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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00072147/00242
 Material Information
Title: Tapia
Physical Description: no. : illus. ; 43 cm.
Language: English
Publisher: Tapia House Pub. Co.
Place of Publication: Tunapuna
Creation Date: December 5, 1976
Frequency: completely irregular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Politics and government -- Periodicals -- Trinidad and Tobago   ( lcsh )
Genre: periodical   ( marcgt )
serial   ( sobekcm )
 Notes
Dates or Sequential Designation: no. 1- Sept. 28, 1969-
General Note: Includes supplements.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 000329131
oclc - 03123637
notis - ABV8695
System ID: UF00072147:00242

Full Text



Vol. 6 No. 49


Mrs. Andrea Talbutt, \,
Research Institute fr,
Study of Ma1.1
162, East 78th Street"
New York, N,Y. 10021,
Ph. Lehigh 5 8448,
U.S.A.


WEEKLY REVIEW PRINTED AND PUBLISHED BY THE TAPIA HOUSE


BAI


ON


NATIONAL Broadcasting
Service Chairman Jimmy
Bain has personally handed
down instructions banning
Wilbert Holder from
handling any more inter-
views on Trinidad and
Tobago Television.
Two days after Holder
conducted his last inter-
view, a discussion with
EXPRESS managing direc-
tor Ken Gordon on "free-
dom of the Press", Bain
told T'TT general manager
Sonny Rawlins that Holder
would be doing no more
interviews on .the Govern-
ment-owned station.
Rawlins told Holder a
week ago the Chairman
had said his reasons were
that Holder's interviews


SLAPS


(TANIA NEWSCESK)


"lacked balance" and
"were partial."
As was the case when
Bain fired five journalists
from the Government-
owned NBS 610 in mid-
1975, the Chairman acted
without consulting mem-
bers of the Board. Bain
was attending "meetings"
last week but it could not
be ascertained whether it
was the Board resisting.
A Trinidad citizen born
in Guyana, Holder was a
popular TTT interviewer
but he recently came under
attack from 'the Bomb'
newspaper which claimed
that Guyanese in particular
and non'-Trinidadians in
general were holding top
jobs in the Government


NO COMMENT


ON LOCKED-OUT



SCHOOLBOY


REFUSAL by a private
school to admit a 4-year-
old boy who wears his hair
in Rasta 'locks' could have
"a lot of political and
social implications", a
Ministry of Education
spokesman said last week.
But the spokesman said
the Ministry of Education
was unlikely to step into
tle issue unless the parents
niade an official complaint
to the Ministry.
He was commenting on
reports that Bishop Anstey
(Private) Junior School
had refused entry to 4-year-
old Sesame Raphael be-
:ause, according to Head-
mistress Mrs. Jennifer Als,
the rules of the school do
not allow children with
"untidy hair".
The child's parents, Mr.
and Mrs. Lennox Raphael,
said they had been trying
to get Sesame into the
school to join his six-year-
old brother and had been
"insulted" and their child
discriminated d against".
Mr. Raphael said last
week he. had now been


told by Mrs. Als the
school Board had decided
that his son could not enter
the school with his hair in
'locks'. "I don't know what
we're going to do right
now", he said. "We don't
want to do anything that
might make it worse. We
still hope to get Sesame in
the school by January."
Private schools are sub-
ject to the Ministry of
Education, the spokesman
said last week. "But pro-
vided they meet our
requirements, physical
space and qualifications of
teachers, they are fully
autonomous bodies."
He added: "Legally, a
child cannot be prevented
from entering a school
because of a particular
hairstyle.
However, schools have
their codes -of dress to
which the pupils adhere.
There are uniforms, for
example."
Teachers at the school
have since been instructed
by Mrs. Als to make no
comment to the Press.


media.
Rawlins also told Holder
last week that Bain had
moved to stop him from
doing interviews before
but Rawlins had "re-
instated" him.
A leading actor in the
Trinidad Theatre Workshop
and one of the few West
Indians to play major roles
in Caribbean-made films,
Holder has also worked in
radio in Guyana and Trini-
dad.
He had been asked this
year to do interviews for
the station by TTT News
Editor Neil Guisseppi and
had been talking to a
wide range of people,
from Guyana Prime Min-
ister Forbes Burnham to
members of a visiting
British trade mission.
The controversial Ken
Gordon programme was a
follow-up to an earlier
interview with Guyanese
GovernmeAt Broadcasting
Official Ron Saunders,
who criticised Gordon for
attacking the Government-
owned Guyana Press at a
meeting of the Caribbean
Publishers & Broadcasters
Association (CPBA) in
Trinidad two weeks ago.
Gordon was invited to
reply to Saunders by TTT
general manager Rawlins


and the interview, broad-
cast on November 22,
raised questions about
freedom of the Press -
and included a public
admission by Gordon that
in 1969 the EXPRESS
had almost been killed by
an advertising boycott.
The boycott, Gordon
admitted, had come as a
result of the EXPRESS
stand against the Country
Club after four black
American tourists claimed
"discrimination."
The tourists said they
had been refused a drink
at the Country Club bar.
There was a public outcry
and the Government
appointed a one-man Com-
mission of Enquiry into the
affair. The Enquiry ruled
there was no discrimina-
tion other than that exer-
cised by other "private
clubs" in the country.
Bain is known to nave
also fired Radio 610
sportscaster Tony Williams,
brother of Prime Minister
Eric Williams, because
Williams criticised the
Trinidad Turf Club.
Holder said last week he
was seeking "advice" on
the ban and that he had
written to Rawlins asking
for "reasons" for it.


ASSEMBLY
CONTINUES
SUNDAY

THE Tapia Annual
Assembly resumes this
Sunday, December 5, at
the Tapia House in Tuna-
puna. At this sitting, the
gathered Tapia members
will pick up where they
left off on November 14.
That Sunday saw the initia-
tion of a full-scale debate
on the state of the party,
especially in the light of
the campaign for the 1976
General Elections.
It is hoped that out of
the discussions will come
firm decisions on the res-
tructuring of the party,
as a conclusion to nearly
three years of intermittent
debate on constitution re-
form within Tapia. There
are several sets of proposals
before the Assembly.
On Sunday, proceedings
will get underway promptly
at 10.30 a.m., and the
registration desk will be
open an hour before that
for members who wish to
put themselves in good
financial standing.


LI'3RARY
F:r. F. CH INSTiTUTE
SUNDAY DECEMBER' 5, 176 O AN

S- .X


30 Cents


AT THE KAIRI cultural festival of Novembpr 21. Marina Omowale Maxwell is invited from
the audience ar:d joins Andre Tanker (centre) and bass guitarist Angus Niuncs in a song one
of the highlights of the day-long festival which ended some two hours after the scheduled time.
Paul Keens-Douglas, Malik, Victor Questel and Christopher Laird were among a number of
young artists wtlo too&, part in the show as a contribution to a AAIRI Arts Journal of 1976.
PHOTO NYLA PA TRICK


MAN


TTT






PAGE 2 TAPIP SUNDAY DECEMBER 5, 1976


IF, at all the Tobago issue had
slipped out of the consciousness
of Trinidadians, as it had slipped
out of the headlines of the morn-
ing papers, it has certainly come
back to haunt them with the
filing of Mr. Robinson's motion
in the House. And if, the issue of
Tobago's relationship with Trini-
dad is a peripheral concern for
most of the inhabitants of the
larger island, beset as they are
with their own problems of sur-
vival, they can be assured that it
is the most urgent priority on the
agenda of most Tobagonians.
This very ignorance, and,
indeed, lack of interest, on the
part of most Trinidadians con-
cerning what goes on in Tobago
suggests the sources of the senti-
ment which has come to be
summed up, inacurately perhaps,
but ominously enough, in the
word secession. 'A few years back
it might have been possible to
dismiss the call for, secession
associated with the likes of Dr.'
Rhodill Norton as the ratings of
a lunatic fringe. But Tobago's
repudiation of the
PNM at the polls dramatically
served notice that dissatisfaction
had become rooted among the
solid rank and file and that the
time had come for a new dis-
pensation.

NATIONALISM

Yet, real as it might be, it would
be a mistake to take at face value
Tobagonian's rankling at what they
obviously perceive to be the big-island
chauvinism of Trinidadians. To do so
would leave us with the problem
of explaining the sense of disposses-
sion which the people of the two
islands share. We need to identify
straight off the real source of the
problem an incompetent, insensitive
and over-centralized regime, at the
hands of which the suffering of
Tobago is only, even if painfully so,
an extreme case.
The people of Trinidad are
as poorly provided for by the Govern-
ment as far as the utilities which
service a decent existence are con-
cerned. And the parlous state of the
Tobago economy is rivalled by the
chronic depression of such a region
as St. Patrick.
The crucial difference is that
Tobagonians retain a sense of being
done in by an alien power. What in
Matelot or Cedros is merely a strong
sense of local community, is in Tobago
the almost full-blooded nationalism of
a race of people conscious of their
distinct history and their" unique
cultural heritage.
All such distinctions and qualifi-


S


TOBAGO


DAC'.S NEW





FOOTBALL?


THE MOVEMENT


cations fade into insignificance in the
panoramic view of centralized power.
In the case of Tobago, the incapacity
of a corrupt regime has combined with
a sense of differentness to produce
what amounts nearly to a conviction
of colonial .oppression. It is that which
is at the bottom of Tobago's growing
assertiveness and that assertiveness,
which was behind the DAC's electoral
success.
A Government in touch with
the country and responsive to our
needs would 'have noted the growing
signs of stress in Tobago a long time
ago and would have taken action
early. Even after its electoral defeat
in Tobago, the PNM could have swal-
low its partisan pride and signalled its
commitment" to the preservation of
the integrity of the nation as a whole,
at the cost of whatever concessions il
considered necessary and reasonable.
On the contrary, the Prime
Minister, in his notorious post-election
speech in Port-of-Spain, preferred to
play politics with the issue, fanning
the fires of secessionist sentiment.
Too insecure to appear to be making a
concession to Robinson's victory, he
took the opposite tack of making
Tobago's defection appear to carry
punitive costs. He closed down the
Ministry of Tobago Affairs.
The case for locating an effective
executive agency in Tobago was made
by Tapia in our Election Manifesto. We
also argued the need for a representa-
tive forum in the island so that execu-
tive action could be informed by
Tobago opinion. We put our proposals
under the general rubric of Home Rule.
The entire set of proposals was placed
in the context of an analysis of the
concrete possibilities for the material
and spiritual advancement of Toba-
gonians, related to their own expressed
desires, so as to demonstrate the plan's
eminent feasibility.


Which is not to say that we did
not appreciate that the one absolutely
necessary condition for the success of
any such plan was the general accept-
ance of its underlying principles among
Tobagonians themselves. As a party
with few organic links to Tobago at the
time, Tapia could hope only to plant
a seed, which might be watered by
native sons and daughters. What is
surprising in this context is that the
DAC, a party much more heavily
based in Tobago, and presumably
keenly sensitive to the currents of
opinion there, entirely ignored the
question of Tobago in their published
proposals, except for a vague promise
of the "involvement of residents in
the planning of their own future"
Even now, its motion calling
for internal self-government for
Tobago by 1977, is unaccompanied by
any serious argumentation which could
convince Tobagonians and Trinidadians
of the practicability of the scheme.
Such a casual approach to the issue is
bound to raise suspicions that the
DAC is merely pandering to popular
feelings for its immediate advantage.
These suspicions are strengthened by
the performance of the party during
the election itself. Despite the down-
playing of the Tobago issue in Trinidad
and in its published statements, it was
widely alleged in Tobago that the
DAC was "preaching" secession. And
only recently, in the Sunda, Express of
November 21, a reporter quoted an
unnamed Scarborough businessman as
saying that "the DAC is talking seces-
sion here, but not openly. It is being
done in a very subtle way. Through
innuendo they are trying to bring
about a conflict, but openly they are
saying 'no'".
That kind of performance is in'
keeping with- Robinson's habitual
attraction to the. passing parade of


i'


hEEO


Wholesale & Retail


Hurry


Now


R. NARA Y NSINGH
Eastern Main Road, Tunapuna


_~_


GIBBINGS

MARKETING
Agents for:
PRESIDENTIAL INSURANCE
COMPANY LIMITED.
Manufacturers Representatives
An! (General Insurance Agents
No.5 C(oncessiotn Rd. Sea Lots
Phone: 62-37113


AnnualAssembly December 5


i~


agitational issues. Congenitally incap-
able of buckling down to the sustained
work of building organization, and
ideologically hostile, if not intellectu-,
ally unfitted, t6 the task of providing
political education tor his followers,
I the DAC Leader has forever been in
search of shortcuts to glory. When it
wasn't '.hie-. ih improbable ACDC-
DLP merger, it was the permanent
promise to expose PNM corruption. If
it hasn't been the threat of a national
remonstrance over National Insurance,
it has been his silly attempt to put
' himself in the limelight by hinting
darkly of a coup.
A major element in Robinson's
electoral strategy was to convince
Trinidadians that he was strong in
Tobago, while impressing Tobagonians
.of his excellent chances in Trinidad.
IThat explains why he talked with a
forked tongue during the campaign. In
Trinidad, not only was secession not
an issue, but Tobago had to be pre-
served as the first-rung on the ladder
of success. In Tobago secession was a
tempting issue, but had to be played
pianissimo in relation to the haunting
melody of a Tobago boy in Whitehall.
Now that the election has rudely
defined the DAC as a Tobago party_,
Robinson has begun to change his
tune'

It is Williams who, in his guise
as historian, has written of Tobago's
role in the nineteenth century as a
political football for the European
powers. It would be tragic if today
the people of Tobago were to allow
themselves to be reduced once more
to that status, and by national politi-
cians, to boot. Between the cynical
manipulations of Williams, attempting
to drive his opposition to extreme
measures and thereby to discredit
them, only to appear at the last
moment as a saviour offering remedies
and concessions, and the opportunistic
manoeuvrings of a guileless Robinson,
the people of Tobago must pick a
path of unostentatious common-sense
as they have always done in the past.
The people of Tobago deserve
to be offered serious solutions for
their very real problems. And not only
for their own sake. The solution of the
Tobago problem is important to the
interests of the people of Trinidad and
the people of the West Indies as a
whole. If Tobago were to be granted
home rule, as it must, it would help
the people of Caroni and St. Patrick,
of Couva and Cedros, make their own
claims for local government, in their
own less extreme, but equally valid
cases. Similarly, if Tobago and Trinidad
were to work out a more equitable
form of relationship, it would provide
the entire Eastern Caribbean with a
model for that integration which is an
imperative of West Indian nationhood
and survival.
Tobago could be the model, but
it is Tobagonians who have to make
it that.






SUNDAY -. .18-.R 5. 1976 TAPIA rAGE 3


Michael Harris

AS this is being read President Andres Perez of Venezuela
would have just about completed his tour of some of the
major political capitals of the world. Beginning in'New York,
where he delivered an address to the United Nations, his tour,
at the end. would have taken him to Rome, London and
Moscow among other capitals.
For Perez this tour was no mere continental safari. Its
importance is perhaps best understood in the context of two
events of unquestionable international significance.


President Perez of Venezuela speaking
ro the Third Woria


FPor

THE first event was the
election of Jimmy Carter
as President of the United
States last month. The
second event has not taken
place yet. But it will. Just;
as soon as the Oil Ministers
of OPEC meet to0 discuss
the question of price
increases.
Indeed, the meeting
of the Oil Ministers was
,originally scheduled to
have taken place in Quatar
on the fifteenth of this
month (December) but
only last week was it
announced that it had
been postponed to a date
yet to be determined.
The postponement of
the Oil Ministers meeting
is clearly another develop-
ment in the intense dip-
lomatic, and not so
diplomatic, efforts which
have been conducted on
both sides of the petroleum
curtain.

ANTAGONIST

Which is, of course,
where Carter's election is
significant. The United
States has of course from
the Very beginning of the
Oil crisis, assumed the role
of chief antagonist against
the oil producing coun-
tries.
But United States
efforts at sponsoring con-
sumer solidarity against the
oil producers has always
run into the problem of
the disparities of interests,
economic and political,
among the members of the
industrializedd bloc of coun-
tries.


As part of the effort
to eliminate the problems
posed by these disparate
interests and to achieve a
common front in relation
to the oil producers, there
has developed in very
recent years the concept of
trilateralism.
Very simply, trilateral-
ism is an attempt to struc-
ture the relationship
among the world's indus-
trialised nations. On the
one hand, it urges the co-
ordination of their internal
economic policies and on
the other it seeks to con-
struct a common front in
their dealings with the
demands of the developing
countries
Anu whatever me
lack of concreteness in his
other plans, trilateralism
has been, embraced by
Jimmy Carter as a central
theme of his foreign policy.
In a major foreign policy
speech during the cam-
,paign he put it this way,
"'Our three regions share
economic, political; and
security concerns that
make it logical that we
should seek ever-increasing
unity and understanding."
Notwithstanding the
language in which the
package is wrapped, "tri-
lateralism" is but the latest
attempt to break the soli-
darity of the Oil Producers
and more importantly to
derail the movement on
the part of the non-
industrialised world for a
new economic order.
A point which brings
us right back to Perez and
his trip. For certainly the
real significance of the trip


lay more in what Perez had
to say rather than where he
,aid it.
In his speech at the
United Nations he reaffirm-
ed his commitment to a
united approach to negotia-
tions between the third
world and the trilateral
countries. He also made it
clear Athat he would resist
any attempt to separate
the oil price question from
other world trade issues.
In London he spoke
of the need for OPEC to
devise a system whereby
the developing countries
would be shielded from
the full impact of any
new price increase. Anc
he promised the continued
efforts of the Oil producers
in assisting other third
world countries in their
development efforts.


SOLIDARITY

in other- words he
went to the industrial
capitals but spoke to the
third world. The name of
the game is still solidarity
and Perez obviously knows

this as well as anyone;
S What some commen-
tators are beginning to refer
to as the North-South Cold
War is obviously not going
to end with the next price
increase. But the Third
World exhibits even more
disparities than' do the
trilateral countries.
Perez, for one, means
to see that it holds toge-
ther if not at any cost,
then at least perhaps, at
the cost of an .immediate
price increase.


THURSDAY NOV. 25.
Caroni lacing losses says
firm s head. More women
than men turn up for
postal jobs. WASA men to
be charged. Firemen
threaten legal action if job
vacancy is not advertised.
50,000 lbs ham arrive from
Canada. Jaycees to hold
Carnival queen show again.
Salvage work on JURUA
delayed.

FRIDAY NOV. 26.
St. George County
Council charges cabinet
with eroding its authority.
Labour Congress criticises
Gov't on postmen's issue.
Prostitute sentenced to
death for killing man who
demanded money back.
New alderman, Victoria
Perry, to replace Senator
Hamilton Holder. Cedros
villagers turn out in force
for County Council meet-
ing.


" SATURDAY NOV. 27
ULF representative Har-
rison accuses top BWIA
official of accepting '.ibe.
Mahabir promi:i ..ivesti-
gation. PTSC bus kills
mechanic while under
repair. burroughs returns
from Venezuela Cubana
Crash Trial. Venezuela and
Soviet Union sign oil ex-
change agreement.

SUNDAY NOV. 28.

TTAS and BWIA fighl
over Hasely Crawford Jet
PSA seeks 80% increase ul
to range 46, 50% increase
over range 46 also gratuity
at 55 after 331/2 years
service. Perez ends talks
'with Russians. NHA to be
reorganised. Julien to head
5-man committee. Beryl
McBurnie and Hamilton
Maurice awarded UWI
honorary doctorates. Guy-
ana to spend $20m on


security. Kwayana trial
adjourned to Monday.

MONDAY NOV. 29.
90 postmen suspencec
with full pay. Fishing dis-
pute: 5 Trinidad boats
seized by Venezuelan
National Guard. SWWTU
criticise government for
role as employer and en-
forcer of IRA. Caroni Ltd.
to eliminate Ash pollution
Marabella residents threaten


to close two bad roads.
Santa Cruz farmers press
government to take over
and distribute "abandoned"
lands. Brezhnev accepts
Perez' invitation to visit
Venezuela.

TUESDAY NOV. 30.

Chamber of Commerce
calls for complete overhaul
of tax structure. T&TGNP
rate third in Carib/1


America. Point tortin
constituency g rD- calls
on PNM convention to
train forces to man essential
services. Official says road
works not part of County
Caroni budget. Pollution
Control Council calls for
environmental protection
agency. Press freedom row
brews in Guyana.

WEDNESDAY DEC. 1.
Sugar workers, may
strike overChristmas bonus.
Venezuelans free Trinidad
fishermen and boats. Arima
Borough Council asks for
S10m to make additions
to Municipal stadium.
Jamaica revenue shows big
drop. Court frees Kwayana
on legal technicality. Adams
in Independence appeal to
Barbadians to play down
differences. President of
Windward Islands Cricket
board calls for Caribbean
South African Policv.


Perez


~= --------- -----a I I- -sma~---~e -~---R-- -~-- --- I ~C-


Pa~ra mlgglftgd






PAGE 4 TAPIA SUNDAY DECEMBER 5. 1976





rnr~TT~iml


Bhoendradatt Tewaric
THREE VERY different
types of plays made it to
the final of the recently
concluded Twelfth Annual
Drama Festival at the Nap-
arima Bowl.
Imaginatively conceived,
Naparima Girls' Riding
Haas, perhaps failed to
make the impact that it
could have because it was
the last play on the pro-
gramme.
Riding Haas tells the story
of Brer Ananci, the eternal
smart man who dupes Brer
Tiger into allowing him to
ride on his back. With whip
in hand and spurs on his
boots, Annanci rides Brer Tiger
like a horse into town to the
amusement of the townsfolk
and the embarrassment of Brer
Tiger.
The play makes use of two
choruses and this together with
the very colourful costumes,
richly made up faces and the
exaggerated acting which such
a play demands brought the
Annanci story alive on stage.
Susan Thompson as the
narrator, was in total command


Unique


Store

SERVING
SANGRE
GRANDE


of the dialect.
She was an energetic narra-
tor who sought to entice
the audience to enter the
world of her folk tale.
It was an error however to
put a television interview in the
middle of a folk tale. This was
an unfortunate intrusion which
threatened to make a humor-
ous story, ridiculous, and a
genuinely creative effort gim-
micky.

SAN FERNANDO

Perhaps San Fernando Gov-
ernment Secondary's real con-
tribution was that their pro-
duction was a significant
student achievement. Eighteen
year-old Beverly James, a sixth-
form student directed Douglas
Archibald's Junction Village
with the touch oi a profes-
sional.
The production was very
near flawless and came through
with a kind of wholeness that
is rare.
Mark David, playing the
role of an old rum-thirsty,
grass roots realist, who likes to
reminisc about his event-
ful youth, gave by far the


outstanding performance of
the festival.
lie took his cues perfectly
and his delivery of Archibald's
one liners was so good, that
often the audience over did
itself with laugtuer.
Michael Friday, playing the
stiff, afro-saxon druggist Mr.
Courtenay, totally out of
touch with reality, also made
some impact on the audience.
He is an overbearing cha-
racter and the audience did in.
fact, get fed up with him.
As a whole, Junction Village
was a fine production, credibly
recreating the small village,
where life could in fact have
been "a whirwind of events"
and bringing alive a disappear-
ing breed of village "charac-
ters'"
But it was Fatima College
which got the nod of the
judges.
The Model, a full length
original play, tells the .love
story of African Joanne and
Indian Krishna, two sixth-form.
students, against the back-
ground of a sterile school
experience and a society
ridden with racial antagonism,
emerging class consciousness
and political strife.
Not only is the play
improvised, but it is experi-
mental and bold. It uses slides
with a narrator's voice to aug-
ment the action on stage and
to fill in gaps for the audience.
The narrator, Joanne who
,ecunes "the model" tells her
own story.
Recorded voices function
as radio announcers in an
attempt to establish authenti-
city and to give the feel of a


live happening.
The drama is built around
a series of inter-related tensions
and conflicts which emerge from
a range of controversial,
issues: Education vs life; indi-
vidual vs community; personal
fulfilment vs political oommit-
ment; cynicism vs social res-
ponsibility; capitalism vs com-
munism;elections vs guerrilla
warfare.
The play relies heavily on
the juxtaposition of contrast-
ing but related situations to
achieve its effect. Girls school
boys school; African family,
Indian family; guerilla assertions
of working class victory, the
bleeding breast of a "sister" as
she reports the death of a
'brother".

IDEAS

The final scene shows
Joanne, me moael, on uon
side of the stage dancing her
wvay to fame and fortune in
Canada, every step closely
followed by the hungry eye of
a photographer's camera.
On the other side of the
stage is Krishna, giving a-politi-
cal speech after an election
victory in which he agonizes
over the psychological, econ-
amic and political condition
of the people.
Although abie to triumph


over the ,obstacle of race,
their love could not withstand
the clash of values.
The love story may be the
thread which links the various
episodic scenes in the play, but
The Model is really a play of
ideas. Krishna's revolutionary
fervour is a response to the
injustice he sees in the society.
His political oratory censures
and attacks the system.
When he yearns to establish
justice he speaks directly to
the audience, perhaps to en-
lighten, perhaps to provoke or
perhaps even, to persuade.
In this sense-the play comes
very close to being didactic.
But as a play of ideas, The
Model falls short. Although the
issues raised are controversial,
relevant, even topical, they are
very superficially dealt with.
Positions are not forcefully
articulated, nor is the-language
persuasive or convincing, as a
result the ideas fail to acquire
stature.
The play also displays a
weakness for exaggeration,
stereotyping and cliches.
All in all however, this
production was an innovative
advance for theatre in Trinidad
and Tobago.
And the generally high
standard of performance on
final night, makes one hopeful
for the future of theatre in
the country.


Uncle

Sam


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IN
DOWNTOWN GRANDE


p :Sp l


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SUNDAY DECEMBER 5, 1976 TAPIA PAGE 5


IN a victory which took most observers by surprise, Carlos
Romero Barcelo, mayor of San Juan, won the governorship
of Puerto Rico for the New Progressive Party (NPP) by a
narrow 2 per cent margin on 3 November.
-The NPP also won control of the island's legislature
from the Popular DemocraticParty (PDP), which had domi-
nated this branch of g-''ern lent since its foundation in
1940.
The social democratic Puerto Rican Independence
Party (PIP), and the marxist-leninist Puerto Rican Socialist
Party (PSP), which both advocate independence for the
island, took only 6 .e-r cent of the total vcte between
them.
The PIP took 5 per cent, slightly better than in 1972,
while the PSP, fielding candidates for the first time, took


only 1 per cent.
The NPP, whose most
prominent figure is Luis
Ferre, a close associate of
the Rockefellers ant gover-
nor of the island from
1968 to 1972, favours.-
statehood for Puerto Rico
('the preservation of the
Puerto Rican nationality
within the great American
nation').
During this campaign,
however, the party care-
fully played down the
issue of the island's status.
Romero Barcelo went so
far as to declare that
during his term no steps
will be taken towards
statehood.
The key campaign issue
for the New Progressives
was getting Puerto Rico
'back on the road -to
economic recovery'.
Romero Barcelo cam-
paigned heavily in the
countryside. Promising an
unobjectionable programme
of higher wages, lower
taxes, and no government
corruption, and attacking
'the type of progress that
benefits 300 millionaires at
the expense of three million
Puerto Ricans', he suc-
ceeded in undermining the
PDP's traditional rural base


- a key factor in the
NPP's victory.
However, the decisive
defeat of 53' PDP incum-
bents (including the Gover-
nor, the resident commis-
sioner in Washington,
seven senators, 14 repre-
sentatives, and 30 mayors)
was not merely the result
of populist style and
rhetoric.

MUNOZ-MARIN

Analysts of all political
tendencies agree that this
year's record turnout (1.4
million of the nation's 1.7
million registered voters)
was basically a vote against
the PDP.
Originally responding to
popular demands for struc-
tural reform on the island,
and embracing Puerto
Rican independence as a
prime political objective,
the PDP has changed radi-
cally since its founding by
Luis Munoz Marin.
It abandoned protection-
ist positions in both the
agricultural and industrial
sectors, opening the nation
up entirely to foreign
capital.


Clouds Over Porto Rico


Investors were encouraged
with 10-year local capital
tax exemptions, and labour
policies became progres-
sively pro-business.
On the question of the
island's status, the Popular
Democrats fully supported
the free-associated state
formula and have recently
attempted to drum up
enthusiasm for Washing-
ton's newest solution: the
Compact of Permanent
Union, which would make
the island's independence
an 'internal affair' of the


United States.
During the governorship
of Hernandez Colon, the
PDP strengthened ties with
powerful United States,
interests, especially in the
mining and oil industries,
developed a technocratic
administrative style and
introduced a number of
highly unpopular measures,
including some 25 new
taxes and several key tax
increases.
There is currently a 6.6
per cent excise tax on all
imports of consumer goods,


except for food and
medicine (bringing the cost
of ordinary Fords and
Chevrolets to 10,000
dollars), and last year a 5
per cent surtax was added
to all gross incomes above
10,000 dollars retro.
actively to 1974.
Wages, on the other
hand, were frozen. The
wage freeze and the
increased taxes were the
PDP's formula for en-
couraging investors tc
remain in the country; not
Continued on Page 11


Big IBscounts on revalued prices


.... it' like Ole Thles again!


THE AMERICAN STORES
throughout the Nation


__


_ I ___ ~


hir s tms., G Iif t


I







PAGE 6 TAPIA SUNDAY DECEMBER 5. 1976

U i mIE


MICHIAEL HARRIS

DEMOCRACY is in crisis.
Throughout the world, in the West
and in the East, in rich nations
and in poor, in countries large
and small, the Democratic ideal
is on the defensive. Governments
in democratic political systems,
whatever their differences, seem
to have one thing in common as
they lurch ungainly from crisis
into crisis.
They are all manifestly
incapable of providing the innov-
ative leadership necessary to steer
their respective countries out of
the -seemingly perpetual political,
social and economic instability
and disorder. Already in many
countries all attempts at dem-
ocratic regeneration have been
abandoned in favour of what has
been called, "the terrible simplifi-
cations" of the military.
One phenomenon has been a
central feature of the entire crisis;
that is the burgeoning responsibility
and power of the Executive branch
Government and in particular of the
Chief Executive. An aggrandissment
power that takes place even as the
authority of the other institutions of
State and Society; the Legislature and
the courts, the Churches and Schools,
the Family and the local community
are all inexorably being sapped and
subverted.
That such a situation is funda-
mentally alien to the ideals of dem-
ocracy is clear. The essence of the
democratic system is the incorporation
of the will and wishes of the people,
Yet clearly, the greater the degree to
which the Executive augments its
power and extends the scope of its
responsibility and the sphere of its
action, the less capable become the


,dmffAh"
Im AM
loam
w RONRrl


people or their representative organ-
isations of controlling, influencing or
even understanding the process of
decision-making which affects their
lives, their well-being and their freedom
It is this widening gap, this yawn-
ing chasm between Government and
people that is directly responsible for
many of the external and visible signs
of a deep-seated and complex crisis.
hi the first place there is the
growing sense of alienation on the
part of the people. Believing that
nothing the individual does can affect
the course of State, some withdraw
from the political system content to
protect themselves in the various
cloaks of cynicism, nihilism or exotic-
ism,
Other people perceiving the
ineffectiveness of the channels of
representation feel the need to resort
to direct action. The spectacular
demonstration which at the simplest
level is really an effort to signal their
own existence and at the other extreme
seeks to destroy the whole execrable
system.
In the end, Governments find
themselves, for all their massive power,
reduced either to a frenzied application
of salve on the surface of the system,
or, to the abandonment of any pretense
at responding to the popular will.
Here then, is the-heart of the
crisis of Democracy. That the greater
grows Executive Power, the further
away it grows from the people and
the weaker become the pillars of its
legitimacy.
The crisis of Democratic Govern
ment is the crisis of legitimacy. And
until legitimacy is restored, govern-
ments shall keep stumbling ineffectu-
ally in the dark, incapable of bursting


cree from the vortex of crisis at the
center of which lie the equally unpalat-
able alternatives of stagnation and
despotism.
Clearly the need of the time is
for a new social contract, a new political
order which would seek to close the
gap between Government and people
and thus restore to strength the pillars
of legitimacy.
But it would be a mistake to
think that the answer lies simply in the
dismantling of Executive responsibility
and power. In fact it does not lie there
at all.
The increase in Executive res-
ponsibility and power both in absolute
terms and relative to other institutions
of State and Society is a process which
has occurred over time in response to
changes, at times radical,often swift,
always inexorable, that have taken
place in the social, demographic,
economic and above all technological
spheres of society.

EXECUTIVE POWER

Buffeted from all sides by
changes too sudden or too vast, too
insidious or too complex for them to
control or even comprehend by tradi-
tional means or through their traditional
institutions, people looked more and
more to the one institution of state
which possessed the necessary flexibil-
ity and the capacity to command and
deploy resources necessary for bring-
ing some order to an increasingly
revolutionary world.
The problem arose simply because
even as the Executive was having more
and more responsibility thrust upon
it and its power was increasing corres-


P EOF


pondingly, there was no ettort to twi
change or aaapt any or the other I "Th(
institutions of state or society to to t
allow them to share effectively the to
burden of Government. omi
If these two are irreconcilable of I
then Democracy is doomed. cani
The first step is clearly a re- nun
examination of all the old concepts and
all the old institutions which have mal
traditionally been held to be necessary Gov
to any democratic system. effi
For example it is no accident corn
that throughout the world the impor- and
tance and functions of Legislative par
institutions have been rapidly eroded pec
and that in contemporary times they
find themselves merely responding to des
legislative initiatives emanating from ing
the Executive. and
The fact is that in an increasingly Nei
complex world the distinctions between froi
policy formation and policy execution wh;
are almost meaningless. Actions bring will
reactions which have to be responded Dei
to immediately and the responses can of'
change the whole orientation of the
initial action. The mere act of doing
is also the act of deciding.
So that, de facto, the situation
of the combination of Executive and
Legislature which Locke envisaged as
leading to a state of tyranny, now
exists to a lesser or greater extent in
many political systems. Clearly the
eighteenth century concepts have lost
much of their validity in the face of


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SUNDAY ,ECBEMRBER 5, 1976 TAPiA PAGE 7


GN



LE

4tieth century realities.
Worst diservice that can be done
e democratic cause is to atLibute
ie people a mystical, magical
potence which takes no cognizance
lat very large n-imbers of people
)t do by the sheer weight of
ers."
By the same token, we cannot
the mistake of imagining that
nment will be able to function
,ntly without adequate levels of
tunication between Government
people and adequate channels for
:1pationr on the part of the
le,
It is, of course, impossible to
a new institutions or adapt exist--
nnes in the abstract. The shapes
sizes of the institutions of the
Democracy will clearly vary
society to society. But perhaps
all the new institutions together
portray is a new definition of
)cracy, a definition which speaks
government with the people."


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:


still





PAGE 8 TAPIA SUNDAY DECEMBER 5, 1976


Since



Time


When


Is


Against Te


I 0 A 4 -osoN"


Roger Laing
THE ARREST, on the
morning of November 21,
of some 41 persons at
what would appear to have
neen a private, though verv
"gav" party in Cocoyea
village, San Fernando, nas
met with humour,--gossip
and a certain degree of
concern by a number of
self-righteous citizens
throughout Trinidad &
Tobago. But have we really
considered the deeper and
more far-reaching implica-
tions of such action by
our police force?
Whilst some measure of
coiitrol has to -be main-
tained over a traditionally
promiscuous society such
as ours, to ensure an accept
able level of public morals,
it is nevertheless regretable
that the police, whose
principal duty we imagine
to be one of "protection",
and by no means one of
"oppression", should be
given free licence to enter
private homes, on mere


speculation, and arrest,
without specific explana-
tion, free and adult citizens,
on as vague a charge as
"indecent behaviour".
Perhaps for the educa
tion of the "defendants",
as well as the general
public, the Commissionei
of Police might consider it
pertinent to give some
specific definition of the
term "indecent behaviour"

PUBLIC MORALS

Indeed, some of the
films that are passed for'
public viewing, the smutt3
calypsoes that are loudly
applauded, and the beha-
viour of the great mass of
our citizens during the
Carnival Season, (or on
any evening, in- certain
streets of "down-town"
Port-of-Spain for that
matter), could hardly be
considered by anyone who
is genuinely concerned
with public morals, to be
"decent".


It is alleged that the
majority of the men who
were guests at the "inde-
cent" party in question,
were dressed in women's
clothing,but surely this is
not enough to constitute
"indecency". For a start,
fashion today is baser on
"uni-sex", and most ot the
new fashions are being.
designed for both sexes.
Furthermore, I have never
heard of a woman being
arrested for wearing shirts,
jackets and trousers, all of
which are traditionally
accepted as men's attire.
Also, it may well be
argued, if men are allowed
to parade in public at
"Ole Mas" fetes, and
through the streets at
Carnival, attired erttirely
as members of the opposite
sex, why then should it be
considered "indecent" for
them to do 'the same in
private?
The presence of a 16-
year-old girl at the party,
who incidentally, appears
to be no "minor", should


hardly be of great concern
to the police, as, if the
"gents" who were present
were in fp 4 homosexuals,
as they would have us
believe, she would certainly
have had better assurance
of leaving the party less
offended, (and with her
virginity intact), than in a
similar group of so-called
"normal" males.

DANCE HALL

We have read, as well,
that the unfortunate host
is being charged with using
a private home as a "dance.
haan it would be interest-
ing to hear the legal defini-
tion of what constitutes a
"dance hall", as I fre-
quently go to parties in
highly residential areas
such as Cascade, St. Ann's,
Maraval, Goodwood Park
Baysnore, where I am
charged a "sub" at the
door, or previous to the
day of the party, and
where there is a profes-
sional "D.J." in attendance.
On the charge ot "posses-
sion of marijuana", we


Law ?
could hardly attempt to
defend the guilty parties,
as, although it is well
known that the effects of
"weed" are by far less
harmful than those of
alcohol, the use of Cannabis
still remains outside thea
permits of the law. What
is in fact frightening about
the charge, however, is the
knowledge that anyone of
us might very well find
ourselves in a large party
or group, where there is
some "grass" being circu-
lated, and, before realising
it, we might well be faced
with a charge of "posses-
sion of marijuana" our-
selves.
In closing this commen-
tary on the unfortunate
incident of November 21, 1
should just like to impress
upon the citizens of this
new republic, that it is the
duty of every Trinidadian
to ensure that law enforce-
ment is not abused to the
extent that it becomes a
threat \to any section of
the community, however
small or insignificant a
minority it may appear to
be.


FAR MERS

IN PROTEST


ACTION

A CALL has gone out to
the nation's foodcror
farmers to join in a protes"
demonstration outside
Parliament this Friday,
December 3. According to.
a stencilled leaflet put out
by an organization styling
itself the National Food-
crop Farmers Association
(NFFA), Friday's action is
to be a follow-up to an
earlier demonstration at
the Ministry of Agriculture
on November 17.
Accoramg to the leaflet,
on that day more than 300


farmers gathered on the
grounds of the Ministry
and asked to meet with
the Minister to present
their case. But the Minister,
Mr. George Chambers,
never showed up. The
leaflet lists nine demands
being made by the farmers.
suph as compensation for
loses due to flooding and
the opening of the whole-
sale market by month-end.
DEMONSTRATION

As to the aim of the
demonstration, the leaflet
asserts that there are no
false hopes that Parliament
can solve the farmers' pro-
blems: "We go in public
protest because we want-
the public to know, we
want the whole nation to
know what we are strug-
gling for."


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_I_ I __ ~I~_ _






SUNDAVLECEMBER 5, GE


Comment?


by


Fillip


DEAR FRIENDS, today
Fillip is mad, hopping mad.
They say that Christmas is
a time of peace and good-
will to all men. Well as far
as I am concerned this
Christmas all that done.
I am not entertaining so
much as a cockroach in my
house. Anybody who make
the mistake of saying they
visiting me for Christmas
will dine on wind pies and
nutten chops, washed
down with k6olaid.
Oh God friends, I just
cant take no more. To
begin with I decided to do
my Christmas shopping
early to beat the hike in
prices which we all know
those bandits who call
themselves m e r c h a n.t s
always put on.
So help my bless friends
I am not lying. Since
September 'I have been
hunting the stores for bar-
gains, Would you believe I
could not even afford the.
prices they were charging
at the pre-Christmas sales.
But I didn't panic. I did
not get vex.
Seeing how tight things
were going to be and think-
ing that I had some time
to make other arrange-
ments, I decided to band
my belly and only go for
the bare necessities of
Christmas. The Ham, the
Lamb, and the Jam as they
say.
My house won't even get
a coat of paint for Christ-
mas. It is months now
that I have the same cur-
tains on my windows and
all I am going to do is
take them down, wash
them and put them back
again. The same thing with
my chair covers.
In other words I was
taking my licks like a man.
But no more. They gone
too far. When they touch
my ham they touch my
soul. I tried everything I
know. In the first place I
got a pork leg and tried
making my own ham. I did
everything the instructions
said. But by the next
morning the damn thing
turned green and start
stinking up the place.
Well that started the
ball rolling but worse was
to come. I contacted a
friend who was going up
to the States on holiday


IT doesn't pay to dance
the Haitian "gaga" in the
Dominican Republic these
days. And if you're black
and can't pronounce your
'R.S, you stand a good
chance of being expelled
from the country.
On the orders of the
Dominican President,
Joaquin Balaguer, thousands
of destitute Haitian peasants,
have been summarily
deported in the past few
weeks in a diversionary
campaign, with a strong
racist tinge, to counter the
collapse of the superficial
prosperity which Lyndon
Johnson along with
22,000 U.S. troops -
installed a decade ago in
the strategically-important
Caribbean republic to keep
it safe from what he said
was the threat of com-
munism.


VICTIMS

The Haitians, all illegal
immigrants and victims of
one of Latin America's
most infamous labour rac-
kets, are being hunted
down by the Dominican
army. They are identified
by asking them to say the
spanish word "perejil"
(parsley) which is especially
hard for the creole-speaking
Haitian to get his tongue

and asked him to bring
down two small hams for
me. So at least when
Christmas roll around I
could offer my friends
,some slice ham and chow
chow.
Friends, you know those
effing bitches in the cus-
toms seize :my. two hams
and tell my friend he
smuggling. Oh God, when
I heard that I could have
dropped down dead.
But I am planning for
they arse. I just waiting till
all them people who could
afford ham and want- to
boil it in the old time way
make the mistake of
putting they ham outside
in a pitchoil tin. I am just
waiting for them.
I will take them one by
one. Plenty man going to
bawl for Christmas. And
friends, just in case I am
not around when Christmas
comes, Feliz Navidad.


around. Then they are
crammed into lorries and
dumped across the 200-
,mile long border the
two countries have shared
uneasily for the past 155
years.
Officially-inspired stories
have appeared in the
Dominican press over the
past few days claiming that
Haitian airforce planes
have violated Dominican
air space, that an ominous
military build-up is under
way in Haiti, and recalling
the existence of the profit-
able Haitian-run traffic in
light-skinned Dominican
girls destined for the
brothels of Port-au-Prince,
the Haitian capital.
The official Haitian
press has called the mass
expulsions "unspeakable"


but the regime of president
Jean-Claude Duvalier, inter-
nally divided and aware of
its vulnerability, has stres-
sed its desire for peace in
response to the Dominican
charges.
The expelled Haitians --
some 4,000 so far are
the backbone of the Domi-
nican Republic's main
source of income, the
cane sugar industry, where
they work in appalling
conditions which have
been described as near-
slavery by some Dominican
observers.
It was the collapse of
the world sugar price and'
the recent tripling of the
U.S. sugar import duty
which has shattered the
country's slim economic
hopes.


The last time the esti-
mated 300,000 Haitians
illegally living in the
Dominical Republic were
asked to say "perejil" on
any big scale was in 1937.
In that year, when sugar
prices were again at rock
bottom, the then dictator
Gen. Rafael Trujillo,
ordered some 25,000
Haitians shot in the frontier
area in one of the world's
lesser-known massacres.
No slaughter is expected:
this time, but the anti-
Haitian racism shared by
Trujillo and the white
Dominican ruling class,
with its snobbish second-
band pretentions to Euro-
pean culture, is getting a
full airing.


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PAGE 9





PAGE 10 TAPI.A SUNDAY DECEMBER 5. 1976
NOW YOU CAN OWO A



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Now that you have arranged financing for house and land,
you'll need furniture and appliances, you'll be able to furnish
your home completely, all for orie monthly payment only a little
more than what you would normally pay for a mortgage loan


4th Option Conventional Mortgage Financing:
If you own a parcel of land and need finance to build and fur-
nish your home'pr if you have cash, or interest in land equal to
10% of the value of the home you wish to acquire and furnish
Options 2 and 3 again including all closing charges can be
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$6.500 to $140.000
The Workers' Bank Trust Company (Trinidad and Tobago) Ltd.


---1_-)--~118~- -1Y LI -- -


- LI I _~_ 1_ --





SLN.AY DECEMBER 5, 1976 TAPIA .PAGE 11


Clouds


0 From Page 5
-only are standard wages
-half those in the United
States, but new investors.
are granted a 25 per cent
payroll subsidy by the
Puerto Rican government.
With 85 per cent of
industry controlled by
North American capital,
and 90 per cent of its
food imported from the
United States, prices in
Puerto Rico are at least 12
per cent higher than in the
United States.
One of the island's
most dramatic problems is
unemployment. The official
rate is 20 per cent, but the
real figure is considered to
be well over 30 per cent.
and up to 60 per cent in
depressed rural areas.
The minimum wage law,
which guarantees workers
2.35 dollars an hour, is!
blamed by business men
for discouraging some
200,000 workers from
even looking for jobs; they
are thus not counted as
unemployed.
According to the Wall
street Journal (9 March,
1976), these workers 'are
not productive enough to
hire at that wage'.
According to the same
article, the high level of
unemployment put 70 per
cent of the population on
food stamps last year, at:
an annual cost of 600
million dollars.
It is also the primary
reason why fully one third
of the island's inhabitants
have migrated to the
United States in recent
years, where many of them
are clandestinely employed
at below the minimum
wage.
Problems also abound
for investors, especially in
the depressed real estate
sector, in- which Chase
Manhattan Bank has exten-
sive interests. Puerto Rico's
economic situation has
become so notorious of,
late that on 1 September
1976 Forbes magazine
stated: I"the Common-
wealth of Puerto Rico has.
almost more problems -
unemployment, high birth


Tune pune
THE Tunapuna Constitu-
ency Party of Tapia will.
hold a Saturday Night Do
on December 11. On hand
will be two DJ's and the
Old Oak Serenaders, Parang
Grand-Masters.
Venue is the home of
Fitz Baptiste on Cheese-
man Avenue West, St.
Augustine. The damage is
$2 per head.
The fete is part of the
programme of activities
arranged by the party for
Tunapuna Week December
5-12.


rate, stuttering economy,
you name it than Chase
.Manhattan has money'.
It was in protest at these
problems that the majority
of votes in Puerto Rico
seem to have been cast.
Most people still do not
view independence as "a
means of solving these
problems, a fact which
pro-independence parties
have had to face as a result
of the election.
The PSP's leader, Juan
Mari Bras, has done so


with no qualms in a post-
electoral statement: 'To
opt for the New Progres-
sive Party and Carlos
Romero Barcelo in the
face of the debacle, of the
Hernandez Colon admin-
istration is an error in the
masses' outlook. But this
decision has been induced
by the overwhelming
colonialist machine, with
its repressive manipulation
and publicity, on the one
hand, and by the failures
of the patriotic and pro.


gressive leadership in the
country on the other'.
A final significant feature(
of these elections, accord-
ing to some observers, is
that they have ushered in
a period in which the
traditional links between
Puerto Rico's two main
parties and the Republican
and Democratic parties in
the United States are
being transformed.
Whereas historically the
Popular Democrats were
close to the Democrats and,


the New Progressives had
strong ties -with the Re.
publicans, R o m e r c
Barcelo's administration
has evidently sought the
support of Democrats
close to President-elect
Jimmy Carter.
It is expected that
during the next four years
an important sector of the
New Progressive Party will
attempt to consolidate, ties'
with the Democratic
machine as a whole.
(From LA TIN AMERICA)
4 .


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ovrer Porro, 'RICO

















WEEKLY REVIEW PRINTED AND PUBLISHED BY THE TAPIA HOUSE PUBLISHING CO. LTD., 91 TUNAPUNA. R. TUNAPUNA. TEL: 662-6126 and CIPRIANI BVD, P.O.S. 62-25241.


Earl Best


Review's


Sunday's


Game


And Says:


GET THE BALL


THE TFA must today be
pa ting itself on the back
after the financial success
of Sunday's World Cup
qualifier. There were some
35,000 fans on hand to
witness what turned out to
be one of the best displays
by a national team for a
ong time.
The selector had done a
good job. It was good to
see Russell Tesheira back
in the line-up after his
unexplained absence and
one was glad that it had
been decided to retain
Carter ahead of Barclay.
My own feeling is that
Spann who had played well
in the away game, should
have made it ahead of
Carpette who came on
field with a bandaged left
thigh.

NO SURPRISE

Also LaForest continues
to be the best goal-scorer
in the country and my own
feeling is that he should
have been included instead
of Steve David.
It was no surprise to dis-
cover that both wing-backs
were very much involved in
the midfield play. Tesheira at
-ight back frequently lay deep
and drew the' opposition down
and out into his corner of thr
field.
Then, one quick, accurate
pass would be used to set up
the left wing in at least a one-
to-one situation. It was unfortu-
nate tfiat Steve David was not
in better nick -or he should
certainly have notched a couple
of goalson passes from Tesheirn
in the first half.

SECOND HALF

In the second half, Archibald
collected a few of these and ne
always seemed to make far
better use of them although he
too failed to score Pierre, on
the left flank used the long
pass less frequently opting
instead for the infield dribble
and the short pass.
This is a style that was no
less effective than Tesheira's
but infinitely more dangerous
since it tended to involve him
very deeply in the attack even
while the loss of possession was
a real possibility.
As it turned out, the second
Surinam equaliser came through
"

really in contention.
He is, without doubt, the
best of our recent left wing-
backs but until'he learns that
his primary responsibility is
defensive and makes the neces-
sary adjustment to his style
he will remain an ordinary
player.
The stoppers both had out-
standing games. Their tackling
was flawless, their heading
superb. They too were never
afraid to sally forward when
the occasion warranted it.

FREEKICK

As for the second Surinam
goal, I thought Carter was jusl
a little slow in coming for the
ball here but Pierre must, take
most of the blame for this goal
as he allowed Enfingh to creep
up on the blind side of the
stoppers so that they could do
little when the pass was finally
laid on for him.
Carter ought, perhaps, to
have insisted on yet another
one or two players in the wall
when the freekick by Olmberg
was being taken.,Fairly ordinary
players can score from 18 yards
out in the middle of the goal,
barrier and all! And Olmberg
is fast gaining a reputation as
the finest dead ball kicker in
the region.
The midfield trio of Cum-
mings, De Leon and Carpette
were content to jockey the
opposing attackers into hurried
passes and. less favourable
positions but seemed to have
abandoned as ineffectual, the
policy of tackling in midfield.

DE LEON

In the second halt, the links
were playing extremely well in
attack with DeLeon being the
pick of the lot. He does not
need a lot of operational room
and it is this more than any-
thing else that lifts him above
his comrades. He very often
split the defence right down the
middle and set up David,
Archibald and Sammy at dif-
ferent points in the game with
real scoring chances.
Neither of our goals, interest-
ingly enough, came at the end
of a midfield build-up. It was
not that we were not building
up well: there was lots of evi-
dence of rehearsal, of planning.
Sammy Llwellyn and Archibald
were running particularly well
and causing the Surinamese
defence no end of worry
Tesheira's overlaps were excel.
lent as decoy runs and I thought
he was too often given the ball
- when he had successfully
diverted the attention- of the
defenders from the higher
priority areas.


Coach Vidale has got to
take Carpette in particular to
task for this and he's also got
to ensure that come. the reolav
on the 19th. Archihld_ SammI
and whoever the third forward
is (I do not see how we can
retain Steve David!) are shoot-
ing far more quickly, far lower
and far more often.
. The Trinidad substitutes all
remained on the field during
the interval. That, to me,
suggests that they are or are
considered as being mere foot-
ballers and not students of the
game.
I really wonder that none of
them felt he could add some-
thing to or gain something
from the half-time delibera-


tions. And since Snann was on
he field early in the second
half, it also suggests a lack of
planning on the part of the
coach.
Finally a word about the
spectators. The roar that filled
the air when each of our goals
was scored could, presumably,
have, been heard in faraway
John Donaldson Institute; yet
not a single plaudit was heard
when Olmberg scored his free-
kick almost on the half-time
whistle. And when Entingh
drew the teams level again,
only an audible gasp from
35,000 disbelieving, disappoint
ed souls marked the occasion.
To come back and draw
level twice in the circumstances


is no mean teat.
To fai to score more tuan
twice in the same circumstances
cannot augur well for us.the
next time, especially if, as seems
very likely, the replay is to be
played in a neutral country.
We are going to need a lot
of luck to go on to the next
round.
Let us, however, not simply
keep our fingers crossed but
get busy making arrangements
to ensure that those who so
desire can be on hand to view
the game wherever it is played
and, more importantly, i,.:
our forwards know how to
find the net on the run the
next time around.


sportl Game kd


.-WO RL D

,C.Uwp


mm =
IV 11
wST-
TTFORWARDSMff


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