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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00072147/00244
 Material Information
Title: Tapia
Physical Description: no. : illus. ; 43 cm.
Language: English
Publisher: Tapia House Pub. Co.
Place of Publication: Tunapuna
Creation Date: December 19, 1976
Frequency: completely irregular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Politics and government -- Periodicals -- Trinidad and Tobago   ( lcsh )
Genre: periodical   ( marcgt )
serial   ( sobekcm )
 Notes
Dates or Sequential Designation: no. 1- Sept. 28, 1969-
General Note: Includes supplements.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 000329131
oclc - 03123637
notis - ABV8695
System ID: UF00072147:00244

Full Text

30 Cents


vULL.


Mrs. Andfrea Talbutt,
Research Institute for
Study of Man,
162, East 78th Street,
New York, N,Y. 10021,
Ph. Lehigh 5 8448,
U.S.A.


WEEKLY REVIEW


POINTED AND PUBLISHED BY THE TAPIA HOUSE PUBLISHING CO. LTD.,91 TUNAPUNA RD.,TUNAPUNA TEL:662-5126 AND 22 CIPRIANI BVD, P.O.S. 62-25241.


AM M





PSA General Secretary
James Manswell said last
week there was "no sub-
stantial foundation" to
Budget Speech statements
accusing the civil service of
"inefficiency and incompe- "an example of a civil
tence." servant who is putside. But
Manswell said he would is it inefficiency or incom-
go "no further" than that petence?" E
at the moment because he In a 4-hour presentation
was studying the Budget to the House on December
Speech and intended to 10, Prime Minister and A
make his own statement. Finance Minister Dr. Eric foI
"When I make my state- Williams and inefficiency two
ment", he said, "I want to and incompetence in the Bud
be able to back it up, to civil service was a major he
quote incidents", problem for the Govern- of
He referred to Eugenio ment. reach
Moore, former economic Dr. Williams also hinted 4
adviser to the Prime Min- that a number of civil ma]
ister, now suspended, as servants will soon be sent unt
on "study leave" and that the
New Tapia the Government was going But
to lean on outside "consul- tha
Price tancy" services to make fou
Government projects go like
STARTING next week, ahead, van
Friday December 24,
the price of Tapia will
go up to 45 cents from
the current 30 cents.
We are forced to
make this adjustment IN a sudden change of a
to mounting costs by heart, Bishop Anstey the
the fact that we are (Private) Junior School has T
producing bigger papers. decided to open its doors brie
Sellers commission will to. 4-year-old Sesame by
also be increased. Raphael who had been And
Subscription rates barred from entering the will
will also rise in sym- school because he wore bro
pathy. Readers are en- his hair in 'locks'. sam
courage to take The child's parents, Mr.
advantage of the cur- and Mrs. Lennox Raphael, B
rent rates which will got a letter last week from Rap
survive until January Headmistress Mrs. Jennifer wer
15, 1977. Als saying that there were new


lanswell, who returned
Trinidad from Grenada
3 days after the 1976
Lget was presented, said
had got hold of a copy
the Speech and was
ding it. He added:
'I don't think I can
ke any useful comment
il I read exactly what
Prime Minister said.
t I can definitely say
t there is no substantial
nation in statements
that about civil ser-
ts."




few places available" at
school.
'his ,,..s followed by a
f 'lis I-,vcn the child
a teachk'r :at the school.
Son .!Jiia;y 3, Sesame
join liis 6-year-old
tlicr aic oes to the
Fe school
Botli Mr. and Mrs.
hael said last week they
e "happy" over the
decision.


Victor
Questal
hails a
Gibbons
production,
See P. 4.


At right,
a scene
played at
Tapia
House
Moonlight
Theatre


A TOY

BUDGET
IF the 1976 Budget was
unexpectedly brief, the
1977 one, on the contrary
was long-winded beyond
reason. Yet the two make a
single statement if only
because both are almost
completely innocent of the
imperatives of the econ-
omics of budgeting in
Trinidad and Tobago today.
Many have long sus-
pected the incompetence
of the 1956 Movement.
The chronic unemploy-
ment crisis, the growing
army of people below the
national income average,
and the related social
unrest almost brought a
political upheaval in the
1970's.
When the Government
in part responded with
plans for national recon-
struction, our public
seemed willing to give them
the benefit of any linger-
ing doubt. And then the
(1973) oil bonanza blessed
our country with the
material ways and means
of a civic regeneration.

AIRY-FAIRY

The airy-fairy offerings
in the Budget of 1974 and
1975 served only to
deepen the popular feeling
that the Ministry of Dr.
Williams had spent its.
moral energy and was rely-
ing for its survival on the
naked politics of posses-
sion.
Now there remains no
doubt whatsoever that the
Prime Minister is as inept
as any of his yard-fowls in
the Ministry of Finance.
His entire moribund admin-
istration is sadly out of
touch with the possibilities
open to our new-born
Republic.
We must now face up
to the unholy horror that
the Government which we
have recently elected is
hopelessly unequal to our
second golden chance in
only 20 years.
Psychologically incap-
able of dislodging the
foundations of the old
colonial economy, morally
unable to confront Trini-
dad & Tobago with the
need for patriotic discipline
and endeavour, their every
succeeding Budget is one
more campaign statement,
another election bribe.
The 1977 offering is
another contemptuous trin-
ket which could make a
H. ppy Xmas only for a
childish colonial people.


Paper Closed

For Xmas
THE Tapia Offices at
82, St. Vincent Street,
Tunapuna will be
closed from Thursday
December 23 to Tues-
day December 28,
1977.
Following our re-
opening on Wednesday
29, Tapia will appear
as usual on Friday
December 31.
That Edition will
contain a full-length
review of the interna-
tional and regional
political situation seen
through Trinidad and
Tobago eyes.
The preceding Edi-
tion, appearing on Dec-
ember 24, as well as
the succeeding one,
appearing on December
6, will both contain
Literary Supplements.
This week's Edition
presents our overall
review, of the 1977
Budget.
Next week, we fol-
low with our specific
appraisals of Education,
Agriculture, Petroleum
and Construction.

Staff Party
THE Tapia House
Publishing Company
will hold its Xmas party
on Thursday December
23 at the Tapia Port-
of-Spain Centre.
Exquisine Caterers
will do the evening's
honours and a DJ will
be on hand to supply
seasonal music.


__ __ _r ___


I __ ___ ~I ___


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1), IU/b


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pOP

LJ


ML 2






PAGE 2 TAPIA SUNDAY DECEMBER 19, 1976


This
THE Budget this year is
the bun-bun from last year,
the left-overs warmed up.
It has been served in two
courses. The first is an
apology for 20 guava sea-
sons of economic mis-
management. The second
is a Manifesto after the
event, a throw-back to the
election campaign.
After last year's mini-
statement, we have had
a repetitious rationalization
of the four terms of bung-
ling. The whole intermin-
ably irrelevant exposition
at the start was the usual
retailing of technical diffi-
culties, unforeseen factors,
operational constraints-and
inevitable delays.
If it was not truculent
labour, it was the interna-
tional lending agencies or
imported inflation, uncer-
tain revenue or the weaken-
ing pound.
At no time did the
Minister admit that our
problems are the accumu-
lated consequences of his
own incompetent steward-
ship.
The post-election Mani-
festo came in three parts.
* A replay of old pipe
dreams; rainbow projects
delivered in resounding
robber-talk and promising
construction on a scale
that we never can deliver.


Budget


Is


Pure


Wahbeen


And Tax Relief is no use to poor people either


* A comprehensive cog
from the Tapia Manifesto
in regard, especially, to a)
localization b) decentral-
ization and devolution to
local government bodies c)
apprenticeship education
d) national parks to rescue
the environment.
* A blatant bribe of the
public, a pay-off in fact,
for a windfall election vic-
tory. But the tax-reduc-
tions give little cause for
real rejoicing. On first view,
they seem to be offering an
all-round relief on taxable
income and a certain
reduction of the tax pay-
able on a small share of
consumer spending.
If we weigh these gains
against the losses in the
purchasing power of the
dollar since 1973, we will
probably find better reason
to cry.
In any case, the problem
of the little people is that
they enjoy little or no tax-


able income. In far too
many cases, they cannot
find any work. The brutal
outcome of high unemploy-
ment and low wages is that
they have no money to
spend.
So what use can they
make of tax concessions
on income and on spend-
ing?
The whole thrust of the
Government's policy is
towards a continuing im-
provement in the position
of the haves.
Last year the Budget
tried to bramble the public
by a heavyweight presenta-
tion of numbers and
figures; this year we are to
be mesmerised by the
avalanche of words.
We got o..Development
Plan, a President's Address,
a Piccadilly Street Speech
all in one, rolled together
in subdued picong.
The statement was
replete with all the usual


tricks:
* the overweaning con-
cern for legality, for eti-
quette. for protocol and
procedure the constant
invocation of the specific
parliamentary authority of
"this Honourable House."
* the vast detailing of
quantities and dates; the
ritual recitation of places
and names a transparent
campaigning device.
The one thing that the
Budget never quite
achieved was a new sense
of direction and national
purpose. Significantly, the
priorities articulated were
more than a dozen and if
so many things are impor-
tant, then what is there
that really matters?
It is frightening that
after so many years of his
Ministry, Dr. Williams
remains innocent of bud-
get economics. He has no
concept whatsoever of the
impact of the whole
Budget on spending and
on prices,, on production


DEMAS BOOK

I HE publication has been
announced of Essays on
Caribbean Integration and
Development by William
Demas, President of the
Caribbean Development
Bank.
In a foreword to the
book, CARICOM Secretary-
General, Alister McIntyre
writes that the volume
"represents a substantive
contribution both to the
understanding of. Carib-
bean economy and to the
history of Caribbean econ-
omic thought".
Priced at $15.60, the
book is issued by the
Institute of Social and
Economic Research, Uni-
versity of the West Indies.
It is available at leading
bookstores in Trinidad.


and supply, on the balance
of payments, on general
expectations or on any-
thing else except votes.
He remains an incorrig-
ably colonial figure, incap-
able of taking the economy
in charge and assuming
responsibility for its
management.
No surplus, he repeats
from last year, when the
whole problem is one of
excess liquidity m the
public sector, a surfeit of
foreign exchange, and a
virtual paralysis of the
banking system on account
of production constraints
on lending.
The only safety valve in
the economy is to import,
import, import. Import
goods and services, import
contractors, import consul-
tants, import corporate
expertise, maintain the
open colonial economy
and end up with recolon-
isation.
That is the rub of the
1977 Budget. The Govern-
ment has abandonedcon-
trol and the economy is
freewheeling, driven by
Golden Age conditions in
the traditional export sec-
tor. We are floating on a,
pink cloud fuelled by the
oil, the gas and OPEC.
After their scandalous
spreading of joy and
whisky in the recent elec-
tion campaign, the Govern-
ment have no alternative
but to go along for the
ride.
In the ultimate analysis,
we have been regaled with
another Budget of franco-
ment guabeen and grog. It
will never lift the morale
of the public; it does not
even dare attempt any
restoration of morality in
public affairs.
The 1977 Budget is a
straight case of money
talking. But if money has
ceased to be a problem,
money is hardly a solution
either.


NOTICE TO PARTY MEMBERS
MANY of our members have not paid their dues for 1976.
In some cases people have not paid for 1975. We would
appreciate it if all those in arrears called us here at the
Centre and check to see how much is to be paid.
If anyone has moved since becoming a member of Tapia, we
ask you to send in your new address, phone numbers etc., and help
us to keep the files up to date.
Copies of the membership list will soon be available to the
Secretaries of Constituency Parties, Regional Parties and Local
Groups. Registration cards are also available and guidelines on the
registration of new members.


Allan Harris
Administrative Secretary.
Tapia POS Centre.


22, Cipriani Bvd,
Port-of-Spain.
62-25241.


laud Grog






SUNDAY DECEMBER 19, 1976 TAPJA PAGE Z,


"I am a hardworking ii:mc Minister and I am not a softee.
Nobody says Iam adamn fool. Eric Gairv, December 8, 1976.

AS election day dawned in Grenada on December 7, the
island's only Radio Station, which is owned by the Gov-
ernment, came on the air to urge some 63,000 voters to
come out and "do your civic duty"
Then the announcer blandly read out the 15 names
and constituencies of the candidates for the ruling Grenada
United Labonr Party (GULP), completely ignoring the


Opposition.
That didn't have quite
the desired effect. For by
the time the polls closed
that evening GULP's previ-
ously overwhelming ma-
jority of 14-1 in the House
of Representatives had
been seriously reduced to
a 9-seat majority, up against
6 sects won by the newly-
formed People's Alliance.
The turnout was reported
to be 60-75 per cent, with
18-year-olds voting for the
first time.
The Alliance has since
announced it will go to the
High Court to challenge the
count in two seats St.
David's, which was won by
Prime Minister Eric Gairy's
wife, Cynthia, and St.
Patrick East, won by
GULP'S Oliver Raeburn.
Prime Minister Gairy,
who was formally sworn
in by Governor-General
Leo de Gale last week,
countered that the Oppo-
sition had tampered with
votes but added that he
was not going to press
charges because he was
"happy with the results".
-Around the region, the
results were almost eagerly
regarded as a "defeat" for
Gairy
ROUGHSHOD

In an editorial on Dec-
ember 9, the "Trinidad
Guardian" noted that
Gairy's "defeat was a
distinct possibility for
some hours after the polls
closed" and added that
with such a. reduced ma-
jority, Gairy "cannot pre-
tend that he has received
any overwhelming mandate
and proceed to behave as if
Grenada were his.personal.
estate."
The "Trinidad Express"
voiced the "hope that Mr.
Gairy does not try to run
roughshod over any opposi-
tion that confronts him"
and went on to praise the
People's Alliance for "a
last-minute- effort" by
three Oppisition groups
which got together "for a
common purpose, to form
the Government for the
next five. years."
As it turned out, the
Alliance formed the Oppo-
sition and the question.of
its "common purpose" will
soon ,be tested in Parlia-


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ment where, in spite of his
reduced majority, Gairy is
still very much. in control.
His 3-seat majority in
the House is backed up by
the fact that Gairy also
controls 10 of the 13 seats
in the Senate. As at present
composed, the Senate has
7 Government members, 3
Independents (appointed
on the advice of the Prime
Minister) and 3 Opposition
members.
In the House, Gairy also
has 9 solid GULP votes.
The People's Alliance is in
the House with 3 seats
belonging-to the New Jewel
Movement (NJM), 2 seats-
to the older Grenada
National Party (GNP) and
the more recent United
People's Party (UPP) holds
1 seat.
Maurice Bishop, 35, and
a leading NJM figure, has
emerged as Leader of the
Opposition, displacing Her-
bert Blaize who has been
the traditional leader of
the Opposition during
-Gairy's regime.

CARRIACOU

Blaize comfortably won
his Carriacou seat but is
obviously on the wane as
a political leader in Grena-
da.
Bishop has promised "to
transform Parliament from
the playhouse and talk
shop it has been to an
active forum where we can
seriously challenge the
Government's decisions and
policies."
This is assuming that
Gairy will go along with
that. Bitter past experience
suggests otherwise.
The 1976 Grenada elec-
tion came three years after
a bloody confrontation


between Gairy and the
Opposition forces, with
the NJM playing a leading
role.
Bishop's father was
cold-bloodedly gunned
down by a rifle-toting


THEY


member of the "mongoose
squad" that was unleashed
on the population in the
troublesome months of
August-Stptember 1973.
Gairy clung hard and
fast throughout to "law
and order and used the
naked power of the State to
survive the Opposition's
siege.
As for Parliamentary
niceties, Gairy appointed a
Commission of Enquiry
into the disturbances and
then completely ignored
the Commission's report
and recommendations.
One of the successful


GULP candidates on Dec-
ember 7 was ,Innocent
Belmar, who served as an
assistant Superintendent
of Police during the 1973
upheaval.
Given that background,
is it likely that Gairy will
now bow to pressures in
Parliament?
Or will he in fact pro-
ceed as usual, even using
the Parliamentary Opposi-
tion to achieve his own
ends?
Asked if he saw his.
reduced majority as a
problem, Gairy said: "What
matters is that my Govern-
ment has been returned to
power."
With Gairy, "power'" is
the operative word.


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PAGE 4 TAPIA SUNDAY DECEMBER 19, 1976


D 0A d1


Unlocking


the


gates


of


Victor D. Questel
RECENTLY, at the Tapia House,
Tunapuna, Rawle Gibbons
directed Dennis Scott's "An
Echo in the Bone". Working
with a relatively young and
inexperienced team of actors,
known as Group 15, this daring
director has given us one of the
most exciting pieces of theatre
to be seen this year. "The Gods
are not to Blame", staged by the
U.W.I. Drama Society, and the
Trinidad Theatre Workshop's
production of "Belle Fanto"
directed by Albert LaVeau, are


Belinda Barnes as Rachel
(Photo: Chris Laird)


the only other two productions
for this year that merit in depth
discussion.
Scott's play attempts to
explore the echoes in our history
.and the degree to which people
anid situations "echo" other
people and situations. To do this
he builds his play around the act
of possession. This immediately
challenges many statements made
on theatre in the Caribbean, part-
icularly Derek Walcott's state-
ments on the use of possession in
our theatre.
The play is set in Rachel's
vard. The occasion is a wake held
iine nights after her husband's
death. At the wake we are taken
back to the circumstances that
caused her husband's death as
well as to the circumstances that
caused her husband, Crew, to
murder a white man. Thus, Scott
is able to show that the reasons
are both actual and historical,
both rooted in the present reality
and the fact of the past. The
characters in the play therefore
find themselves not only acting
out their history, but actually
living it. The act of possession is
thus the key that unlocks the
gates of history.
Gibbons in his use of the
Tapia House Moonlight Theatre
found an ideal setting for the
play. His actors, given their
experience, gave of their best.
Paul George as Rattler the dumb
drummer was admirable. Asquith
Michael as Dreamboat the young
limer ad current boy-friend of
Lally, the young easy going
good-time girl, brought a leisurely
control that made his role look
deceptively simple. Pat McLeod
as Madam Love could have been
more dependable and reliable in


History


appearance and gesture, but
faced up well to a difficult role.
Gibbons very sensibly
ignored the Jamaican influence
shaping the act of possession in
the play and drew on his know-
ledge of Shango. Gibbons' strength
as a director lies in his use of
ritual; in this instance, his
ability to select ceremonial ges-
tures from the act of possession,
relevant to his dramatic purpose
and context is remarkable. The
compression required to stage
possession so as to advance the
action leads to the most amazing
tightness of theatre expression.

METAPHOR

For example, one saw the
table in Ma Rachel's yard become
a slave ship, a shop counter and a
table again, so smoothly that one
sees.how a director can change a
play into a poem and make move-
ment become metaphor. At one
stage a cocoyea broom became a
water hose, a gun and then a
broom again, with a fluency that
was nothing short of spectacular.
Probably the most expressive
gesture was John Warner's flip
up to the beams of the Tapia
House. Suddenly he was on the
top of a ship's mast, steering
across the Atlantic a British
sailor surveying both the sea and
his future in the slave trade
business.
The play is linked not only
by ritual but by song and song
used to create not only the


atmosphere required but to dic-
tate the required pace. The most
moving is the wake song:-
Me alone, me alone
in de wilderness.
Me alone, me alone
in de wilderness.
After this song is sung off
stage, Rachel enters, places a
lighted lamp on a hook down
stage, moves around a large
table to a blood stained shirt,
repeats the song almost to herself.
Off stage Brigit calls "Ma", and
Rachel says, "don't call me child,
to night I have business tonight
I belong to the dead".
Before the wake gets going,
Dreamboat arrives with Lally, P,
Stone and Madam Love. The
drummer, a dumb man, realizes
that the deadman's spirit is in
the yard, so he beats in order to
control the spirit. Despite the
drummer's efforts, Dreamboat
becomes possessed. Watching the
actors clear the table before
Dreamboat makes his flip across
the table, watching Dreamboat
make the flip and the go grunt-
ing around the ground, and
watching the spirit leave Dream-
boat, .one realizes the vast areas
of Caribbean theatre that have
remained untapped.
Once Dreamboat is out of
the possession, Rachel moves
around giving each member at
the wake her blessing. This gesture
reflects Gibbons knowledge of
the Baptists and was executed
Continued on Page 12


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3j vvr APA PAGE E


l;,/, ,'iu dhlrlt Tcwaric
THE 1976 issue of Kairi is
both a testimony to the
persistence and hardwork
of Christopher Laird, who
is determined to build
something permanent and
enduring in the Arts in Tri-
nidad and Tobago, and to
the commitment and
seriousness of Victor
Questel and Rawle Gibbons
among others, wht. ere
prepared to act on what
they believe.
IN 1973.when the ISWE
Group put on its first full
length evening of theatre at
Tapia House, they attempt-
ed new things, they were
not afraid of dealing with
serious themes, and there
was a commitment in the
material chosen and a
vitality in the production,
that hinted at the possibili-
ties of West Indian theatre.
Christopher Laird had
been one of the livewires
behind the ISWE Group.
Today his dedication to
the cause of theatre is well
known. He is a builder and
organizer, not merely a
performer. And he is not
afraid of work.
VICTOR Questel was
also a member of the
ISWE team, who had been
writing creatively and
analytically before that.
Since then he has become
established as poet and
critic.

THEATRE

THE spirit of ISWE lives
in this year's Kairi maga-
zine and many of the
ISWE people are part of
the Kairi team Jackie
Iinkson, Judith Laird,
Zena Ali.
THE 1976 Kairi is a
year long effort that seeks
to be "at once a record of,
a comment on, and an-
outlet for the cultural life
of the Caribbean .and
Trinidad and Tobago in
particular".
.FOR a magazine of some
62 pages, Kairi has come
quite close to achieving
this goal.
THE magazine is heavy
in its emphasis on theatre.
Its perspective is socio-
political; its point of view
that of the artist, its con-
text the Caribbean and the
Caribbean experience.
THERE is much variety.
Poetry, short story, prize ,
winning play; book and
drama reviews, -features;
notices and comments on
books, shows and records;
a comic strip; a biblio-
giaphy of the Trinidad
Theatre Workshop.
THERE is a theatrical
sense at work even in the
visual presentation from
the Moko-Jumbi K of
Kairi in the simple but
excellent cover design by
Jackie Hinkson to the taste-
ful use of the graphic art
and photography in the
layout of the magazine.
AS for content, virtually
everything is worth read-
ing, which is rare in a maga-


INumVber of people under re view-
91000. rccen rage (cf invisible fathers
or mothers of haphazard status -
79. (or more). Number of people
who pay taxes too many
or too few, Number of people
who starve; number of people who
eat; number of people
who eat people who starve...
hogads ohate Number of humans, hybrids,
hogheads_ ha" herhaphodites, ha
still wait to be opened herfphodites,
in the headquarters of the hungry hominids ....





^111


zine. Kairi 1976 is really
superb quality.
THE preface by Editor
Laird runs smack into
politics. Commenting on
one item included in the
magazine Laird writes:
"In the line of original
creative work, one item deserves
special mention here. That item
is Shake Keanes' poem "Per
Capita Per Annum" from his
mimeographed publication Five
Lessons in Home Economics.
Shake Keane is the interna-
tionally renowned jazz coronet
player who returned to St.
Vincent from a professional
career in Germany to head the
Department of, Culture.
His activity and involvement
in the Cultural life of the
people as well as his political
views ,were presumably the
causes for the government's
closure of the Department and
the sacking of Shake who noW
teaches school.
He is not the only creator
in the Caribbean to suffer
political victimization by Neo-
colonial governments or even
'socialist' governments such as
in Guyana".
Kairi's belief in the free-
dom of the artist is sug-
gested in the little note on


the credits page which
reads: "All work remains
the property, of the respec-
tive authors."
A fine piece of work in
the magazine is Rawle
Gibbons' review of Errol
Hill's Trinidad Carnival.
GIBBONS, who recently
directed a successful pro-
duction of Denis Scott's An
Echo in the Bone reveals
himself as an intense
thinker on the theatre,
especially in the context of
the Caribbean experience.
HIS very positive ideas,
forcefully articulated,
about theatre and its func-
tioning in the society hints
at an evolving theatre that
will be radical, fiercely
independent and accutcly
sensitive to growing social
consciousness and self-
awareness.
ALL four poems -
"Triangles of Sound" by
Victor Questel, "Per Capita
Per Annum" by Shake
Keane, "Look for me in the
Whirlwind" by Abdul
Malik and "Levi" by Alvin
Massey seem to be per-
formance poems, reflecting


/


f


c

^ThII


a growing trend in Carib-
bean poetry. "Per Capita
Per Arinum" perhaps packs
the most power of the
three.
AS written words, the
poem has impact, but in
performance it would ex-
plode. (See above)
THE features in Kairi
are also interesting. There
is
*one on the growth of
the "Banyan" programme
,and the TT television
workshop;
*one on Lord Superior's
attempt to build a National
Kaiso Tent and
one on painter David
Moore, with photographs
of some of his paintings,
who digs into the history
of Trinidad and Tobago to
present- his subjects in
minute detail.
"A Sense of Movement"
(the only short story) by
Winston Hackett tells the
story of Rupert and Helen
who are planning to
migrate to Canada, after
Rupert becomes an object
of ridicule following a
scandal at the "People's


Bank".
The story is told against
a background of political
parties and politics which
keep the races apart in a
society "not ready for
independence" and very
conscious of social status.
Hackett's cynical eye '".ews
the characters as they go
through their motions.
THE magazine also in-
cludes a useful bibliography.
with comment, on the
Trinidad Theatre Workshop
including interviews with
Derek Walcott. It publishes
for the first time To Con-
firm St. Peter by Mwalimu
Efebo which won the 1976
National Cultural Cuncil
Playwriting competition.
IN presenting an interest-
ing and serious Annual of
the Arts, Laird also addresses
himself to the plight of the
artist in a callously indif-
ferent society.

LIP SERVICE
S,"IN. need of eulogy and
support also," he writes,
"are the growing number
of artists who are trying
desperately to maKe it
through their art and con-
sequently put their integrity
on the line daily in the
coming and begging neces-
sary to get by in a society
which pays only lip service
to them".
SAMUEL Selvon in The
Calypsonian has dealt with
this. That today, artists
should still be crying out
of hunger is not a tragedy
but a shame.
ALL in all, Kairi is a
good buy at $5. It is the
product of serious effort
and perhaps it is reason
enough to say, bending
Gibbons' a little, that, "the
arts in these places will go
about its business;it can,
not afford to wait-on poli-
tical promises and multi-
million dollar myths."


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76 INDEPENDENCE SQUARE, P.O.S.


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CHINESE DELICACIES




DINE WHERE


THE FOOD IS GOOD0

PHONE: 62-54113' o
FOR RESER VA TIONS


R. BEHARRY





. -,;. : i --.- 5uiNoLA-Y i.-.I-; lVi8-P" 19, 1976

EVER since I..i-Les began their steep rise in 1971, the real
worth o; the l iniidad and Tobago dollar has been slipping
continuously. Starting from a small percentage increase in
the indux ot retail prices in 1971 compared with the
previous year, increasingly higher rates of inflation have
been experienced. This is shown in the table below.
Between June 1971 and June 1976 the index rose
by over 977: in the last three years June 1973 to June


1976 there was about a 57% increase.
The revaluation of our
dollar and its detachment
from the sliding British
pound in June last was 100-
expected in time to con-'
tinue to slow down price 90 *
increases.
But the October figure
of a 2.9 points increase, 80 -
even when the contribu-
tion of higher taxi-fares is 70 -
taken out, indicates that
housing, household sup- 60 -
plies and services continue
to push prices upwards.
Taking 1971 as base, the 50
value of the dollar fell to
half its value in five years. 40 -
It must be recalled that
inflation has been a world
wide phenomenon associ-
ated with monetary in-
stability and currency re- 20 -
alignments, shortages in
key commodities (e.g. 10 -
wheat, soya), shipping
surcharges, and the oil
crisis. / 190
As an importer of two-
thirds of its supplies,
Trinidad and Tobago could tively sl
hardly avoid importing by our
price increases. our eas
Moreover, we have effec- ing mo
ing mor


pread these increases
r mark-up pricing,
y credit and grow-
ney supply, and our


wage bargaining mechan-
isms.
But because of our oil
resources we have been a
beneficiary from the oil
crisis which raised oil prices
just at the same time as
domestic offshore crude


Unique


Store


SERVING
SANGRE
GRANDE


Falling




Slower

WRITES DR ERIC ST CYR


PRICE DOLLAR
RISES VALUE

1971 3.5 100
1972 9.3 92
1973 14.8 80
1974 22.0 65
1975 17.0 55
1976 12.5 48
(Sept
to
Sept.)


oil production increased
and the new petroleum
legislation came into effect.
Government revenues
rose five-fold since 1971
and are expected to exceed
$200m. this year, or close
to half the country's
income.
With the country's
foreign assets exceeding
$2200m. compared to
$93m. at the end of 1973,
there is clearly a very
healthy financial position.
However, the data sug-
gest that imports of build-
ing supplies have shown
substantial price increases,


OIL GOV'T
PRODUCED REV.
mn. $mn.
barrels

1971 47 342
1972 51 398
1973 61 476
1974 68 1217
1975 79 1687
1976 -


and the shortages of key
building supplies and skil-
led labour are widely
known.
The critical issue seems
to be whether we can
transform our sizeable
financial resources into
productive assets at a fast
enough rate to prevent
rapidly rising prices from
eating too substantially
into them.
The race is between
import prices, local wages
and local mark-ups on the
one hand, and the rate at
which projects can be im-
plemented, on the other.


Big Discounts on revalued prices

*...it's like Ole Times again!


THE AMERICAN STORES
throughout the Nation


INDEX OF RETAIL PRICES:
PERCENTAGE INCREASES.


1971 1972 1973 1974 1975 1976


GIBBINGS

MARKETING


Agents for.
PRESIDENTIAL INSURANCE
COMPANY LIMITED.


Manufacturers Representatives
And General Insurance Agents
No. 5 Concession Rd. Sea Lots
Phone: 62-37813


~ __ ~


'"""~~~~"~"""~~~"-~~c --


&wool or


, mk 9

Ivow


a-





SUNDAY DECEMBER 19, 1976 TAPIA PAGE '


MR. Michael Manley could
not have asked tor any-
thing more. An overwhelm-
ing majority of the Jamai-
can voting public has
taken him on his word and
has given him a mandate
to deliver the goods of
democratic socialism.
No doubt, one of the
factors in the PNP vic-
tory must have been the
skilful exploitation of the
advantages of incumbency,
and for some time we may
expect accusations of
gerrymandering and pad-
ded voting lists. There is
also what now seems to
be acquiring the status of a
hallowed tradition the
pattern of two terms in,
two terms out.
Yet, from this distance,
and in view of the magni-
tude of the victory, it
would be difficult to deny
that the PNP seems to have
touched a chord in the
hearts of many Jamaicans.
It cannot be said that the
electoral contest was an
uneven one, in the sense
that the opposition JLP
lacked resources.

CAMPAIGN

There have been differ-
ent opinions on the size of
the JLP campaign fund
and on its sources. It is
beyond dispute that the
party had plenty of money
to spend. On the day
before the election, the
JLP took out 15 full
pages of ads in the Gleaner.
The ruling party had 3V4
pages.
No distant observer
could have predicted the
outcome of the election,
and it is not certain
whether Jamaicans them-
selves could have made any
intelligent forecasts until
fairly late in the cam-
paign.
The PNP's 4V2 year term
saw the Jamaican econ-
omy stumble into a severe
depression under the
impact of adverse foreign
conditions and what the
Government's critics chose
to -call economic and finan-
cial mismanagement at
home.

RHETORIC

More than that, for the.
past two years the country
has been engulfed by a
rising tide of violence,
political and otherwise.
The election took place
under a State of Emer-
gency.
Much of the criticism
of the Government's econ-
omic policies focused on
their ideological inspira-
tion. Mr. Manley in part-
icular has been strong on
the rhetoric of socialism,
His stated aim is to r
create Jamaica in the
interests of the small man.
Yet, so often, his party's
policies seemed to fall


J maicaThe


Manley
between two stools; not
being far-reaching enough
either to dismantle the
traditional structures of
power and wealth, or 'to
satisfy the vast needs of
the indigent majority and
the aspirations stimulated
by the rhetoric.
The 1972 election, which
the PNP won handsomely,
lacked the strong ideol-
ogical coloration of this
year's contest. Mr. Manley's
declaration, subsequent to
that victory, of his party's
commitment to socialism,


Seaga
and the establishment of
close ties with Cuba, among
other things, served to
trigger a fierce debate over
ideological direction.
During the campaign
the JLP raised the spectre
of the emergence of an
undemocratic, collectivist
system of government and
economy which would
threaten individual liber-
ties and private property.
Mr. -Seaga, leading the
JLP in an election for the
first time, offered a philos-
ophy called Nationalism, a


TAPIA SOL HERE
PORT-OF-SPAIN
Henry St. & Ind. Sq. under Salvatori's
Stephen's Bookstore
Frederick St. & Ind. Sq. under Nova Scotia
Frederick St. &' Ind. Sq. under Salvatori's
Chacon St. & Ind. Sq. under Hoadley's
Alchemist Drug Store Duke Street
St. Vincent St. & hid. Sq. under Gordon Grant
St. Vincent St. Opposite Trinidad House
St. Vincent St. Under Trinidad House
Frederick Street & Queen under Ross Drugs
Frederick Street & Queen under Y. De lima's
South West Cor. Duke & Frederick Streets
Frederick Street & Park under Min. of Petroleum
Chock Hong Parlour Duke St. West of St. Vincent
Sealy's Bookshop 111, Frederick St. North.


major element of which
was the restoration of the
confidence of foreign
capital in the future of
Jamaica.
The people of Jamaica
have repudiated both Mr.
Seaga's programme and his
fears. They have given the
PNP another term of office,
in full knowledge of the
party's ideological stance,
or, at least, after full expo-
sure to its slogans.
The fears of a massive
backlash from the well-to-
do sections seem not to
have materialized. Apart
from the victory of the


JLP candidate in St.
Andrew North-Central, the
commentators could point
to no seat where it could
be claimed that the
expected ideological re-
action was decisive.
Clearly, despite the
immense difficulties with
the economy, and the
paucity of real benefits, the
majority of Jamaicans
have had their appetite for
change whetted. The PNP
has started something.
They must understand
that the people have given
them an unambiguous
mandate now to deliver.


J__________ I_


START THInHING



I METRIC-OW


kI On a hot day in Trinidad

A\* T^.L7_w< B is am w furp


at ionag inre


EtEEIfnij" r- u I wIF-


( cegre es


Celsius


of course !)


Metrication Board of Trinidad & Tobago,
Ministry of Industry and Commerce, ---
Sage Building -
27-31 Henry St.,
Port of Spain


Specialized In

Chinese Cuisine


~~6


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Monday to Saturday

213, Eastern Main Road
Tunapuna


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_ _I


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PAGE 8 TAPIA SUNDAY ULU)tUllVILStr i, lu/


17.1


Budget Day in Parliament: Tapia Managing Editor Lloyd Best chatting at Half-Time with the Indian High Commissioner,
the P.S. of External Affairs and the General Manager of the Industrial Development Corporation.


FOR the first time ever,
the Review of Fiscal Mea-
sures admits, on page 1-2,
that the returns from the
Government's Investments
must be accounted for as
an inflow into the Consoli-
dated Fund; spelt out in
the Annual Budget.
The Government's reluc-
tance to provide the infor-
mation is confirmed by
the rider that "The profits
from companies in the
public sector do not form
part of the Government's
revenues except in the
form of declared divi-
,dends and then in propor-
tion to Government's


addition, to'an account for
earnings from Government
Departments, we have earn-
ings hopefully, from the
$938minvestment which,
according to the papers
from the Symposium on the
Mobilisation of Domestic
Financial Resources, the
public sector must have
undertaken by now.
The purely financial
manoeuvring of a colonial
administration has always
brought returns from
Investments in Funds, from
Floating Balances, from
Loans and Advances. Now
the intervention in the
name of economic trans-
formation brings dividends,
surpluses and interest.
The amazing thing is
that in 1975 and 1976, we
estimated zero and $10.8m.
respectively as returns from
Gov't business. The actual
return in 1975 was $23.6m:
in 1976, tne revised esti-


'75 (est)
'75 (act)
'76 (est)


Finance
Earnings
14.7
13.5
5.7


'76 rests) 12.1


'77 (est)


11.8


shareholding." (p.2)
Yet Tapia's insistence
on honest accounting has
forced a surreptitious
change of posture. For the
first time, in 1976 we do
have an account for returns
on the taxpayers' money
used to acquire public
shares in industry and
business.
Head 15 in the Esti-
mates of Revenue is no
longer entitled' Interest; it
is now Returns on Loans
and Investments. Now, in


777-70


Full Control

NCB
Orange Grove
Forres Park?

T&T Printing
NP
TTAS
BWIA
TELCO
T&TEC
WASA
PTSC

Hilton Hotel
Trinidad Cement

T&T Lime Products
TRINTOC
T&T Export Credit
Insurance
TTT
NBS
ADB

!n Process

Federation Chemicals
AMOCO Joint
Venture
Texaco Joint
Venture
Texaco Ltd
Point Lisas Power
CARICOM Soya
Caribbean Food Corp.
W.I. Shipping Corp
/Red Rose Feed
Citrus Growers


Majority

National Fisheries
T&T Meat Processors
T&T Development
Finance
TEXTEL
Caroni Ltd.
Tesoro
National Flour
Port Contractors
Point Lisas Ltd
Trinidad Nitrogen
Brickfield Forest
Industries
Trinidad Bagasse
Insurance & Reinsur-
rance Co.
Furfural Co.
Iron and Steel Co.





Minority

Workers Bank

National Brewing

Neal & Massy
Maritime Life

Angostura
Arts & Crafts Export
Allied Inn-Keepers

T&T Mortgage Finance
Gas Pipeline Co.
LIAT


There Are



Returns



From Govt



Ene pr ises


mate is $93.4m. The esti-
mate for 1977 is $108.5m.
These returns embrace
equity profits, earnings
from Statutory Boards and
Public Companies, and
takings from the National
Lottery, formerly treated
as Capital Receipts.
But why have we not
had such full accounting
before? Are all the com-
panies catered for? .Why
are implied earnings not
brought in as returns and
sent out as reinvestment?
And what about losses?
Are they covered in these
aggregates? Or is the total
largely the result of the
profits made by TRIN-
TOC?
If accountability is to
be more than convenient
and crooked rhetoric, Tapia
will be pressing for valid
answers to these important
fiscal questions.


Business
Earnings


23.6
10.8
93.4
108.5


(Equity
Earning)
( )
(10.6)
(10.0)
(8-/./)
(96.5)


-- ~ ----_ Ir= 4C 11~1 1


"I will be more than

delighted when the

time comes that I cai

retire to a cabin

somewhere and take

it easy and, let others

worry about budgets

and all the other thin!;


that are constantly or

my desk".

Dwight D. Eisunho;





CLIC(

IND
WITH I


LLOYD BEST
YES, what Review of Fiscal
Measures? The document
in fact does not review
anything at all. It is simply
a storehouse of valuable
information, obviously un-
used for any such purpose
as the planning or manage-
ment of the economy -
evidence that the Minister
of Finance simply has no
use for technical analysis
or study.
Fiscal measures, we are
told on page 3, are some of
the instruments available
to the Government in its
task of steering the econ-
omy. And then follows a
turgid attempt to cover up
the fact that no conceivable


LOOK: Suddenly


k~ ~- ~-------


1811: ~~~~~------4~---~-~-.~~~`.~ Y-~-"-r~pc~i~- -1


Aspk


',





SUNINI'W L'YELLIVI0Ln 13, IVJu It-%uM r-t.t *l


steering can be said to be
taking place.
It is outrage in 1977, as
it was scandal in 1976.
That there is no review
of the impact of last year's
tax reliefs on total demand.
on prices, on the distribu-
tion of income, on the
level of employment.
Then again, there is no
review of the impact of
price changes on revenue,
no measure of the rea!
value of anything, let
alone the share of real
resources accruing to the
Government and the public
sector.
That there is no con-
sideration of the problems
caused by excess liquidity,
no evaluation of the highly


touted technique of manag-
ing the surplus by way of
budgeting Special Funds.
All we have is the shout-
ing of this absurd nonsense
by the Minister that there
is no surplus in the Budget.
That the only offering
about monetary and credit
policy is the statement
that it aimed to restrict
private consumption, to
curb spiralling inflation, to
protect the foreign reserve
position; and that the
Central Bank employed, as
its tools of monetary con-
trol, the bank rate, the
rate of interest on special
deposits and the reserve
ratios. But how effective
was all this mindless ortho-
dox activity? Not a word


FISCAL


from this so-called Review
of Fiscal Measures. Incom-
petent Ministerial leader-
ship is simply paralysing
the cream of Trinidad Th
House.
That the subsidies to
agriculture are simply s
brought out for the annual
airing without any appraisal
whatsoever of their impact O f
on the output of food, on
the farmers' level of living, ABSC
on the composition of est a
consumer budgets and on fiscal
the nutrition status of the conti
people., cont+


Introduces its..


IVIDUAL PENSION PLAN
GUARANTEED INCOME FOR AGES 60 to 65



remember contributions to our pension plan are fully
ax deductible to 1/6 of your total income.




COLONIAL LIFE INSURANCE CO
(Trinidad) Limited.
Head Office 29 St. Vincent Street,
j Port of Spain.

with Agencies throughout the Nation and the Caribbean


MY


E %I
ir E.


is "No-Surplus" Budget


Only The Latest


SMany Nansy


)LUTELY the dread-
spect of the Govt's
management is this
nuing nansy story
i. lneft n n cow .e


~lO~sD~lll~p~~pmb. ~III-~L~II*-^LI -- 9~111


Stories


tilat terie exsaBs no surpiuo
in the Budget.
Last year you might
have said it was an irres-
ponsible rhetorical flourish.
Now you cannot help con-
cluding that it is the inveter-
ate unresponsible stance of
an unresponsible regime.
Look at the balance
sheet, there are now 27
Funds. The total appropria-
tion in 1974 amounted
to $408.7m; in 1976,, it
is $1,034.5m.
Expenditure, on the
other side, however, is in
an entirely different lea-
gue. There therefore exists
colossal unspent if com-
mitted balances and that,
in any book of economics,
is precisely what a surplus
is.
You cannot eliminate a
surplus by simply budget-
ing it away. If the econ-
omy cannot absorb the
funds allocated in the Bud-
get, you only dancing top
in mud.

OUTDISTANCED

And the first sign of
surplus is the ease with
which the estimated ex-
penditure is outdistanced
by the actual and the way
in which total expenditure
simply goes off into orbit.
In 1976, total expen-
diture exceeded the initial
budget by $79.7m.; and
recurrent expenditure out-
paced the original figure by
$58.8m.
Between 1969 and 1976
total expenditure increased
by 521.5%, current expen-
diture rose by 297.1%.
Capital repayments grew
by 575.6%; development
programme spending by
521.0% and loans and
grants to statutory authori-
ties rose by 525.9%. These
are the data of the Review
of Fiscal Measures. (p.19).
Liquidity is the one
condition that permits
such wild excess. When
this liquidity i.. combined
with a domest ic shortage
of goods and scr, ices. the
only sane rcMoitsc is to
import extra s,,tipl as \'
have been doing in Tri-
dad & Tobago \\llhitilu
even a modicum o1 res-
traint.
We are importing every
conceivable thing because


REVIEW


there is simply no domes-
tic supply; and the com-
plete breakdown &f national
management, the total
collapse of the utilities, the
ignominious crumbling of
the institutions, all gua-
rantee that there can be no
early return to the road of
constructive endeavour -
unless there be some apo-
calytic or revolutionary
intervention from above.
Trinidad & Tobago is
more than ever the classic
import economy, depen-
dent on the whimsy of a
dirty hole in the ground.
Colonial economy with a
vengeance; plantation econ-
omy writ large.

CRIPPLED

The most absurd mani-
festation of our crippled
condition is the state of
the banking system. Loan-
able funds abound and yet
the banks can find few
lending outlets.
They have to pay for
these colossal idle balances
by borrowing on savings
deposits at a rate of 2V2%
while the common or
garden demand-loan is
going at 102%. This breadth
of the interest margin is
the only way to any salva-
tion for the bankers.
If the banks cannot
lend their money, it, is
because there are no car-
penters, or masons, no
electricians or plumbers;
you can borrow if you
wish to, but you cannot
hope to build a house or
repair a room or start a
chinky, little business.

CONFUSION.

There is no cement,
there are no blocks; the
telephone does not ring;
the water does not flow;
you are tied up in endless
traffic on your way to an
important business engage-
ment.
Confusion, for sure, his
masterpiece has wrought.
And the Minister of
Finance, secure in his
anachronistic irrelevance
to the present needs of
the country, has the
effrontery, tie insufferable
check, to repeat in the
1977 Budget that "Total
revenue is equal to total
expenditure. No surplus is
:nticipt-d."''
Well, what ;a crooked
nansi story!






PAGE 10 TAPIA SUNDAY DECEMBER 19,1976


DEAR FRIENDS, You all
know the famous state-
ment about men and their
greatness. How some are
born with it. Some achieve
it. And others have it
thrust upon them. Then
there are the select and
special few to whom all
three are applicable. I
wonder, Dear Friends, if
you will agree with me
that such a one is Rufus
Martinez Esq., First Presi-
dent of the Sovereign
Republic of Matelot.
I had the honour, for
such it undoubtedly was,
of meeting this gentleman
exactly one week ago. The
exact moment will forever
be etched in my memory
- 9.25 a.m. Wednesday 8,
December 1976.
He walked into my office,
completely ignoring the
protestations of my secre-
tary, introduced himself
with the title I just gave
you and proceeded with
total assurance and serious-
ness to make the most


amazing statement I have
ever heard.
He started by proffering
a sheaf of copybook pages
covered' with writing done
in pencil but in a neat and
orderly way. On the very
first page was headlined
the title. "The -Declaration
of Independence of the
Sovereign Republic of
Matelot."
Mr. Martinez informed
me that he had taken his
Declaration to all the other
papers in the country and
to the Radio and Televi-
sion Stations but they had
all turned him down. He
hoped he said that "you
people will have the
courage to print the facts."
Matelot, he said, had been
totally ignored by Trinidad.
He paused in his stride,
turned to face me and
pointing his hand upwards,
shouted, "Well we the
people of Matelot have
had enough. We are declar-


ing our independence from
Trinidad and we feel sure
that we can do much
better for ourselves on our
own."
I asked him somewhat
timidly whether he did npt
think that .such a declara-
tion would bring retalia-
tion from Trinidad. No,
he said, your Prime Min-
ister has already indicated
that he does not care if
people want to secede.
"The whole world heard
him say so. He can't back
out now."

MATE LOT

He went on to discuss
his economic plans. To be
honest they made sense to
me. Matelot he said was
blessed with good agricul-
tural land, they would
develop their fishing indus-
try. In addition, they
would impose a toll on
everyone using the Matelot
bridge and to encourage
their tourist they would
legalise bush rum.
More than that "Once
our nation has settled
down we shall declare a
200 mile economic zone
and prevent Trinidad from
exploiting our offshore oil
resources. If Your Govern-
ment refuse we shall haul
you before the World
Court."
Friends, I had heard
enough. I promised Mr.
Martinez that I would
certainly see that his
"Declaration" would get
into print in some form
or fashion.
Then he said something
which made me realise
that politics in the Repub-
lic of Matelot was going
to be like politics every-
where else.
"Oh Gord man", he
said to me beseechingly"if
you could really do that
for me I promise that you
go be my first Ambassador
to Trinidad."


STEP IN AT


HODGKNSON 'S

62, QUEEN STREET, PORT-OF-SPAIN


~%&~"~s~i~asr~8a~sPsI;l~ar


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-- -----"9





bUIVJLJY ULuoiVIBER 19, 1976 TAPIA PAGE 11


World Cup Football

Tough Hurdle


In Devil's Isle

THE "farewell" match between the NSL Champions
Defence Force and our National Team now in Cayenne
did not come off as scheduled. So there is little new
information on which to base a first-hand speculation
about the outcome of Saturday's game.
The selector Coach Vidale has made three changes
to his Squad. Renwick Williams has come in for Gordon
Husbands, Anthony Douglas for Curtis Murrell and Ron
LaForest for Godfrey Harris.
None of these three is likely to be in the starting,
line-up though one does feel that LaForest should
displaceDavid. However, such a to-do was made when
Steve failed to fly in from the USA, that it is difficult
to believe he 11 be left out in the end.
Williams' inclusion is neither here nor there; but
the presence of Douglas may not be in the best interests-
of the team. And then I fear that the old commess over
amateurs and professionals may rear its ugly head again,
ayoing the benefits of the lengthy sojourn in "camp".
However, if Douglas does not play, there is unlikely
to be much of a problem. For me, therefore, the best
starting line-up will show two changes from last time.
Spann will be retained ahead of Carpette, LaForest in
for David.

WE MUST SCORE FIRST

Still, the decisive factor is unlikely to be the com-
position of the teams. Remember, we scored once and
held on for dear life thereafter in the game in Paramaribo.
At The Oval, we hit twice and missed twice in a display
generally agreed to have been our best in many a long
year.
A lot therefore depends on morale, on the tonic
we can take on the plane by way of vocal home support,
and on the number of patois-speaking Guyanese we can
win to the Calypso way.
Above all, we must go all out to score, if not early,
at least first. Almost all depends on seizing the initiative
and never relinquishing it thereafter.
The opposition is buoyed by the knowledge that
they scored twice in Port-of-Spain when all the odds
were long against them. Besides, they will be bolstered
by a huge support of nationals who will be bussing to
Devil's Island; and then they are probably better knit
than we, by virtue of longer association in the Surinam
Team.
Presumably, they are psychologically better prepared
too. Who knows how much our team-spirit has been
affected by the reported dissension over participation in
the end-of-season NSL games plus the uncertainty over
flight arrangements?
It is not, then, going to be an easy hurdle. But win
or lose, we shall have done well enough to encourage us
to do better next time round.
EARL BEST


XMAS


FRIDAY DEC. 10.
Budget to. be presented
by P.M. today. Grenada
Opposition Alliance to pro-
test against election results.
Jamaica bans motorcade
and marches. -15000 for
1977 Panorama champions.
$2m backpay for city
council workers.
SATURDAY DEC. 11.
Common entrance out
by 1980 says Education
Minister. Panday seeks
bonus talks with Caroni.
Municipal Councils undei
review. PM in budget
speech: Planning as econ-
omic tool has lost its
mystique. US firm gets
contact to maintain new
Comprehensive schools.
Licence fee plus taxes or
pool halls.
SUNDAY DEC. 12.
WASA & PTSC lose
$112m in 2 years. Sparrow
& Catelli All Stars for
Lagos Black Arts Festival.
Personal income tax
abolished in Antigua. CDB
to put accent on regional
agriculture. Arms found
under JLP office.
MONDAY DEC. 13.
ATSEFWTU planning
to call for enquiry into
Caroni Ltd. OPEC experts


discuss oil prices. Romesh
Mootoo named new DLP
leader.
TUESDAY DEC. 14.
ULF want Ellis Clarke
as President but will not
vote in electoral college.
Teachers Union suggest
smaller classes to Ministry.
Jamaica News Media
refuse to submit election
ads for censorship. PNP
candidate shot in Jamaica.
Take over of Caroni to cost
$38m. .Maurice Bishop to
lead Grenada Opposition.
Roy Richardson quits
politics. Walcott's "charla-
tan" to open at Little
Carib in January.
WEDNESDAY DEC. 15.
No communism for Ja-
maica says Manley but ties
with Cuba will continue.
Jamaica election today as
state of emergency con-
tinues. Budget debate in


-T-L


^ ^ r. ^- .

" t ? f"' a 'ln
Ofl
T


M. as
"n 200
and sensuous


house today. OPEC meets
today on basic oil price.
TT to get $9m EEC aid.
THURSDAY, DEC. 16.
Manley's PNP Back in
Power with possibly 45-15
plus ANR critical of Bud-
get deficient in economic
intelligence, lacking in
social conscience, devoid
of cultural awareness, lack-
ing relevance and candour,
significant for what it con-
cealed (especially about
Tobago).
Hafeeza breaks down in
House over plight of wo-
men. TUB Butler felled by
heart attack, in hospital,
Postmen appear in Court;
Congress call for army
removal. School Pilot
scheme under study. Sugar
bonus issue sent to Min-
ister. Fishing agreement
expected with Venezuela.
Burnham reveals grim econ-
omic facts.


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PAGE 12 TAPIA- SUNDAY DECEMBER 19, 1976


* From Page 4


n oc

by Rachel with a dignity and
control seldom seen in our
theatre. Soon they split up into
groups and begin to talk about
the dead man in a manner that
suggests a slight adaptation of the
call and response tradition.
As they talk, Rachel's son
Sonson becomes possessed by his
father's spirit. This gesture re-
flects the degree to which
Gibbons has streamlined the
original reality for his purpose.
Only the essence of the original
is used head held right back,
body fairly rigid. Possessed,
Sonson relates that he had to kill
Mas Charlie because "he was a
bad man". The possessed man
says, "I had to do it".
Masks are used by some-
members of the cast when they
wish to become 'white'. The use
of the mask enables the actor to
explore the echo in the well of
his unconscious, if you like. Its
use in this play also allows for a
tightness of presentation that is
remarkable. As the programme
notes state:-
The play reflects and retains
important nmoinr-n-ik in our
history. Its truth is presented
with a nakedness found in
few other plays of the
Caribbean theatre.
There are links in the play in
addition to the songs. Some of


LI


the


these links are the ironmonger's
chains, the act of hunting and
killing wild pigs or hogs and the
cocoyea broom. Because the play
is staged in a yard it does not
mean that Gibbons tried to in-
volve the audience during the
play. The play remained studied
spectacle. We were watching a
wake and listening to echoes
Thus, when the actors embraced,
they embraced each other, not
us. When they smoked, we were
not offered a spliff.
Thus, when the audience is
asked at the end to participate
one is a bit surprised, and though


Hi


impressed with the actor's agility
and the director's daring, it is an
uneasy moment that threatens
to undo all that went before. It
would seem that Gibbons is
deliberately mixing forms; the
yard theatre, the ritual tightness
of the Kabuki (bent to his own
purpose) and the proscenium stage
where he swings between studied
reality, realism and a de-emphasiz-


of


story
ing of the actual. Thus, the ges-
ture gives you the realism, but
the prop tells you we are within
a theatre situation.
That Gibbons is going to
contribute immensely to the
development of Caribbean theatre
there is no doubt. He obviously
feels that a director must be very
faithful to the original script,
even if there are offending
scenes that don't work. Now, the
play "Echo in the Bone"-suffers
from one drawback, the language
is not always appropriate to the
situation. To have a maroon
moralizing about history and
revolution in a play in which so
much is said by the play's struc-
ture and use of theatre, is to
defeat the playwright's purpose.
Secondly Scott seems to
feel he must put in every signifi-
cant historical event in the pre-
emancipation period so as to
make the play authentic. Again,
the play is so brilliantly struc-
tured that the scene with the
doctor, the colonel and the house
slave who poisons her master on
the eve of emancipation just did
not work, and did not advance
the play in a meaningful way. Or
again, having Rachel say at the
e Continued on Page 13


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SUNDAY DEGLIVIBLKI T, -19/6 1AVIA VAUL 1,


* From Page 12
end that "we must forget the
dead. and study de rest that leave
behind" seems to run counter to
the spirit of the play, though I
might be giving too much empha-
sis to the literal here.


Belinda Barnes and Cyril Andalcic
in a moving.moment.


Of the several transitions,
the transition from the moaning
on the table where snatches from
the play are groaned and grumbled
to the Great House scene where
Crew is humiliated and thus in
anger kills Mas Charlie the white
man, is far too abrupt. The
chanting at that point does not
fit into the general mood and
better might have been a certain
cocktail hilarity at the Great
House which Crew interrupts.
Yet one can see the scene as
both parallel and parody of the
earlier witnessing in the wake.
Belinda Barnes as Rachel
brought a control of body and a
presence that- both dominated
the stage and controlled and
paced the other actors. Her
dancing with the jar of water
while possessed will long be
remembered. She did everything
that was required. Actors will
learn a lot through working with
her.
Veronica Williams ps Brigit was


more than satisfactory in her role
as the daughter-in-law who chose
to marry the reliable Jacko rather
than the impulsive Sonson.
Gibbons attitude to theatre
may require a tougher approach
with respect to getting publicity
and an audience. Gibbons is
determined to shape raw talent
into refined acting skill. He has a
clear concept of the role- of the
actor in the evolution of our
theatre.
Given that approach one
can see that actors will be
allowed to assist to a large extent
in the shaping of both character
and scene. John Warner as one
of the young actors making that
journey to his collective self,
needs to control all that energy
he has. As P, a sprightly old man,
Wainier was in and out of the
role. He was certainly into it as
he danced "me no rock so".
Cyril Andalcio is an actor I
have watched develop from Butts
in Hill's Ping Pong to Stone in


Scott's play. Andalcio is growing
with each role he attempts. His
slow motion tight, with Crew
showed this to great advantage.
But to remember Mas Charlie so
clearly without remembering
Stone suggests that Andalcio
could have worked harder at
that peasant character.-
Irwin Layne as Jacko, a foil
to Sonson, was probably weaker
than the playwright intended
him. Geneve Fletcher as Lally, a
foil to the more morally upright
Brigit, was just the right blend
of forwardness, sensuality and
wide eyed innocence for her role
as goodtime girl and house keeper.
Scott has written a play
that has pushed Caribbean
theatre forward into areas it
must explore.
Gibbons is the kind of daring
and exciting director that makes
the play work as theatre first
and as message second; a feat not
always achieved by some. of our
leading directors.


I-_ I_~ _I ______________________


Keep a breast of the

real currents in the

Caribbean Sea.


Trinidad & Tobago
Caricom Countries
Other Caribbean
U.S./Canada
E.E.C. (incl. U.K.)


TT $18.00 per year
30.00
U.S. $25.00
$30.00
Stg. t 14.00


Surface rates and rates for
other countries on request.
Tapia, 82-84 St. Vincent St., Tunapuna, & 22 Cipriani Bvd.
P.O.S. Trinidad & Tobago, W.I. Telephone 662-5126. & 62-25241.


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PAGE 14 TAPIA SUNDAY DECEMBER 19, 1976





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SUNDAY DECEMBER 19, 1976 TAPIA PAGE 15


DOMINICAN officials s
are talking of a "fifth
column" of Haitians carry-
ing out a "peaceful occu-
pation" of the country,
bringing with them disease,
crime and "pagan" religious
beliefs. Others voice fears
about "miscegenation."
The governor of the
border province of Elias
Pina has banned local
people from dancing the-
Haitian "gaga" which he
says is superstitious and
obscene.
He has also ordered
people not to listen to
Haitian radio stations,
which can be heard loud
and clear along the
frontier, at one point only
20 miles from Port-au-
Prince, while those in the
Dominican capital, Santo
Domingo, more than 100
miles away, cannot.
The church favours a
vigorous crusade in the
border area to suppress
Haitian voodoo rites there.
Dominicans also resent the
names of many frontier
villages have been Haitian-
ised.
"But this cultural jingoism
while handy to drum up
national unity in the current
crisis, ultimately conflicts
with the economic interests


of the wealthy Dominican
sugar estate owners who
far prefer the cheap and
willing Haitian labourers
to the Dominicans, who
in spite of high unemploy-
ment, traditionally shun
the plantations and sugar
factories because of the
wretched conditions. Al-
ready some owners have
opposed the decorations
on these grounds.
About 12,0100 Haitians
are recruited anid sold
every year by the Haitian
government at 10 dollars a
head to the Dominican
estates. The Duvalier regime
also gets five percent -of
their wages, and a further
30 percent is docked by
the estates and handed
over to the Duvaliers as a
guarantee that the labourers
will return to Haiti at the
end of the season.
Few Haitians ever see
this money after returning,


I I,


15 Henry


St.,


hence many "disappear"
soon after being allowed
into the Dominican Republiq
across the border, which
has been officially closed
for the past' nine years.
Thousands of others are
sold to the estates by
allies of the Duvaliers at
60 dollars a head. They
often become simple slaves .
because of the constant
threat of expulsion if they
do not comply.
For those who get paid,
the two dollars a day -
even when only paid in
company store coupons -
is a welcome increase on
Haitian rates of pay.
Another deterrent from
going back to Haiti is the
steep 25 percent commis-
sion charged by the money
changers who court the
canecutters.
The christian democrat


Latin American workers
Federation (LAWF) recently
joined the many Haitian
exile groups and denounced
the trafficking in Haitian
canecutters as a "a modern
slave trade" and accused
the Duvaliers of violating
the "most fundamental
human rights."
But for many Haitians,
a free ticket to cross the
border for the sugar harvest
remains a much sought-








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This and the needs of
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Fu I Speed




Ahead


Report On Sunday Gone


Earl Best

THERE was a kind of refreshing informality about the
proceedings of the Eddie Hart League on Sunday night.
Up on the platform, all but hidden behind an impressive
array of trophies, sat the "distinguished guests" and officials
of the League. The number grew right up to the moment
when the night's Chairman rose to ask for silence so that
the function might begin. His request, in the absence of a
P.A. system, had to be relayed by half a dozen voices to the
back of the hall.
First, there was the Secretary's report. He deviated
from the norm by treating not just the season under review
but the whole ten years of the League's history.
He showed clearly how the League had grown from strength
to strength, surmounting the hurdles placed in its path by friends
and foes alike through the courage of his and Eddie's own convic-
tion. He showed how Eddie's charisma and enthusiasm survived the
continuous buffeting he received only because it was married to his
own uncompromising defence of principles; how what seemed to be
the deliberate attempts to disrupt the League's progress were
thwarted by the -mobilization of the large community it served.
The list of the League's achievements, he made clear, was long.
There had been Education for the community, not just the visual
education of the halcyon days of 1968 and 1969. In those days, the
cream of the local footballing crop, sponsored by two small-time
club owners c.f the district, had been on show on the League's
.-.. '*"~ approval as the crowd recalled
'"-amoufnt Interna-
tional.
It was, the Secretary reminded, at this point in the League's


CA TERERS

ANGELA CROPPER
62 -22175
662-3694


The National
Team in action.


TTFA must recognize
those Leagues
which do not
operate under
the aegis of
the national Body.


DEAR SIR,
I admire your we
newspaper for
genuine scholar
with which it iswrit
The contribution
sport, particularly
ket, are intell
knowledgeable
readable.
I feel that suc
newspaper is wo.
of encouraged
mainly for the rea
that it educates.


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history that it so incurred the wrath of the ruling body that a public
demonstration had to be organized to counter the harassment.
The education had also taken the form of a series of lectures
by the U.W.I. Guild of Graduates under the League's aegis, the
publication of three brochures and a continuing series of courses for
referees.
There had been a tour to Grenada by an under-17 squad in
1968; there had been the introduction of cash prizes for the seven-a-
side tourney inaugurated in 1974. And there had been, and con-
tinues to be, representation on national teams, Senior and Junior
(Earl Carter, "Sam" Phillip and Wayne Lawson were three of those
present) and on national bodies (both the Secretary and Eddie had
served onthe now defunct N.S.C.)
SFinally, there had been the introduction this year of cash
prizes to the tune of $1,475.
This led the Secretary to lament the fact that the players
continue to disappoint with their response to the fund-raising
ventures. For years the League has been trying-to start a.Sports
Co-operative, the idea is still on the shelf mainly because the
.clubs on whom, naturally, its success depends are quite unprepared
to work for its realization.
But worse, the fetes and other small ventures undertaken by
the League to raise the funds for prizes were not supported by the
players with the result that once more and when Eddie. said it he
made many in the audience .squirm the League was forced to
approach private individuals, and to depend on community
generosity to supply a lot of the individual prizes.
Furthermore, it was only througri an overdraft from their
bankers that they were able to .meet the commitment to give cash
prizes.
The Parliamentary Secretary then rose to deliver the feature
address. Having endorsed the Secretary's lament and called for the
players to organize themselves with a view to forcing the TTFA to
recognize "those who do not play under the umbrella of the national
body," she sat down again.

TOGETHERNESS IS THE MOTTO


Those who knew of the overtures that have long been made to
.ekly Government to acquire the grounds on which the League is now run
the before the owners reclaim them and erect thereon, "in the name of
-ship progress", another set of offices, were at first surprised, then dis-
shten. appointed, and finally annoyed that there was no statement forth-
tten on coming from the competent authority:
n on The plans, therefore, to work at fund-raising all year round -
cric- there's a'bingo, a Carnival fete and a "nationwide raffle" already on
ligent the drawing-board are being pursued under Damocles' sword.
and A host of speakers (including one member of the audience who
took the stage to voice his dissatisfaction with the conduct of the
;h a competition and was shouted down by the whole assembly and -
rthy another who pledged his club's support for the League's programmes)
nent followed the P.S. And then the Chairman introduced Eddie to take
ason charge of the prize distribution.
Neither the absence of the recipient nor of the trophy could
G.G. slow down this part of tehe proceedings as Eddie, leaning comfort-
ably against the side of the stage
summoned members of the audience to present prizes
exhorted the gathering to applaud with more feeling
praised the dedication of the referees and their wives "whose
job it is to keep the referee clean"
saluted an occasional star past or present
observed, without rancour, that for yet another year the
RS press.had stayed away from the function thereby robbing the prize-
winners "of the pleasure of seeing their names and/or pictures in the
papers. That's th' way it is. Yeah."
or tossed a coin to "decide which of the joint winners would
hold the trophy for the first six months.
When it was all over, the lion's share of the prizes had gone to
... Upstarts, a club founded by Eddie 8 years ago and with a present
membership of go-odd youths, a triumph of community organiza-
tion and organic growth which is what the Eddie Hart League with
its motto "Togetherness" is all about.
Next Week: The Prize Winr.,rs.


WEEKLY REVIEW PRINTED AND PUBLISHED BY THE T/.PIA HOUSE PUBLISHING CO. LTD., 91 TUNAPUNA RO. TUNAPU'NA. TEL: 662-5126


The Score
ON September 24,
1967 14 teams paraded
before a panel of
judges to launch the
Eddie Hart League.
In that year 18
teams were entered in
the competition which -
was-. contested in 2
divisions on field for
four trophies. Today,
in 10 years, the League
has grown into not
just a community but a
national institution. It
ooasts 58 teams from
as far afield as "Man-
zanilla on the East and
Carenage on the West."
The secretary dis-
closed in his Report at
the Tenth Annual Pre-
sentation of prizes held
at the Community Hall
of the St. Mary's,
Children's Home On.
Sunday last, some 30
trophies (and a score
or 50 additional awards
and prizes) were con-
tested for in 5 divisions
on 4 fields needing a
total of 480 matches!