
21,08

621,60


2000

$ 730,246
92,425
7,595
41,663

276,851
23,644
56,223
5,487
1,024
111,567
4,011

375
20,902

53 847,534
8 154,599
42,147
i5 86,663
1 64,763

17 $ 2,567,719


$ $ 1,191,378 $ 1,117,362 $
80,961 77,282
78 329 130
838 838 163
276 279 166
41,402 39,787
2,029 2,002
3,393 3,188
62,119 35,282
64 103

150

$ 1,192 $ 1,382,792 $ 1,275,615 $


(356)


(356) $

752 $

42,771 $


43,523 $
43,523 $


115,737

115,737 $

104,958 $

1,771,514 $


1,876,472 $
1,876,472 $


114,934

114,934 $

149,829 $

1,621,685 $


1,771,514 $
1,771,514 $


$ $ $ 1,191,378 $ 1,117,362
80,961 77,282
329 130
838 163
279 166
41,402 39,787
2,029 2,002
3,393 3,188
62,119 35,282
141,431 199,450 573,920 914,865 886,494

150

141,431 $ 199,450 $ 573,920 $ 2,297,593 $ 2,162,006


(30,697)

(30,697) $

116,526 $

737,850 $


854,376 $
854,376 $


(84,871)

(84,871) $

1,124 $

80,622 $


81,746 $
81,746 $


(38,349)

(38,349) $

9,338 $

331,447 $


340,785 $
340,785 $


(38,180)

(38,180) $

231,946 $

2,921,433 $


3,153,379 $
3,153,379 $


(9,297)

(9,297)

309,923

2,610,370

1,140

2,921,433


1999

686,372
87,342
7,269
42,435

278,411
24,167
47,570
5,231
981
103,581
3,752


23,399

816,060
129,761
35,499
125,352
64,044

2,481,226














Statement of Current Funds Revenues, Expenditures, and Other Changes
For the Year Ended June 30, 2000, with Comparative Figures for 1999
(amounts expressed in thousands)


UNRESTRICTED
FUNDS


CURRENT FUNDS
RESTRICTED
FUNDS


Revenues
Educational and General
Student Tuition and Fees
Federal Appropriations
State Appropriations
Gifts, Grants and Contracts:
Federal
Other Governmental
Private
Sales and Services of Educational Activities
Other Sources:
Investment Income
Other
Total Educational and General Revenues


Auxiliary Enterprises
Sales and Services Operations
Student Fees
Investment Income
Total Auxiliary Revenues


$ 134,231 $

518,022


16,578
10,692
41,928

5,829
2,966
$ 730,246 $


$ 77,360 $
12,796
2,269
$ 92,425 $


$ 134,231
7,595 7,595
-518,022


278,554
23,274
55,970
20,525


48
385,966


278,554
39,852
66,662
62,453

5,829
3,014
$ 1,116,212


$ 77,360
12,796
2,269
$ 92,425


121,858
7,269
491,400


280,166
37,608
56,307
61,358

8,227
3,381
$ 1,067,574


$ 73,085
11,895
2,362
$ 87,342


Total Revenues


$ 822,671 $ 385,966 $ 1,208,637 $ 1,154,916


Expenditures and Mandatory Transfers
Educational and General
Instruction
Research
Public Services
Academic Support
Student Services
Institutional Support
Operation and Maintenance of Plant
Scholarships and Fellowships
Mandatory Transfers for Principal and Interest
Resources Remitted to Other SUS Universities/BOR
Total Educational and General Expenditures

Auxiliary Enterprises
Expenditures
Mandatory Transfers for Renewals and Replacements
Mandatory Transfers for Principal and Interest
Total Auxiliary Enterprises


$ 359,658
126,678
67,680
85,168
22,803
67,225
63,028
13,172


$ 805,412


$ 34,838
157,414
29,558
2,631
2,688
1,512
496
156,829


$ 385,966


$ 80,961 $

5,914
$ 86,875 $


394,496
284,092
97,238
87,799
25,491
68,737
63,524
170,001


1,191,378


366,043
275,519
85,442
83,387
24,638
61,323
57,498
163,512
136
150
1,117,648


$ 80,961 $ 77,282
9
5,914 5,308
$ 86,875 $ 82,599


Total Expenditures and Mandatory Transfers


$ 892,287 $ 385,966 $ 1,278,253 $ 1,200,247


Other Transfers and Additions/(Deductions)
Excess of Restricted Receipts Over Transfers to Revenues
Refunded to Grantors
Interfund Transfers
Primary Government to/from Component Units
Total Other Transfers and Additions/(Deductions)


$

10,492
84,842
$ 95,334


$ 386
(251)
(16,274)
26,587
$ 10,448


$ 386
(251)
(5,782)
111,429
$ 105,782


$ 67
(95)
(16,655)
107,891
$ 91,208


Net Increase/(Decrease) in Fund Balances


$ 25,718 $ 10,448 $


36,166 $


45,877


The accompanying Summary of Significant Accounting Policies and Notes are an integral part of the financial statements.






0


TOTAL


FISCAL YEAR
1999
TOTAL














University of Florida

Summary of Significant Accounting Policies
June 30, 2000

The significant accounting policies followed by the University of Florida are described below to enhance the usefulness of the financial statements.


REPORTING ENTITY
The University is considered a separate entity for financial reporting
purposes; however, it is a part of the State University System (SUS). The
SUS is a part of the State Board of Education, Department of Education,
Division of Universities, the Board of Regents (BOR) directing the latter.
The BOR is primarily responsible for adopting system-wide rules and
policies, planning for and coordinating the future programmatic, financial
and physical development needs of the system, reviewing and evaluating the
universities' teaching, research and service programs, and monitoring fiscal
performance. The Chancellor, who is appointed by the BOR, performs
duties as assigned by the Board, including serving as the chief administrative
officer of the Board. The University President, also appointed by the BOR,
serves as the chief administrative officer of the University and is responsible
for the operation and administration of the University.
Although one of the primary purposes of financial reporting is to account
for resources received and used, there are several instances where University
resources are accounted for and reported by other entities. For example,
Unexpended Plant Funds construction projects, committed to the Univer-
sity but financed from statewide sources, are accounted for and reported by
the BOR. When the construction projects are substantially completed, they
are then included in the University's Investment in Plant Funds.
The University's financial statements do not include the professional fee
clearing funds established to account for professional fees generated by
physicians and dentists engaged in the practice of medicine and dentistry at
the J. Hillis Miller Health Center. Some of these monies are subsequently
deposited in the University's agency funds and grants, contracts, and dona-
tions trust funds to support University programs.


Component Units

Direct Support Organizations
The financial operations and financial position of the University's "direct
support organizations," as provided for in Section 240.299, Florida Statutes,
and Board of Regents Rule 6C-9.011, Florida Administrative Code, are con-
sidered component units of the University and are included in the financial
statements of the University by discrete presentation. These are separate, not-
for-profit corporations organized and operated exclusively to assist the Univer-
sity in achieving excellence by providing supplemental resources from private
gifts and bequests, and valuable education support services. These organiza-
tions are authorized to receive, hold, invest, and administer property and to
make expenditures to or for the benefit of the University. Annual post audits of
each organization's financial statements are conducted by independent certi-
fied public accountants. The annual reports are submitted to the Auditor
General and the BOR for review. These not-for-profit corporations and their
purposes are explained as follows:


Gator Boosters, Inc. supports athletic activities at the University.
University of Florida Foundation, Inc. solicits, collects, manages and di-
rects contributions to the various academic departments and programs of the
University and assists the University in public relations, fund raising, and
maintenance of alumni records.
University of Florida Alumni Association, Inc. is to foster and enhance the
relationship between the University of Florida, its alumni, students and
friends and to support the University's mission of teaching, research and
service.
University of Florida Law Center Association, Inc. supports the College of
Law.
Florida Foundation Seed Producers, Inc. supplies Florida farmers and
producers with crop seed and nursery stock. This organization stocks
foundation seed of the best-known varieties acceptable to Florida climate
and soils in adequate quantities and at reasonable prices.
Florida 4-H Foundation, Inc. promotes the educational objectives of the
Florida Cooperative Extension Service.
University of Florida Research Foundation, Inc. promotes, encourages and
assists research activities of the University through income derived from or
related to the development and commercialization of intellectual properties,
which include inventions, discoveries, processes and work products.
University Athletic Association, Inc. conducts various inter-collegiate ath-
letic programs for and on behalf of the University.
Southwest Florida Research and Education Foundation, Inc. provides
research and educational support to the University of Florida Southwest
Florida Research and Education Center.
Florida Association of Basic Medical Scientists, Inc. provides scholarships
to students.
University of Florida Research and Development Park, Inc. promotes,
encourages and assists the research activities of the faculty, staff and students
of the University and facilitates the transfer of their discoveries, inventions,
processes and work products to public use, all through the development of
the University's research and development park. (Inactive)
University of Florida Tissue Bank, Inc. procures, develops, processes and
distributes human tissue for transplantation, in support of the education,
research and service programs of the Department of Orthopedics, College of
Medicine.
Florida Leadership and Education Foundation, Inc. was formed to further
agriculture and natural resource education and related activities, promote
agriculture and natural resources leadership and to make contributions to
and confer benefits upon the University.
Treasure Coast Agricultural Research Foundation, Inc. supports, encour-
ages and fosters research, education and extension at the Institute of Food
and Agricultural Sciences of the University on issues related to the citrus
industry within the Indian River region.
Citrus Research and Education Foundation, Inc. expedites citrus produc-
tion, propagates new plant materials and environmental impact research
data, and provides research and education support to the University of
Florida Citrus Research and Education Center at Lake Alfred.














Health Science Center Affiliates
The financial operations and financial position of several corporations,
closely affiliated with the University of Florida J. Hillis Miller Health
Science Center (HSC) are considered to be component units of the Univer-
sity and are included in the University's financial statements by discrete
presentation. The first six corporations listed are "Faculty Practice Plans," as
provided for in the Florida Administrative Code Rule 6C-9.017. The
Faculty Practice Plans provide educationally oriented clinical practice set-
tings and opportunities through which faculty members provide health,
medical, and dental care to patients as an integral part of their academic
activities and their employment as faculty. Because these faculty practice
activities generate income, the colleges are authorized to regulate fees gener-
ated from faculty practice and maintain Faculty Practice Plans for the
orderly collection and distribution of fees. These organizations provide
significant support for the clinical instruction function of the HSC. Univer-
sity of Florida Health Services, Inc. and University of Florida Jacksonville
Healthcare, Inc., "Health Services Support Organizations," as provided for
in the Florida Administrative Code Rule 6C-9.020, engage in strategic
alliances and partnerships with non-academic entities, effecting managed
care contracting and provider network development for the HSC. Faculty
Clinic, Inc. was originally organized to operate a multi-specialty clinic.
However, effective January 1, 1995, Faculty Clinic, Inc. was restructured to
operate as a facilities management company. Jacksonville Health Education
Programs, Inc. operates the Borland Medical Library in Jacksonville, Florida.
Family Practice Medical Group, Inc. is a non-profit medical group operated
by arrangements with the University of Florida College of Medicine and
Shands at Alachua General Hospital (related parties). The physicians are
residents or faculty members of the College of Medicine and are not
employees of the corporation. Family Practice Medical Group, Inc. acts as a
billing and collecting agent for Florida Clinical Practice Association, Inc.

* Florida Clinical Practice Association, Inc. and University of Florida
(UF) College of Medicine Academic Enrichment Fund (AEF)

* Faculty Associates, Inc. and UF College of Dentistry AEF

* Florida Health Professions Associations, Inc. and UF College of Health
Professions AEF

* UF College of Nursing Faculty Practice Association, Inc. and UF
College of Nursing AEF

* UF College of Pharmacy Faculty Practice Association, Inc. and UF
College of Pharmacy AEF

* UF Jacksonville Physicians, Inc.

* UF Health Services, Inc.

* UF Jacksonville Healthcare, Inc.

* Faculty Clinic, Inc. d.b.a. UF Faculty Clinic/Jacksonville

* Jacksonville Health Education Programs, Inc.

* Family Practice Medical Group, Inc.


Shands Hospital and Others
Shands Teaching Hospital and Clinics, Inc. was incorporated October
15, 1979, as a not-for-profit corporation. Shands, a major tertiary care
teaching institution, is a leading referral center in the State of Florida and the
southeast United States and facilitates medical education programs at the
University.
Shands entered into a contractual agreement, as of July 1, 1980, with the
State Board of Education of the State of Florida (State Board of Education),
as subsequently restated and amended, which provides for the use of hospital
facilities at the University of Florida Health Center through December 31,
2030, with renewal provisions. The contractual agreement also provides for
the transfer to Shands of all other assets and
liabilities arising from the operation of the
hospital facilities prior to July 1, 1980. At
termination of the contractual agreement,
the net assets of Shands revert to the State .
Board of Education. Legal title to all build-
ings and improvements transferred to
Shands remains with the State of Florida
during the term of the contractual agree- A
ment. The contractual agreement provides
for a 12-month grace period for any event
of default, other than the bankruptcy of
Shands. In addition, the contractual agree-
ment limits the right of the State Board of
Education to terminate the contractual agreement solely to the circumstance
in which Shands declares bankruptcy and, in such event, requires net
revenues derived from the operation of the hospital facilities to continue to
be applied to the payment of Shands' debts.
Under the terms of the contractual agreement, Shands is obligated to
manage, operate, maintain and insure the hospital facilities in support of the
programs of the Health Center at the University of Florida and further
agrees to contract with the State Board of Education for the provision of
these programs.

Baby Gator Child Care Center, Inc. was incorporated October 19,
1970, under Florida Statutes, Chapter 240.531, to establish and operate an
educational research center for child development, for children of University
of Florida students, faculty and staff. The Center is funded primarily
through fees paid by parents and an annual allocation of funds from the
Capital Improvement Trust Fund (CITF) established by the BOR of the
State of Florida. In addition, the Center receives other governmental
assistance.
The Center uses a facility owned by the University without charge. The
University also provides other services and support for the Center, some also
without charge. The Center's policy is to not record contributed facilities,
services and other support in its financial statements.

The University of Florida Health Education Insurance Company is
blended into the University's financial statements. Although this entity is
legally separate from the University, the BOR owns all shares of stock, and
their sole purpose is to assist in providing liability protection. See Note 10.





.3~~ 0 0


BASIS OF ACCOUNTING
The University's fiscal and accounting operations are essentially struc-
tured around the recommendations of the National Association of College
and University Business Officers (NACUBO), constituting generally ac-
cepted accounting principles, as published under the title of Financial
Accounting and Reporting Manual for Higher Education. Financial state-
ments were prepared in accordance with instructions provided by the BOR.
Financial statements have been prepared on the accrual basis of account-
ing; however, depreciation of fixed assets is not recognized. Revenue is
recognized in restricted current funds when expenditures are made for
current operating purposes. The reserve for encumbrances portion of the
fund balance is a representation of purchase commitments for which the
merchandise or services have not been received. Notes receivable from
students are reported in the loan fund at net present value.
The Statement of Current Funds Revenues, Expenditures, and Other
Changes is a statement of financial activities of current funds related to the
current reporting period. It does not purport to present the results of
operations or the net income or loss for the period as would a statement of
income or a statement of revenues and expenses.
To the extent that current funds are used to finance plant assets, the
amounts provided are accounted for as:
* expenditures, in the case of normal replacement of movable equipment
and library books;
* mandatory transfers, in the case of required provisions for debt amorti-
zation, interest, and equipment renewal and replacement; and
* transfers of a non-mandatory nature for all other cases.

Physical plant and equipment are recorded at cost at the date of acquisi-
tion or at appraised value at the date received in the case of gifts or purchases
from the State Division of Surplus Property.



FUND ACCOUNTING
In order to ensure observance of limitations and restrictions placed on
the use of resources available to the University, the financial records and
accounts are maintained in accordance with the principles of fund account-
ing. This is the procedure by which resources for various purposes are
classified for accounting and reporting purposes into funds that are in
accordance with activities or objectives specified. Separate accounts are
maintained for each fund; however, in the accompanying financial state-
ments, funds that have similar characteristics have been combined into one
of the following fund groups:


Current Funds
This fund group includes those economic resources of the University
which are expendable for operational purposes in performing the primary
objectives of the University. Resources restricted by donors or other outside
agencies for specific current operating purposes are reported as restricted
current funds; resources not so restricted are reported as unrestricted current
funds.


Loan Funds
This fund group consists of loans to students and of resources available
for such purposes. The terms of the loan agreements usually specify that the
money operate on a revolving basis, i.e., repayments of principal and interest
are loaned to other eligible students.


Endowment Funds
This fund group consists of financial resources for which donors or
outside agencies have stipulated, as a condition of the gift, that the principal
is to be maintained inviolate and in perpetuity and invested for the purpose
of producing present and future income which may be either expended or
added to the principal.


Plant Funds
This fund group consists of four separate self-balancing fund subgroups
for which separate accountability and reporting are required. These fund
subgroups are as follows:
* Unexpended Plant Funds account for unexpended resources received
directly by the University from various sources to finance the acquisition
or construction of long-lasting plant assets and the associated liabilities.
* Renewal and Replacement Plant Funds provide for the renewal and
replacement of plant fund assets as distinguished from additions and
improvements to plant assets.
* Retirement of Indebtedness Funds account for the accumulation of
resources received directly by the University for interest and principal
payments and other debt service charges including contributions for
sinking funds relating to plant fund indebtedness.
* Investment in Plant Funds include all long-lasting assets in the service of
the University, including construction-in-progress and the associated
liabilities. Long-lasting assets, which are held as investments in endow-
ment funds, are excluded from the investment in plant funds.


Agency Funds
This fund group consists of funds held by the University as custodian or
fiscal agent for others.


Component Units
This fund group consists of organizations for which the University is
financially accountable or for which the nature and significance of their
relationship with the University are such that exclusion would cause the
financial statements to be misleading or incomplete.


OTHER SIGNIFICANT

ACCOUNTING POLICIES
Other significant accounting policies are set
forth in the financial statements and notes
thereto.














UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA
NOTES TO THE FINANCIAL STATEMENTS
June 30, 2000

1. CASH AND CASH EQUIVALENTS

The amount reported as cash and cash equivalents consist of cash
on hand and cash in demand accounts. Cash in demand accounts,
except for amounts held in foreign banks, is held in banks quali-
fied in accordance with the provisions of Chapter 280, Florida
Statutes, as a public depository. Deposits are fully insured and
collateralized by a mutual collateral pool. Revolving funds autho-
rized by the State Comptroller for deposit in banks in Italy and
Zimbabwe totaled $190,000. As of June 30, 2000, actual deposits
in foreign banks totaled $102,861.

2. CASH HELD BY PAYING AGENT

Expenditures for the payment of long-term debt are recognized
when the University makes payment to the paying agent, rather
than when the paying agent pays the matured debt. Accordingly,
any cash balances held by agents at year-end are not included as an
asset of the Retirement of Indebtedness Funds.

3. INVESTMENTS

Generally accepted accounting principles require that credit risk
of investments be classified into three categories:

1. Insured or registered, or securities held by the University or
its agent in the University's name.
2. Uninsured and unregistered, with securities held by the
counterpart's trust department or agent in the University's
name.
3. Uninsured and unregistered, with securities held by the
counterpart or by its trust department or agent but not in
the University's name.


The University participates in investment pools through the State
Treasurer and the State Board of Administration in accordance
with the provisions of Sections 18.125 and 215.49, Florida Stat-
utes. Collateral for public money on deposit is arranged through
the State Treasurer under Chapter 280, Florida Statutes. Invest-
ments consist of the instruments listed in Sections 18.10 and
215.47, Florida Statutes. The investments are recorded at cost;
any difference between market value and the cost of investments
is negligible. These pooled investments cannot be categorized,
because the participant's ownership is not evidenced by specific,
identifiable investment securities of the pools. The University of
Florida Health Education Insurance Company has a variety of
investments managed by several different banks.

In addition, the University has received donations of marketable
securities. These securities are held by the University and are
therefore categorized in the first risk category. The book value and
market value of these locally held securities at June 30, 2000, is
$22,789. A summary of these investments is shown in Table 1.



4. ALLOWANCE FOR DOUBTFUL RECEIVABLES

The University provides allowances for uncollectible accounts
and notes receivable based upon management's best estimate of
uncollectible accounts and notes at the balance sheet date, consid-
ering type, age, collection history of receivables, and any other
factors as considered appropriate. Notes receivable are reported
net of an allowance for uncollectible notes of $4,838,277, which
is 13 percent of total related notes receivable. Accounts receivable
are reported net of an allowance of $4,514,057, which is 10
percent of total related accounts receivable.


I 0 1 S umr ositInemns


Value of
Marketable
Funds Securities


Investments of the
Health Education
Insurance Company


Unrestricted Current
Restricted Current
Loan
Unexpended Plant
Renewal and Replacement
Retirement of Indebtedness
Agency
Total


$ 22,789 $ 60,705,347 $ 125,368,582
90,168,593
8,918,189
39,799,886
4,110,717
4,683,537
11,242,124
$ 22,789 $ 60,705,347 $ 284,291,628


$ 186,096,718
90,168,593
8,918,189
39,799,886
4,110,717
4,683,537
11,242,124
$ 345,019,764


Investments
Made Through
the State


Total Book
Value of
Investments














7. NET INVESTMENT IN DIRECT-FINANCING
AGREEMENTS

The Board of Control and its successor, the Board of Regents,
issued revenue certificates for the construction of certain dormito-
ries. Dormitories constructed from the proceeds of the 1962 series
revenue certificates were leased to fraternities and sororities with
the option to purchase for the agreed upon values of the lots on
which the dormitories were constructed, plus the actual costs of
dormitory construction, including related incidental expenses and
interest paid or payable for money borrowed for the construction
of the dormitories. Because the purchase options have been exer-
cised on the dormitories, their costs are not included in the fixed
asset account "Buildings". Instead, an amount equal to the out-
standing debt incurred for their construction is reported as "Net
Investment in Direct-Financing Agreements," which represents
the discounted value of purchase payments to be received from
the fraternities and sororities (excluding lot payments) and the
amount available in the Retirement of Indebtedness Funds for the
retirement of debt relating to these dormitories.


A schedule of anticipated collections appears in Table 2.


5. INVENTORIES


Inventories have been categorized into the following two types:

Departmental Inventories Those inventories maintained by
departments and not available for resale. Departmental invento-
ries are comprised of such items as classroom and laboratory
supplies, teaching materials, and office supply items which are
consumed in the teaching/work process. These inventories are
normally expensed when purchased and therefore are not re-
ported on the balance sheet.

Merchandise Inventories Those inventories maintained which
are available for resale to individuals and/or other University
departments and are not expensed at the time of purchase. These
inventories are reported on the balance sheet.

Three different inventory valuation methods were used to value
inventories. The University of Florida Bookstore inventory, which
is the largest of the University's inventories, was valued using the
retail-cost method. Other inventory valuation methods used were
the moving average method and the first-in, first-out methods.

6. MUSEUM AND ART COLLECTIONS

The Florida Museum of Natural History, which is part of the
University, maintains a depository of biological, geological, ar-
chaeological, and ethnographic materials. The Museum's collec-
tions contain approximately 10,000,000 individual items, more
than half of which are catalogued, either individually or in lots.
While many of the collections are undoubtedly quite valuable and
irreplaceable, the University has not placed a dollar valuation on
these items and, accordingly, the financial statements do not
include these assets in the investment in plant fund.


Year Amount


2000-01
Total Collections
Less Interest
Present Value of Anticipated Collections



8. LONG-TERM DEBT


$ 20,700
20,700
(700)
$ 20,000


The University's long-term indebtedness is reported in the Invest-
ment in Plant Fund, Retirement of Indebtedness Fund and Unex-
pended Plant Fund and is classified according to the following
types of indebtedness:

A. Revenue Certificates and Bonds Payable

Bonds and revenue certificates were issued to construct uni-
versity facilities including parking garages, student housing,
academic and student service facilities. Bonds and revenue
certificates outstanding,
which include both term and
serial bonds, are secured by a
pledge of housing rental rev-
enues, traffic and parking fees
and various student fee assess-
ments. The building fee and














capital improvement fee collected as a part of tuition and
remitted to the Board of Regents is used to retire the revenue
certificates for the academic and student service facilities.

A summary of pertinent information related to the University's
bond indebtedness follows in Table 3.


B. Loans from Florida Department of Management Services

The University was granted advances from the Florida De-
partment .- Ii 1.-i1. -,r Services for the construction of two
parking garages. Payments are made from proceeds of parking
fees collected. A summary of pertinent information related to
the loan follows in Table 4.


I.i Tae 3 S y of te Ui.. ri t' B dI -s -btedness


Series
Student Housing Bonds:
1959E
1959F
1962
1964
1984
1993
1998
2000
Subtotal


Parking Garage Bonds:
1993
1998
Subtotal


Amount of
Original
Issue


$ 3,730,000
1,500,000
400,000
1,786,000
3,500,000
13,000,000
26,155,000
30,695,000
$ 80,766,000



$ 19,545,000
10,000,000
$ 29,545,000


Academic and Student Services Facilities Bonds:
1991 $ 5,686,923
1993 22,548,089
1997 11,349,317
1997A 4,723,765
1998 13,783,839
Subtotal $ 58,091,933


Total Bonds


$ 168,402,933


Total
Retired


2,952,000
930,000
361,000
1,786,000
1,395,000
1,280,718
605,069
614,641
9,924,428



5,156,580
78,325
5,234,905



5,616,617
5,879,102
1,139,482
159,709
813,055
13,607,965


28,767,298


Maturity
Date


2005
2011
2002
2004
2014
2023
2028
2029


Bonds
Interest Payable at
Rate June 30, 2000


3.00%
3.00%
3.50%
3.50%
3.00%
4.625 to 5.50%
4.00 to 6.00%
5.00 to 7.00%


2014 4.20 to 5.00%
2019 3.65 to 4.75%


2003
2013
2022
2016
2023


6.00 to 6.50%
4.50 to 5.375%
7.00%
3.95 to 4.50%
4.00 to 5.00%


778,000
570,000
39,000


2,105,000
11,719,282
25,549,931
30,080,359
$ 70,841,572



$ 14,388,420
9,921,675
$ 24,310,095



$ 70,306
16,668,987
10,209,835
4,564,056
12,970,784
$ 44,483,968


$ 139,635,635


Principal and interest requirements on the above revenue certificates and bonds are as follows:

Year Principal
2000-01 $ 4,593,035
2001-02 4,818,884
2002-03 5,463,627
2003-04 5,688,537
2004-05 5,854,922
Later Years 114,998,914
Subtotal 141,417,919
Less: Bond Discount (1,782,284)


Interest
7,362,396
6,856,472
6,627,005
6,353,570
6,082,812
63,397,054
96,679,309


$ 139,635,635


Total
$ 11,955,431
11,675,356
12,090,632
12,042,107
11,937,734
178,395,968
238,097,228
(1,782,284)


$ 236,314,944


$ 96,679,309















I Table4 Summar o Lon f F Ida Dn of M m S


Original
Loans
$ 1,310,325
2,356,695


$ 3,667,020


Outstanding
Loans At
June 30, 2000
$ 263,358
524,786


$ 788,144


Principal and interest requirements are as follows:


Principal
$ 155,499
159,689
164,132
126,638
85,650
96,536
$ 788,144


Interest
$ 15,801
11,611
7,168
2,459




$ 37,039


Total
$ 171,300
171,300
171,300
129,097
85,650
96,536
$ 825,183


C. Installment Purchase Agreements

The University has entered into several installment purchase
contracts for the purchase of equipment. Table 5 is a schedule
of future minimum payments remaining under the contracts
at fiscal year end.

D. Obligations Under Capital Lease

The Division of Bond Finance issued the 1974 Series Univer-
sity of Florida Housing System Revenue Bonds in the amount


Tabl 5 Intlmn Puchs Agrement


Year
2000-01
2001-02
2002-03
2003-04
2004-05
Total Minimum Payments
Less: Interest


Total Present Value


Amount
$ 193,798
88,539
62,461
43,822
17,215
$ 405,835
(29,146)


$ 376,689


of $2,880,000 for the acquisition and conversion of buildings
and facilities to house married students and their families.
The Board of Regents entered into a lease-purchase agreement
(capital lease) with the Division of Bond Finance for these
facilities. The University of Florida makes lease-purchase
payments to the State Board of Administration, agent for the
Division of Bond Finance.

These payments, together with an annual federal subsidy, are
sufficient to pay the principal, interest and related administra-
tive costs of maturing revenue bonds as well as maintaining
reserves at the required levels. Accordingly, all capital lease
payments are determined by the amount needed by the State
Board of Administration to service the bonded debt. During
the 1999-2000 fiscal year the federal subsidy collected was
$78,330.

On June 8, 1994, the Board of Regents, on behalf of the
University of Florida, entered into a lease agreement with the
University of Florida Foundation, Inc. (the Foundation), a
direct-support organization (component unit) of the Univer-
sity of Florida under Section 240.299, Florida Statutes. Under
the terms of the agreement, the University of Florida agreed to
lease from the Foundation a 607-space parking garage (the
garage) located near the Health Center Administrative Offices
for a period of thirty years beginning July 1, 1994. Rent of


Loans
Garage I
Garage II


Interest
Rate
6.00%
0.00%


Year
2000-01
2001-02
2002-03
2003-04
2004-05
Later Years
Total














Table 6 Obligtion 0r C a L

Outstanding
Interest Original Loans At
Loans Rate Loans June 30, 2000


1974 Married Student Housing Facilities 6.70 to 7.50 % $ 2,880,000 $ 765,000
Shands Parking Garage 6.45 % 1,382,470 1,204,493
Total $ 4,262,470 $ 1,969,493


Principal and interest requirements are as follows:


Year Principal Interest Total


2000-01 $ 192,310 $ 131,240 $ 323,550
2001-02 208,749 117,901 326,650
2002-03 220,281 103,419 323,700
2003-04 241,912 88,138 330,050
2004-05 28,647 71,353 100,000
Later Years 1,077,594 822,406 1,900,000
Total $ 1,969,493 $ 1,334,457 $ 3,303,950


$100,000 annually is due each July 1. The garage was simulta-
neously acquired by the Foundation from Shands Teaching r.
Hospital and Clinics, Inc. (Shands), also a component unit,
and financed by the Foundation through the issuance of a
promissory note secured by a nonrecourse mortgage contain- '
ing payment terms similar to those in the lease agreement
between the Foundation and the University of Florida. An- *
nual payments of $100,000 for thirty years from the Univer- '
sity of Florida to the Foundation and from the Foundation to
Shands were based on an original construction cost of I&
$3,000,000 and 0% interest. For reporting purposes, the lease
is considered a capital lease under Statement of Financial
Standards No. 13, Accounting for Leases. The initial obligation
was discounted at an imputed interest rate of 6.45% and was
recorded at $1,382,470. The asset, "Leased Property Under
Capital Lease," was recorded at cost to Shands of $3,000,000.
The $1,617,530 difference was reported in the Investment in i
Plant Fund Statement of Changes in Fund Balances as ex-
pended on plant facilities.

A summary of pertinent information related to the liability is
above in Table 6.

9. COMPENSATED ABSENCES LIABILITY

Employees earn the right to be compensated for annual leave
(vacation) and sick leave earned pursuant to Section 6C-5.920,
Florida Administrative Code, and pursuant to bargaining agree-
ments between the Board of Regents and the United Faculty of
Florida. Leave earned is accrued to the credit of the employee, and
records are kept on each employee's unpaid (unused) leave bal-














ance. GASB Statement No. 16 requires that the University accrue
a liability in the current funds for employees' vested right to
receive compensation for future absences when certain conditions
are met, whereas State appropriations fund only the portion of
accrued leave that is used or paid in the current fiscal year.
Although the liability is expected to be funded primarily from
future appropriations, generally accepted accounting principles
do not permit the recording of a receivable in anticipation of
future appropriations. Consequently, the recording of the liability
for compensated absences without the corresponding recognition
of such future resources results in the appearance of a reduced
ability to meet current obligations. At June 30, the total estimated
liability for annual, sick, and compensatory leave is $47,567,986,
$48,251,383, and $369,090 respectively. A current compensated
absences liability of $105,806 has been established for the amount
of leave for the new participants in the Deferred Retirement
Optional Program (DROP) as of June 30, 2000, for which they
are eligible and elect to receive payment. The University's Current
Unrestricted Fund Balance at June 30, 2000, of $146,697,922
would have been $242,886,381 had the non-current portion of
the liability for compensated absences not been applied against it.

10. LIABILITY FOR SELF-INSURED CLAIMS / RESERVE
FOR SELF-INSURED CLAIMS

Claims settlement and adjustment expenses are accrued as ex-
penses and liabilities of the J. Hillis Miller Health Center Self-
Insurance Program, inclusive of the Gainesville Self-Insurance
Program, Jacksonville Self-Insurance Program, and University of
Florida Healthcare Education Insurance Company, for the esti-
mated settlement value of claims reported as a "Liability for Self-
Insured Claims" in the Current Unrestricted Funds. The esti-
mated settlement value of claims was determined on the basis of
the judgment and experience of management and the Self-Insur-
ance Program Councils through a case-by-case review. Estimated
losses from unreported incidents are accrued based upon the
findings of Tillinghast/Towers Perrin, casualty actuaries.

The Self-Insurance Program provides comprehensive liability pro-
tection, including professional liability, for the Board of Regents
in those amounts described in Section 768.28, Florida Statutes,
and protection for legislative claims bills subject to limits of


$1 million, inclusive of the specific limits of liability described in
Section 768.28, Florida Statutes. Pursuant to the authority of
Sections 240.213(1)(f), 240.513(3)(d), and 240.5135, Florida
Statutes, the Self-Insurance Program provides professional liabil-
ity protection for certain Board of Regents support corporations
in the amount of $2 million per claim or action. The per-claim
limit of liability protection for such support corporations does not
exceed $2 million per claim in the event more than one protected
entity is involved in the same claim or action.

As part of the Self-Insurance Program, the Board of Regents
created the University of Florida Healthcare Education Insurance
Company on September 1, 1994. Although legally separate from
the State University System, the company is reported as if it is part
of the primary government, because all shares of stock are owned
by the Board of Regents, and the company's sole purpose is to
assist in providing liability protection for the University, the
Board of Regents, and affiliated individuals and entities.

The amount of "Liability for Self-Insured Claims" accrued for the
Self-Insurance Program for fiscal year 1999-2000 was $29,552,808
for compensatory losses and for allocated expenses. The "Liability
for Self-Insured Claims" was accrued at an undiscounted present
value.

The aggregate amount of claims liabilities for which annuity
contracts have been purchased in the claimants' names and for
which the related liabilities have been removed from the balance
sheet totals $1,639,190 for the Self-Insurance Program at June
30, 2000. These annuities have been assigned to third parties, and
all claimants have fully and completely released trust fund partici-
pants from all actual and contingent liability.

Changes in the balances of claims liabilities for the Self-Insurance
Program during the fiscal years 1998-99 and 1999-2000 were as
follows in Table 7.

The Self-Insurance Program's fund balance, after accrual of the
"Liability for Self-Insured Claims", less the amount reserved for
encumbrances, was $34,364,986 at June 30, 2000. This balance
is reported as reserves for incurred but not reported losses or
"Reserve for Future Self-Insured Claims" in the Unrestricted
Current Funds.


I Table 7 Cl0ims Lbit f or t h -i


Claims
Liabilities
Beginning
ofYear


$ 28,899,322 $
$ 27,890,739 $


Current
Claims/
Changes in
Estimates


3,602,258 $
9,390,712 $


Claim
Payments


(4,610,841) $
(7,728,643) $


1998-99
1999-00


Claims
Liabilities
End of
Year


27,890,739
29,552,808














11. RETIREMENT PLANS

A. Florida Retirement System

Pursuant to Chapter 121, Florida Statutes, the Florida Legisla-
ture established the Florida Retirement System to provide a
retirement and survivor benefit program for participating public
employees. Most employees working in regularly established
positions of the University are covered by the Florida Retire-
ment System, a State-administered cost-sharing multiple-em-
ployer public employee defined benefit retirement plan. Par-
ticipating employers include all State departments, counties,
district school boards, and community colleges. Many mu-
nicipalities and special districts have elected to be participating
employers.

Generally, regular employees' retirement pension benefits vest
after ten years of service, and members are eligible for normal
retirement benefits at age 62, with ten years of service, or at
any age after 30 years of service, which may include up to four
years of credit for military service. Benefits are computed on
the basis of age, aver-
age final compensa-
tion and service
credit. Members are
also eligible for in-
line-of-duty or regu-
lar disability and sur-
vivors benefits.

The Deferred Retire-
ment Optional Pro-
gram (DROP) is a
program under
which an eligible
member of the
Florida Retirement
System may elect to
participate, deferring
receipt of retirement benefits while continuing employment
with a Florida Retirement System employer. The deferred
monthly benefit accrues on behalf of the participant, plus
interest compounded monthly, for the specified period of the
DROP participation. Upon termination of employment, the
participant receives the total DROP benefits and begins to
receive previously determined retirement benefits.

The current schedule for employer contributions is based on
Chapters 112, 121, 122, and 238, Florida Statutes. All partici-
pating employers must comply. Except in those instances
where employees have elected to remain in pre-existing pro-
grams, employers pay all contributions. The University's li-
ability for any unfunded pension benefit obligation is limited
to the payment of the required contribution at the rates
established by law on future payrolls of the University.


7/1/00 7/1/99
Statutory Statutory


Membership Class
Regular
Senior Management
Special Risk
Deferred Retirement Optional Program


Rates*
8.21%
10.19%
19.35%


Rates*
9.21%
11.19%
20.22%


11.56% 11.56%


* Rates at 7/1/00 and 7/1/99 exclude contributions for health
insurance subsidy of 0.94% for each membership class (Note 12).
Retirement contribution rates were adopted by the 1998 Legisla-
tive Session as recommended in the 1997 actuarial valuation of
the system.


The University's 1999-2000 fiscal year payroll for all employ-
ees totaled $670,461,576 including $310,265,046 paid to
employees who were members of the Florida Retirement Sys-
tem. Required contributions made to the Florida Retirement
System in the 1999-2000 fiscal year totaled $32,300,636,
none from employee contributions, which represents 10.41
percent of the covered payroll.

Additional information on the Florida Retirement System,
including the ten-year historical trend information and the
total unfunded pension benefit obligation is presented in the
annual financial report of the Florida Retirement System.

During the 1999-2000 fiscal year and as ofJune 30, 2000, the
Florida Retirement System held no securities issued by the
University.

B. Optional Retirement Program

Pursuant to Section 121.35, Florida Statutes, the Florida
Legislature created an Optional Retirement Program for eli-
gible State University System faculty and administrators. The
program, which became effective July 1, 1984, was expanded
in 1988 to include the State University System Executive
Service. The program is designed to aid the University system
in recruiting employees by offering more portability to those
employees who are not expected to remain in the Florida
Retirement System for ten or more years.

The Optional Retirement Program is a defined contribution
plan which provides full and immediate vesting of all contri-
butions submitted to the participating companies on behalf of
the participant. Employees in eligible positions are allowed to
make an irrevocable election to participate in the Optional
Retirement Program rather than the Florida Retirement Sys-
tem, and to purchase retirement and death benefits through
contracts provided by certain insurance carriers. The employ-
ing university contributes on behalf of the participant the














same percentage of the participant's salary as would have been
contributed to the Florida Retirement System. A portion of
the total contribution is transferred to the Florida Retirement
System Trust Fund to help amortize the unfunded actuarial
accrued liability of the Florida Retirement System, and an
additional small amount remains in the Optional Retirement
Program Trust Fund for program administrative costs. The
remaining contribution is invested in the company or compa-
nies selected by the participant to create a fund for the pur-
chase of annuities at retirement. The participant may contrib-
ute by salary reduction an amount not to exceed the percent-
age contributed by the University to the participant's annuity
account. There were 3,730 University participants during the
1999-2000 fiscal year.

Required contributions made to the Optional Retirement
Program in the 1999-2000 fiscal year totaled $19,127,582
including $9,395,132 from employee contributions, which
represents 9.87 percent and 4.85 percent, respectively, of the
covered payroll, which totaled $193,717,433.

During the fiscal year and as of June 30, 2000, the Optional
Retirement Program held no securities issued by the University.

C. Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences
Supplemental Retirement

In 1984, the Florida Legislature enacted the Institute of Food
and Agricultural Sciences Supplemental Retirement Act to
provide a supplement to the monthly retirement benefit being
paid under the Federal Civil Service Retirement system to
retirees of the Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences
(IFAS) at the University of Florida. The supplement is desig-
nated for IFAS cooperative extension employees employed
before July 1, 1983, who are not entitled to benefits from
either a State-supported retirement system or social security
based on their service with IFAS. It was intended to compen-
sate these IFAS employees for the difference between their
Civil Service benefit and the benefits a Florida Retirement
System (FRS) member receives, which include a social security
benefit. No additional persons can become eligible for this
supplement.

The employer and employee contributions were 26.80 per-
cent of the gross monthly salaries of eligible employees. Em-
ployee contributions were $655,659, and employer contribu-
tions were $1,409,281. For fiscal year 1999-2000, the
University's covered payroll was $7,702,281, and there were
149 employees covered.



D. Other Retirement Programs

Other retirement programs include the Florida Teacher's Re-
tirement System and the U.S. Civil Service Retirement Sys-


tem. Twenty-five employees were covered by the Florida
Teacher's Retirement System during fiscal year 1999-2000.
Employer contributions were $90,456, and employee contri-
butions were $50,568, on a total payroll of $ 829,082.

Twenty-two employees were covered by the U.S. Civil Service
Retirement System during fiscal year 1999-2000. Employer
contributions were $108,227, and employee contributions
were $93,147, on a total payroll of $1,045,433.


OTHER POST-EMPLOYMENT BENEFITS


To assist retirees of all State-administered retirement systems in
paying health insurance costs, the Florida Legislature established
the Retiree Health Insurance Subsidy (HIS). During the 1999-
2000 fiscal year, the HIS program was funded by required contri-
butions consisting of 0.94 percent assessed against the payroll for
all active employees covered in State-administered retirement
systems.

Eligible retirees, spouses, or financial dependents under any State-
administered retirement system must provide proof of health
insurance coverage, which can include Medicare. During the
1999-2000 fiscal year, participants received an extra $3 per month
for each year of creditable service completed at the time of retire-
ment. If contributions fail to provide full subsidy benefits to all
participants, the subsidy payments may be reduced or canceled.


OPERATING LEASES


The University has long-term commitments for assets leased un-
der operating lease agreements. These leased assets and the related
commitments are not recorded on the University's balance sheet.
Lease payments are recorded as expenditures of the related funds
when paid or incurred. Outstanding commitments resulting from
these lease agreements are not considered material and are contin-
gent upon future appropriations.














14. INTERDEPARTMENTAL AUXILIARY SALES


Interdepartmental sales between auxiliary service departments
and other institutional departments have been eliminated from
expenditures and revenues for reporting purposes. The interde-
partmental transactions eliminated in the financial statement prepa-
ration totaled $70,722,829 and $71,397,184 for the years ended
June 30, 2000, and June 30, 1999, respectively.


15. FUNCTIONAL DISTRIBUTION OF EXPENDITURES

The educational and general expenditures on the Statement of
Current Funds Revenues, Expenditures, and Other Changes are
determined by applying the primary Program Classification Struc-


ture Code (PCS Code) assigned to each educational and general
department to the total expenditures for each department.


CONSTRUCTION COMMITMENTS


The major construction commitments of the University for those
projects for which the estimated cost is $1 million or more at fiscal
year end are as follows in Table 9.


17. STUDENT FEES AND OTHER COLLECTIONS

Student and Other Fees Trust Fund collections are remitted
directly to the State Treasurer. Subsequently, these collections are
returned to the University by State appropriation. Pursuant to


M~i~:ITa ble 9 MjorCns*itruc0ion Commi0me


Project # Project Name


Allotment Expenditures


Amount Unspent
at Year End


Baughman Center
SW Recreation Center Expansion
New Hume Hall
Hall of FL Fossils-Museum of Natural History
Two New Parking Structures
Reitz Union Expansion
Security Lighting
IFAS Everglades Auditorium
O'Connell Center Roof Replacement
Anderson/Flint Hall Renovations
Murphy Residence Hall Electrical Upgrade
1997-98 Life Safety, ADA & Capital Renewal
IFAS North Florida Research Facility
Diamond Village Renovation
McCarty Chiller Plant
1998-99 Life Safety, ADA & Capital Renewal
Weil Hall Renovation
1999-2000 Maint., Repairs and Renovations
Williamson Hall
Broward Area Dining Facility
Teaching Center Addition Indian River
Frazier-Rogers Hall Renovation
Utility Infrastructure Improvements
Pharmacy Building
IFAS Central Florida Research Facility
1999-2000 Capital Renewal, ADA, & Fire Safety
Health Professions & Pharmacy Complex
WUFT-TV/FM Gainesville
Critical Deferred Maintenance
UMC-Shands Jacksonville Proton Beam Facility
M. E. Rinker, Sr. Hall School of Bldg. Const.
Student Residence Hall-2000


$ 1,580,726
4,748,800
21,763,000
1,000,000
12,055,640
5,763,000
2,361,673
1,000,000
9,433,870
18,720,044
2,500,000
3,820,517
9,650,000
4,500,000
13,781,493
3,279,351
5,035,963
1,395,814
3,229,989
3,724,000
3,700,000
8,611,383
7,837,329
3,800,000
12,718,000
3,256,900
17,860,000
2,630,000
6,326,647
5,000,000
7,870,400
17,583,583


$ 226,538,122 $ 79,138,164 $ 147,399,958


BR 100
BR 101
BR 103
BR 109
BR 110
BR 112
BR 114
BR 122
BR 125
BR 126
BR 127
BR 129
BR 130
BR 131
BR 138
BR 139
BR 142
BR 149
BR 152
BR 153
BR 156
BR 159
BR 165
BR 166
BR 167
BR 168
BR 173
BR 180
BR 182
BR 189
BR 191
BR 192


1,327,125
136,982


69,289
8,437,250
174,407
1,221,511
154,418
7,654,084
3,134,540


3,224,459
4,106,418


11,351,168
2,393,539
410,930
348,866
2,446,620
1,661,022
181,649
1,746,301
2,195,505
918,206
10,004,515
266,543
299,990
62,183
274,311
210,229
117,601
14,608,503


253,601
4,611,818
21,763,000
930,711
3,618,390
5,588,593
1,140,162
845,582
1,779,786
15,585,504
2,500,000
596,058
5,543,582
4,500,000
2,430,325
885,812
4,625,033
1,046,948
783,369
2,062,978
3,518,351
6,865,082
5,641,824
2,881,794
2,713,485
2,990,357
17,560,010
2,567,817
6,052,336
4,789,771
7,752,799
2,975,080















I 0 TlTia b Studeflnt Fe an O l ltin


Total Actual
Collection


A. Educational and General
Student Tuition and Fees:
Matriculation
Out-of-State
Application
Late Registration
Total Student Tuition and Fees


$ 66,686,540
20,280,328
902,374
478,698
88,347,940


Total Budgeted
Requirement



$ 63,982,021
19,415,466
797,116
288,703
84,483,306


Total Excess
(Deficit)


$ 2,704,519
864,862
105,258
189,995
3,864,634


Research Overhead


Other Revenues:
Library Fines
Miscellaneous
Prior Year Revenues
Total Other Revenues


Prorate to Appropriation
Redistribution of Student Fee
Trust Fund Authority
Total for Educational and General


B. Special Units
Student Tuition and Fees:
Matriculation
Out-of-State
Total Student Tuition and Fees


1,020


891,064
$ 89,046,465 $ 86,042,672


$ 9,309,395
296,847
9,606,242


$ 9,185,298
337,673
9,522,971


(1,020)


(891,064)
$ 3,003,793


$ 124,097
(40,826)
83,271


Redistribution of Student Fee
Trust Fund Authority -9,030


$ 9,606,242 $ 9,532,001 $ 74,241


generally accepted accounting principles, the total of budgeted
revenues has been offset against total State appropriations re-
ported for the Unrestricted Current Funds. The revenue catego-
ries of the actual collections and the budgeted requirement are as
shown above in Table 10.

Student fees of $8,497,925 were collected prior to June 30, 2000,
for the 2000 summer semester, and were remitted to the State
Treasurer during fiscal year 1999-2000, but the appropriation
process considers these funds revenue of the 2000-01 fiscal year.

In accordance with generally accepted accounting principles, stu-
dent tuition and fee revenues reported in the Unrestricted Cur-
rent Funds on the Statement of Current Funds Revenues, Expen-


ditures, and Other
Changes have been ad-
justed to include the value
of tuition and fees waived.
Also, instruction expendi-
tures reported have been
increased to include
$13,580,034 of graduate
student waivers; scholar-
ship and fellowship expen-
ditures reported have been
increased to include
$6,706,812 of undergraduate waivers. A schedule of fee waivers is
presented in Table 11.


425,059



219,269
54,197


273,466


425,059



196,288
45,935


242,223


22,981
8,262


31,243


Total for Special Units


(9,030)















iTable 11 Schedule of FeeWaivers


Fee
Matriculation
Out-of-State
Building
Student Financial Aid
Capital Improvement
Activity and Service
Health
Athletic
Housing
Lab
Repeat Surcharge
Total


Amount Waived
$ 8,203,426
11,350,367
24,321
237,754
59,229
180,120
148,430
29,066
29,885
14,717
9,531
$ 20,286,846


ble 2 Stden 0e Coll et a


Fee
Building
Student Financial Aid
Activity and Service
Health
Women's Athletic
Athletic
Material & Supply
Late Payment and Registration
Total


Certain student fees were collected and retained by the Univer-
sity. These are presented in Table 12.

In addition, certain student fees were collected and remitted
directly to the State Treasurer on behalf of the Board of Regents
(see Table 13). Accordingly, these fees were recognized as revenue
by the Board of Regents and not the University.


Amount Collected
$ 894,948
5,717,275
8,973,155
6,866,339
1,511,596
544,185
807,787
479,419
$ 25,794,704


18. INSURANCE RISK EXPOSURE

In accordance with a program for central insurance purchases
adopted by the Florida Cabinet in 1969, the Department of
Management Services has been granted authority to purchase
insurance on behalf of all State agencies. This authority was
granted with the enactment of Section 287.022, Florida Statutes.


I Table 1 Fee .Co-gll ected and Remid to te S e .r


Fee
Capital Improvement Fee
Building Fee (University
Capital Improvement)


Balance Due
to BOR
at 6/30/99
$ 66,256


41,872


Balance
Collected
1999-2000
2,950,885


1,910,830


Balance
Remitted
1999-2000
3,017,141


1,952,702


Accounts
Receivable
at 6/30/00
$ 48,743


30,615


$ 108,128 $ 4,861,715 $ 4,969,843 $


Balance
Due to BOR
at 6/30/00
48,743


30,615


79,358 $ 79,358














Other actions by the Legislature have resulted in the development
of State self-insurance funds providing hazard insurance for prop-
erty and casualty insurance for State employees workers' compen-
sation, general liability, and fleet automotive liability. The Uni-
versity participates in these programs. Property losses in excess of
$4 million are commercially insured up to $300 million per loss
event. Payments on
tort claims are lim-
ited to $100,000 per
person and $200,000
per occurrence as set
by Section 768.28,
Florida Statutes. Pre-
miums are calculated
on the cash needs of
the program and are
based on the amount
of risk exposure for
each State agency.
There have been no
significant reductions
in insurance coverage
from the prior year
coverage. Settlements have not exceeded insurance coverage dur-
ing the past three years.

The J. Hillis Miller Health Center Self-Insurance Program and
the University of Florida J. Hillis Miller Health Center/Jackson-
ville Self-Insurance Program were established by the Board of
Regents pursuant to the authority of Section 240.213, Florida
Statutes. The Self-Insurance Programs are used to account for a
program of general and professional liability protection for the
Board of Regents acting as the six health colleges of the Health
Science Center, including the Student Health Care Services Aux-
iliary and the Veterinary Medical Teaching Hospital. Hospital
professional liabil-
ity protection is
provided to Shands
Teaching Hospital
and Clinics, Inc., ..........
University Medical
Center of Jackson-
ville, and other
Board of Regents
support corpora-
tions which volun-
tarily participate in
the Self-Insurance
Programs. The
Health Science
Center is protected
for losses, which are
subject to Section
768.28, Florida
Statutes, including


legislative claims bills, which in combination with the waiver of
immunity limits described in Section 768.28 do not exceed $1
million per claim. The Self-Insurance Programs provide $2 mil-
lion per-claim protection for the participants which are not sub-
ject to the provisions of Section 768.28. Each Self-Insurance
Program retains annual aggregate limits of liability protection of $
7.5 million.

Pursuant to the authority of Rule 6C-10.001(2) Florida Adminis-
trative Code, the University of Florida Self-Insurance Program
Councils has created the University of Florida Healthcare Educa-
tion Insurance Company (HEIC), a captive insurance company
which is wholly owned by the Board of Regents and which is
domiciled in the State of Vermont. HEIC is managed by a Board
of Directors created by the Board of Regents for that purpose.
HEIC provides $5,000,000 of per-claim and annual aggregate
claims coverage on a claims-made basis for losses which are in
excess of the protections afforded by the Self-Insurance Programs.
In association with the
University of South
Florida Health Science
Center Insurance Com-
pany (HSIC), HEIC
purchases $45 million of
per-claim and annual ag-
gregate claims coverage
on a claims-made basis

the underlying limits of
liability provided by the
Self-Insurance Programs
and HEIC. The Uni-
versity of South Florida
Self-Insurance Program
provides the same per-claim limits of liability as do the University
of Florida programs, and $3.5 million in annual aggregate claims.
The excess insurance is paid to claimants on a first come-first serve
basis. HEIC and HSIC fully reinsures all risks underwritten by
the two companies. See Note 10.

19. CONTINGENT LIABILITIES
The United States Department of Justice is investigating certain
billing practices and contractual relationships at the College of
Medicine relating to four federal programs. Such programs in-
clude the Veterans Administration, Champus, HHS, and State
Medicaid. The HHS Office of Inspector General is conducting
an audit of Medicare billing practices at the College of Medicine.
It is probable that the University of Florida and the Florida
Clinical Practice Association, Inc., will settle the matter for a sum
between $8 million and $9 million dollars, to be satisfied over a
period of years. Such a settlement amount could have a material
financial impact on the University of Florida, the University of
Florida Health Science Center and other related entities, as well as
the Florida Clinical Practice Association, Inc., but it will not
adversely affect the operations of those entities.















Financial Summary of Current Programs
For the Year Ended June 30, 2000
(amounts expressed in thousands)


UNRESTRICTED


Revenues and Other Additions
Student Tuition and Fees


$


Government Appropriations State
Government Appropriations Federal
Gifts, Grants, and Contracts:
Federal
Other Governmental
Private
Auxiliary Sales & Services-Operations
Sales and Services of Educational Activities
Other Sources:
Investment Income
Other Income
Total Revenues and Other Additions $


Expenditures and Other Deductions
Instruction
Research
Public Service
Academic Support
Student Services
Institutional Support
Operation and Maintenance of Plant
Scholarships/Fellowships
Auxiliary Expenditures
Resources Remitted to Other SUS
Universities/BOR
Total Expenditures and
Other Deductions


Transfers Among Funds
Mandatory
Nonmandatory
Refunded to Grantors
Primary Government to/from
Component Units
Total Transfers Among Funds


Net Increase/(Decrease) in
Fund Balance


130,397
311,413


9,386
5,059
72,518
16,328


5,336
2,270
552,707


$ 217,923
33,153
3,621
66,223
21,723
36,099
52,986
12,879
68,219


$ 130,397
311,413


220,499
10,613
26,933


8,804


2,605
25
269,479


$ 5,670
69,760
1,922
2,272
2,688
919
274
155,291


220,499
19,999
31,992
72,518
25,132


7,941
2,295
822,186




223,593
102,913
5,543
68,495
24,411
37,018
53,260
168,170
68,219


$ 16,542 $
96,375


506
4,521
4,842
24,154


2,718
173
149,831




122,530
21,603
36,226
18,945
1,080
23,495


293
12,672


$ 16,542
96,375


39,360
9,374
11,636


11,245




18
71,633




28,905
58,094
16,717
195


1,538


$ 512,826 $ 238,796 $ 751,622 $ 236,851 $ 105,449 $ 342,300


$ (5,914) $
9,300




10,196
$ 13,582 $




$ 53,463 $


$
(4,257)
(222)


3,230
(1,249) $


(5,914)
5,043
(222)


13,426
12,333 $


1,980




74,265
76,245


(11,472)


22,922
$ 11,450


97,187
$ 87,695


(10,775) $ (22,366) $ (33,141)


EDUCATIONAL AND GENERAL FUNDS


RESTRICTED


TOTAL


UNRESTRICTED


HEALTH CENTER
RESTRICTED


TOTAL


39,360
9,880
16,157
4,842
35,399


2,718
191
221,464




151,435
79,697
52,943
19,140
1,080
23,495
7
1,831
12,672


(9,492)


29,434 $ 82,897 $















Financial Summary of Current Programs
For the Year Ended June 30, 2000
(amounts expressed in thousands)


UNRESTRICTED


Revenues and Other Additions
Student Tuition and Fees


$


Government Appropriations State
Government Appropriations Federal
Gifts, Grants, and Contracts:
Federal
Other Governmental
Private
Auxiliary Sales & Services-Operations
Sales and Services of Educational Activities
Other Sources:
Investment Income
Other Income
Total Revenues and Other Additions $


Expenditures and Other Deductions
Instruction
Research
Public Service
Academic Support
Student Services
Institutional Support
Operation and Maintenance of Plant
Scholarships/Fellowships
Auxiliary Expenditures
Resources Remitted to Other SUS
Universities/BOR
Total Expenditures and
Other Deductions


Transfers Among Funds
Mandatory
Nonmandatory
Refunded to Grantors
Primary Government to/from
Component Units
Total Transfers Among Funds


Net Increase/(Decrease) in
Fund Balance


130,397
311,413


9,386
5,059
72,518
16,328


5,336
2,270
552,707


$ 217,923
33,153
3,621
66,223
21,723
36,099
52,986
12,879
68,219


$ 130,397
311,413


220,499
10,613
26,933


8,804


2,605
25
269,479


$ 5,670
69,760
1,922
2,272
2,688
919
274
155,291


220,499
19,999
31,992
72,518
25,132


7,941
2,295
822,186




223,593
102,913
5,543
68,495
24,411
37,018
53,260
168,170
68,219


$ 16,542 $
96,375


506
4,521
4,842
24,154


2,718
173
149,831




122,530
21,603
36,226
18,945
1,080
23,495


293
12,672


$ 16,542
96,375


39,360
9,374
11,636


11,245




18
71,633




28,905
58,094
16,717
195


1,538


$ 512,826 $ 238,796 $ 751,622 $ 236,851 $ 105,449 $ 342,300


$ (5,914) $
9,300




10,196
$ 13,582 $




$ 53,463 $


$
(4,257)
(222)


3,230
(1,249) $


(5,914)
5,043
(222)


13,426
12,333 $


1,980




74,265
76,245


(11,472)


22,922
$ 11,450


97,187
$ 87,695


(10,775) $ (22,366) $ (33,141)


EDUCATIONAL AND GENERAL FUNDS


RESTRICTED


TOTAL


UNRESTRICTED


HEALTH CENTER
RESTRICTED


TOTAL


39,360
9,880
16,157
4,842
35,399


2,718
191
221,464




151,435
79,697
52,943
19,140
1,080
23,495
7
1,831
12,672


(9,492)


29,434 $ 82,897 $




















INSTITUTE OF FOOD AND AGRICULTURAL SCIENCES
UNRESTRICTED RESTRICTED TOTAL


88
110,234


7,595


6,686
1,112


1,446


44
523
$ 120,133


16,539
3,107
16,968


476


550
5
$ 45,240


88
110,234
7,595


16,539
9,793
18,080


1,922


594
528
165,373


TOTAL CURRENT PROGR
UNRESTRICTED RESTRICTED


147,027
518,022


7,595


16,578
10,692
77,360
41,928


8,098
2,966
822,671


276,398
23,094
55,537


20,525


3,155
48
386,352 $


AMS
TOTAL



$ 147,027
518,022
7,595


276,398
39,672
66,229
77,360
62,453


11,253
3,014
1,209,023


$ 19,205 $ 263 $ 19,468 $ 359,658 $ 34,838 $ 394,496
71,922 29,560 101,482 126,678 157,414 284,092
27,833 10,919 38,752 67,680 29,558 97,238
164 164 85,168 2,631 87,799
22,803 2,688 25,491
7,631 593 8,224 67,225 1,512 68,737
10,035 222 10,257 63,028 496 63,524
13,172 156,829 170,001
70 -70 80,961 80,961





$ 136,696 $ 41,721 $ 178,417 $ 886,373 $ 385,966 $ 1,272,339


(788)


381
$ (407) $




$ (16,970) $


(545)
(29)


435
(139) $


$ (5,914) $
(1,333) 10,492
(29)


816 84,842
(546) $ 89,420 $


$ (5,914)
(16,274) (5,782)
(251) (251)


26,587 111,429
10,062 $ 99,482


3,380 $ (13,590) $


25,718 $


10,448 $


36,166















Direct Support Organizations
For Fiscal Years Ended in 1999
(amounts expressed in thousands)


Assets
Current Assets $
Deferred Charges and Other Assets
Due from Primary Government/Component Units
Net Investment In Plant
Total Assets $


Liabilities
Current Liabilities $
Due to Primary Government/Component Units
Long-Term Liabilities
Total Liabilities $


Total Fund Balances $


Total Liabilities and Fund Balances $


Revenues and Other Additions
Fees, Dues and Charges $
Grants, Contributions and Donations
Sales of Goods and Services
Investment Income
Other
Total Revenues and Other Additions $


Total Expenditures and Other Deductions $


Transfers Between Primary Government
and Component Units $


Net Increase (Decrease) $


Fund Balances at Beginning of Year $


Fund Balance Adjustments $


Fund Balances at End of Year $


University
of Florida
Foundation
6/30/1999


763,312
468


34,081
797,861




6,084
17,821
30,364
54,269


743,592


797,861





92,111


60,644
7,385
160,140


38,435




(16,829)


104,876


638,716





743,592


University
of Florida
Alumni
Association
6/30/1999


$





$


University
of Florida
Athletic
Association
6/30/1999


$ 48,355
2,354
1,880
56,765
$ 109,354


Gator
Boosters
6/30/1999


2,882
341
22,330
60
25,613


$ 64,667 $ 1,164
-2,083


$ 64,667 $ 3,247


$ 44,687 $ 22,366


$ 109,354 $ 25,613


932
932


2,209


1,277 $


$


$


$


$


2,238
29,040
1,884
4,226
37,388


42,999




11,391


5,780


38,907





44,687


15,479


1,985


17,464


1,841




(12,973)


2,650


19,716





22,366


University
of Florida
Law Center
Association
6/30/1999


$ 603


4,976


$ 5,579


University
of Florida
Research
Foundation
6/30/1999


$ 56,670


16,771


$ 73,441




$ 36,341
6,205


$ 42,546


$ 30,895


$ 73,441




$ 475
29,074


3,726
21,358
$ 54,633


$ 36,633


2,981




2,981


2,598


5,579


(12,897) $


5,103 $


25,792 $


$


30,895 $


(20)


35


2,563





2,598




















Florida
4-H Club
Foundation
3/31/1999


$ 754
7
1,910


$ 2,671


Florida Southwest Citrus
Association of Florida Research Research &
Basic Medical & Education Education
Scientists Foundation Foundation
6/30/1999 6/30/1999 6/30/1999


$ 22 $ 36 $ 80


$


22 $


46
82 $


80


Florida
Foundation
Seed
Producers
6/30/1999


$ 2,256
9


1,213
$ 3,478




$ 73
511


$ 584


$ 2,894


$ 3,478




$ 11


864
53
573
$ 1,501


$ 973


572 $


2,099 $


2,671 $


$ 865 $
682
25
147
27
$ 1,746 $


$ 1,151 $


(31) $


564 $


1,535 $




2,099 $
2,099 $


2 $


22 $
22 $




$
4


-T $

$


$
4 $










4 $


18 $




2 $
22 $


8 $


82 $
82 $




$
22
13
2


37 $


35 $




$


2 $


80 $




8 $
82 $


80 $





80 $
$


80 $


University
of Florida
Tissue Bank
6/30/1999


$ 6,446
15


78
$ 6,539




$ 1,612


1,329
$ 2,941


$ 3,598


$ 6,539


12,128
35


12,163


15,106







(2,943)


6,541





3,598


Florida Treasure Coast
Leadership & Agricultural
Education Research
Foundation Foundation
12/31/1999 6/30/1999


$ 402 $ 70


1,065
12 8
$ 1,479 $ 78


$ 92 $


92 $


1,387 $


1,479 $


Total


$ 881,888
3,194
48,932
92,263
$ 1,026,277


2 $ 113,588
26,620
31,693
2 $ 171,901


76 $ 854,376


78 $ 1,026,277


$ 1,233 $
223


168
1
$ 1,625 $


$ 1,227 $


2,587
140,307
42,147
69,026
34,587
288,654


141,431




(30,697)


116,526


737,850





854,376


398 $


98 $




1989 $
$


1,387 $


$ 572 $


(615)


(87)


2,981





2,894













UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA

Financial Aid Administered
For the Year Ended June 30, 2000


Federal Programs
Pell Grants
Supplemental Educational Opportunity Grants
Perkins Student Loans
Health Professions Student Loans
William D. Ford Direct Loans
Total Federal Financial Aid Administered



State Programs
Loans:
University of Florida Short Term Loans
Student Aid For Education (SAFE) Loans
University of Florida Long Term Loans
Total Loans Administered

Scholarships and Grants:
Racing Scholarships
State of Florida Financial Aid Programs
Lottery Trust Grants
Total Scholarships and Grants Administered
Total State Financial Aid Administered

Other Scholarships and Grants
Institutional Grants:
College Awarded Scholarships
Graduate Tuition Remission
General Scholarships
Total Institutional Grants Administered

Custodial Scholarships:
Tuition, Trusts, Clubs, Service Organizations, etc.
Total Other Scholarships and Grants Administered

Fee Waivers
Non-Resident Tuition Waivers
Other Waivers
Total Fee Waivers Administered


7,155
2,774
1,443
115
19,648
31,135






1,144
88
571
1,803



441
21,559

22,000
23,803


$ 13,657,372
2,884,315
2,858,926
275,393
119,059,647
$ 138,735,653






$ 842,193
109,140
633,416
$ 1,584,749



$ 360,106
42,493,007

$ 42,853,113
$ 44,437,862


9,108
8,721
4,028
21,857



3,332
25,189



4,240
10,412
14,652


$ 18,236,702
7,741,742
7,108,781
$ 33,087,225


5,174,561
38,261,785


$ 10,830,591
9,456,255
$ 20,286,846



$ 241,722,147


Total Financial Aid Administered


Number of
Recipients


Aid
Disbursed




















































a- --


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The University of Florida 1999-2000 Annual Financial Report was prepared by the
Finance and Accounting Division of the Office of Administrative Affairs

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