<%BANNER%>






Tapia
ALL VOLUMES CITATION THUMBNAILS ZOOMABLE PAGE IMAGE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00072147/00250
 Material Information
Title: Tapia
Physical Description: no. : illus. ; 43 cm.
Language: English
Publisher: Tapia House Pub. Co.
Place of Publication: Tunapuna
Publication Date: Sunday, June 12, 1977
Frequency: completely irregular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Politics and government -- Periodicals -- Trinidad and Tobago   ( lcsh )
Genre: periodical   ( marcgt )
serial   ( sobekcm )
 Notes
Dates or Sequential Designation: no. 1- Sept. 28, 1969-
General Note: Includes supplements.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 000329131
oclc - 03123637
notis - ABV8695
sobekcm - UF00072147_00250
System ID: UF00072147:00250

Full Text
SUNDAY JUNt 12, 1977


Vol.7. No.24


.. -tWARY
RESFACH, INSTITUTE
fR T-:;" ;Tuij O MANi
I2 EA.ST 78 STREET
.fcw2A vek i M.


PRINTED AND PUBLISHED WEEKLY BY THE TAPIA HOUSE PUBLISHING CO LTD., 91 TUNAPUNA RD., TUNAPUNA TEL: 662-5126 AND 22 CIPRIANI BVD. P.O.S. 62-25241.


ONE GONE-


HOW


PUNA ID.. TUNAPUNA TEL: 662-1S AND 22CIPRIANI 0VD.P.O.S. 62-41 -
,- -"


A

'1
I ?







r.
F
TH


Wyra-
trmco^~


FLASHBACK


to TAPIA, SUNDAY, MAY-22


Gary Woo Chong


THE public is invited to
the Symposium on the
Building Industry carded
for the Holiday Inn Hotel
on Saturday July 9:
- Administrative Secretary
of Tapia, Allan Harris,
has said that, at the right
time, the Symposium
would be advertised in
the national media.

PAPER WORK

Invitations have also
been mailed to all Tapia
members, reports Gary
Woo Chung, the man in
charge of that paper work.
Meanwhile preparations
are being advanced for
what the Organising Corn-


IT HAPPENED.
The peripatetic rangers of the Flying
Squad finally overran a "guerrilla" camp
in the Guayaguayare forest.
The body count: one dead, Wilbur
"Abba" McAllister, shot "in an exchange
of fire '
Pausing only to pose triumphantly for
newspaper photos over the dead body and the
captured arms and equipment in the abandoned
camp, the Flying Squad took off again into the
bush, in hot pursuit of another camper,
believed by them to have been wounded in the
exchange.
They were still manhunting in Guyagday-
are when two bank robbery attempts happened
in Port-of-Spain within 45 minutes of each-
other.
And at once the Flying Squad Chief came
flying back to the city to take charge of
investigations: a man, had got away on.a motor
bike with $18,000 from the Bank of Nova-
Scotia.
He wore, the papers said, a medium
afro, and not the natty dread-locks shown'on
the head of the late Abba.
As yet no connection has been suggested
between rasta-plaited "guerrillas" or "comman-
dos" in the hills and motor-biking, afro-wearing,
devil's angels who hit the Nova Scotia in St.
James last week.
But the deadly game goes on.
"- (L.G.)


mittee anticipates will be
a thorough technical
examination of the pro-,
blems and possibilities of
the construction industry.

ACTION
Laymen, says one Com-
mittee Member, will be
presented with expert
opinion and the hope is
that priority action will
become clear in a free,
frank and non-partisan
exchange.
Registration fee for the
Symposium is $1 with
lunch ($14) and coffee
($5) optional.
Some participants have
already been registering
in advance at 22, Cipriani
Boulevard.


The Committee's plan
is to circulate an advance
Agenda for the day, once
the main statements have
been finally agreed.
Publication of articles
in a Special Supplement
is aimed for Sunday July
2 in what has been hope-
fully described as "a
splendid effort".


Daulton O'Neil, Committee
Member


Viet Nam

would. b



M




j a
. li


S outer
0


READ
ALLAN HARRIS
ON
PAGE 3


I o o o.o- O


Will England


soften the


mighty Aussies


for W.L


CONCLUDING

NEXT WEEK'



The


Alfred


Mendes


Story


Natural
Health Foods
Keate Street
P.O.S.
COME AND FIGHT
THE FAT WITH
FORMULA 3 +6
AND A
1,000 CALORIE DIET

Stephen son's
BOOKSHOP
31A Erthig Road
Belmont
Wide Range of
Books, Stationery,
Art Material.
Art Material.


45 Cents.


G


P


-6


P. N
B'4""

TPLrZ :
^^**Tjj~rl-l

*h~T~jTS^


i
''





PAGE 2 TAPIA SUNDAY JUNE 12, 1977


Has


run


Dr


out


steam


WITHIN recent times the
Commonwealth Prime Min-
isters' Conference has
emerged as an important
forum for the spokesmen
of the poor and the
oppressed.
On this occasion in
London the African leaders
may be expected to be
eloquent in their condem-
nation of racial discrimina-
tion, apartheid a n d
minority rule.
They will press the rich
and influential countries to
isolate the minority regime
of Southern Africa econ-
omically, politically and
morally.
The majority of Carib-
bean leaders appear to be
not unmindful of the
function of such interna-
tional occasions in helping
to shape world opinion,
and even to build their
own personal reputations.

ILL HEALTH

Gairy, Adams and
Manley have gone to
London. It is almost certain
that only ill-health has
forced Forbes Burnham to'
stay at .home. What, then,
could have been Dr.-
Williams' reason for missing
yet another of these con-
ferences, and such a vitally
important one?
It was unfortunate that
he missed the conference
in Kingston where such a
path-breaking discussion
took place on the question
of a new international
economic order. But the
Prime Minister's absence
on this occasion is even
more remarkable.
It cannot be expected
that the inexperienced
Minister of External Affairs
will provide an adequate


7
*


Burnham
substitute. And it is doubt-
ful that Manley, despite
his recent visits to Africa,
has either the experience
or the stature to speak
convincingly for the Carib-
bean on the central issue
of Southern Africa.
Dr. Williams may or
may not be concerned at
this stage with his interna-
tional reputationT. That is
not the point. The point is
that he is still the Prime
Minister, and as such he
must give the lead.
It is his duty to make
clear where his government
stands on the great inter-,
national issues of the day.
The final responsibility is
his to define his govern-
ment's approach to the
creation of a just interna-
tional order.

INVOLVEMENT

Moreover, the Prime
Minister of Trinidad and
Tobago has had a life-long
interest and involvement
in colonial questions and
race relations, both as an
historian and as a politician.
Indeed, the great expec-
tations that accompanied
his accession to office were
based on the reputation he
had acquired as a formid-
able intellectual champion
of equality for the Negro
in the Caribbean and the
New World.
Surely such a man must
have many important things
to say on the urgent ques-
tions of racial justice in
Southern Africa? By ignor-
ing such a momentous
occasion as the current
Prime Ministers' Confer-
ence, Dr. Williams denies
his country, and his people
and his region an invalu-
able opportunity to make


Manley


a new regime of full rights
for all individuals in
Southern 'Africa, would he"
not have made at the same
time a powerful contribu-
tion to the case for equality
here in the Caribbean and
the New World?
And would it not have
been an equally powerful
contribution to the cause
of justice and fair-play at
home, had he embraced
the opportunity in Kings-
ton to clinch the case for
the closing of'the gap
between the world's rich
and poor, as he was called
upon by the -historical
juncture to do?
That Dr. Williams has
allowed these two opport-


our impress on the world
community.
But the responsible use
by Caribbean leaders of
such international forums
would allow them to do
more than make an impact
on world opinion out of
all proportion to the size
of the countries they
represent.

ASPIRATIONS

Such occasions are
important also for the way
in which they point the
people of the region
toward our role and
orientation in world
affairs, and by extension
toward our aspirations fbr
Caribbean society.
By consistently ignoring
the large moral and politi-
cal issues on \the world
stage, is not the Prime
Minister contributing to
the progressive narrowing
of our horizons and the
trivializing of our existence
at home.
Had Dr. Williams gone
to the 'Commonwealth
Conference as the Dean of
West Indian leaders, and
made a compelling case for


B&H


p


Practical
Wearing. f
ly Styled,
Clothes
\


Williams




of


SHOP


Animaland Poultry Feed Depo t


Local and Foreign


Birds


PET


Pets and Pet Supplies
Cor. E.M. Rd and Basilon St, Tunapuna
Telephone: 6624039


LONGLIFE MUFFLERS
BEAT ALL OTHERS FOR QUALITY VALUE AND LIFE

DIEGO MARTIN PORT OF SPAIN LAVENTILLE SAN FERNANDO
four roads 112, henry st. 42, eastern mn. rd. cross crossing
II I I II


unities to go by default,
and consistently declines
to make use of such impor-
tanf occasions, must be a
cause of serious concern
to those who perceive the
responsibilities of the Gov-
ernment of Trinidad and
Tobago to its people, to
the West Indies and indeed
to the wider world.

COMMITMENT

When we should expect
Dr. Williams to crown a
long career with a rousing
affirmation of the ideals for
which he spoke in the past,
all we get is silence. It
would be churlish to assert
that he only paid lip-
service in the past.

But it 'is entirely reason-
able to wonder whether
his commitment to these
great and vital causes was
merely intellectual,-and to
speculate whether he in
fact lacks those qualities
of heart and soul, which
alone can animate us over
long periods of time, and
in the midst of the greatest
difficulty, when otherwise
our energies would flag.
Lacking that emotional
commitment, has Dr.
-Williams run out of steam?


I --




SUNDAY JUNE 12. 1977 TAPIA ,PAGE 3


WHY



ON C
By ALLAN HARRIS
BEFORE the Conference
of Commonwealth Prime
SMinisters opened in London
earlier this week, the British
Prime Minister, Mr. James
Callaghan, went on record
as saying that Rhodesia and
Namibia would rank very
high on the agenda.
Mr. Callaghan's opinion
reflected the growing
world-wide concern over
the fate of those two terri-
tories, and, indeed, over
the' fate of Southern
Africa as a whole. As
Commonwealth Secretary-
General Shridath Ramphal
put it, Southern Africa
would be the "most urgent
single political issue"
before the assembled Prime
Ministers.
The winds of change, of
which a former British
Prime Minister, Harold
MacMillan, gave notice in
Cape Town nearly twenty
years ago, have how swept
with all their force into
the southernmost part of
the Afriqan continent.
There they threaten to
tear down the last remain-
ing structures of imperial
rule-and of racial subjuga-
tion. Yet, without being
crass. we could say that the
S issue in Zimbabwe (Rho-
S desia), and, to some extent,
Namibia too, has already
Been settled.
SOn all sides of the con-
flict, and for diverse
Reasons, there is the fervent
desire to be rid of Mr.
Smith and his fated little
regime. The only question
now is how to cut the
costs.
But as protracted and
costly in terms of human
life as the liberation of
Zimbabwe and Namibia
could turn out to be, they
are as nothing compared
with what is at the core of
the issue in Southern
Africa.
What many men per-
ceive, but are cautious in
speaking about, is the pro-
blem that lies ahead in the
very heartland of white"
supremacy, the problem of
dismantling the entire
structure ofAfikaner domi-
nation and privilege in
South Africa itself.
The whole enterprise of
change in Southern Africa
is fraught with the greatest
dangers. Southern Africa
happens to be, one of the
most vitally strategic areas
in the world. It is a matter
of the most urgent concern
to the large powers which
way the region goes.
Already the West is on
the defensive. They happen
to have been the former
imperial powers. They still
have a large economic
stake in the region. And
their racial and cultural
affinities to the ruling
minorities are all too obvi-
ous.
Among the communist
superstates, Russia has
emerged as the favourite
supplier of arms ahd aid to


AFRICAN


;'WEALTH PM's AGENDA


the liberation movements.
And as far as the Ameri-
cans go, Kissinger initiated
a policy which tried to
neutralise those factors
which appeared to line up
the United States auto-
maticalfy with the minority
white governments.
President Carter has sent
his vice-president to talk
with the South -African
Prime Minister. Mondale is
reported to have told
Vorster that there was no
way in which the United
States would come in on
the side of South Africa
in any likely war.
The American Ambassa-
dor to the U.N., Andrew
Young, has even gone to
South Africa to talk to
black groups there. Yet
even the controversial
Young stresses that the
United States would prefer
to see a-peaceful settle-
ment in Southern Africa.


The Americans probably
understand all too clearly
the powerful emotions
that could be released in
the countries of the North
Atlantic by an all-out
racial war in 'Southern
Africa.
Their stategists .could
well appreciate the diffi-
culties that could be posed
for American decision-
makers, in a country where
both racism and cold war
thinking are still powerful
in many quarters, if the
white minorities of South-
ern Africa were to appeal
to the conscience of the
West on the basis that they
were being threatened"
with genocide by African
majorities who were them-
selves merely the pawns of
the communist super-
powers.
The role of the Afri-
kaner ruling group in
South Africa must be care-


fully considered. They are
not an ordinary "settler"
group. In fact, they have
been in South Africa for
over three hundred years,
antedating many of the
black ethnic groups them-
selves.
That is only one aspect
of the complicated racial
mosaic in South Africa,
which includes people of
Asian stock, and the impor-
tant group of Cape
Coloureds.
The narrow prejudices
of the Afrikaners are the
more fiercely held because
of the privileges they enjoy
by virtue of them. They are
not to be expected easily
to relinquish their status
in favour of a more equit-
able racial situation.
And 'yet, the more en-
lightened of them may
understand that today
there is need for.some
concessions. Shrewdly, they


may hope to buy valuable
time thereby.
But if the hardliners
prevail, we may expect a
fight to the bitter end. The
Afrikaners have nowhere to
go. They would die to
keep the only country
they know. And the
country they know is
almost synonymous with
the privileged status they
have historically enjoyed.

If the hardliners prevail,
the resulting holocaust
would suck in not only
the rest of Africa, but the
entire world. It could
make Viet Nam look like
child's play. It is therefore
entirely right and fitting
and responsible of the
Commonwealth Prime Min-
isters to accord to South-
ern Africa the prominence
in their deliberations which
is predicted.


- I


OUR SERVICES

A Personal Productive Loans
A Personal checking accounts
A Bankable business loans
A Business checking accour.. ,
A Savings Account, from $1
A. Fixed Deposits from $100 .
A Chaconia Accumulator Plan
a type of "Sou-Sou" from
\ Bahk


$4 per montn
SAk Travellers Cheques
4 Import Financing
A Export Financing
A Letters of Credit
SPersonal Financial Advice
A Business Finance Advice
A~All other commercial banking
services


N.C.B of T &T 60 Independence Square: la
N.C.B. of T &T, 60 independence Square: lat


National Commerial Bank
of Trinidad & Tobago

We Bank with the
Nation's Interest-
L Your Interest-In mind.


Bank .C.B.


laza. tnms Cor. High b Penirce Sts..San Fernanm


LIBERATION


'~:r~c~;j~cileug~rr*-~ey~~,--u~.;


-- -- ~-~.


'gewood


/





PAGE4 TAPIA SUNDAYJUNE12,19//


THURSDAY MAY. 26.
Political Leader of-ruling party did not walk out of May 17
Council Meeting: Central Executive letter to Express.
CSO Report: 1976 food import bill $320m, $35m. over
1975. Manley orders worker participation in all enterprises.
Amin: I'm'going to Commonwealth Conference whether
they like it or not. Sec-Gen. Ramphal: it is ideal to pretend that
there are no difficulties over attendance.
One hundred benches to be put in Savannah by Rotary and
SOS Committee. Journalism Course starts at Kapok May 27.

FRIDAY MAY. 27.
Reports on Leyland scandal reveal that senior Bus Company
official was offered $96,000 for 100-bus contract in early 1960's.
AG Richardson has started investigations.
Works Ministry lifts ban on new taxi H-rights in force since
1963.
Rented and hired vehicles to go beyond the 10,717 figure at
end of last year; first preference to unemployed, announces
Minister McClean.
Hopes PH system will end. AG and Ministry working on new
traffic regulations.
Sugar price talks breakdown in Geneva; no agreement on
buffer-stocks by 70 countries. Hopes of assembling key 20 as first
step to a reconvened UNCTAD Conference next September.
Catholic Teachers Assn. forum fails tounitefour Teachers'
Unions.
Express Editorial: Dr. Murray elevated to a martyr.
Ja. and TT refuse to buy Barbados onions under AMP:
output of 900,000: Ibs involved.
Young: Cubans can do some good in. Ethiopia. Some 50
technicians involved.


Mr MANLEY
Mr. M.ANLEY


. .1,


SRNAN


I "-


CRYSTAL

WHITE

RMIUM BLN



PRODItCT OF T1rUNIbAs D

OL T-.ERS tM17 L
TH DAi s43Val,/VO


Start something.
Share it with someone.
Pour a little Premium Blend.
Thai exciting rum
fhorom Femandes Distillers
the Rum Specialists.
Crystal White Premium Blend
on the rocks... or mixed...
smooth .
and unquestionably satisfying.
Crystal White Premium Blend.


Pakistan Opposition agree to talks with Bhutto.

SATURDAY MAY. 28.
Guyana Foreign Minister: those who play with apartheid
not welcome.
British Foreign Sec. hopes Amin will not attend Common-
wealth Summit.
Chamber-replies to PM: Share prices have changed since
January.
Guardian publishes Sunday Times article on Leyland connec-
tion.

SUNDAY MAY. 29.
Express explains unrest-in its print-shop in front page state-
ment:
Company will not submit to "intimidatory strategies. .
Political Reporter Subero of Express elaborates on-rDr.
Williams' walli-out from Council and repercussions." Technically, it
was a walk-out", says his source, shifting the position slightly.
West Indians welcome: President Amin inTmterview (Express).
Motor-car assembly to be probed by team of five headed by
David Punch, Director of Price. Commission. McEnearney's O'Brien
says 1976 demand 36% over 1975. Feasibility of rationalisation to
be evaluated.
Opposition planning motion to get Dr. Murray back into
Lower House.

MONDAY MAY. 30.
CSO Statistical Digest for.April' 1977 records slight drop in
foreign reserve position to $2354.7m. from 2434.4m. end 1976.
Integrity Commission Now: Guardian Editorial.
Mexico poised to join select oil league: huge new finds.
Medical Assn. to prepare report on abortion in six months.

WEDNESDAY JUNE. 1.
SDeLa Bastide. Report on the Magistracy laid in Senate.
Wide-scale corruption, much time wasted in Courts.
BWIA net loss in 1975 amounts to $30.1m. a drop from
1974 of 3.4$m.
Met. Services predict end to water woes in' early June. 45
days left in Hollis at draw-off rate of X 6.5m. gals per day.
Carnegie Library San Fernando to be resisted.at St. James_
Street.
Police shoot "guerrilla" in Guayaguayare Forest.


THURSDAY JUNE. 2.
Panday queries allocation of funds to County Councils -
House question.
Dominica Caribs want legal title to land occupied.
Barbados Govt. considering tax-haven facilities.
Guardian Editorial: Six-month suspension of Murray too"
long.
Govt. studying-management consultancy service for Statutory
Bodies:
Senator Elmo Gonzales, Parl. Sec. in Ministry of Finance.
Venezuela has vast reserves of heavy crudes 700 billion
barrels.
IADB Report: TT growth rate in 1975 9.4% as against 3.4% in
1974.
Rhodesia defends invasion of Mozambique: self-defence.
Financial controller Borel and accountant Bakqh resign from
Port Contractors' -Ltd, MD Pollard Moore declines comment.
AG must move on Leyland lowdown: Express Editorial.
Tell ustmore about Mucurapo Park: Express Letter.
Burnham: Racism on the way out in Guyana Interview
(Express) Cipriani College students call for meeting with Board.

FRIDAY JUNE. 3.
Bank Robber on motor-bike makes off with $18,000 from St. -
James Nova Scotia. Three virtually simultaneous incidents.
ANR Robinson files motion of no-confidence in Speaker.
Guardian publishes DeLa Bastide Report.
New Republican currency to be introduced Monday June 6.
with $100 and $50 notes included.
Five homes demolished at Red Hills, Morvant in programme
involving 300 homes and 1,000 people on land rented at $36 per
year.




Shop at


LEONE'S

111 Belmont Cir. Rd.
Belmont

For quality clothes

at reasonable prices


"For the beginning of a beautiful affair"


Aqualife


FOR
FRESHWATER
AND

MARINE FISHES
Queen and Abercromby Streets
St. Joseph


Systems


-




c
:5
I







,:
i




SUNDAY JUNE 12, 1977 TAPIA PAGE 5




Water riots may be first




thing coming on stream


LLOYD BEST
SOME people claim that
the biggest politics in
Trinidad and Tobago to-
day is the matter of house
and land. Could be; but
the question of water
cannot have lost by'any-
thing but the very
shortest of heads.
Water -truly is a big,
big thing so much so that
when well-wishers en-
quired why Tapia
bothered to put up candi-
dates in the recent local
elections yours truly
circulated a letter explain-
ing that we had to keep
at least one of the crews
campaigning just in case
there were water riots.

THEORIES

It was almosfas simple
as that and I hope that
Dr. Ryan is reading so
that he can now straighten
out any theories he has
about Tapia choosing
districts on the-basis of
general elections data and
all- that kind of science.


No, water riots are now
the subject of valid politi-
cal calculation though I
doubt if the pundits
realise that things are as
bad as that.
My advice to the Gov-
ernment has been that
they should not pin their
hopes on the WASA plan
to bring on stream by
1980 aquifers in the
Northern Valleys plus the
huge new catchments at
Navet and at Caroni-
Arena.

PROPOSALS

As always the Tapia
solution is that we should
take up our beds and
walk. And lo and behold
last Saturday morning I.
was thumbing through
the International Herald
Tribune of May 30, 1977
only to find that I was
not on a scene of my
own when spelling out
our proposals.
In San Francisco, Cali-
fornia also, water is a big,
big, big, big, thing. And
hear how people have


been scheming and con-
triving to cut it down to
size.
"It is well known by
now that Bay Area resi-
dents have resorted to all
manner of ingenuity to
save water. They're taking
Navy showers; wet down,

~~~PTOW XerF~


soap up,,rinse off. They're
only washing clothes once
a week. They're brushing
teeth with the tap turned
off. They're scrubbing
clothes and bodies with
biodegradable soap so'the
water can be reused to
nourish plants. They're
even bringing plants into


the shower. They're in-
stalling nifty water stop-
pers with cute names like
"Watergate" to conserve
gallons per flush."
The Etiquette. of Water
Chic in California, by Art
Harris.
See Page 9


Residents have resorted to all manner of ingenuity to get water.


** *
K tTHE FVfmi~omNl


P t :riTA:H




PAGE 6 TAPIA SUNDAYJUNE 12,1977


New


Poems


Land


The trucks pass up an'
If I were born again I
so that their colours ir
blending into the. one
But somehow, while v
my mind does not res
where the mirror is p
You are a woman cal
of what is "cool."
Against your words I]
for freedom from the
The picture is painted
where the fire is dani
against the brick and
I want to walk outside
where you can someti
Now all I ee arb the,
pincered by the back-


S


Programme

he casually decodes
her scrambled mews
the cat is reading
heat
miaow implodes
a molotov
well mixed
o she will have him
she will have him
fixed

AMervyn Morris.


Curtain



Then all that remained was stone, stone, stone.
In the mercurial sea,'riven by mist
ard sulphur stink,
I, close to death,
saw by a green moon
the metal-drowned clash of those who were left:
Poets versus the police.

Clyde Hosein
I




SUNDAY JUNE 12,1977 TAPIA PAGE7


iort-


and


long


scape


down.
rould memorize them,
eight have meaning,
loved landscape.
e share the one earth,
from travel here
:ous. "J
against the hysteria.
hunger
vessel.
there,
at little of a blue sky.
the field
nes touch the unhappy.
nail faces of children
stabbing light..
.the.bread /
the wave.
cular something.
Down,
market.
fove towards their destinies,


Clyde Hosein


There's a coloured girl in the ring
hair a-streaming, cry unleashed
movement unfettered, abandon gay"
Oh, let me see your motion
snake-like, innocent child
jiving to the throb of an internal rythm
Soon,
the web will ensnare you
the slowly engulfing cocoon
will envelop, you in its narrow confines
The outcast eccentric
The condemned non-conformist
The woman-child striving to be herself q
All are caught upsin the awesome stereotypes
from which there is no issue.


Is tlere no room


for all at the rendez-vous of conquest?


/ I


MARKETING


: 1Agents. for:
PRESIDENTIAL INSURANCE
COMPANY LIMITEd.
Manufacturers Representatives .
And General Insurance Agetts
No.5 Concession Rd. Sea Lots
Phone: 62-37813


Si`


S.


' *. I I . .i 'l tl* .



Tapia House .
Printing Tapia House
Company Publishing


*Handbil ls


Marilyn Trotz-Guyana


ai


Droning dreary
dull\metallic sounds
drumming on the boulevard of my boredom
Formless phrases
futile philistine slogans
sinking to the gaping abyss of my anguish
Vacuous verbalizing
senseless chaos
proliferation of pontificating pundits
Induced inertia
coerced captive
caught in a web of complicity
caught----


is.ready for
LETTER

HEAD S
in addition

to the

usual

*Booklets

*Newspapers

Pamphlets


Company

has also.

produced

full length

BOOKS
Visit or phone us at:
82-84 St. Vincent Street,
Tunapuna
662-5126.
22 Cipriani Boule-ard
Port-of-Spain.
62-25241.


i' C -- -i `r


--


.mom"






TAPIA PAGE 8 SUNDAY JUNE 12


MONEESH drove a P.H.

Yes, he was breaking the law,
and blatantly. It was not even as
though he worked his route (from
Port-of-Spain to Diego Martin)
only clandestinely at night, but
did so quite openly during the
day.
Whatever fear he might have
had for the law, was suppressed
by his ambition to make enough
money to purchase his own car,
preferably a stylish and sturdy
Ford Zephyr, and escape the
clutches of his .uncle, who
demanded a high rent, usually half
of Moneesh's earnings, (since it
was the former who owned the
vehicle in question) and compelled
him to buy the gas and oil, and
share the cost of any repairs. No
one bought tyres, and this is why
all five were bald without trace
of any treads.


Today, Friday, shopping and
market day, business was good. Moneesh
had taken out the ornamented car,
lights, stickers, extra bumper guards,
and aerials, in profusion.
His favourite decoration was a
large glossy-black and eagle-like bird,
with wings outspread, screwed to the
front of the bonnet, as if standing on it,
braving wind, rain, night and glare, with
its vicious eyes, and open, hooked,
sharppointed beak.
Moneesh began working at seven
in the morning, virtually filling his car
to capacity every trip. The money
flowed in. He was happy, and the
thought that-he was driving a P.H. car,
not- only did not worry him, it did not
even cross his mind. Moneesh was an
illegal gambler who felt about gambling
somewhat in the way, a foolish, over-
ambitious businessman thinks about
investment. But Moneesh was not even
aware of the meaning of worry. It was
as though all his thoughts were crowded
just.behind his forehead.,His philosophy
S was, without -his 'full consciousness.
"Onward, never look back".



-e had been this way since child-
hood, climbing the highest mango trees
to pluck the most luscious fruit, while
his mother almost died of fear. He
seldom studied at school, cheating so
boldly in exams that his very audacity
obscured his crimes; and he had only
once been caught, in a manner of


speaking in these endeavours.
That incident had ended his
academic career, (and Moneesh was
almost grateful), in fifth form, dis-
qualifying him from the all-important
General Certificate of Education exams.
With no G.C.E. passes and a bad record,
jobs were few and far between, menial,
exhausting, and far from lucrative. But
all this did not bother the energetic and
resourceful Moneesh. He went from
relative to relative, (and these he had in
abundance),
-Moneesh found that anytime he
was accused and considered guilty, it
was through the unfair malice of his
accuser; or on very rare occasions, ill
luck. It might also be a mixture of both.
It was on one of these occasions that he
was thrown out, (partly walked out) of
the overcrowded family house, (he had
ten brothers and sisters, all younger
than him), when his drunken father
accused him of pilfering from the family
funds.
Moneesh protested that most of
the money was his-anyway, from times
he had been able to save anything, and
donate to the family' funds; which was
at least partly true. He casually and dis-
creetly slipped a twenty dollar note
into his pocket, (as his father grabbed
at the bills, 'beginning to count them)
and left.


O ce, he narrowly escaped being
sent to the Boys Industrial Institute (or
St. Michael's College). This incident-
involved the stealing of a neighbour's
- cow. The greedy, small-time butcher to_
whom he sold the beast, was arrested.
for selling rotten meat. '"
So great had been the quantity
of meat avariciously bought, (no ques-
tions asked) at a tremendous bargain
Price, that the butcher had been unable
to-store it properly. The man ratted, on
Moneesh, but, unable to prove his case,
ended up with the smaller half of the
wishbone, and paid a fairly heavy fine.
It was soon after this that his
uncle, who knew all sorts of people,
and had a flair for getting around the
Slaw, took an interest in the boy, his
'ingeniousness and courageousness. This
uncle decided that Moneesh, with some
training, could become a valuable asset
to his -multifarious money-making


schemes, some bolder than others and
soon this wordly, gaunt and hook-nosed
benefactor had taken Moneesh under his
wing, allowing him to live comfortably
in his home.
Moneesh, now in his seventeenth
year learned quickly, and soon was
employed as we find him on the morning
in question, already making enough to
to have moved into his own small hut,
saving a bit, while he spent rather freely
on women, alcohol, marijuana, and
gambling of every sort but usually
illegal.
At eleven o'clock that morning, it
suddenly became overcast and the rain
was soon pattering down softly, steam
rising from the sun-broiled asphalt road;
then turning into a prolonged torrential
tropical rainstorm, Moneesh turned on
the single windshield wiper and was
incensed to even greater efforts as
people, their mobility cut short, dashed -
- about frantically searching for shelter,'
and transport home.
Squeezing recklessly through the
city traffic, and, once out of the mess,
racing through thirty miles per hour
zones at fifty and more; Moneesh was
covering his route several tinies quicker
than usual. To his joy, the rain kept up
remorselessly.
Moneesh had ,dreamt corbeau the
night before, and put five hundred
dollars, large portion of his savings into
the Whe Whe pot. On awakening that
morning he somehow knew this was to
be his day.
Moneesh had been' warned by a
prominent science man. the corbeau
would mean evil and ill-luck day. This
science man was known to have had
dealings with devils at obeah ceremonies
and all of his services were high priced.


I his afternoon Moneesh would
learn the results of the game, held in a
clearing, amidst the massive trunks
and impenetrable undergrowth of the
Valencia forest, the rich soil of which
supported a flourishing field of ganja
which Moneesh smoked frequently. The
setting for his hut was wickedness and
illegalityitself. Moneesh experienced the
tremendous power of knowing he was
in control of all these men and their
interests and megalomania pumped
through his handsome brown skull and
face.


MONEESH

a short story

by Anthony Malcolm Milne


Mickey's

Automotique

Cor. Edward Lee
&
Cipero Streets
SAN FERNANDO


Main Road
FYZABAD


Pyramid



Drug



Store

28 Mucurapo Street
SAN FERNANDO;


- .ai~.c *k


_- :. .!-
q.
L4,


YOUR CHOICE


On his twenty-first trip to Diego
Martin, doing seventy around the bend,
just before Four Roads junction, the
car without tyre-traction of any sort,
skidded out of control. Passengers
screamed, Moneesh, using all of his skill,
barely avoided a teak lampost. The car
leaped off the embankment, and while
airborne, it was as though the orna-
mental corbeau (for this was what the
black hawklike figurehead represented
for Moneesh, his foremost lucky charm)
was guiding the airborne vehicle with
its mighty outstretched wings, to a safe'
landing.


Slamming into the ground, some-
how on all four wheels, after a flight of
several yards, and charging through
masses of scrub and high grass,-the car
finally came to a halt a hundred yards
from the highway. Miraculously, no one
was badly hurt but all were pretty
shaken. Those passengers more in con-
trol of their faculties, were outrageously
angry, and let Moneesh know it.
Moneesh spent most of the day's take, a
considerable sum, in bribing his furious
former patrons to make no report of the
matter to the police.
The car, however, was a total
write-off. No 6ne had seen it run off the
road, and what was left of it was hidden
by the bushes. Moneesh pried off the
number plates, and hid them in a
muddy hole. Then carefully unscrewed
the ornamental corbeau, placing it in
his pocket, with a large portion left
jutting out. Making his way to the high-
way, with what little change he had
left, he took a bus home, where he set
about carefully: cleaning the undamaged
but dirty model corbeau.
At five in the afternoon, Moneesh
noticed the approach of two people -
the whe whe man and his uncle.
S "Moneesh!" his uncle cried angrily
- or was it exasperatedly? The whe whe
man, one of his uncle's best friends
looked pretty dismal.
"Yes uncle?"
"What kind of .explanation you
have, for this? And don't behave sc
.blasted innocent."
"What?"
"But you really bold-face, yes!
You know what you do? What you
feel the wh whe man, is a millionaire?
He going an have to live in the poor.
house now. The least you could do is-
offer him back some of the ten
thousands dollars you win?'
SMoneesh, getting up out of the
chair in which he had- been reading the
evening paper, said kindly and confi-
dently:
"Come in, come in nuh man. Let
we take a drink, and talk."


~
-- -- r -


~9~3~ F~




~B~a, ;~1Y





SUNDAY JUNE 12, 1977 TAPIA PAGE 9





WATER IN THE WORLD
amm I Hi i =ME- -=--


Always


the



problem


iS one


of


manag.emei


THE history of man could
be written in terms of
the struggle, to find solu-
- .. tions always provisional
-o the increasingly
complex problems of the
management of water,
our planet's most valuable
renewable resource.
The water requirements
of human beings depend
in part on climate and
physical activity but
mainly on what is known
as the standard of living.
These requirements vary,,
therefore, from some two
litres aday as a minimum
-;insome rural areas to
:moe than-400 litres a
S day in high standard
urban areas.
S" FQr the present population
S of-the world an average daily
consumption of 200 litres per
capital would amount to a
\ yearly total of less than 300
cubic kilometres (72 cubic.
miles).

RESOURCES


In fact 'only about half
this amount is actually used'
at present. This is a very
small amount compared to
available resources; for in-
.stance the average yearly dis-
charge of. the Mississippi
alone is about 600-cubic
kilometres (144 cubic miles).
domestic and municipal
needs, which only represent
a small percentage -of total
water demands could, quanti-
tatively speaking, easily be
met- from available water
resources in practically all
parts of the world.The pro-
blems lie elsewhere, and are
mainly of a financial and
organizational nature.
S Unfortunately, the present
and the immediate future,
Appear rather gloomy for a
large part of the world. The
spread of urbanization is
everywhere overtaking water
-supply systems, unable to
cope with rapidly increasing
demands.

ESTIMATES

The situation is even more
difficult in rural areas where-
very little has been done so
far.
The World Health Organ-
ization estimates that in 1975 -
of the 580 million people
living in urban areas in deve-
loping countries (excluding
China), 77 per cent had a
reasonably adequate 'com-
munity water supply, but


only 22 per cent of the
1,420 million people living
in rural areas benefitted from
this facility.
In temperate and humid
regions,-water is supplied to
agriculture mainly by rainfall.
In arid and semi-arid regions,
irrigation is indispensable and
calls for an external source
of water from a river or from
groundwater.
On average, 7,000 cu.
Smetres (250,000 ci. ft.) of
water for wheat and 15,000
cu. metres (530,000 cu. ft.)
-,for rice are required to irri-
gate one hectare (2.47 acres)
per year by conventional
means which is a lot.
Approximately 2,000 cu..
km. (490 cu.Miles). per year
are used at present for irriga-
tion in the world, but only
some 30 per cent of this
amount returns to rivers or
ground aquifers, the rest evp-
porating above the ground
through plant transpiration.
On top of this, water-is
Lost through evaporation from
the reservoirs created by irri-
Sgation dams. For instance,
more than one litre out of
eight from the Nile discharge
is evaporated at Aswan.
Finally, losses can reach
up to 80 per cent through
seepage from irrigation chan-
nels. So irrigation wastes a
great deal of water.
Yet, at the same- time
irrigated land is far more pro-
ductive than most other agri-
culturaJ lands and the world
of hunger in which we-are
bound to live ih the foresee-
able future requires an inten-
sification of irrigation-where-
ever this is feasible.

MARKET ECONOMIES

According to recent Food
and Agriculture Organization
studies, in order to meet
growing food demands, the
irrigated area of the develop-
ing countries with market
economies- (excluding there-
fore China) should continue
to increase from some 72
million hectares (178 million
acres) in 1965 and 92 million
ha. (227 million acres) in
1975 to 114 million (282
million acres) in 1990.
The main, industrial uses
of water are commonly
grouped as follows: cooling
water, processing water (used
in the product or in its pro-
cessing), and boiler water (for
generating steam or for manu-
facturing processes).
Industrial use of water is
growing rapidly and may
reach some 80 per cent of
,total water withdrawal in the


technologically advanced
countries of northern Europe
where irrigation is not neces-
sary.
In countries which are
both industrialized and impor-
tant agriculturally, such as
the- United States, USSR,
Hungary or France, the per-
centage of industrial with-
drawals is only of e order
of 40 or 50 per cent.

CONSUMPTION

It is virtually negligible in
developing countries'in conr
prison to irrigation with-
drawals.
In any case, two essential
factors are, to be considered
in industrial water demand.


The first is the possibility of
reducing water consumption.
This can be achieved
through re-cycling or techno-
logical improvements.
The second factor is the.
reduction in waste load This
can be achieved through
various methods such as in-
plant treatment, underground
disposal or modified produc-
tion technology, since ulti-
mately the greatest problem
arising from industrial use is
obviously stream pollution.
The amount of water in
the hydrosphere is enormous.
However, about 97.5 per cent
of this is salt water contained .
mainlymin the oceans and seas.
Only 2.5 per cent consists
of fresh water.

DISTRIBUTION

But here again about 70 -
per cent of this fresh water
is in the form of ice in the
in the polar regions and in
glaciers, representing some 24
million cubic kilometres (5.75
million cu. miles). Most of
the remainder approxi-
mately 30 per cent is in the-
form of groundwater.
With the exception of some
waters which may be con-
sidered as "fossil" and are
"mined" from very deep
aquifers, all the water we use
is; derived from the hydro-
ligical cycle whereby fresh
water is precipitated on the
surface ot the earth in the
form of rain or snow, perco-
lates as grounidw pter, evapo-
porates from soil and plants,
or runs off in rivers and
lakes, until it reaches the sea


--


from where it evaporates
again.
The natural distribution of
water resources is highly vari-
able on the planet both in
place and time, so that vast
quantities of high quality
water are not utilized and.will
not be utilized btor a long
time.
The huge amounts of water
of the Amazon cannot irri-
gate the Sahara, nor even the
dry areas of Brazil. -

DEPENDABLE


On the other hand, regula-
tion of streamflow through -
the building of dams can
easily be limited by the law
of diminishing returns.
For this reason, namely'
the irregularity of river flow,
the "dependable" water
supply is far less than the
total runoff.
Groundwater can be deve-
loped rapidly and in progres-
sive, stages without the large.
scale investments required by
surface storage.-So utilization
of groundwater has seen -a
sharp increase in recent
decades.
In France, for instance, it.
is estimated that some 60
per cent of the water used-
comes from aquifers, where it
is free from pollution, while
only 40 per cqnt comes
directly- from rivers: This
proportion is .even higher in
some northern i European.-, '!
countries,' andofcourse much.: ;,:
higher in arid treas. -

(UNESCO FEATURES





PAGE 10 TAPIA SUNDAY JUNE 12, 1977


WHILE young Wayne Wendell Daniel of Barbados and the
West Indies continued to devastate English county bats-
men, England's Captain-elect Vike Brearley won himself
and his team an important 2-1 victory in the Prudential
Trophy Series with Australia which concluded earlier this
week in the British capital.
Although there is a great difference between the one-
day "cavalier" games and the rigorous five-day Tests,
England has undoubtedly gained an important psychological
advantage especially in the light of the humiliating defeat
they inflicted on the Aussies Saturday June 4.
On that occasion, Chappell's boys were routed for a
meagre 70, the smallest total made by an international
team since Roberts, Daniel and Holding bowled England for
71 last year at Old Trafford.
Though they ended the
series with a narrow two-
wicket victory at the Oval,
the Australians can be no
less unhappy than doubt-
lessly they were after
Saturday's annihilation.
On the evidence of the
tour so far, one can be
justified in thinking that,
with Walters' apparent in-
ability to get going in
England, Chappell remains VWill Bi
the sole class batsman in
what seems like one of the
weakest Australian teams thd m
ever to tour England.
With his team's miser-
able performances to date Indies.
and the burden he'shoulders Willis' partner, Essex'
as. Captain; and being the John Lever, also made
man on whom the large noises and for the first
totals depend, plus, on time this season. His 4-29
Saturday's showing, his earned him the following
key part as a bowler too, tribute from Freddie True-
Chappell must now be man: "in .this boy Lever,
having headaches as well as England 'ave found them-
insomnia. selves a very, very good
bowler."
I ,His is a lively, Iteft-
S COMMENTATORS handed medium pace with
a natural/ away swing
towards -the slips, the
S Even his' Number One occasional one whipping
blitzman Jeff Thorhson has' back sharply from off
1Ione nothing to lift his rather like Bernard Julien's
spirits so far, his claim of three years ago.
being-only- two wickets in On Saturday Lever
the two Prudential matches posed as many problems as
in which he played after-a he did in India seven
haul of only nine wickets .-months- ago when he
prior to that. decidedly emerged as the
/ Thomson's performance find of the tour with no
last Saturday -was part- fewer than '29 wickets in
icularly disappointing (9-0- his bag..
46-0), and he was described
by commentators as being.
neither fast nor accurate SOLID PLAYER
while his problem with no- L
balls and with his run-up
persisted. Most significantly, the
Significantly, Chappell England selectors did retain
chose not to introduce him their rebellious trio though
to dispose of the tail though Greig, Underwood and
he did have two overs Knott performed no out-
unbowled at the end. standing roles in any of the
The entire commentary games.
team, including guest Aus- In contrast, Warwick-
tralian Alan McGilvery, shire's Dennis Amiss was
agreed that the Aussie impressive against the pace
showing was indeed with a brief 35 qn Saturday
pathetic. and a crisp 108 on Monday
Freddie. Trueman, .in while Skipper Brearley
particular, bemoaned the. played two sound innings
fact that, Chappell apirt, of 29 i, the first game and
the -batsmen seemed un- 71 in the third
willing tto get behind the In spite of the reported
line. soundness of Amiss and
Especially, they were at Brearley and the promise
fault when confronted of Randall and Barlow at
with Bob Willis. who re- numbers three and four,
pprtedly brought back Trueman still feels that a
memories of the type of "solid player" is needed in
-pace howled at England the middle-order.
last year by our unholy Gaze is on 35-year-old
trinity from the West David Steele who scored


ANfGi L'S Be


11 %A In No V

WELL

SERVICES
Phone 649-5847
Santa Flora


JUBILEE ST.
TUNAPUNA,
For the most elegant
cutsingents /
and ladies suitings


England



prospers




under



captaincy


Greg Chappell (above), must be
having headaches as No 1 .
blitzman Jeff Thomson (below).
continues to aisappoint.


rearley's boys dethrone

mighty Aussies?


308 runs (avg. 30.80)
against us last year. But
with the emphasis on young
new talent, one wonders-
what are Steele's chances
of making the side?


We will get some early
answers at Lords when the
battle is joined on the
16th of June.
* CORRECTION: Last week
MiPke Dnnoess was nwrnn lh


ivmr Eu UuMIU was orongty
Will England, then, described as having originally
under a new captain, rule come from Sussex. Kent, in
the waves again and convert fact, was his first County and
the Caribbean tilt here.next he now plays for Essex.
season into a mere semi-
final? OWEN THOMPSON
-- C /--
.IM BB ^g ^BIH"V~f


SAN6OSTURA


Angostura Old Oak Rum
A mellow blend of light
Trinidad rums. Smooth.
clean tasting


- '




SUNDAY JUNE 12,1977 TAPIA PAGE 11


Whitsuntide Sports-o-rama

FEBEAU Govern-
ment School grounds
was the arena for a
Whitsuntide sports-o-
rama that attracted
scores of youths from
the Saddle Road
area in San Juan.


The occasion
featured small goal-
nost, five-a-side foot-
ball, windball cricket,
a women's exhibition
cricket match, exhibi-
tion basketball
games, a well-stocked
bar and live and
recorded music.


Sponsored by the
Zenith Sports and
Cultural Club and
Bellies United, the
occasion was designed
to raise funds to send
the latter football
club on a goodwill
tour'to Grenada.


Irithe bargain, it
provided an
excellent divertise-
ment from the habitual-
do-nothingness that
are the bane of young
people in the com-
munity.


These compliments
were suitablyreturned
by a good turn out
and much keen com-
petition.


Popular football
organizers Desmond
O'Brien, Ken Hodge
and Bellies were, on


hand to manage the
day's proceedings.
Trophies were distri-
buted to winning
teams.
(L. T.)
Photos by Gary Woo
Chong.


UNIQUE


STORE
SERVING
SANGRE
GRANDE


Universal
Barber

Saloon
EASTERN MAIN RD.
TUNAPUNA.
For The Best
in
Men's Hair Styling


r
Fe i"


~sn~s
-~- I -
.. d;.,
I.. 'ky
~tpy~ r ~

-..... -iY
) C~Ei :
r* ''
~ ~i ;~5~i~ "
':02 ~~a~f%-~a~. ~1~' ,";







Mrs. Andrea Talbutt,
Research Institute for
study of Man,
162, East 78th Street,
New York, N,Y. 21,
,h. Lehigh 5 8448,
U.S A.


4


'REVIEW'


JULY


Jeremy Mar


CADRES of the Tapia
House Movement will
gather this Sunday to
resume deliberations
on -party reform.
< Venue ff the meet-
ing' is the party's
Central. Office at
Cipriani Boulevard,


Port-of-Spain,
SAt an adjourned
meeting on Sunday
May 22, far-reaching
decisions were taken
with regard to Tapia's
publishing programme,
to the party's financ-
ing and administra-


ORGAN-


CHING


tion and its strategies
for field work over
the next 18 months.
Secretary Lloyd
Best outlined a pers-
pective plan of action
culminating in the
Tenth Anniversary
Assembly of Tapia in


November 1978.
Education Secre-
tary Lloyd Taylor
elaborated a pro-
gramme of training
for party cadres
which is scheduled to
begin in July this
year.
This Sunday's dis-
cussions are expected
to focus on details of'
implementation part-
icularly in regard to
a new Review which
is to be launched in
July and to .te
re-capitalisation of
the Movement's print-
shop.
Also on the Agenda
is a Report from the
Committee on long-
term finaincing-headed
by Jeremy M'ar. "'
The: meeting will
also hear a progress
report from the Con- .
mittee charged tb
oranise and run a
non-partisan-Sympos-
ium on the Construc-
tion Industry at the
,Holiday Inn Hotel on
Saturday July 9.
Starting time is
10.30 a.m.


"l. I


PROGRAMME FOR PERMANENT POUTICS

RE SISTER NOW
Course begins July, 1977

OUTLINE


Part L 8 weeks.
IDEOLOGICAL FOUNDATIONS.


i) Does Tapia Have an Ideology?
ii) Capitalism: A Critique
iii) Socialism:A Critique
iv) Race Politics and Class Politics in The
West Indies: Jamaica and Guyana as
Case Studies.
v) Party Politics in Trinidad & Tobago:
Race, Class and Nationality.
vi) ,The Tapia Manifesto: Elements of a
West Indian Ideology.
vii) The Idea of a Professional, Permanent,
Political Party


PART II. 8 weeks.
PUBLIC AFFAIRS IN THE CARIBBEAN:
Economics, Politics, History.

i) Government and Politics in the West
Indies.
ii) ThePlantation Economy of the Carib-
bean.
iii) Race and Class in Caribbean: The
Plural Society Examined.
iv) Culture and Identity: A Caribbean
Hang-up?
v) Models of Caribbean Change: The
Puerto Rican Experience.
vi) Models of Caribbean Change: The
Cuban Experience.
vii) RADICAL Reconstruction in the West
IndiesSINC 1953.- 1977


PART III. 8 weeks.
MANUAL FOR PARTY CADRES ONLY
Duties of a Political Organiser.
i) A Permanent Party: Nine Years of
Tapia The Message and The Medium.
ii) Mobilization for radical recoiistruction:
problems of winning cadres.
iii) Organisation for radical reconstruction:
Need for a Central Office.
iv) The Party Machinery: regional and
constituency units.
v) Duties of a Tapia cadre: selling the
message, building party groups, win-
ning popular support.
vi) Representation in a permanent party:
Council, Assembly, the Parliamentary
Party, the Executive, the constitutional
make-up.
vii) Perspectives on the 1981 Elections.


For further information-and Registration Forms contact Education Secretary, TAPIA CENTRAL OFFICE, 22 Cipriani Boulevard Tel: 62-25241.


LAU




University of Florida Home Page
© 2004 - 2011 University of Florida George A. Smathers Libraries.
All rights reserved.

Acceptable Use, Copyright, and Disclaimer Statement
Powered by SobekCM