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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00072147/00243
 Material Information
Title: Tapia
Physical Description: no. : illus. ; 43 cm.
Language: English
Publisher: Tapia House Pub. Co.
Place of Publication: Tunapuna
Creation Date: December 12, 1976
Frequency: completely irregular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Politics and government -- Periodicals -- Trinidad and Tobago   ( lcsh )
Genre: periodical   ( marcgt )
serial   ( sobekcm )
 Notes
Dates or Sequential Designation: no. 1- Sept. 28, 1969-
General Note: Includes supplements.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 000329131
oclc - 03123637
notis - ABV8695
System ID: UF00072147:00243

Full Text


30 Cents


SUNDAY DECEMBER 12, 1976


.2'-'


rs. Andrea Talbutt
Research Institute a
Study of Man,
162, East 78t~h Street,
New York, NlY. 10021, T.M
Ph. Lehigh 5 8448,
WEEKLY REVEW PRNTEDS. A.E TAPA HOUSE PUBLSTUNAPUNA L:6626126 AND22 PRIAI VDP.O 6-241.
WEEKLY REVIEW PRINTED AND PUBLISHED BY TH.E TAPIA HOUSE PUBLISHING CO. LTD., 91 TUNAPUNA AD.,TUNAPUNA TEL:662-5126 AND 22 CIPRIANI BVDPP.o 62-25241..


THIS weekend, Tapia will
conclude our Tunapuna
Week with a Fete and an
All Fours Match.
On Saturday night at 66,
Cheeseman Avenue West,
St. Augustine, the.ante is
$2 per head.
Two DJ's and a.parang
Side will be in attendance.
The host is Fitz Baptiste..,,
On Sunday afternoon at-."
2.30, Coach Rampersad
will welcome Heroes of
War up at the Tapia House.




LAST Sunday, I was
accosted by an angry
football fan in the
Tunapuna Market. He
wanted to find out
how I "could say is
Dark Horse way cause
we to lose the match
larse. week".
"And to besides,"
he went on vex too
bad, "yuh eh even say
nutten bout how they
pick Steve David in
front of Godfrey,
Harris."
"Yuh know," he
concluded, waving a
dramatic finger, "is all
yuh so way bringing
down Tunapuna."
I am forced to dis-
agree. Point the accus-
ing finger at those who
insist on ignoring the
legitimate community
leaders, preferring to
foist on us their own
handpicked crew.
The result? We are
saddled with charlatans
and clowns for admin-
istrators and we end
up with dilettantes and
careerists, not to men-
tion makers of policy
who know little and
care less about the
real interests of people.

Read Inside this week's
Tapia Tunapuna Supple-
ment for Earl Best's
reflections on Sport in
Central St. George.


WHAT




T IE B

BUDGET time is this
weekend. Budget time in
the Christmas Season.
a Wniatiwill Santa Claus bring
':for -us this year, now that
money is no problem?
Some are hoping for
toys, some for the hard- much harder to w
ware. of development,- most the public when t
for new token tax reduc- sister of Finance c
tions. bread left is right.
Who is so crazy to hope The road back 1
for utilities and services must by-pass the
that function? and the endless bre
What has taken twenty As always, we
years to run down will political thrust f:
take a score times twenty have had national e
to re-build again. in 1976; in 1977
Money is no solution;- have local gov
morale and morality are elections.
closer the mark. We have had are
But they become so constitutional ref


RI


min from
:he Min-
an share

to sanity
spending
aad'.
need a
first. We
elections
we must
ernment

etrograde
orm of


the national government;
we must have a counter-
vailing reform of the local
administration.
Recently the Govern-
ment has been mouthing
the idea of a grand decen-
tralization, a turning of
the gaze away from White-
hall.
We shall see from the
Budget if they really mean
it; we will see how they
Budget for local govern-
ment.


-'V.'
.4E


7k 2 -0= MA

-~ ,', r
- 15~Ri~~i0"


Downtown Tunapuna. Inside this week's Tapia read our su/pplkciit on
one of the fastest growing municipal areas in Trinhdad & lubagc.


LONGLIFE MUFFLERS
BEAT ALL OTHERS FOR QUALITY VALUE AND LIFE

O'ESi MARTIN PORT OF SPAIN LAVENTILLE SAN FERiANJOO0
tou1 roads 112, henry st. 42, eastern mn. rd. cross crossing
I --


Vol. 6 No. 50


Maingot
Bazaar
THE Maingot Village
Youth Organisation
holds a Grand Bazaar
this Sunday December
S1,2.
UR 'at First Trace,
Maingot St., there will
be music, games and
stalls. A Bazaar Queen
will be selected.


I-.;. -, ------- -`-- -


lu D a


a







"( Lt2 TAP'A SUNDAY DECEMBER 12, 1976





1
SOULLESS would he be, yea, a veritable Scrooge,
,who could successfully resist the inundations of good
cheer flowing from all points of the compass these
days. Of course, it is old hat nowadays to decry the
crass commercialism which has overtaken tme spirit
of Christmas, It is considered much better form to
grin and bear it.
WHATEVER tl- lingering doubts in our minds
shall we not concede to the media of communication
an awesome power to mould the minds of men? For
it was but a few short weeks ago that we seemed to
be in the slough of despond, all of our hearts bI ,vy
with a great despair. Now, verily, all of that seems to
be way behind us, ao we prepare once again to
celebrate the coming of the Lord.


DOES it not seem particularly
boorish of Mr. Sham Moham-
med, PNM parliamentarian a"
ex-Minister, to protestthe
emphasis placed on Christmas
in our admittedly multi-
religious society? A shrewder
man would have calmly noted
the diminution of the religious
content and the evolution of
the feast day into a festival of
national significance. A wiser
man would have noticed the
crucial importance of the media
in this development. For,
whoever the ultimate benefi-
ciaries of the season of Christ-
mas maybe, it is the media
which jingling their bells from
as early as October, form the
battering rams of consciousness.
IT is a strange coincidence
that, within the past few weeks,
'there has been a muted debate
on the question of the freedom
of the press. Little attention
has been focused on the
power of the press and the uses
to which that power is put.


Only last week Tapia reported
that a freelance interviewer
at TTT. nd we include the
electronic media in our defini-
tion of the press, had bc'-1
debarred froit the station
because, according to the
Chairman of the Board of
Directors, his interviews we; e
biased and partial. But the
prohibition against bias and
partiality does not _- am to be
universally applied.
HOW else are we to explain
TTTs heavy bias toward Christ-
mas programming and its
partiality to advertisements these
days. In the station's charter
there is supposed to be a
formula dictating the propor-
tion of advertising content per
hour of broadcasting, but those
rules seem to be honoured
more in the breach than in
their observance. Perhaps the r
rules have been seasonally
adjusted. Meanwhile the geese
are getting fatter.


SEASONAL


2-

SPEAKING of seasonal
adjustments, we have been
treated, again within the
past few weeks, to an
intervention by Mr.
Everard Medina, a Chamber
of Commerce personality,
on the subject of
unemployment. Mr.
Medina is reported to have
told a gathering at the
F' ';day Inn that the
country's unemployment
figLu; s were grossly over-
stated. According to this
gentleman, to arrive at the
true number of the
unemployed, we would
need to make several com.
putations, taking into
consideration the annual
number of school-leavers
and making appropriate
seasonal adjustments".
IN a subsequent letter
to the press, Mr. Medina
estimated that we had
succeeded in bringing the
percentage of unemployed
down from the official
17% of a few years ago to
closer to 10% today. Such
a figure might be high for
a developed country, but
for a developing country,
opined this pillar of
business morality, we were
not doing too badly.
'Tis the season to be jolly.


Ir l --~~~ -


rrsr-rNo 6L


NEAL & MASSY Bearing & Tool Division
AND DEALERS IN TRINIDAD & TOBAGO.


NEWS




3
"Christmas is coming and the geese are getting fat"
ONCE more a jolly good time seemed to be had by all at
this year's Convention of the ruling party. And this in
spite of the absence of copies of the official reports
!because of labour disputes at the PNM Publishing Company
Other pressing business seems to have reduced the amount
of coverage the press was prepared to give to this occasion.
But the Political Leader, in his usual starring role, reiter-
ated some of his favourite themes, old and new.
THERE was, of course, the problem of Tobago,
put down to the perverse small-island pride of the inhabit-
ants of that place. And there was the issue of local
government, highlighted by the by-passing of the St.
George County Council in the matter of road repairs in the
Barataria district, an action, according to the Political
Leader, contrary to the spirit of the Cabinet decision in
the matter. And doubly unfortunate, too, in coming at a
time when the party was discussing the question of greater
powers for local government bodies. It was difficult to
fault Dr. William's conclusion, in the light of experiences
of this kind, that "all County Councils should be
disbanded".
NOR did the Prime Minister; phalanx.
in addressing his party, fail to ALL in all, the gathered
made amends for his recent party faithful must have
expression of distaste for the warmed to the perorations of
incessant protest actions out- the "Old Man", as they fondly
side of Whitehall. He could be and affectionately refer to
"reasonably certain that PNM him. They may have a further
members... took part in these opportunity to do so this
agitations. .. partly to give vent Friday (December 10), when
as citizens, their tremendous The Minister of Finance
displeasure with the inade- presents in the House the
quacy and inefficiency which Budget for 1977. The Trinidad
they face everyday and every- Guardian has already raised
where". Now we know why editorially the banner of
the PNM has prevailed they Relief, and if that is any guide
are in touch with the pulse of to the action, citizens may be
the nation. In fact, at every cheered tolearn on Friday that
flashpoint of protest we must they do not have to put a
now look for the solid PNM penny in the "Old Man's" hat.
"Please put a penny in the old man's hat"





4
"If you haven't got a penny a ha'penny will do"
ONE dark item news ot yet another oil slick. This one
caused by a sunken Texaco barge and said to be threaten-
ing the coast line off Point Fortin. The more 'dispirited
among us report that the entire coastline of Trinidad has
already gone in any case. The cynical might say that this
confirms that the island is floating on a sea of oil.
WHATEVER the cynics might say, the confident
expectation in confident circles is that revenues next year
will exceed even this year's record $2,000m. And if the
OPEC Ministers hike the price when they meet later this
month, all the more gravy, liquid cash, ready credit. Who
can care about beaches at a time like this? With money to
burn? And no energy-based and energy-using projects to
worry about now that they have all either been scaled


down or phased out?
THE one fly in the oint-
ment, according to the Trinidad
Guardian, is the determination
of trade union members and
unorganized workers "to secure
what they think that (sic) they:
should have without any
regard to the possible adverse
effects upon the whole
economy" (Editorial,
Monday, December 6). The
only ideology the PNM
claims, says Dr. Williams to
his party's convention, is to
provide a better way of life
for the people of Trinidad and
"If you haven't got a ha'pcnn


Tobago.
"IN my view", writes Mr.
J.A. Bain, Chairman of the
Board of Directors of TTT
and 610 Radio, "what has
gone wrong is that the trade
unions have not been
satisfied to confine their
activities to getting better
conditions of service, but
have also been interfering with
the process of management
to such an extent that manage-
ment has been deprived of its.
right to manage"
(Sunday Guardian, December
5).
v then God bless you"


IL


-


-Aso 0 m


I -


I


mm mim


I
MOD. NO, DESCRIPTION REG. PA. SPECIAL PR.
EG00
N 5 ,42
7004 1/4-DRILL 4200 39.00
7004/04 U." DRILL KIT 7906. 75.00
7104 W'DRILL 5106 48.00
7104/05 DRILL KIT 88oo 83.60
7114 14" VARIABLE SPEED 93,00 84.00-
7301 71/," CIRCULAR SAW 110,00, o 96'00
7404 FINISHING SANDER 68.00, 65.00
T
7450 2 SPEED BELT SANDER _24600 220.00
7519 2 SPEED JIG. -SAW 78.00
7761 H013BY COMPRESSOR 20900 1188.00
8780 RECHARGEABLE 6&'00 65.00
LANTERN KIT


I Black a Beakep J


II


I


I





SUNDAY DECEMBER 12,1976 TAPIA PAGE 3


THURSDAY DEC. 2.
Shots fired from light air-
plane as fish war between TT
and Venezuela continues. 50
estate constables to police
Piarco airport. 3 Central bank
workers fired for $100,000
negligence. Output at Forrest
Reserve drop by 13,000 barrels.
Caricom row brews over free
trade, local manufacturers
complain to Chambers. Matelot
complains of no bus service.
Docks congestion sends up
surcharge on' cargo. Mootoo
tipped to be DLP leader.
Caribbean population up 21%
in 10 years.

FRIDAY DEC. 3.
Electoral college meets 1


p.m. today. Returned fishermen
make charges of beatings;
Venezuelan envoy denies charge.
Government to scale down
Iron and Steel industry. Tobago
Chambers say no to self rule.
Japanese interested in supply-
ing total cement plant system
to TT. Weekes calls on Texaco
for Xmas bonus. Jimmy Bain
bans Wilbert Holder from TTT.

SATURDAY DEC. 4.
Budget day is Dec. 10. 200
foodcrop farmers protest out-
side Parliament. Chambers
relutes ULA ciLaige against
BWIA official. Panday ques-
tions government on fishing
dispute. Castro hits Iran and
Saudi Arabia for oil policy and
lack of concern for poorer


Third World countries. Bur-
roughs to report directly to
Commissioner May. Dayclean
trial t.- take place Dec. 10.
BWIA begins Caracas run.

SUNDAY DEC. 5.
Dr. Williams to PNM Con-
vention: no deliberate govern-
ment policy to neglect Tobago;
Caribbean integration moving
backward rapidly. Sham
Mohammed asks House Leader
whether back benchers can
speak in Parliament. Tobago
,-rkwkay showdown looms.
-ciiy'a Nationa! Sport Council
against African boycott of
1968 Commonwealth games.
Bob Marley shot in Kingston
home.


SUMc t,---


MONDAY DEC. 6.
Dr. Williams surprised over
Tobago fuss; charges Simonette's
report on Tobago election
results false; does not object
to protests at Whitehall. No
Xmas bonus no 1977 crop say
sugar workers. Ken Gordon
attacked in Guyana Press.
Dominicans to get first look at
draft constitution next week.
Heavy rains cause havoc in
east Trinidad.
TUESDAY DEC. 7.
Bridges collapse in East
Trinidad; villagers at Matelot
marooned. PM to Convention
election pledges must be kept.
Grenada votes today; Tony
Cozier refused entry in Grenada;
Gairy calls opposition alliance
a communist group. Caroni
workers pledge no bonus, no
crop at Chaguanas meeting.
Burroughs summons taxi-drivers
to discuss anti-hijacking strategy;
drivers required to take oath of


WHENEVER the Oil Min- the price of oil. Rather preferential pricing will
sisters from OPEC meet, discussion will .focus o. come to the fore.
the topic of discussion will how mucn OT aTn morease? For in spite of the
not be whether there and for whom. In short many prophecies of inter-
should be an increase in the whole question of national economic disaster


(ANGOSTURA


I?~~m


Angostura Old Oak Rum
A mellow blend of light
Trinidad rums.Smooth.
clean tasting.


which are coming from
the Industrial world, all
the member countries of
OPEC are united on the
need for some increase.
They argue that since
the last price increase 15
months ago, their real
export earnings have been
significantly eroded by the
increases in the prices of
imported industrial goods.
In addition they main-
tain that very little is
being done to adopt strong
conservation practices in
the use of energy resources.
The Industrial countries
focus their arguments on
the disruptive effects any
price increase will have on
the general balance-of-
payments position of
consumer countries.
They point to the
increasing incapacity of


lhe international financial
-system to finance the
massive deficits which any
price increase will bring.
Speaking at the 32nd.
session of the General
Agreement on Tariffs and
Trade, the American repre-
sentative gave the follow-
ing estimate of the magni-
tudes involved.
"We foresee a current
account surplus in the
OPEC countries of nearly
50,000 million dollars.. .
Add to this the aggregate
deficit with OPEC coun-
tries for the past several
years some 150,000
million dollars and the
dimensions of our econ-
omic problem become
obvious."
The industrial consumers
are also quick to point out
Continued on Pg. 12.


See



DHARRIES

COR


INDEPENDENCE SQ.


&HENRY ST. POS

FOR:

POTS, PANS, GLASSWARE,

and other Household items.

.ELECTRICAL FITTINGS

CHRISTMAS BULBS, PAINTS,

BRUSHES NAILS.


secrecy.
WEDNESDAY DEC. 8.
80% turn out in Grenada
elections; Gairy holds on with
slim majority. Opposition
alliance captures 6 seats.
Soldiers go to Matelot's aid.
POS General Hospital seeks
authority to manage own
affairs. Independent senators
vote with opposition again
$159m. Supplementary Appro-
priations Bill. Panday stands
firm on sugar bonus issue.
Trouble brewing over $1m.
backpay for City Council work-
ers.
THURSDAY DEC. 9.
Tobago self-rule motion left
out of Parliament Agenda;
Robinson remonstrates. Jump-
up celebration by Gairy sup-
porters over 9-6 win. Agee says
JLP gets CIA money. PPP
threatens rice and sugar strike
against Burnham Govt. Mushtaq
re-instated.


--- -- ---- ---- -------=--`~---~-~~1~~---1- s-------------~----





ri-O L. 1 I IU t I IV t-A I a/ VL )LIY L IZ? U




/p ~i-r


Today I want to tell
you the story of my friend
James. It is a story which
I am sure is not particularly
strange. No doubt any of
you can repeat it, with
different variations, about
a friend of yours.
So why do I bother to
tell his story? I have no
other explanation but that
he is a friend and as he is
so might I also be but for
all the accidents along the
way.


I first met James in
secondary school. And I
filjt spoke to him in the
principal's office whither
we had both been sum-
moned to be punished for
some breach of the rules.
The sight of each other
being forced to bend over,
jut our bottoms out and
wail in agony with each
stroke of the Principal's
cane, was so mutually
embarrassing that it sealed
our friendship for many a


year to come. Thereafter
we were almost inseparable.
Inseparable, that is,
except for the invisible
barriers which slowly grew
between us as our school
careers took different
paths. I went up and he
went down. Who knows
why?
This is not an effort at
sociological analysis. May be
I was brighter than he.
Maybe he was the lucky
one and I was stupid


enough to do well in a
system which brought, for
its successes, only the
death of creativity and
imagination.
Who Knows? All that
can be stated for certain
is that the dreaded exami-
nations came around. We
both wrote them.
Then three months later
Mr. Cambridge sent to say
that I had "passed" but
James had "failed". I-went
back to school to "further
my education." he went out
onto the streets to further
his.
The next time I saw
James was during those
hectic, exciting and frighten-
ing months in 1970. The
cry all over town you
would remember was
"Black Power".
And James could be
seen at every march, at
every rally, resplendent in
his African robes, his face
a study in intensity and
commitment. Unsmiling.
His voice loud in the
denunciation of the white
power structure, the im-
perialists and the black
puppet government.
I remember that every
time we met in those days
his presence would fill me
with unease. He never
accused me 'of anything.
iut as i looked at myself,
in my white shirt and
tie, hurrying to or from
"the office", my mind
occupied solely with my
plans to go away to
"study", I felt ashamed
for some imprecise reason.
I started to avoid him.
He never tried to impose
himself. When the State
moved to restore law and
order James disappeared
from his usual haunts. I
was fairly certain that he
had not been locked up,
although one could not be
sure.
Forgotten until four
years later. I had been
back in the country less
than a month and I saw
him one day liming on a


corner with some other
brothers. He was bare-
backed, his hair was plaited
in dread locks. He was
dirty and he was high,
very high.
He accosted me. His
eyes were red and out of
focus. He dribbled slightly
as he spoke, "Man yuh
could gie me a bob;" He
extended a hand which
shook.
I told him who I was and
he smiled a crooked greet-
ing. We spoke for a while.
I found out that he had
never found a job since
leaving school. That he was
no longer involved in any
politics.
In his words, "Marn I
orf that scene." That his
only pastime these days
was getting high.
I left James that day
more depressed 'and lost
than I have ever been. And
I could think of nothing
that I could do to rescue
my friend.

GUI LT

But this time I did not
forget. From that day on
James has lived in my mind,
the burden and guilt of the
crime of being me.
Last week I saw James
again.. And ne waa a man
reborn. In more ways than
one. He was once again on
a street corner but this
time he was clean and well
dressed.
He was clutching a bible
in one hand and preaching
in, a ringing voice to a
motley congregation of
some two dozen people.
"Almighty Gawd look
dang I begg yuh on dese dy
sinfull chilrun and forgive
dem dere sins." The Ameri-
can accent was thick and
straight from Oral Roberts.
James' eyes were bright.
I could not decide whether
they were lit with the light
of devotion or the malicious
twinkle of the rogue. But
James had found his call-
ing.


STEP IN AT


62, QUEEN STREET, PORT-OF-SPAIN


1$ ~48~Ds~paxas~p~ars~li~s~~--~~I- a.~JT~PIT~~I~-~I ---;SFICLC=~~


I -
E~sPsr~B~IILI~ ~s~---~V -~s~----~ss rile


ELM

solm"




SUNDAY DECEMBER 12, 1976 TAPIA PWp 5


Will


Tunapuna


ONCE upon a time they used to say that Tunapuna was a
small vibrant town. Nowadays it is a big macco metropolis
sprawling along on both sides of the Eastern Main Road,
embracing the ward of Tacarigua and surrounding areas.
Some people say it is time to establish a City or Borough


Council.
A Borough of Tunapuna
would probably extend
from Mount Hlope and
Champs Fleurs to Garden
Village at the far edge ol
Arouca. That seems to be
the popular idea of the
Near East -- judging by the
people who religiously
shop in the Tunapuna
Market.
To the Far East is Arima,
already a Borough. Beyond
is Sangre Grande, begin-
ning now to grow into
giant city size.
To the West is San Juan,
an overgrown megapolls,
crying out for a Govern-
ment Council to look after
its needs.
At least two Commis-
sions of Enquiry have
recommended the creation
of Boroughs along the
Eastern Corridor.
Cane Farm, Paradise, El
Dorado; Pasea, Monte
Grande, Caura. Once these'-
were sleepy donkey-cart
hamlets, looking hopefully
to the sugarmill at Orange
Grove. The bright lights
were far- away in town, at
the end of the road and
railway lines.
There has been a huge
development in Valsayn,
Curepe, Macoya, Trincity,
Dinsley, Maracas, Elizabeth
Gardens, Santa Margarita
and Mt. St. Benedict.
Already the foot-hill
North of Tacarigua and
Arouca is becoming a
hunting ground for land
developers and real estate
wheelers and dealers.
Along with Chaguanas,


DID you know that
Tunapuna enjoys
$1501m Income per year.
half dozen banks.
4 grand supermarkets.
I sugar Factory.
1 Monastery.
2 Markets.
A Dozen Gas Stations.
3 Police Stations.
1 Magistrate's Court.
12 Friendly Societies.
4 Hospitals.
1 University.
15 primary schools..
14 Secondary Schools.
1 Hotel.
1 Pawn-shop and
No Borough Council?

Tunapuna is said to be
the fastest growing town
in the island. In 1960 the
Ward of Tacarigua by
itself had 68,000 people.
Today the potential
Municipality would have
certainly no fewer than
90,000 souls.
Tunapuna proper has
become a vast commercial
centre. Industry has been
crowding the Estates down
on the Churchill-Roosevelt
Highway.
A kind of patriotism
has been creeping up in
relation to the Eddie Hart
League and the TECSA
Football fan club.
They say Tunapuna is a
town that never sleeps.
With all the hustle and
bustle and the frustrations
of an emerging city, that
saying is true in more ways
than one.


TAPIA SOLD HERE
Pressy's paper Stall, Tunapuna Market
Olga's Parlour, E.M. Rd, East of Bazilon St.
Ali's Snackette, E.M. Rd, West of Bazilon St.
Payne's News Agency, E.M. Rd, West of Jubilee St.
Under Hi-Lo, Tunapuna.
Carl Carrington, Henry Rd, Tunapuna.
Carmen Best, El Dorado Rd, Tunapuna.
Sankar's Parlour, Corner Green & Fairley Sts.,
Yacoob Ali, North of St. Thomas St. on Tunapuna Rd.
Cox Tailoring Est, Tunapuna Road & E.M. Rd.
Universal Barbering Saloon,E.M. Rd, East of Auzonville Rd.
Paula Williams, UWI Campus
Pat Sampson, UWI Campus.
Chooran Roberts, Richards St. Tacarigua.
Hi-Way Grocery, Cor. Knowles and South Main Rd, Curepe.
Tapia House, St. Vincent St. Tunapuna, Nr. Water Lane.
Under Hi-Lo, St. Augustine.
Sobers' Parlour, Jackson St. Curepe
Mini-city, Valpark Plaza.
Manbodh'scafe; Curepe Junction.


Roof leaks are

a pain in the neck.

Use EvodeFlashbad

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way to a secure, watertight roof.
EVODE Flashband is a self-adhesive, aluminium
faced sealing strip. It's easy to apply, and the
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And you save on the cost of material and labour.by
u ng EVODE Flashband too! Because conventional
waterproofing costs more. Also, the aluminium
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AWDIA'S





PAGE 6 TAPIA SUNDAY DECEMBER 12, 1976


Learning

Plentiful

In The


WHY should so many children from the East be going to
school in town? The biggest transport problem on the
Eastern Main Road is the problem of the school children.
Thousands leaving early; thousands stranded on the way,
reaching home late.
When you look at the educational resources available
in the Tunapuna Region, you are bound to repeat the
original question. In this article, Bhoendradatt Tewarie
argues the case for a New Deal in Education in Tunapuna.
It is not just a matter of transport, he says. With the
wealth of talents and equipment in the area, the much-
needed revolution in education is possible here. We can
equip our children for making a living.


DEAL


EAST


SUPPOSE.we had a Borough
or City Council for the
Tunapuna Region. Suppose
all the Schools had School
Boards which could relate
to one single Educational
Authority for the Region.
Could we not provide a
first-class secondary edu-
cation for all the region's
children. And then, would
Tunapuna not be a shining
example for the entire


Open


For


CHRISTMAS


at
Valpark Shopping Plaza
specializing
in


,e nts & Boys


Clothing & Cosmetics


soon!


Are


Area


The University of the West Indies
The Tunapuna Public Library
The Veterinary Lab in Curepe
The St. Joseph Farm & Exp. Stn.
Orange Grove Sugar Factory
St. Augustine Phone Exchange
The Industrial Estates on the Churchill-Roosevelt Hwy.
The Commercial Centre in Tunapuna
The small garages, repair shops, backyard craftsmen.

STATE St. Augustine Senior Comprehensive; Tunapuna
Secondary; Curepe Junior Secondary; Five Rivers Junior
Secondary; El Dorado Girls Camp (Vocational).
PRESBYTERIAN Hill View College; St. Augustine Girls
High School; Archibald Institute (Vocational).
CATHOLIC St. Joseph's Convent; St. Benedict's College;
St. Bede's (Tech/Voc).
HINDU Laxmi Girls.
MUSLIM Asja Girls.


country?
The resources would be
tremendous in a Tunapuna
Borough. Schools of all
denominations, Priv a t e
S c h o o s, Government
Schools; Vocational schools,
commercial schools; the
shops of tradesmen and
craftsmen, the factories of
industry, the shops of
commerce, the offices of


Unique

Store
SERVING
SANGRE
GRANDE


administration.
Perhaps all we need are
the imagination and the
will. As Tunapuna grows
into a modem city, on-the-
job training can be made
a vital part of secondary
education.
Teachers could be drafted
on loan from industry and
commerce so that the com-
prehensive schools could
truly provide technical and
vocational tuition.
If the Government gave
help to small craftsmen in
management and finance,
what would the opport-
unities be for apprenticing
students?
Would the inspection be
beyond the ability of the
School Boards and the
Educational Authority of
the Borough?


AT
JIVAN'S BAZZAR
50 Eastern Main Rd., lunapuna.
Dressing table ; 0-1 $275. Buffet -90. $199.
Pillow Cases from $3 Bed sheets from 7.95
10% off on all watches


MERRY


XMAS


TO
ALL OUR CUSTOMERS
FROM


"as




TAILORING & ME N'S WEAR
Valpark Shopping Plaza, Valsayn


Facilities


e -: '" -- .---,-. .
Idle lAdngataD..n....s.... Sit.- .Tn .
Idle building at Caura Dam Site Tunapuna Region.


EDUCATION


FOR


THE


a I --- I~


Now


In Time


cormx





SU NDAY DECEMSEP? .12-1-764 T!PIA PAGGE7


.A '-


Practical



Marriages



Needed


*: *. ,;


Says Beau Te

EDUCATION in Tunapuna
requires three marriages
between the academic and
the technical schools. At
Mount St. Benedict, St.
Bede's has for a long time
been training students in
technical and vocational
skills. But St. Bede's and
the Abbey School have
traditionally functioned as
separate schools.
At present, these schools
are initiating the first of'
the marriages we need. The
plan is to expose the St.
Bede's students to the
academic programme at
the Abbey School.
It is hoped that pro-
gramme will not give a
one-sided exposure. The
Abbey School students
should also be exposed to
craft. There may even be
room for the St. Joseph's
Convent of St. Joseph to


EVERYBODY in Tuna-
puna knows that if you
want to fix a car, pass
either by Cheesy or Pouch
or Akal. That is a law.
Men famous for fixing
anything, for finding parts,
for fashioning some solu-
tion, for making blood out
of stone.

CHEESY& POUCH

Mechanics f a t h e r;
wizards, geniuses. What
miracles would they not
work, if only they had the
equipment, the finance,
the accounting?
How many apprentices
would they--train? How
many young wizards? What
would it do for vocational
education?
SSuppose the IDC started
to take a real interest in
these little garages. With



Mickey's


Automotique

Cor. Edward Lee
&
Cipero Streets
SAN FERNANDO
&
Main Road
FYZABAD


warie


share in an experimental
project aiming at a better
blend of academic and
technical education.
The Presbyterian Board
must also now be urged
to bring its schools toge-
ther. What better prospect
is there than a collabora-
tion between the St.
Augustine Girls' High
School and the Archibald
Institute not so far away?
Both these schools are
highly reputable institutions
in their respective fields. It
is difficult to see what
major problems of cost or
of management and admin-
istration would arise from
a modest attempt at a
pilot project.
Many of the parents of
the SAGS would prefer to
enrich the experience of
their girls with practical
training at the vocational


~fi*i' jkL 1
~:Il-C



.u
---:
sea v.
~~~









'i
.~, -:


; .-_ .._ :


-4
.

.. .
iv


4r-


',ird~; ''s c.Office Tuinapina: area needs a single education authority working with local school, boards.


facilities of the Archibald
Institute.
A third prospect would
show the Government
Schools bringing the El
Doi,;do Girls' C,-.,Ip and
the Orange Grove lab and
machine-shop into a pro-
gramine oi app ti cc hip


nI

MW -ID I-




ANI CASS

DO 11TOVON GRANDE


is working with Neal and
Massy now.
The St. Augustine Senior
and the Curepe Junior
would probably look to
the St. Joseph Farm. The
possibilities are unlimited
as the Borough expands.


study.
It is not necessary to
press the imagination too
far. Once the scheme
catches on, you could
envisage Hill View College
working with ANSA and
Sterling Drugs in muci the
same way as Fatima College


'- A 4~i*is -..


28 Mucurapo Street
SAN FERNANDO
652-2093


money for equipment and
tools. With help in manage-
ment and accounting
help that could fit into
the backyard without tears.
Suppose the Secondary
Schools were brought into
the plan?
Well suppose your nose
was a door post!


_________________________ J ___________~P"" Y________________________________________________________________
Ulr- ----;----~iBiif "


I


RESTAURANT & A

76 IND. LENDi.'


FAMOUS FOR A

CHINESE DI









THE W M O Dtds C


RE CONDTIONED BAR

",E SQUARE, P.O.S.


VARIETY OF

ELICACIES


PHONE: 62-54113

FOR RESER VA TIONS


R. BEHARR Y %
riir --C-- I---;---~~'i L - '


Mechanics Father


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-.
J~;~
3
r


'
I-i--- r;~. ~ I'i~~
:. :~.Z

i:~-i --i_: 1
~k~-'l:;~;i~--~ 4-. ``'- r'i 1 :'f'3i~,~l?'~?i~s~:~
i
X~'~ '
s~'l ~~;~-
~\ -1 ?.~ c-


PYRAMI'









- L ek *.

I jr P

Vie..
R-: '~j~?,;,rV


4
C,
Ar-.~h
IAw-rr


TUNAPUNA
IN the old days, we had
Anzacs, Hornets and
Corinthians. And then
Invaders, Naiads, Ebony.
Those were the days. Foot-
ball was King.
You could kick ball at
Honeymoon, on the draft
board down Henry Road,
up Tunapuna Road about
three places, down Lovers
Lane on Back Street, down
Picton Street, on Green
Street, you name it.
In those days you could
kick ball, believe it or not,
down in the Savannah,,
where the Fire Brigade
Station stands today.
Same Savannah CLR
James wrote about in his
famous book "Beyond the
Boundary." In the cricket
season, Stanmore used to
play there; and Oriental.
Clarence Skeete, Chickie
Sampath, Elias Constantine
Percy Roach, Rupert
Hosein.
Those were the days of
,sport; the days before pool.
To be young was very
heaven. Now you just lime
on the block and smoke.


By

Earl Best


Trinidad gets the ball into the net vs Barbados in World Cup.


Regent


Pharmacy

Eastern Main Rd.
Tunapuna.

FOR ALL YOUR
DRUG SUPPLIES


TAKE the CStGFL. In the
8 years of its existence,
only three of the League's
Teams have managed to
campaign in the National
First Division. The exist-
ence of the League has in
no wise improved the living
conditions of Sport in
Central St George.
Tunapuna is still without
a single public ground
where one can take a gate
on a regular, serious, busi-
ness basis. Honeymoon
remains unused because it
remains unusable despite
reports of continuing
spending thereon.
Constantine Park started
without a fence. It now
has one on its Western
boundary and on part of
the South. It still has one
single football field and
one single matting wicket
with a set of overgrown
cricketing nets.
The Park has a netball
and lawn-tennis court,
used as often by the
block-o-rama crowd as by
either lawn-tennis or net-
ball players. It is reported
that the expansion now
underway will equip us


with a swimming pool plus
another pitch for football.
You wonder if, suppos-
ing the rumours were
true, this new ground
would become the home
ground of our local team
TECSA.
You wonder too, in
passing, how long TECSA
will continue to be the
local team in the sense that
it comprises mainly players
from in and around Tuna-
puna.

PROFESSIONALS

Will not the desire to
keep the team "on top"
bring more and more "pro-
fessionals" in? Will we not
thereby frustrate the legiti-
mate desires of the dozens
of youth who are now
campaigning in the Barker
and Eddie Hart Minor Lea-
gue and who doubtless,
have an eye, on promotion
to the local Championship
Division Team?
It should thus be no
surprise to discover that
the hasty conversion of the
many small leagues strug-


gling to find a place in the
Trinidadian scheme of
things was espoused from
the outset by the admin-
istrators- of the now
defunct CStGFL.
It was obvious that
energies could far more
profitably be expended on
developing the basic ameni-
ties such as, clubhouses,
match and training grounds,
dressing rooms, and inevit-
ably, proper and practical
transport arrangements..
But none so blind as
those who will not see...
The CStGFL championed
the cause of the four-
division National League;
the CStGFL carried the
day; and the CStGFL, along
with the PYMFL and the
AFL, became the Zone
Committee of the NFL.
Predictably, the East
Zone Comrmittee was
recently disbanded when
several clubs, up to here
with bungling and ineffi-
ciency, decided to get
together and do their own
thing outside of the juris-
diction and the maladmin-
istration of the East Zone
Committee of the NFL.


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'" -* " !' **:*'
y .:,


~'Z .." ''
*


- rt


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Hurry Now

R.NARAYNS INGH

Eastern Main Road Tunapuna


Patel's


Store
Eastern Main Rd.
Tunapuna
for


Ulm I



B 3 B 2 SBun





SUNDAY DECEMBER 12, 1976 TAPIA PAGE 9


Hornets
Naiads
Invaders
Ebony


In The Good
Old Days
They Had


ra

--i
r -; -
-JLI
*:1~;--~~
pir


Grounds


Allyuh


oes


own


Way 1




Bring


Tunapu/na


SUPPLEMENT
Anzacs


Universal
Barber
Saloon
EASTERN MAIN RD.
TUNAPUNA
For The Best
in
Men's Hair Styling


If It's


Hardware


LINES

Then it Must Be

ACME HARDWARE
in the heart of
TUNAPUNA.


Meanwhile, in Tacarigua,
the Eddie Hart League
was bursting at the seams
and making long strides
forward every year with
new players, young and
old, new grounds, new
competitions!
Eddie Hart, however,
the League's livewire and
founder, a man who has
almost singlehandedly been
responsible as well for the
survival and continuing
success of the Tacarigua
E.C. Old Boys' Association
Team in the local cricket
competition, was forever
passed over in the selec-
tion of officials for duties
on and off the field.
Hart, let it be noted.has,
recently been tossed a bone
in the form of the deputy-
trainership of the North-
East Squad. We can only
hope this means that the
authorities are now ready
to trust the people's judg-
ment.


It certainly is welcome
news that, with the old
regime of administrators
now in limbo, Ken Hodge
too, has been tossed a bone.
Ken has been responsible
for a highly successful
"minor" league in St.
Augustine last season.

WORLD CUP

A very good friend of
mine, who has for years
refused to go to any foot-
ball match at the Oval,
told me that his presence
at the World Cup Game
by no means meant that
he had revised his views
about the TTFA's "derelic-
tion of duty" in not yet
having acquired its own
ground.
"But", he pointed out
by way of explanation, "I
didn't go out to support
TFA; I went to support


Trinidad. Narrow parochial
considerations are com-
pletely out of place when
the national interest is at
stake."
That is a lesson which
we can only hope the
TTFA has learnt from the
experiences of the CStGFL.
It is a lesson which hund-
reds of frustrated youths
have learnt the hard way
even if most of them
remain sadly unaware of
its applications.
The new wind of change
in East football must now
restore Honeymoon to us
before long, must make
Constantine Park worthy
of its illustrious name. We
must go back to the days
when it meant something
to be "from Tunapuna".
But let us not forget
that cockroach eh ha no
right in fowl party. Or as
they say in patois: "Ravet
pa ni raison douvant
poule."


Vanity Fair

Valpark Shopping Plaza
for
* ladies dress fabrics cosmetics costume jewelry
Manyv Gift ItemLs
Opens 9 a.m. to 8 p.m. Every day
except Thursdays 9 a.m. to 1 p.m.
SHOP IN COMFORT AND AT YOUR LEISURE


Congratulations and All success
TO
THE PEOPLE OF TUNAPUNA
FROM


FURNITURE & APPI
37 & 64 EASTERN MAIN ROAD


IIIA


LIAvN L
D. TUNAPUNA


662-7046
DISCOUNT HOUSE
24 CHARLOTTE ST. P.O.S. 62-36736.


S


ESTABLISHMENT
for
The finest cuts
in
Gents Suitings
TUNAPUNA RD.


Is


SHOP AT


F & R HADEED


2 Stores

25 and 51 Eastern Main Road
Tunapuna.


-- ---L--~--C-~ I I~-.-~i~eL~P~s


-
ii
= i---~i -=


--
a


shWp


'rrr ft.






PAGE 10 TAPIA SUNDAY DECEMBER 12, 1S76


BECOMING a big town
creates new problems while
many old problems survive.
Squatting remains one of
the gravest problems in
expanding Tunapuna.
Up the hill lace. froin
Quarriy Drive hlroulgh
C(aiman Village all the way
past (lark Lands and
Madoo Lands in Tuna;puna
riglit up to behind Kanda-
har-Five Rivers.
Equally, down the bot-
tom in the old rice country,
West of Orange Grove and
East of now built-up
Valsayn.
Some say that Streat-
ham Lodge and Bamboo
Settlement .have squatting
for their middle name.
Hundreds of squatters


Trinidad & Tobago
Caricom Countries
Other Caribbean
U.S./Canada
E.E.C. (incl. U.K.)


Bamboo


Streatham

Lodge


Caiman


Madoo

Lands

live in a perpetual state of
squalor and insecurity.
South of the Churchill-
Roosevelt Highway, people
in the Morang area look


TT $18.00 per year
30.00
U.S. $25.00
$30.00
Stg. t 14.00


WI
IIGA


with longing at the gener-
ouis prosperity y enjoyed by
the showpiece part of St.
Augustine, North of the
Eastern Main Road.
There seem to be two
distinct classes of squat-
ters in the Tunapuna
region.
There are housing squat-
ters who run up a little
joupa house mainly on
Government land.
pay no rent, have
no rights, they are simply
hc; i', strain. They expect
to be evicted from home
at any old time.
Then there are farming
squatters mainly far
South of the area. These
people create self-employ-
menCt by cultivating idle
land.
A good share of the
food crops in the market
are produced in this way.
in Bamboo Settiemeni,
the more ambitious of the


Cleasse



Rousing People


Farming People


unemployed youth some-
times take the plunge and
squat. But not all the
farmers are encroaching on
unowned land.
Farming squatters have
two problems with flood-
ing on the low lands.
They lose their crops
and they lose money even
as shortages in the market
impose higher prices on the
buying public.
But the squatters are in


no position to claim com-
pensation under Relief
Projects such as the Alma
Compensation Scheme;
Nor can they risk putting
up drains and other perma-
nent improvements on'
temporary land.
One of the hopes of
squatters is that a new
local government deal in
Tunapuna would bring
reform in the system of
tenancy and titles to land.


F7.AX SIEN,#HOUSE


9i


of QUALITY FURP~NIT P AIANCS

NOW UN lhi


_-t
LATE OPENING '
UNTIL .
CHRISTMAS
MON. TO THU.
7.30 a.aL to 7.00 p.m.
FRIDAY
7.30 a.m. to 8.00 p.m.
SATURDAY
7.30 a.m. to 12.00 noon


3 pc. LIVING ROOM SUITES
E $365.00 NOW $295.04


LIL CHEST OF
with mirror
without mirror


i PC. TOLEDO DANISH M-=
99W. now $79.1 5 PC.WROUGUT roT 00
$265. `Now T199.




110 E STERN MAIM tROAD TUN u 66-MA8


DRAWERS
Now $360.00
Now $299.00


3 pe.-DANISH LIVING ROOM SETS
REG. PRICE $670.00 NOW 1570.00


Keep abreast of the

real currents in the

Caribbean Sea.


Surface rates and rates for
other countries on request.
Tapia, 82-84 St. Vincent St., Tunapuna, & 22 Cipriani Bvd.
P.O.S. Trinidad & Tobago, W.I. Telephone 662-5126. & 62-2524i.


$9138.


Special
PRE-CHRISTMAS
OFFER

WALL TO WALL
CARPETING
(9 DIFFERENT COLOURS)
$39.50 per sq. yd. INSTALLED
20% DISCOUNT for CASH
FREE ESTIMATE AND ADVICE.
--


se~s~c~s~e~ ---- -- Cyl
~~~~'~'''`-''~`'


e~es~p~


[





.aUNLvAY DECEMBER 12. 1976 TAPIA PAil II


i):L.R SIR.
IT was with some con-
sternation that I read of
the harsh judgement
handed down to the Knott
woman. I claim no special
privileges for women, and,
while I am against Capital
Punishment as babaric and
outdated, I will not ask
that she be spared because
of her sex.
However, Sir, the whole
decision seems to me a
callous misjudgement. The
judgement is unbelievably
harsh since there are
obviously extenuating cir-
cumstances, if not from a
legal point of view, then
from a human point of
view.
The woman was preg-
nant. She claimed that
the man asked that some-
thing be done, something
which could have hurt her
and in extension her ciuld.
Secondly, it is obvious
that the man/men made
threatening advances to
her. Any physical violence
with or without weapon
could have had deleteri-
ous effects on a woman in
her condition.
The instinct to protect
the body becomes uncon-
sciously heightened where
there is a pregnancy. More-
over, it is a medical fact
that the psyche of a preg-
nant woman is different to
that of a non-pregnant
woman.

CONTEMPT

I cannot understand
why defence, judge nor
jury recognized these facts.
The fact tha the man felt
that physical violence
could be used on her
because of his dissatisfac-
tion reflects the contempt
which is held for women
in general. As such the
case is important not for
Knott alone, but to all
women.
One hopes that the
fact that Knott was a
prostitute would not blind
us to the facts of the
situation. Knott is a pro-
duct of certain Socio-
economic conditions which
must make us take a look
at the circumstances which
produce cases like hers.
I can only hope that
organizations like HATT,
the League of Women and
humanitarian groups would
recognize the implications
of this case for us all, and
agitate for a revision of an
obviously harsh decision.


C.w.


D 'abadie.


a type of "Sou-Sou" from
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AlImport Financing
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AL All other commercial banking
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TAR' iasnHIfAG


Metrication Board of Trinidad & Tobago,
Ministry of Industry and Commerce,
Sage Building
27-31 Henry S,t
Port of Spain


I" The distance from

the side of the face

to the tip of an

outstretched hand

is one metre


TUNAPUNA'S
CHEAPEST
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I _


_._____---------------1






PAGE 12 TAPIA SUNDAY DECEMBER 12, 1976

Nightmare Traffic And

Overcrowded Housing


Make


In A Tin


TRAFFIC down-town
Tunapuna is a nightmare.
As soon as you hit Auzon-
ville Road coming from
town, the pile-up begins
in car nest.
You might as well stop
and take a trim at Niggers
Barber Shop.
But the overcrowding



A~r11


on the road is like nothing
compared to the housing.
Fifteen hundred people
to the square mile, we are
like sardines in a tin. One
out of every house is
grossly below standard.
By 1980, Tunapuna will
need over 20,000 new
three bed-room houses.


The Bike
For
everyone



.; -



























Fast, Easy, Economical
620r3162., 4 7 6222934 692q


XMAS SPECIALS

15 CU. FT. (no frost) REFRIGERATORS $1,388.


10 CU. FT. REFRIGERATOR

19" CURTIS MATCHES COLQR T.V.


$798.


$1,859.


From Pg. 3.
that the worst effect of
any price increase will be
on the so-called poorer
primary-producing coun-
tries.
This is one argument
which the Oil Ministers
cannot afford to ignore.
The Politics of oil are just
as important as the econ-
omics.
It is the alliance between
the OPEC countries and
the rest of the third world
nations which has played a
large part in the continued
solidarity of OPEC.
That support has not
been unearned. Apart from
the intangible psychol-
ogical reasons for third
world solidarity, the OPEC
countries have been careful
to link their struggle to
the question of trade rela-
tionships between poorer
nations and the Industrial
World.
In addition, they have
been more generous if
more erratic in their aid
to third world nations.
Yet the industrial nations
are clearly prepared to


(


drive a hard bargain. The
much publicised North-
South dialogue has dragged
on in Paris for months
now with little to show in
terms of better trade or aid
prospects for the other
developing countries.
So that any price in-
crease by OPEC which is
allowed to fall with full
force on the non-oil deve-
loping nations will certainly
serve to strain the bonds
of the alliance.
It is therefore not sur-
prising that Perez has been
talking recently of a dis-
criminatory system of
price increases. And it is
certain that this is what is
going to be uppermost in
the minds of the Oil
Ministers.
Any system will inevit-
ably pose difficulties and
anomalies. But at least the
OPEC Ministers know
that there is precedent.
After all the Industrial
countries were the ones
who first raised preferential
trade agreements into high
political art.


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THE collapse of the world
sugar boom has spelt
disaster for the Dominican
Republic's five million
inhabitants.
Two years ago, the crop
was selling for 65 cents a
pound on the New York
market and the economy
was one of the fastest
growing in the western
hemisphere.
Today sugar is fetching
less than eight cents. The
Government has sold the
harvest at or below the
cost of the production, the
balance of payments is
lurching deeply into the
red and the economy is in
decline.
One symptom of the
crisis is the Government's
decision to stop bringing
in casual workers from
poverty-striken Haiti on
the other side of the island
of Hispaniola to work the
harvest.

STATE COUNCIL

The State:Sugar Council,
which produces about two-
thirds 'of the annual crop,
is planning a campaign to
recruit reluctant Domini-
cans for the backbreaking
work in the fields where
90 per cent of the labour
force has traditionally been
supplied by their despised
Haitian neighbours.
But the economic out-
look remains grim. The
slump-in prices has hit the
Dominican Republic harder
than any other country in
the world.
Cuba, the world's
biggest exporter, sells more
than half its crop to the
Soviet Union at four times
the current free market
rate in exchange for petrol-


SU S ar us m '




Makes AMas In




San Domingo



As World Price Drops From


$1.56 To 19 Cents


eum at slightly less than
world prices.
Even so, the Cuban
Prime Minister Fidel Castro
has announced austerity
measures, including a
freeze of hard currency
purchases of investment
goods for its ambitious $18
billions five-year plan for
the years 1976 to 1980.
Brazil, which holds
second place, has a diverse
economy and a wide range
of exports, but the Domini-
can Republic, the third
biggest sugar exporter,
depends on the crop for
about two-thirds of its
export revenue.
Sugar exports are so
important to the Domini-
can Republic that in 1974
and 1975 they represented
about one-fifth of the
country's entire -gross
national product.
Officials here say the
gloomy picture has been
made even darker by the
United States, which last
month trebled its import
duties on the commodity
to 1,875 cents a pound in


order to protect American
growers.
The move produced a
wave of protest here. The
industry and Commerce
Minister, Dr. Guido d'Ales-
sandro, described it. as
unjust and said it could
provoke his government
into tightening the gener-
ous terms under -which
foreign companies operate
here.

U.S. MARKET

But President Joaquin
Balaguer, one of the
United States most loyal
allies in the Caribbean, has
said publicly that' he saw
little hope of getting the
American Government to
change its mind before the
presidential election last.
month.
What the Dominican Re-
public would like now is a
re-establishment of the
quota system operated by
the US until 1974, under
which exporters here had a
guaranteed market bigger
than they could supply.


Whatever the outcome
of the pleas which the
Dominican Republic is
now making in Washing-
ton, there are few encourag-
ing signs for its sugar
industry over the next year
or two.
First the State Sugar
Council has demonstrated
its inability to withhold
production and wait for
higher prices.
Its attempt to store
more than half a million
tonnes of sugar in aircraft
hangars and other emer-


ency '.,,wrehouses earlier
this year ended with the
Council giving in and selling
to US buyers at 15 cents a
pound --'two and a half
cents less than it could
have got earlier in :the

There is no sign of an
upward move in prices and
the world market is also
facing competition from a
substitute product known
as high fructose corn
syrup.

MINIMUM PRICE

At current maize prices,
the syrup becomes cheaper
than cane sugar when prices
reach 12 cents a pound.
The boom days of 1974
therefore may have gone

for ever, and today's belt
tightening here may draw
out into an indefinite
period of austerity.
Latin American and
Caribbeanproducers, who
provide more than half the
sugar on the world market,
have been talking for two,
years about the possibility
of an oil-type cartel to set
prices. But there is little
hope on this score either.
The group has never
achieved any real cohesion
and its most ambitious
current plan is merely to,
advise member countries
what their minimum selling
price should be.


GIBBINGS

MARKETING
Agents f or:
PRESIDENTIAL INSURANCE
COMPANY LIMITED.
Manufacturers Representatives
And General Insurance Agents
No.5 r(oncession Rd. Sea Lots
Phone: 62-37813


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PAGE 14 TAPI. SUNDAY DECEMBER 12, 1976


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SUNDAY DECEMBER 12, 1973 TAPIA PAGE 15


THE 111-9 vote in favour of Belizean self-determination
by the United Nations Decolonisation Committee was
indicative of little more than Guatemala's increasing isola-
tion from international public opinion.
The huge majority was a foregone conclusion after
Belizean Premier George Price had received solid backing
from the 85 nations represented at the Colombo non-
aligned conference last August.
Panama became the first
isthmus country to desert
the Guatemalan cause,
again a strong likelihood
after Price had met Torrijos
in September, and the
Panamanians had opened a
consulate in Belize shortly
afterwards.
Only Guatemala's Cen-
tral American neighbours
and some of the dictator-
ships of the Cono Sur are
left to support the ill-
starred Guatemalan claim: -. .
It was this isolation,
particularly from its erst-
while allies in Latin
America, that prompted
new speculation in Sept-
ember about the Guate- P
malan military's intentions
toward Belize. J


BORDER

It was sparked off by a
bellicose speech by Presi-
dent Kjell Laugerud Garcia
to a group of graduates
from the army's commando
training centre at Melchor
de Mencos on the Belizean
border.
Laugerud said that if
peaceful methods failed he
would ask Guatemala's
youth to 'cut their hair
and put on helmets .
and take up arms to claim
what legitimately belongs
to us'.
Commentators in Gua-
temala dismissed the speech
as a move to keep the
right-wing hawks in his
ruling coalition in line.
What was more significant
was the place where it was
delivered.

MAYA

For the past 18 months
the army has been training
an elite group of officers,
cadets, sergeants and
specially selected privates
at its border training
centre, to be what the
chief of staff, General Otto
Spiegler, has called 'the
toughest fighting men of
America.'
Soldiers serving in this
purple-bereted special
forces unit are known as
the Kaibiles, after a legend-
ary Maya warrior, but owe
their inspiration to a more
recent and more tarnished
warrior elite, the United
States Rangers and Green
Berets.
The stated rationale of
the unit is counted
insurgency, and to this end
the rigorous eight-week
course is based on the
latest United States train-
ing methods (although no


United States personnel
are directly involved) using
new automatic weapons,
including the small Israeli
Uzi sub-machinegun.
The creation of the
'Kaibiles would appear to
give the Guatemalans
another option between
those of peaceful negotia-
.tion and an all-out military
adventure. Commando-
style raids on selected
targets in Belize com-
munications centres, bridges,
fuel dumps and so on -


would place immediate.
pressure on Britain.
Diplomatic sources in
Guatemala believe that if
there is no progress in the
negotiations within six
months, the army hawks
will get their way and some
sort of military action
against Belize will be set
in motion.
One scenario sees a 48-
hour drive to the Caribbean,
probably through the rela-
tively unguarded upland
areas in the southwest of


Jarring Up


Belize around the Gracias
a Dios falls (Guatemalan
survey marks have been
found 15 miles inside the
border at this point).
The army expects that
it will have to withdraw
almost immediately in the
face of British reinforce-
ments and .United States
pressure.
But it believes that in
this way its honour would
be satisfied, and the Gua-
temalans would be in a
better position to claim at
least a fair slice of Belize's
territory as war spoils.
Meanwhile, Cuba's offer
of assistance during last
year's troop movements
scare and its enthusiastic
espousal of the Belizean
cause at the United Nations,
is causing concern both
among opposition politi-
cians in Belize, and in
Washington.
Earlier this month Belize
radio felt it necessary to
state that Price had 'em-
phatically denied' reports
of secret talks between
the governments of Belize
and Cuba over the defence
of the colony.
The conservative United
Democratic Party (UDP)
has attacked some mem-
bers of the government,
particularly attorney-gene-
ral Assad Shoman, for
being 'communist-inclined'
The UDP, despite im-
passioned denials by its


leader, Dean Lindo, may
also be taking a more open-
minded line on the Guate-
malan demand for terri-
tory in compensation for
dropping its claim to
Belize, although it insists
that the claim must be
dropped first.
In an editorial last
month the opposition
newspaper The Reporter
said: 'The one route
towards a political settle-
ment of the dispute over
Belize remains out of reach
as long as Belize sticks
literally to the Premier's
aphorism that "not one
square centimetre" of
Belize land is going to be
bargained away'.

ISRAEL

The United States, for
its part, has refused to sell
transport planes and other
equipment to the Guate-
malan air force, forcing
the Guatemalans to buy
14 Arava STOL aircraft
from Israel.
Meanwhile, for the first
time, one of the giants of
United States industry,
Exxon, has moved into
Belize.
It has set up a special
company, Esso Ventures,
to operate a nine-block
*exploration concession of
one million acres off the
colony's southern coast.
(From LATIN AMERICA)


Fidel Castro: Support for Belize


a -----s. ------- ~~II~L-C~I~- --~n~b~a Pl II-


Frederick St. POS,112 High St. Saln F'do,.,Arima,"u

alaondIHAIRDWARE & ELECTRIC: Kirpalani's Roundabout


BelIl: G uatemaiale







PAGE 16 TAPI A SUNDAY DECEMBER 12, 1976


"THE trouble with
Bain is, he sees
communists behind
tree."


Jimmy
35-40
every


That was the reaction
of a Board member of the
National Broadcasting Ser-
vice (NBS) when Chairman
Bain tried earlier this year
to stop freelance inter-
viewer Wilbert Holder
from working for the
Government-owned Trini-
dad and Tobago Television
(TTT).
Bain told TTT general
manager Sonny Rawlins
and other Board members
(Owen Mathurin, Anna
Mahase and Ashton Parris)
as early as June this year
he felt Holder was a "corn


munist" and should be
barred from interviews on
TTT.
But at least one Board
member described the
charge as "ridiculous" and
Holder continued doing,
interviews until Bain
dropped the axe on Nov-
ember 22, following the
"freedom of the Press"
interviews with Guyana
Broadcasting Service (GBS)
official Ron Saunders and
EXPRESS managing direc-
tor Ken Gordon.
According to an EX-
PRESS story on December
4, Bain said he had chopped
Holder because his inter-
views "lacked balance" and
were "partial".


B'A TI


Bain also said he was
annoyed because Holder
had not challenged the
statement by Saunders to
the effect that TTT was
open only to "select
views."
The Holder ban, follow-
ing Bain's personal dismis-


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sal of five journalists from
Radio 610 18 months ago,
has provided the Guyanese
Press with ammunition to
counter recent charges
that there is "no freedom
of the Press" in the
neighboring Republic.
Guyana "Chronicle"
managing editor Carl Black-
man last week challenged
Ken Gordon, who has
openly said Press freedom
does not exist in Guyana,
to make a statement on
the Holder ban and on


ANGLE'S

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Services
649-5847
Santa Flora.


Bain's actions against other
journalists.
"But we suspect Gor-
don's eyes are too tightly
focused on the note in
Guyana to take notice of
the beam in Trinidad",
Blackman wrote in a front-
page editorial last Sunday.
In fact, the Trinidad
Press remained strangely
silent on the Holder ban
for over a week in spite
of the fact that both the
Express and the Guardian
had details on the story.
Up to last Monday, the
Guardian carried a George-
town, Guyana report on
Blackman's editorial blast-
ing Gordon but has pub-
lished no local story.
NBS Board members
were also silent last week
though each had been
served with a letter trom
Holder requesting "reasons"
fnr thP han.


DECEMBER13TH-14TH




6.20%


YEAR


BONDS
This is a $10 million issue. The 6.20% Bonds 1979 can
be purchased at T.T. $100.00 percent with a running
yield of 6.20% per annum.





6.40%
8 YEAR BONDS
This is a $10 million issue. The 6.40% bonds 1982/1984
can be purchased at T.T.$96.97 percent with a running
yield of 6.60% per annum, and a gross redemption yield
of 6.90% per annum.


GUARANTEED RETURN
The list of applications will open at 8.00 a.m. on Mon-
day 13th December 1976 and close at 12 noon on Tues-
day 14th December, 1976. Bonds will be dated
14 December 1976
AGENT
The Central Bank of Trinidad and Tobago is the sole and
exclusive agent for the raising and management of this
issue.
INTEREST
Interest will be payable half-yearly by the Central Bank
of Trinidad and Tobago on the 14th June and the 14th
December. The first payment will be made on the 14th
June 1977 at a rate of $6.20 per $100 face value per
annum for the 6.20% bond and $6.40 per $100 face
value per annum for the 6.40%/ bond.

PURPOSE OF ISSUE
The proceeds of this issue will be applied to financing
projects in the development programme for 1977 and to
providing. securities for Insurance Companies,
Pension Funds ana similar investors.
WHERE TO OBTAIN APPLICATION FORMS
Prospectuses and application forms may be obtained at
the Investment Division ot the Central Bank of Trinidad
and Tobago, Comptroller of Accounts, Central Bank
Building, any of the branches of the commercial banks
operating in Trinidad and Tobago, Trinidad Co-operative
Bank Limited, Caribbean Stock and Bond (Trinidad)
Limited, West Indies Stockbrokers Limited, Trinidad.
.and Tobago Stockis,and Sharesltd:a!l. Trust Companies
operating in Trinidad and Tobago

Applications will be received at the CENTRAL
BANK OF TRINIDAD AND TOBAGO, INVESTMENT
DIVISION, ST. VINCENT STREET, PORT OF SPAIN,
and must be accompanied by the full purchase price of the
bonds for which application is made.

APPLICATIONS CLOSE AT 12 noon, 14th December, 1976.
CENTRAL BANK OF TRINIDAD AND TOBAGO


BOMBAY BAZAAR LTD.
16a Frederick St. P.O.S. Tel: 62-34316.


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