• TABLE OF CONTENTS
HIDE
 Title Page
 Introduction
 Keynote address
 Corps requirements
 Speakers comments
 I: Artificial reef construction...
 II: Requirements for a department...
 III: Workshop registrants






Group Title: Florida Sea Grant technical paper.
Title: Proceedings Artificial Reef Workshop
CITATION PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00072261/00001
 Material Information
Title: Proceedings Artificial Reef Workshop Sarasota, Florida, June 16, 1976
Series Title: Florida Sea Grant technical paper
Physical Description: 16 p. in various pagings : map ; 28 cm.
Language: English
Creator: Coughenower, Doug
Bender, Bob
Conference: Artificial Reef Workshop, (1976
Publisher: Marine Research Education Advisory Services
Place of Publication: S.l
Publication Date: 1976
 Subjects
Subject: Artificial reefs -- Congresses   ( lcsh )
Genre: government publication (state, provincial, terriorial, dependent)   ( marcgt )
conference publication   ( marcgt )
non-fiction   ( marcgt )
 Notes
Funding: Technical paper (Florida Sea Grant College)
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00072261
Volume ID: VID00001
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved, Board of Trustees of the University of Florida
Resource Identifier: oclc - 12377300

Table of Contents
    Title Page
        Title Page
    Introduction
        Page 1
    Keynote address
        Page 2
    Corps requirements
        Page 3
    Speakers comments
        Page 3
        Manatee reefs
            Page 3
        Sarasota project
            Page 3
        Fort Myers beach
            Page 4
        Naples cruise club
            Page 4
        Marco reefs
            Page 4
        Commercial fishing
            Page 4
        Pinellas projects
            Page 5
        Diver's comments
            Page 5
        State researcher
            Page 5
        Other speakers
            Page 5
    I: Artificial reef construction guidelines
        Page A 1
        Page A 2
        Page A 3
        Page A 4
    II: Requirements for a department of the army permit to construct artificial reefs in the navigable waters of the United States
        Page A 5
        Page A 6
        Page A 7
    III: Workshop registrants
        Page A 8
        Page A 9
Full Text
23~


PROCEEDINGS
ARTIFICIAL REEF WORKSHOP
SARASOTA, FLORIDA
JUNE 16, 1976


Doug Coughenowerl
Bob Bender2


Florida Sea Grant
Technical Paper


~s-~t
22, 13

















PROCEEDINGS
ARTIFICIAL REEF WORKSHOP
SARASOTA, FLORIDA
JUNE 16, 1976


Doug Coughenowerl
Bob Bender2







INTRODUCTION

An all day workshop dealing with artificial fishing reefs was held
June 16, 1976 at the Sarasota Extension Auditorium, Sarasota, Florida. The
following is a summary of the information and materials presented at this
workshop. The program was sponsored by the Florida Marine Advisory Program,
a component of the Florida Cooperative Extension Service and the communi-
cations arm of the Florida Sea Grant Program.
The main objective of the workshop was to provide groups and individuals
interested in artificial reefs with the opportunity to exchange information
about their successes and failures and to learn more about initiating and
operating a successful reef program.





1Extension Marine Agent for the five southwest Florida counties, stationed
in Palmetto (Manatee County Extension Office).

20utdoor writer for the Manatee Times. This summary also appeared in
the June 20, 1976 edition of the Manatee (Florida) Times.











KEYNOTE ADDRESS


Keynote speaker was Richard B. Stone, chief of the artificial reef
program for the National Marine Fisheries Service. Stone, who was then
assigned to the Atlantic Esturarine Fisheries Center at Beaufort, N.C.,
has assisted and studied manmade reef projects along the entire Atlantic
and Gulf coasts.

"Basically, the purpose of constructing an artificial reef is to improve
or provide a rough bottom. Here in Florida, much of the bottom from the
breaker zone is fairly flat for quite a way offshore until you get into the
live bottoms with rock outcroppings, coral, etc.," Stone said.

"We have discovered that there is not much difference between the
carrying capacity of an artificial and a natural reef. The high profile
reefs are best, and a composite reef could be expected to produce the best
results. This would be a reef with tire units, concrete culverts and debris
plus a large vessel. The addition of the vessel would increase the height of
the reef and would help to attract the large pelagic species. This would be
a complete reef, that would also attract the small bottom creatures, the usual
reefs fishes and keep the migratory fishes around longer than usual.

Stone said research information is lacking on how large a manmade reef
has to be to support a certain amount of fishing pressure, and the federal
level field program is completed.

Generally speaking, the more surface area a reef has, the more productive
it will be.

Stone said a number of states provide funds for artificial reefs, along
with personnel. These include Georgia, South Carolina, North Carolina, Virginia
and Maryland.

He said water tank studies would be valuable to determine the effect
of storm wave action on reefs and how stable the various types of reefs are.

"These reefs are a management tool that we probably will be turning
to more and more in the future," Stone said.

"The artificial reefs help alleviate pressures on the natural reefs, and
they not only serve as a gathering place for fishes, but actually result in
an increase in sea life in an area."









CORPS REQUIREMENTS


How much water has to be over a manmade fishing reef was one of the
questions fielded by John Adams of the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers district
office in Jacksonville.

"Our regulations call for 50-foot clearance over the top of the reef, but
this requirement can and has been waived when working in a shallow water area.
We generally ask for 30 feet of water over the reef at mean low water, but
even this has been reduced in some cases. We look at each application on its
own merit," Adams said.

Sarasota's new artificial reef 1 1/2 miles off Lido beach is in 27 feet
of water and the reef is 10 feet in height, resulting in a clearance of 17
feet.

Adams said the corps will not approve wooden vessels as reef material for
they break up and create hazards to navigation. Metal material would have to
get Navy clearance. The use of derelict vessels must be approved by the Coast
Guard to be sure there's no possibility of them sinking while being moved to
the reef site and to insure there will be no pollution from fuel or other sources.

Total time to obtain a corps permit for a reef is about four months. Adams
said, but he said the new permits in most cases are valid for a 10-year period
instead of the previous three years.

SPEAKERS COMMENTS
Manatee Reefs
Bob Fowinkle of the recently formed Manatee Reef Committee: We're now in
the process of obtaining permits for the four reefs we're going to put in. Two
of these will be located three and seven miles due west of Longboat Pass and two
were to be three and seven miles due west of the north point of Anna Maria Island,
but these latter two have to be moved about a mile to the south so as not to be
in a marine waterway. In the future, we hope to develop two more reefs in deeper
water farther offshore: But from these first four reefs the boater still can
see shore and--providing fog doesn't set in--knows which way to head to get
home. (He should have at least a hand-held compass aboard in case fog does set in).

Sarasota Project

Kent Wiley of the Sarasota Reef Committee: We started two years ago in May
to build a series of reefs from the Manatee to the Charlotte County line. We
decided to do it all with privately donated money instead of asking for federal,
state or local funds. Our first reef is 1 1/2 miles out from either New Pass
or Big Sarasota Pass, 1.1 miles offshore and can be lined up by getting the tank
behind the middle of the three tall buildings. We made our first dump of tires
1 1/2 months ago. We used multiple bales of tires that weigh 2,000 pounds and
found we don't need concrete to hold them in place. We have 6,000 tires out there
and hope to put in 100,000 tires in each year at a cost of less than $20,000 per
year in private donations by interested people.









CORPS REQUIREMENTS


How much water has to be over a manmade fishing reef was one of the
questions fielded by John Adams of the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers district
office in Jacksonville.

"Our regulations call for 50-foot clearance over the top of the reef, but
this requirement can and has been waived when working in a shallow water area.
We generally ask for 30 feet of water over the reef at mean low water, but
even this has been reduced in some cases. We look at each application on its
own merit," Adams said.

Sarasota's new artificial reef 1 1/2 miles off Lido beach is in 27 feet
of water and the reef is 10 feet in height, resulting in a clearance of 17
feet.

Adams said the corps will not approve wooden vessels as reef material for
they break up and create hazards to navigation. Metal material would have to
get Navy clearance. The use of derelict vessels must be approved by the Coast
Guard to be sure there's no possibility of them sinking while being moved to
the reef site and to insure there will be no pollution from fuel or other sources.

Total time to obtain a corps permit for a reef is about four months. Adams
said, but he said the new permits in most cases are valid for a 10-year period
instead of the previous three years.

SPEAKERS COMMENTS
Manatee Reefs
Bob Fowinkle of the recently formed Manatee Reef Committee: We're now in
the process of obtaining permits for the four reefs we're going to put in. Two
of these will be located three and seven miles due west of Longboat Pass and two
were to be three and seven miles due west of the north point of Anna Maria Island,
but these latter two have to be moved about a mile to the south so as not to be
in a marine waterway. In the future, we hope to develop two more reefs in deeper
water farther offshore: But from these first four reefs the boater still can
see shore and--providing fog doesn't set in--knows which way to head to get
home. (He should have at least a hand-held compass aboard in case fog does set in).

Sarasota Project

Kent Wiley of the Sarasota Reef Committee: We started two years ago in May
to build a series of reefs from the Manatee to the Charlotte County line. We
decided to do it all with privately donated money instead of asking for federal,
state or local funds. Our first reef is 1 1/2 miles out from either New Pass
or Big Sarasota Pass, 1.1 miles offshore and can be lined up by getting the tank
behind the middle of the three tall buildings. We made our first dump of tires
1 1/2 months ago. We used multiple bales of tires that weigh 2,000 pounds and
found we don't need concrete to hold them in place. We have 6,000 tires out there
and hope to put in 100,000 tires in each year at a cost of less than $20,000 per
year in private donations by interested people.









CORPS REQUIREMENTS


How much water has to be over a manmade fishing reef was one of the
questions fielded by John Adams of the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers district
office in Jacksonville.

"Our regulations call for 50-foot clearance over the top of the reef, but
this requirement can and has been waived when working in a shallow water area.
We generally ask for 30 feet of water over the reef at mean low water, but
even this has been reduced in some cases. We look at each application on its
own merit," Adams said.

Sarasota's new artificial reef 1 1/2 miles off Lido beach is in 27 feet
of water and the reef is 10 feet in height, resulting in a clearance of 17
feet.

Adams said the corps will not approve wooden vessels as reef material for
they break up and create hazards to navigation. Metal material would have to
get Navy clearance. The use of derelict vessels must be approved by the Coast
Guard to be sure there's no possibility of them sinking while being moved to
the reef site and to insure there will be no pollution from fuel or other sources.

Total time to obtain a corps permit for a reef is about four months. Adams
said, but he said the new permits in most cases are valid for a 10-year period
instead of the previous three years.

SPEAKERS COMMENTS
Manatee Reefs
Bob Fowinkle of the recently formed Manatee Reef Committee: We're now in
the process of obtaining permits for the four reefs we're going to put in. Two
of these will be located three and seven miles due west of Longboat Pass and two
were to be three and seven miles due west of the north point of Anna Maria Island,
but these latter two have to be moved about a mile to the south so as not to be
in a marine waterway. In the future, we hope to develop two more reefs in deeper
water farther offshore: But from these first four reefs the boater still can
see shore and--providing fog doesn't set in--knows which way to head to get
home. (He should have at least a hand-held compass aboard in case fog does set in).

Sarasota Project

Kent Wiley of the Sarasota Reef Committee: We started two years ago in May
to build a series of reefs from the Manatee to the Charlotte County line. We
decided to do it all with privately donated money instead of asking for federal,
state or local funds. Our first reef is 1 1/2 miles out from either New Pass
or Big Sarasota Pass, 1.1 miles offshore and can be lined up by getting the tank
behind the middle of the three tall buildings. We made our first dump of tires
1 1/2 months ago. We used multiple bales of tires that weigh 2,000 pounds and
found we don't need concrete to hold them in place. We have 6,000 tires out there
and hope to put in 100,000 tires in each year at a cost of less than $20,000 per
year in private donations by interested people.









CORPS REQUIREMENTS


How much water has to be over a manmade fishing reef was one of the
questions fielded by John Adams of the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers district
office in Jacksonville.

"Our regulations call for 50-foot clearance over the top of the reef, but
this requirement can and has been waived when working in a shallow water area.
We generally ask for 30 feet of water over the reef at mean low water, but
even this has been reduced in some cases. We look at each application on its
own merit," Adams said.

Sarasota's new artificial reef 1 1/2 miles off Lido beach is in 27 feet
of water and the reef is 10 feet in height, resulting in a clearance of 17
feet.

Adams said the corps will not approve wooden vessels as reef material for
they break up and create hazards to navigation. Metal material would have to
get Navy clearance. The use of derelict vessels must be approved by the Coast
Guard to be sure there's no possibility of them sinking while being moved to
the reef site and to insure there will be no pollution from fuel or other sources.

Total time to obtain a corps permit for a reef is about four months. Adams
said, but he said the new permits in most cases are valid for a 10-year period
instead of the previous three years.

SPEAKERS COMMENTS
Manatee Reefs
Bob Fowinkle of the recently formed Manatee Reef Committee: We're now in
the process of obtaining permits for the four reefs we're going to put in. Two
of these will be located three and seven miles due west of Longboat Pass and two
were to be three and seven miles due west of the north point of Anna Maria Island,
but these latter two have to be moved about a mile to the south so as not to be
in a marine waterway. In the future, we hope to develop two more reefs in deeper
water farther offshore: But from these first four reefs the boater still can
see shore and--providing fog doesn't set in--knows which way to head to get
home. (He should have at least a hand-held compass aboard in case fog does set in).

Sarasota Project

Kent Wiley of the Sarasota Reef Committee: We started two years ago in May
to build a series of reefs from the Manatee to the Charlotte County line. We
decided to do it all with privately donated money instead of asking for federal,
state or local funds. Our first reef is 1 1/2 miles out from either New Pass
or Big Sarasota Pass, 1.1 miles offshore and can be lined up by getting the tank
behind the middle of the three tall buildings. We made our first dump of tires
1 1/2 months ago. We used multiple bales of tires that weigh 2,000 pounds and
found we don't need concrete to hold them in place. We have 6,000 tires out there
and hope to put in 100,000 tires in each year at a cost of less than $20,000 per
year in private donations by interested people.








Fort Myers Beach

Michael A. Yakubik of Beach Reefs Inc., Fort Myers Beach: We've been
successful in obtaining a great deal of publicity from the newspapers, radio
and television. We used such fund-raising schemes as bumper stickers, aluminum
can recycling drives, and canisters in stores. We hope for a dramatic start
when we have an old abandoned sub chaser now in the Caloosahatchee River near
the Highway 31 bridge floated and towed down river 35 miles to our reef site.
The site is 2.2 miles to the nearest land, on a 253 degree course off Big Carlos
Pass at the south end of Fort Myers Beach in 22 to 23 feet of water. We hope
to build the reef 300 feet wide by a mile and a half long. We hope to obtain
imperfect junction boxes used for sewer lines free for hauling them away. On
our committee we have an attorney for legal advice, an accountant is our book-
keeper, a banker our treasurer, we also have an engineer and Chief Smith of the
Coast Guard station. I think we've got it made.

Naples Cruise Club

Edward F. Venn of the Naples Reef Committee of the Naples Cruise Club: We
noticed fishing starting to deteriorate around 1972, probably due to so much
dredging and filling and decided to construct a reef 2 miles west of the Naples
Fishing Pier. lie sent letters twice to our 4,000 registered boat owners in Collier
County and raised $30,000. We found out the new Coast Guard approved buoys
marking the ends of the reef must have a top and bottom band of orange with a
white band in between covered with white reflective material. Our first barge
load was dumped in 1974. We use a cubic foot of concrete with each bundle of
tires and the unit weighs 400 pounds. We use a compactor and squeeze 12 tires
into a 2-foot width. (Others said this eliminated useful surface area, and they
were not sure compacting was advisable). The reef is 3 miles from the two area
inlets. They use a punch to put holes in the tires to let air out and help
them sink.

Marco Reefs

Jay Harmic, director of the Marco Applied Marine Ecology Station Deltona
Corp: We have two reefs, one in 20 feet and the other in 30 feet of water. The
reef in deeper water is the more productive. We think concrete rubble is better
than tires but tires are easy to handle and there are plenty of them. We use
12-tire bundles weighing 300 pounds including the concrete, and we have holes
punched into the tires. Visibility is 5 feet at our shallower reef 1 1/2 miles
offshore and 8 feet at the 30-foot reef. Grunts establish themselves early, then
there are mangrove snapper, spadefish, sheepshead, porkfish, snook. Yes, even
snook at our deeper reef 4.4 miles offshore. We saw jewfish and amberjack there
and yellowtail snapper, hogfish and blue angelfish.

Building the reefs has proven expensive, but it has improved fishing in the
area. But we'd now like a private group to take over the reefs.

Commercial Fishing

Corbett Levens, second vice president of the Organized Florida Fisherman
and a commercial fisherman from Fort Myers: These reefs are fine, and we're all
for them, but there are just a couple of things we'd like to ask. First of all,
the most important thing is to save our natural mangroves, our marshes, our grass
flats, our estuarine areas. Let's all work to save these from destructive dredging








Fort Myers Beach

Michael A. Yakubik of Beach Reefs Inc., Fort Myers Beach: We've been
successful in obtaining a great deal of publicity from the newspapers, radio
and television. We used such fund-raising schemes as bumper stickers, aluminum
can recycling drives, and canisters in stores. We hope for a dramatic start
when we have an old abandoned sub chaser now in the Caloosahatchee River near
the Highway 31 bridge floated and towed down river 35 miles to our reef site.
The site is 2.2 miles to the nearest land, on a 253 degree course off Big Carlos
Pass at the south end of Fort Myers Beach in 22 to 23 feet of water. We hope
to build the reef 300 feet wide by a mile and a half long. We hope to obtain
imperfect junction boxes used for sewer lines free for hauling them away. On
our committee we have an attorney for legal advice, an accountant is our book-
keeper, a banker our treasurer, we also have an engineer and Chief Smith of the
Coast Guard station. I think we've got it made.

Naples Cruise Club

Edward F. Venn of the Naples Reef Committee of the Naples Cruise Club: We
noticed fishing starting to deteriorate around 1972, probably due to so much
dredging and filling and decided to construct a reef 2 miles west of the Naples
Fishing Pier. lie sent letters twice to our 4,000 registered boat owners in Collier
County and raised $30,000. We found out the new Coast Guard approved buoys
marking the ends of the reef must have a top and bottom band of orange with a
white band in between covered with white reflective material. Our first barge
load was dumped in 1974. We use a cubic foot of concrete with each bundle of
tires and the unit weighs 400 pounds. We use a compactor and squeeze 12 tires
into a 2-foot width. (Others said this eliminated useful surface area, and they
were not sure compacting was advisable). The reef is 3 miles from the two area
inlets. They use a punch to put holes in the tires to let air out and help
them sink.

Marco Reefs

Jay Harmic, director of the Marco Applied Marine Ecology Station Deltona
Corp: We have two reefs, one in 20 feet and the other in 30 feet of water. The
reef in deeper water is the more productive. We think concrete rubble is better
than tires but tires are easy to handle and there are plenty of them. We use
12-tire bundles weighing 300 pounds including the concrete, and we have holes
punched into the tires. Visibility is 5 feet at our shallower reef 1 1/2 miles
offshore and 8 feet at the 30-foot reef. Grunts establish themselves early, then
there are mangrove snapper, spadefish, sheepshead, porkfish, snook. Yes, even
snook at our deeper reef 4.4 miles offshore. We saw jewfish and amberjack there
and yellowtail snapper, hogfish and blue angelfish.

Building the reefs has proven expensive, but it has improved fishing in the
area. But we'd now like a private group to take over the reefs.

Commercial Fishing

Corbett Levens, second vice president of the Organized Florida Fisherman
and a commercial fisherman from Fort Myers: These reefs are fine, and we're all
for them, but there are just a couple of things we'd like to ask. First of all,
the most important thing is to save our natural mangroves, our marshes, our grass
flats, our estuarine areas. Let's all work to save these from destructive dredging








Fort Myers Beach

Michael A. Yakubik of Beach Reefs Inc., Fort Myers Beach: We've been
successful in obtaining a great deal of publicity from the newspapers, radio
and television. We used such fund-raising schemes as bumper stickers, aluminum
can recycling drives, and canisters in stores. We hope for a dramatic start
when we have an old abandoned sub chaser now in the Caloosahatchee River near
the Highway 31 bridge floated and towed down river 35 miles to our reef site.
The site is 2.2 miles to the nearest land, on a 253 degree course off Big Carlos
Pass at the south end of Fort Myers Beach in 22 to 23 feet of water. We hope
to build the reef 300 feet wide by a mile and a half long. We hope to obtain
imperfect junction boxes used for sewer lines free for hauling them away. On
our committee we have an attorney for legal advice, an accountant is our book-
keeper, a banker our treasurer, we also have an engineer and Chief Smith of the
Coast Guard station. I think we've got it made.

Naples Cruise Club

Edward F. Venn of the Naples Reef Committee of the Naples Cruise Club: We
noticed fishing starting to deteriorate around 1972, probably due to so much
dredging and filling and decided to construct a reef 2 miles west of the Naples
Fishing Pier. lie sent letters twice to our 4,000 registered boat owners in Collier
County and raised $30,000. We found out the new Coast Guard approved buoys
marking the ends of the reef must have a top and bottom band of orange with a
white band in between covered with white reflective material. Our first barge
load was dumped in 1974. We use a cubic foot of concrete with each bundle of
tires and the unit weighs 400 pounds. We use a compactor and squeeze 12 tires
into a 2-foot width. (Others said this eliminated useful surface area, and they
were not sure compacting was advisable). The reef is 3 miles from the two area
inlets. They use a punch to put holes in the tires to let air out and help
them sink.

Marco Reefs

Jay Harmic, director of the Marco Applied Marine Ecology Station Deltona
Corp: We have two reefs, one in 20 feet and the other in 30 feet of water. The
reef in deeper water is the more productive. We think concrete rubble is better
than tires but tires are easy to handle and there are plenty of them. We use
12-tire bundles weighing 300 pounds including the concrete, and we have holes
punched into the tires. Visibility is 5 feet at our shallower reef 1 1/2 miles
offshore and 8 feet at the 30-foot reef. Grunts establish themselves early, then
there are mangrove snapper, spadefish, sheepshead, porkfish, snook. Yes, even
snook at our deeper reef 4.4 miles offshore. We saw jewfish and amberjack there
and yellowtail snapper, hogfish and blue angelfish.

Building the reefs has proven expensive, but it has improved fishing in the
area. But we'd now like a private group to take over the reefs.

Commercial Fishing

Corbett Levens, second vice president of the Organized Florida Fisherman
and a commercial fisherman from Fort Myers: These reefs are fine, and we're all
for them, but there are just a couple of things we'd like to ask. First of all,
the most important thing is to save our natural mangroves, our marshes, our grass
flats, our estuarine areas. Let's all work to save these from destructive dredging








Fort Myers Beach

Michael A. Yakubik of Beach Reefs Inc., Fort Myers Beach: We've been
successful in obtaining a great deal of publicity from the newspapers, radio
and television. We used such fund-raising schemes as bumper stickers, aluminum
can recycling drives, and canisters in stores. We hope for a dramatic start
when we have an old abandoned sub chaser now in the Caloosahatchee River near
the Highway 31 bridge floated and towed down river 35 miles to our reef site.
The site is 2.2 miles to the nearest land, on a 253 degree course off Big Carlos
Pass at the south end of Fort Myers Beach in 22 to 23 feet of water. We hope
to build the reef 300 feet wide by a mile and a half long. We hope to obtain
imperfect junction boxes used for sewer lines free for hauling them away. On
our committee we have an attorney for legal advice, an accountant is our book-
keeper, a banker our treasurer, we also have an engineer and Chief Smith of the
Coast Guard station. I think we've got it made.

Naples Cruise Club

Edward F. Venn of the Naples Reef Committee of the Naples Cruise Club: We
noticed fishing starting to deteriorate around 1972, probably due to so much
dredging and filling and decided to construct a reef 2 miles west of the Naples
Fishing Pier. lie sent letters twice to our 4,000 registered boat owners in Collier
County and raised $30,000. We found out the new Coast Guard approved buoys
marking the ends of the reef must have a top and bottom band of orange with a
white band in between covered with white reflective material. Our first barge
load was dumped in 1974. We use a cubic foot of concrete with each bundle of
tires and the unit weighs 400 pounds. We use a compactor and squeeze 12 tires
into a 2-foot width. (Others said this eliminated useful surface area, and they
were not sure compacting was advisable). The reef is 3 miles from the two area
inlets. They use a punch to put holes in the tires to let air out and help
them sink.

Marco Reefs

Jay Harmic, director of the Marco Applied Marine Ecology Station Deltona
Corp: We have two reefs, one in 20 feet and the other in 30 feet of water. The
reef in deeper water is the more productive. We think concrete rubble is better
than tires but tires are easy to handle and there are plenty of them. We use
12-tire bundles weighing 300 pounds including the concrete, and we have holes
punched into the tires. Visibility is 5 feet at our shallower reef 1 1/2 miles
offshore and 8 feet at the 30-foot reef. Grunts establish themselves early, then
there are mangrove snapper, spadefish, sheepshead, porkfish, snook. Yes, even
snook at our deeper reef 4.4 miles offshore. We saw jewfish and amberjack there
and yellowtail snapper, hogfish and blue angelfish.

Building the reefs has proven expensive, but it has improved fishing in the
area. But we'd now like a private group to take over the reefs.

Commercial Fishing

Corbett Levens, second vice president of the Organized Florida Fisherman
and a commercial fisherman from Fort Myers: These reefs are fine, and we're all
for them, but there are just a couple of things we'd like to ask. First of all,
the most important thing is to save our natural mangroves, our marshes, our grass
flats, our estuarine areas. Let's all work to save these from destructive dredging





and filling and pollution. In Lee County alone, commercial fishing is a $260
million industry. Secondly, we have suffered some destruction to our nets by
tire units that moved from their original sites. We ask that the material be
placed so that it cannot move around on the bottom. And lastly, we invite
you to discuss with us the areas where you plan to construct the reefs, for
even if the bottom appears barren, it might be a shrimp bed or an area where
we net migratory species such as mackerel or kingfish or pompano.

Pinellas Projects

Heyward Mathews, Pinellas County Reef Committee and St. Petersburg Junior
College: We have found slicing the tires in half is far superior to punching holes
in them. They sink more rapidly and fan out when hitting bottom to offer more
surface area. We use nylon banding material to fasten the bundles together. Our
10 municipalities contribute half the cost of our program with Pinellas County
paying the other half. It's an ongoing program that costs about $100,000 per year.
Eventually we hope to have some 10 reefs along our coastline. Our tire splitter
splits even steel radials in three seconds which the punch wouldn't do. We now
have two and hope to add a third tire splitter and handle 200,000 tires each year.
We figure the life of a tire in salt water is around 2,000 years. We don't use
a compressor as it cuts down on surface area. Marine life rapidly attaches itself
to the tires and concrete culverts and some fish move in almost immediately, with
others coming as the food production increases. I don't see any problems between
spear fishermen and the rod and reel fishermen.

Diver's Comments

Mike Della Poali, chief diver, Pinellas Reef Committee: We don't need to
use concrete to weigh down our split tires. Each of our tire units weighs 500
pounds and we tie six units into one bundle weighing 3,000 pounds. We found
that larger numbers of separate piles works better than one big pile, and have
seen the fish get caught by anglers while swimming between the piles. We tried
to use a 230-foot long-mechanized landing ship but when we set off the explosion
to sink it, it blew off the sides so didn't make the high profile we wanted.
We're now trying to dig out a ship that's stuck in shallow water to use. We even
found sargassum on one of our reefs, unusual in this area.

State Researcher

Fred Kalber, Florida Department of Natural Resources, Marine Research
Laboratory in St. Petersburg: An area that produced for the sports fisherman
one-half a fish per hour (one fish every two hours) -- and 95 per cent of these
were sand perch and blue runners -- two years later with an artificial reef
produced 5 to 16 fish per hour, including a wide variety of species. It's
difficult to put an economic price tag on the value of recreational sports fishing,
even though we know it's considerable. With our reefs, we noted kingfish stayed
three or four weeks longer than normal and the reefs kept mackerel around all
year long. In 50-60 mile an hour winds nothing moved. In a really bad
hurricane,there'll probably be a lot more debris from smashed condominiums than
from artificial reefs. There is lack of information on the value of reefs in
shallow estuarine areas such as our bays.

Other Speakers

Among the others who spoke were Grant Bieling of the Pinellas County Artificial
Reef Project; Bill Birchfield, City of Clearwater Marine Department; Frank Manheim
chairman, University of South Florida Department of Marine Science; Jim Higman, and
Bruce Austin, both of the University of Miami School fo Marine Science and Luther
Rozar, Sarasota County extension director.





and filling and pollution. In Lee County alone, commercial fishing is a $260
million industry. Secondly, we have suffered some destruction to our nets by
tire units that moved from their original sites. We ask that the material be
placed so that it cannot move around on the bottom. And lastly, we invite
you to discuss with us the areas where you plan to construct the reefs, for
even if the bottom appears barren, it might be a shrimp bed or an area where
we net migratory species such as mackerel or kingfish or pompano.

Pinellas Projects

Heyward Mathews, Pinellas County Reef Committee and St. Petersburg Junior
College: We have found slicing the tires in half is far superior to punching holes
in them. They sink more rapidly and fan out when hitting bottom to offer more
surface area. We use nylon banding material to fasten the bundles together. Our
10 municipalities contribute half the cost of our program with Pinellas County
paying the other half. It's an ongoing program that costs about $100,000 per year.
Eventually we hope to have some 10 reefs along our coastline. Our tire splitter
splits even steel radials in three seconds which the punch wouldn't do. We now
have two and hope to add a third tire splitter and handle 200,000 tires each year.
We figure the life of a tire in salt water is around 2,000 years. We don't use
a compressor as it cuts down on surface area. Marine life rapidly attaches itself
to the tires and concrete culverts and some fish move in almost immediately, with
others coming as the food production increases. I don't see any problems between
spear fishermen and the rod and reel fishermen.

Diver's Comments

Mike Della Poali, chief diver, Pinellas Reef Committee: We don't need to
use concrete to weigh down our split tires. Each of our tire units weighs 500
pounds and we tie six units into one bundle weighing 3,000 pounds. We found
that larger numbers of separate piles works better than one big pile, and have
seen the fish get caught by anglers while swimming between the piles. We tried
to use a 230-foot long-mechanized landing ship but when we set off the explosion
to sink it, it blew off the sides so didn't make the high profile we wanted.
We're now trying to dig out a ship that's stuck in shallow water to use. We even
found sargassum on one of our reefs, unusual in this area.

State Researcher

Fred Kalber, Florida Department of Natural Resources, Marine Research
Laboratory in St. Petersburg: An area that produced for the sports fisherman
one-half a fish per hour (one fish every two hours) -- and 95 per cent of these
were sand perch and blue runners -- two years later with an artificial reef
produced 5 to 16 fish per hour, including a wide variety of species. It's
difficult to put an economic price tag on the value of recreational sports fishing,
even though we know it's considerable. With our reefs, we noted kingfish stayed
three or four weeks longer than normal and the reefs kept mackerel around all
year long. In 50-60 mile an hour winds nothing moved. In a really bad
hurricane,there'll probably be a lot more debris from smashed condominiums than
from artificial reefs. There is lack of information on the value of reefs in
shallow estuarine areas such as our bays.

Other Speakers

Among the others who spoke were Grant Bieling of the Pinellas County Artificial
Reef Project; Bill Birchfield, City of Clearwater Marine Department; Frank Manheim
chairman, University of South Florida Department of Marine Science; Jim Higman, and
Bruce Austin, both of the University of Miami School fo Marine Science and Luther
Rozar, Sarasota County extension director.





and filling and pollution. In Lee County alone, commercial fishing is a $260
million industry. Secondly, we have suffered some destruction to our nets by
tire units that moved from their original sites. We ask that the material be
placed so that it cannot move around on the bottom. And lastly, we invite
you to discuss with us the areas where you plan to construct the reefs, for
even if the bottom appears barren, it might be a shrimp bed or an area where
we net migratory species such as mackerel or kingfish or pompano.

Pinellas Projects

Heyward Mathews, Pinellas County Reef Committee and St. Petersburg Junior
College: We have found slicing the tires in half is far superior to punching holes
in them. They sink more rapidly and fan out when hitting bottom to offer more
surface area. We use nylon banding material to fasten the bundles together. Our
10 municipalities contribute half the cost of our program with Pinellas County
paying the other half. It's an ongoing program that costs about $100,000 per year.
Eventually we hope to have some 10 reefs along our coastline. Our tire splitter
splits even steel radials in three seconds which the punch wouldn't do. We now
have two and hope to add a third tire splitter and handle 200,000 tires each year.
We figure the life of a tire in salt water is around 2,000 years. We don't use
a compressor as it cuts down on surface area. Marine life rapidly attaches itself
to the tires and concrete culverts and some fish move in almost immediately, with
others coming as the food production increases. I don't see any problems between
spear fishermen and the rod and reel fishermen.

Diver's Comments

Mike Della Poali, chief diver, Pinellas Reef Committee: We don't need to
use concrete to weigh down our split tires. Each of our tire units weighs 500
pounds and we tie six units into one bundle weighing 3,000 pounds. We found
that larger numbers of separate piles works better than one big pile, and have
seen the fish get caught by anglers while swimming between the piles. We tried
to use a 230-foot long-mechanized landing ship but when we set off the explosion
to sink it, it blew off the sides so didn't make the high profile we wanted.
We're now trying to dig out a ship that's stuck in shallow water to use. We even
found sargassum on one of our reefs, unusual in this area.

State Researcher

Fred Kalber, Florida Department of Natural Resources, Marine Research
Laboratory in St. Petersburg: An area that produced for the sports fisherman
one-half a fish per hour (one fish every two hours) -- and 95 per cent of these
were sand perch and blue runners -- two years later with an artificial reef
produced 5 to 16 fish per hour, including a wide variety of species. It's
difficult to put an economic price tag on the value of recreational sports fishing,
even though we know it's considerable. With our reefs, we noted kingfish stayed
three or four weeks longer than normal and the reefs kept mackerel around all
year long. In 50-60 mile an hour winds nothing moved. In a really bad
hurricane,there'll probably be a lot more debris from smashed condominiums than
from artificial reefs. There is lack of information on the value of reefs in
shallow estuarine areas such as our bays.

Other Speakers

Among the others who spoke were Grant Bieling of the Pinellas County Artificial
Reef Project; Bill Birchfield, City of Clearwater Marine Department; Frank Manheim
chairman, University of South Florida Department of Marine Science; Jim Higman, and
Bruce Austin, both of the University of Miami School fo Marine Science and Luther
Rozar, Sarasota County extension director.





and filling and pollution. In Lee County alone, commercial fishing is a $260
million industry. Secondly, we have suffered some destruction to our nets by
tire units that moved from their original sites. We ask that the material be
placed so that it cannot move around on the bottom. And lastly, we invite
you to discuss with us the areas where you plan to construct the reefs, for
even if the bottom appears barren, it might be a shrimp bed or an area where
we net migratory species such as mackerel or kingfish or pompano.

Pinellas Projects

Heyward Mathews, Pinellas County Reef Committee and St. Petersburg Junior
College: We have found slicing the tires in half is far superior to punching holes
in them. They sink more rapidly and fan out when hitting bottom to offer more
surface area. We use nylon banding material to fasten the bundles together. Our
10 municipalities contribute half the cost of our program with Pinellas County
paying the other half. It's an ongoing program that costs about $100,000 per year.
Eventually we hope to have some 10 reefs along our coastline. Our tire splitter
splits even steel radials in three seconds which the punch wouldn't do. We now
have two and hope to add a third tire splitter and handle 200,000 tires each year.
We figure the life of a tire in salt water is around 2,000 years. We don't use
a compressor as it cuts down on surface area. Marine life rapidly attaches itself
to the tires and concrete culverts and some fish move in almost immediately, with
others coming as the food production increases. I don't see any problems between
spear fishermen and the rod and reel fishermen.

Diver's Comments

Mike Della Poali, chief diver, Pinellas Reef Committee: We don't need to
use concrete to weigh down our split tires. Each of our tire units weighs 500
pounds and we tie six units into one bundle weighing 3,000 pounds. We found
that larger numbers of separate piles works better than one big pile, and have
seen the fish get caught by anglers while swimming between the piles. We tried
to use a 230-foot long-mechanized landing ship but when we set off the explosion
to sink it, it blew off the sides so didn't make the high profile we wanted.
We're now trying to dig out a ship that's stuck in shallow water to use. We even
found sargassum on one of our reefs, unusual in this area.

State Researcher

Fred Kalber, Florida Department of Natural Resources, Marine Research
Laboratory in St. Petersburg: An area that produced for the sports fisherman
one-half a fish per hour (one fish every two hours) -- and 95 per cent of these
were sand perch and blue runners -- two years later with an artificial reef
produced 5 to 16 fish per hour, including a wide variety of species. It's
difficult to put an economic price tag on the value of recreational sports fishing,
even though we know it's considerable. With our reefs, we noted kingfish stayed
three or four weeks longer than normal and the reefs kept mackerel around all
year long. In 50-60 mile an hour winds nothing moved. In a really bad
hurricane,there'll probably be a lot more debris from smashed condominiums than
from artificial reefs. There is lack of information on the value of reefs in
shallow estuarine areas such as our bays.

Other Speakers

Among the others who spoke were Grant Bieling of the Pinellas County Artificial
Reef Project; Bill Birchfield, City of Clearwater Marine Department; Frank Manheim
chairman, University of South Florida Department of Marine Science; Jim Higman, and
Bruce Austin, both of the University of Miami School fo Marine Science and Luther
Rozar, Sarasota County extension director.





APPENDIX I


ARTIFICIAL REEF CONSTRUCTION GUIDELINES


The following guidelines have been developed, as a direct result of the workshop,
to assist groups and individuals who are considering artificial reef projects.
These are guidelines and not official policies. However, they have been prepared
by people closely associated with ongoing reef projects and they have been re-
viewed and commented on by several state agencies.


I. SITE SELECTION

A. Preferred Bottom Types

1. Firm sand or shell.
(If the sand is firm, or has a rock layer a few inches below
the sand, heavy reef materials will not sink or fill in and
lose some of their effectiveness.)

B. Bottom Types Not Recommended

1. Soft mud, silt, or shifting sand.
(If reef materials are placed on soft substrate they will
quickly sink of fill in and lose their effectiveness. Soft
silt will cover and kill the fouling organisms that are
important to the reef community.)

2. Existing natural rock outcrops with organic reef communities.
(If the bottom already has a natural reef community there is
no reason to kill or damage it by dumping reef materials on
top of living organisms. There is no advantage in locating
artificial reefs adjacent to existing natural reefs.)

3. Submerged grass flats.
(Submerged grass flats are already productive marine communi-
ties and should not be damaged by reef construction.)


II. PHYSICAL PARAMETERS OF SITE LOCATION

A. Recommended Locations

1. Maximum accessibility to fishermen.
(Since the purpose of reef building is to help fishermen,
the most direct route from the point of origin of the majority
of fishermen is the best location. Whenever possible, a site
due west or east from the pass or channel is best. A compass
heading like 2190 is hard for a 14 foot boat, while a due west
or east heading is very easy for most boats.)





2


2. Water depth greater than 20 feet over the top of the
highest structures on the bottom.
(If reefs are built in shallow water they are subject
to wave damage, and shifting sand. Also the Corps of
Engineers regulations now require 20 feet minimum
clearance over all artificial reefs.)

3. Clean, clear water is desirable if possible.
(If the water is clear then the marine algae will be able
to populate the reef and actually increase the basic food
production of the reef area. Clear water will also allow
diver inspections of the placement of reef materials to
insure proper dispersement for maximum fish attraction.)

B. Locations Not Recommended

1. Areas of high wave energy or high current velocity.
(Many past reefs have been lost or destroyed by being
built in shallow water where shifting sand covered over
reef materials. Strong tidal currents are not good
areas for bottom fishing or anchoring of small boats.)

2. Boat channels, shipping lanes, fairways, dredge areas,
cable crossing areas, or commercial fishing areas.
(The reef will have a large number of small boats at
anchor and should not be in locations where there is
a danger of the fishermen being run down by larger
vessels.)


III. REEF MATERIALS

A. Recommended Materials for Reef Construction

1. Concrete culvert and large diameter concrete rubble.
(Broken or damaged culvert from road construction jobs
is one of the best reef materials used to date. Bridge
or construction rubble with large diameter slabs and
chunks are best, but require heavy equipment to handle.)

2. Steel or fiberglass hulled vessels.
(Even though steel hulls will rust away in time, they
provide almost instant fish population attractors and
are such excellent habitat they they should be used
whenever available.)

3. Vented car and truck tires.
(All tires must be either punched or split in some way
to allow all air to escape upon sinking. Even concrete
ballast will not overcome the need to vent all tires.)








4. Materials used in reef construction must comply with state
water quality standards for Class III waters, which deals
with recreation, and propagation and management of fish and
wildlife. The criteria most likely to effect selection of
reef materials are:

(a) Toxic substances. Material must be free from sub-
stances attributed to municipal, industrial, agri-
cultural or other discharges in concentrations or
combinations which are toxic or harmful to humans,
animals or aquatic life.

(b) Deleterious. Material must be free from substances
attributed to municipal, industrial, agricultural
or other discharges producing color, odor, or other
conditions in such degree as to create a nuisance.

(c) Turbidity. Turbidity shall not exceed fifty (50)
Jackson units as related to standard candle turbidi-
meter above background.


B. Materials Not Recommended for Reef Construction

1. White goods such as old stoves, refrigerators, and washers.
(Some types of white goods are usable but have a limited
lifespan on the bottom in salt water. Other white goods
like stoves and refrigerators have so much insulation that
even concrete ballast will not hold them securely on the
bottom. Even one accidental floating up to wash up onto
a swimming beach would result in adverse publicity that
could end an otherwise successful reef building project.
They are not worth the risk.)

2. Auto bodies.
(Old car bodies were used in early reef construction but
changes in the regulations now require removal of the oil
containing parts like engines, transmissions, rear ends,
etc. The headliner and all upholstery must be removed.
This results in many man-hours of labor for something
which will only last a few years in sea water so not
really worth the effort.)

3. Wooden vessels or pilings.
(Even when ballasted with concrete, wooden hulls will
break up and offer the possibility of floating up to
become a hazard to navigation. Again the risks are not
worth the short time usefulness of the structures.)








4. The Florida Department of Environmental Regulation customarily
requires that the reef materials be inspected by district
personnel prior to emplacement. This inspection is to insure
that the materials have been adequately cleaned of greases
and other petroluem products.


IV. REEF CONFIGURATION ON THE BOTTOM


A, Recommended

1. Clumping of reef materials with dissimilar size materials in
piles or clumps some 30 to 50 feet apart. (By having several
size materials in each pile or clump it will provide a greater
diversity of fish habitat. By having some open bottom between
the piles fishermen will have less anchor entanglement problems,
and fish will be moving from one clump to another and more
likely to be caught by fishermen.)

2. Attain a maximum of relief on the bottom.
(The higher off the bottom the materials can be piled or
stacked the better, with 5 to 10 feet being very good. This
will encourage larger bottom fish, and greater populations
of pelagic fish.)

3. Tires should be secured into large bundles of 25 to 50 tires
or more. (If single tires or clumps are dropped they will
often disperse on the bottom and lose much of their effective-
ness. Nylon or polypropelene line or straps will hold tires
into large bundles and make for better habitat.)


B. Not Recommended

1. Reef configurations that are spread too thin over a large bottom
area. (It may seem like a wider spread would provide room
for more fishermen over the reef, but it results in poor fish
attraction for the effort expended. One good reef is better
than several average ones.)


V. PERMITS REQUIRED

1. United States Army Corps of Engineers see Appendix II for permit
requirements and address for securing permit application.

2. Florida Department of Environmental Regulations Reef work requires
DER Standard Application for Permit/Certification to Work In/On the
Water of the State. This can be obtained by writing Florida DER,
Montgomery Building, 2562 Executive Center Circle East, Tallahassee,
Florida 32301. A portion of this application is reprinted in Appendix II.

3. The ends of the artificial reef must be marked with permanent buoys.
The U.S. Coast Guard should be contacted for approval of the navigational
markers. For information write: Commander, Seventh Coast Guard District,
51 S.W. First Avenue, Miami, Florida 33130.






APPENDIX II


DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY
JACKSONVILLE DISTRICT CORPS OF ENGINEERS
P. 0. BOX 4970
JACKSONVILLE FLORIDA 32201


REQUIREMENTS FOR A DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY PERMIT TO
CONSTRUCT ARTIFICIAL REEFS IN THE NAVIGABLE WATERS
OF THE UNITED STATES


I. The Application.

a. The application should be submitted on the attached Form 4345 and
signed by the person responsible for the reef. Where the applicant is a private
organization or State or local governmental agency, the proper official of the
organization or governmental agency should sign the application.

b. The application, accompanied by plans showing the proposed work,
should be forwarded to the District Engineer, Corps of Engineers, P. 0. Box
4970, Jacksonville, Florida 32201.

2. The Plans.

a. Five copies of the plans (8 by 10 inches in size) are required
to be submitted with the application.

b. The exact location and size of the proposed reef should be carefully
determined and shown on the plans.

c. The center of the reef should be located by distance and bearing
from at least two definite well-known points on shore.

d. The plans should contain a typical sectionshowing depth of water
at the site and clearance over top of the proposed reef at mean low water.

e. Information as to type of material to be used in construction of
the reef should be shown on the plans.

f. Each sheet of plans should contain a simple title, mentioning the
proposed work, name of the waterway, general location, name of applicant, date
and number of sheet.

g. In most cases, buoys at the site of the reefs will be required.
The location of buoys in relation to the reef should be indicated on the plans.
A typical elevation view of the buoys to be used should also be shown. (See
typical application attached hereto).

3. General Criteria.

a. That no artificial reefs will be authorized in natural or improved
channels and fairways in general use by navigation.









b. That the depths of water over proposed artificial reefs shall not
be less than 50 feet below the plane of mean low water where depths in the
vicinity generally exceed this depth.

c. That if deposition of material is authorized in areas limited by
large shoals, depth of water over the material below the plane of mean low water
shall not be generally less than the least depth of water over such shoal.

d. That the materials used in constructing artificial reefs shall
be restricted to heavy non-floatable materials. Metal material may not meet
with the approval of the United States Navy.

e. No artificial reefs will be authorized by the Corps of Engineers
if their establishment would be inimical to the national interest as determined
after consultation with the United States Navy and Unites States Coast Guard.
Approval of a proposed application for the construction of an artificial reef
must be obtained from the pertinent State and local authorities.

f. Permits for the construction of artificial reefs shall include a
condition for the reefs to be marked as required by the U.S. Coast Guard with
costs of installation and maintenance borne by the permitted.

g. The above notwithstanding, all applications will be decided on their
individual merit.

h. The application will be coordinated with the appropriate local
Coast Guard District Commander and with other Federal agencies as necessary.
The Commander Eastern Sea Frontier, Flushing & Washington Avenue, Brooklyn,
New York has been given responsibility for determining Navy interests in pro-
posed modifications to navigable waters along the Eastern and Gulf seaboard.

4. In the review of applications for permits, the jurisdiction of the
United States in navigable waters will be considered as extending to the
ordinary (mean) high water line of non-tidal waters and to the ordinary (mean)
high tide line of seashores and tidal waters. (Note: The U.S. Supreme Court
in Borax Consolidate, Ltd., Vs. Los Angeles, 296 U.S. 26 (1935) stated: "Mean
High water at any place may be defined simply as the average height of the
high waters at that place over a period of 19 years.")





FOR ARTIFICIAL FISHING REEF


c
r-


. ^"


z-z
tn


LIDO BEACH


17
!


CAM OR NUN BUOY
ANCHORED AT
EACH EMD OF.REEF


MA PA5-A-GRILLE
SCALE IN YNARS
zoo. -- ~ '0 o 6EACH


M.LW,


7 PROPOSED ARTIFICIALREEF .
= ij I


TYPIC AL SECT T OkI
-?L- 5-L--L
fL SCALE !!. FEET GIHZOrTAL SC


REEF TO BE CONSTRUCTED OF
"DESCRI BE MATERIAL TO
BE USED) THE TOP TO BE NO
HIGHER THAN -. FT. M.L.W.

PROPOSED ARTIFICIAL REEF
AT_ _____ __
AT-- -
-STATE OF FLORIDA
APPLICATION BY:__
.__ _FISHING CLUB


~-9~---- -1


TYPiCAL APPLICATION


DRAWING







APPENDIX III


WORKSHOP REGISTRANTS


Bob Bender (813) 747-7511
Manatee Times
P.O. Box 1578
Bradenton, FL 33506


M.T. (Fritz Stoppelbein) (813) 472-2685
South West Anglers Club of Florida
534 N. Yachtsman Drive
Sanibel, FL 33957

Norma J. Stoppelbein (813) 472-2685
South West Anglers Club of Florida
534 N. Yachtsman Drive
Sanibel, FL 33957


Jonathan Burr (813)
1213 Woodlawn Terrace
Clearwater, FL 33515


447-8110


James B. Higman (305) 350-7533
RSMAS University of Miami
4600 Rickenbacker Causeway
Miami, FL 33149

Bill Burchfield (813) 442-5690
Marine Dept. City of Clearwater
25 Causeway Blvd.
Clearwater, FL 33513

Kevin L. Erwin (813) 642-2411
Florida Dept. of Environmental Reg.
2180 West First Street
Ft. Myers, FL 33901


Mike Dela Poali
Pinellas Co. Artificial Reef Prog.
14845-49th Street North
Clearwater, FL 33520


Michael A. Yakubik (813)
Beach Reefs, Inc.
5630 Williams Drive
Ft. Myers Beach, FL 33931


463-4445


C. Bruce Austin (305) 350-7297
RSMAS University of Miami
4600 Rickenbacker Causeway
Miami, FL 33149

Corbett Levens (813) 995-0405
Organized Fishermen of Florida
265 Dover Drive
N. Ft. Myers, FL 33903

Col. Edward F. Venn (813) 642-2411
Naples Cruise Club
1876-5th Street South
Naples, FL 33940

W. Larne O'Harra (813) 394-2795
990 North Barfield Drive
Marco Island, FL 33937

Dr. Frederick A. Kalber (813) 896-8626
Marine Research Lab.
100 8th Avenue, S.E.
St. Petersburg, FL 33701


James C. Kinch
990 North Barfie
Marco Island, FL


(813) 394-2795
Id Drive
S33937


Pam Prim (813) 576-6420
9721 Executive Center Dr. N. Suite
St. Petersburg, FL 33702


Jay L. Harmic, Ph.D. (813) 394-2795
990 North Barfield Drive
Marco Island, FL 33937

Darrell Howton (813) 576-6420
9721 Executive Center Dr. N. Suite 200
St. Petersburg, FL 33720

Grant Bieling (813) 531-3596
Pinellas Co. Artificial Reef Prog.
14845-49th Street North
Clearwater, FL 33520


Gregory B. Smith
100 Eighth Avenue
St. Petersburg, FL


Steve Gibson (813)
Sarasota Journal
P.O. Box 1719
Sarasota, FL 33579


(813) 896-8626
S.E.
33701


958-7755


Robert W. Fowinkle (813)
2213 14th Street W.
Bradenton, FL 33505


747-7751


X50








Terry Hazel (813) 447-2206
SPJC Marine Biology
210 N. Missouri Ave.
Clearwater, FL 33515

Becky Jobson (813) 536-1552
491 Woodland Drive
Clearwater, FL 33515

Doug Bowen (813) 977-4290
Student U.S.F.
1517A-139th Ave.
Tampa, FL 33612


Dr. Eila Hanni (813)
U.S.F. So.
14218 Cypress Terrace
Tampa, FL 33624


Wayne S. Kerns (813)
1806A 139th Ave.
Tampa, FL 33612


971-6904


Bradley Ruckup (813) 536-2576
SPJC
2587 Forest Parkway North
Clearwater, FL 33515

Dr. Heyward Mathews (813) 546-0011
SPJC
2546 Drew Street
Clearwater, FL 33515


974-2960


Jay Johnson (813) 758-5167
Press
2605 Florida Blvd.
Clearwater, FL 33515

Alan Fisher (813) 924-6502
1761 Sandalwood Drive
Sarasota, FL 33581

Jim Sims (813) 463-4653
Beach Reefs Inc.
113 Rebecca Avenue
Ft. Myers Beach, FL 33931

Joe Cleary (813) 921-4943
Sarasota Reef Comm.
4552 Camino Real
Sarasota, FL 33581


Thomas M. Leahy (904)
Fla. Sea Grant
G022 McCarty Hall
U. of Fla.
Gainesville, FL 32611


392-1771


Laddie Basa (813) 463-4860
145 Dogwood Lane
Ft. Myers, FL 33901

Dawn Digiacomo (813) 855-1740
SPJC Student
P.O. Box 564
Oldsmar, FL 33557


Dr. Frank
USF Dept.
Tampa, FL


I. Manheim (813) 898-7411
of Marine S. Ex. 231
33612


Don Schug
Rm. 131
Dept. of Marine Sci. USF
St. Petersburg, FL 33700

Dr. Kent Wiley (831) 922-3561
Sarasota Reef Comm.
2035 Constitution Blvd.
Sarasota, FL 33581

Richard B. Stone
Nat'l. Marine Fisheries Service
Atlantic Estuarine Fisheries Center
Beaufort, NC 28516

William Rizzo (813) 388-1105
580 Bowsprit Lane
Sarasota, FL 33577

Doug Coughenower (813) 747-3007
Florida Marine Advisory Program
P.O. Box 338
Palmetto, FL 33561


John Adams (904) 791-2211
U.S. Army Corps of Eng.
P.O. Box 4970
Jacksonville, FL 32201

Luthur Rozar
County Extension Director
2900 Ringling Blvd.
Sarasota, FL 33577




University of Florida Home Page
© 2004 - 2010 University of Florida George A. Smathers Libraries.
All rights reserved.

Acceptable Use, Copyright, and Disclaimer Statement
Last updated October 10, 2010 - - mvs