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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00072147/00239
 Material Information
Title: Tapia
Physical Description: no. : illus. ; 43 cm.
Language: English
Publisher: Tapia House Pub. Co.
Place of Publication: Tunapuna
Creation Date: November 14, 1976
Frequency: completely irregular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Politics and government -- Periodicals -- Trinidad and Tobago   ( lcsh )
Genre: periodical   ( marcgt )
serial   ( sobekcm )
 Notes
Dates or Sequential Designation: no. 1- Sept. 28, 1969-
General Note: Includes supplements.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 000329131
oclc - 03123637
notis - ABV8695
System ID: UF00072147:00239

Full Text


Vol 6.No.46


F-,C' .', '~. .4;T!TUITE
.rn- ;!-:* ,,..;. ,' OF MAN Sunday November 14,1976

Nw Ev i ,10021


PRINTED AND PI BLISH ED BY THE TAPIA HOUSE PUBtlSHING CO. LTI).,-94 TUNAPUNA RD.. TUNAPUNA TIL: 662-5126.





NO-PAY ISSUE





THREATENS BWIA





WORKERS UNION


THE DECISION not to
pay seven BWIA Workers
for allegedly instigating
last month's four-day
strike could only escalate
the row now brewing
within the Communica-
tions and Transport
Worker's Union.
And it could be seen as
well, as part of a well cal-
culated plan to achieve
more, than the company's
stated intention of peialis-
ing the main offenders.
'The no-pay decision has
come in the wake of two
important developments.
Both of which are related.
One is a promise, under-
taken by the General
Secretary and the Acting
President, to keep their
workers informed about
the progress of representa-
tion being made to recover
pay withheld by the Com-
pany.

RESIGNATIONS
------------

This promise was cir-
cularised by letter, dated
November 3, 1976 and was
addressed to the Company's
loyal workers. They, the
letter stated were "put in a'
difficult position because
of the irresponsible actions
of a few persons."
The other development
is the growing and wide-
spread discontentment
among the rank and file of
the Union over the
management of the Union's
funds.
Since the Biennial.Con-
ference of Delegates on
June 4, 1973 the delegates
have been demanding a
proper and comprehensive
statement of the accounts,
These demands have come
in the wake of a motorcar
transport business mder-
taken in sireek and which
eventually came to light
showing heavy loses.
Later the Treasurer and
the First Vice-President
resigned their-posts.
And it was two of the,


now penalised officers of
the Piarco Non-Senior;
branch, Harrison and
Lutchemedial (now United
Labour Front MP's) who
took the lead in spearhead-
ing investigations into the
Union's finances.
According to Lutche-
nedial and Harrison there
was a meeting of the
National Officers and
some members of the
the Executive Board "at
the home of Dr. Aeneas
Wills," which took a
decision to expell them.
Also approved was the
decision to postpone the
Biennial Conference of
Delegates to a date not
liter than iJne 27, 1976


So claims Lutchemedial
and Harrison in a prepared
statement to the Press-
Lutchemedial and Har-
rison through a High Court
injunction before Justice
-SonnV Maharaj succeededin.
gaining reinstatement. But
they failed to restrain the
National Officers from
performing the functions'
of their offices.
The latter issue is still
to be decided by a trial
Judge for final determina-
tion-
It is ,on the- final deternina-
tion of this Court mailer
that John Smith, General
Secretary informed the
branches that the Biennial
Conference of Delegates


CHUCIAL TALKS, long awaited by the Tapia rank
and file, to reform the organisation will take place on
Sunday November 14, 1976, at the Tapia House,
Tunapuna. Starting time 10 am sharp.
Related discussions which have been-in process
for full three years at the level of the National
Executive and the Council of Representatives are
expected to be concluded with the participation of
the membership at large.
Expected are two main submissions.
From the Tunapuna Constituency will come a
resolution for "sweeping party reform in the light
of the September election results." The resolution;
includes calls for:
a reduction of the National Executive from
21 to 7 members.
the Council of Representatives to include a
National Chairman, the National Executive and
3 members from each of the 36 constituencies.
the Secretary to be appointed Chief Executive,
in the Chair of the National Executive.
36 constituency parties to form .the practical
political base of theparty and responsible for
organising local party groups
a Parliamentary party of candidates selected
by the constituencies Ior elect ions due by 198I1 .
a shadow Cabinet responsible for monitoring
the work of the National Government.
a Credentials Committee to supervise member-
ship, discipline, party organisation.
a paid party sl;llf equipped for sustained field
organisation.
a wider popular appeal for the weekly paper.


1976 had to De postponed
In the meantime an
auditor had been appoint-
ed by the Registrar of
Trade Unions to inspect
the finances of the Union
from 1971 to 1975.
MALAISE

Perhaps it is these con,
editions that have led to a
growing rift between cer-
tain oligarchs within the
Union and the general
membership. There is
seething malaise and what
appears to be a willingness
to spark-off a row under
the "slightest pretext."
Such an occurence has
already been anticipated


by a report appearing in
the Trinidad Guardian of
October 12, 1976. It pur-
ported to explain the cause
of the four-day strike that
grounded BWIA. The
report was unsigned and it
led to a lot of controversy
between reporters and the
editor.
In the circumstances
those who want a change
of National Officers can
legitimately feel that the
Biennial Conference- is
being deliberately avoided
under equally dubious pre-
texts.
. No-pay for seven
allegedly main instigators
may just be the straw to
break the camel's back.


"These Tunapuna proposals," a release states,
"draw on ideas thrown up in a debate on
party reform going on in Tapia since 1974. They
aim at a permanent, professional party, capable of
sustained political education, national planning and
direct community action in the localities and on the
blocks."
The other main proposal is expected to come
from a group of Council members from six different
constituencies.
The proposals here call for:
a Council of Representatives, as the supreme
organ of the Movement.
an Executive drawn automatically from the
chairmanship of twelve (12) Standing Com-
mittees of Council and elected by the Council
of Representatives.
a Chairman of the Exectitive and of .the
Movement elected bi-annually.
an Administrative Secretary, the only paid
officer of the Movement.
party groups having direct representation to
lie Council through delegated authority.
San An nual Asscmbly forn rallying the organisa-
tion alld the presentation olf a political and a
financial statement.

All submissions assume lthe need for a drastic.
reorganization of the Tapia Hlouse Movement.
Alter Nov. 14. the Party moves on to the
Election Assembly on Dec. 5, 1976.
/1I." .'


30 c'nts


PARTY REFORM TALKS ON THIS SUNDAY


- q II I 'III~I aI









Hololo puts a hand


IF THE State agencies are
under-equipped to do it,
then people are soon goihg
to be taking their owr
measures to protect life
and limb in the communi-
ties.
That's the message
coming out of Mount
Hololo, Cascade, these
days.
Last Sunday, the Mt.
Hololo Self-Help Brigade
started getting down to
mending the enormously,
pot-holed road that winds


up that steep hill.
This Sunday, the Brigade
is going to be back on the
road, filling in the holes
amd cementing them no
matt what the authori-
ties sayC (a Press report
quoted an Government
source as sar^g people
could fill their Potholes
with dirt but it was illegal'
to apply cement).
"We're not takixl that
on," a member A the
rmgaae told TAPIA last
week. After waiting br


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FRONTIERS AND WARS: HIS FOUR EARLY BOOKS
COVERING HIS LIFE AS SOLDIER AND WAR CORRES-
PONDENT: BY WINSTON CHURCHILL $3.38
Sir. Winston Churchill wrote these four books while he was a
serving soldier. They consist largely of eye-witness accounts
of actions in which he took part.' Edited into this single
volume they show in full measure the splendid march of the
narrative and the force of the author's style. 'The Malakand
Field Force was an expedition sent in 1897 against the tribes
in the Swat Valley, and in the frontier land between India
and Afganistan, and it was Sir Winston's first experience of
active service.
CHURCHILL: A STUDY IN FAILURE 1900-1939: BY
ROBERTRHODES JAMES $4.22
Outstanding political success has rarely been achieved as early
as Churchill achieved it a Cabinet Minister at 33, Home
Secretary at 35 (in 1910). Yet for twenty-four years, from
~1915 to 1940, the triumphant climax eluded him. Office and
-advancement were denied; mistrust and dislike proliferated;
and, by 1939, the erstwhile heir-apparent of national politics
had held no public office for ten years.
CHURCHILL: FOUR FACES AND THE MAN: BY A.J.P.
TAYLOR, R.R. JAMES; J.B. PLUMB B.L. HART & A.
STORR $2.53
Five eminent writers explore five different aspects of Winston
Churchill's life to compose a thorough assessment of his
remarkable career.



SS=temphens
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years for the (in) compe-
tent authority to do
something about the road,
the people have got together
to do their own thing.
And that's only the
beginning.
For a major problem
also faced by residents on
the hill is the annual fire
scares.

SELF-HELP

Vacant lots bf land on
Mt. Hololo are left
untended all year. And
khen the bush fires start
tp in, the hills, people
;have to do the best they
can to douse the flames
before they consume
nearby houses.
This year, angry Mt.
Hololo residents are plan-
ning to take corrective


action before disaster
strikes. "We will just have
to start cutting and clean-
ing those lots," a member
of the Self-Help Brigade
said.
"And since the people
who own those lots don't
seem to have any use for
it, we might as well convert
them into playgrounds.
Even squatters might make
better use of the land.'
The Hololo Self-Help
'Brigade came about when
a number of residents in
the area decided to put
up the money to buy gravel
and cement to, fill the
potholes.
Young boys in the area
pitched in with their labour
and work has been pro-
gressing apace.
The work going on
uphill has a very different
flavour from a project that


has been going on at the
bottom of the hill for ages.
A group of about five
young men are involved in
this latter project which
involves widening the road
and putting up a wall.
But the young men on
that project have been seen
to spend most of their
time sitting on the wall.
The work itself has pro-
:eeded at snail's pace.
Not so uphill where the
gaping potholes are being
filled one after the other.
"The most remarkable
thing about it", a resident
told TAPIA last week, "is
the spirit of the thing. It's
really, a breakthrough
because community life in
Trinidad is so increasingly
non-existp -
"Here we are now show-
ing that things like this
can be done if the com-
munity pulls i t s e 1 f
together."


Trinidad in the firing


THE BOMB explosion last
week in Cuba's Madrid
Embassy (no one was hurt)
could mean that a terrorist
plot uncovered in Caracas
is still in the making. And
that Trinidad is one of the
countries targeted for the
anti-Cuban terrorism.
According to reports
from the Venezuelan capital,
nnlice investigating the Air
Cubana disaster of October
6 have unearthed "what
they believe to be wide-
ranging plans by right-wing
plans by right-wing Cuban
exiles to carry out terrorist
attacks in the United
States and six other
nations."


line
The Caracas newspaper,
El Nacional, has said the
terrorist plans were laid
bare after police raided a
private home in Caracas
while investigating the
Cubana crash.
Police said terrorist-acts
were planned for the US,
Venezuela, Trinidad and
Tobago, Barbados, Guyana,
Panama and Colombia.
Investigators in Vene-
zuela and the United
States have linked the plot
to the bomb murder of
Chile's former Foreign
Minister and Minister of


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Defence Orlando Letelier
in Washington on Sept-
ember 21.
A key figure in all this is
Orlando Bosch, a Cuban
exile now being held by
the Caracas police. Bosch
is said to be the leader of
the United Revolutionary
Organisation, an umbrella
group serving anti-Castro
exiles.
Two brothers, Ignacio
and Guillermo Nov, have
been named as the assassins
of the former Chilean
Minister.

MURDER

aosch, wno jumped
parole in Miami after being
convicted for the attempt-
ed murder of an FBI
agent, is said to have
arrived in Venezuela in
late September with a -
forged Costa Rican pass-
port.
Various news sources
have also traced links
between Bosch and highly-
placed Venezuelan Govern-
ment officials.
Sources within the
Venezuelan Interior Min-
*istry have said shortly
after his arrival in Caracas,
Bosch was welcomed at a
$1,000-a-plate \d i n n e r
"attended by Cuban exiles
and by high-ranking mem-
bers of the Venezuelan
Government."
Orlando Garcia, one of
the sponsors of that dinner.
has since been arrested in
the Caracas police crack-
down. Garcia is also a
Cuban exile.
Venezuelan Government
sources have also been
quoted as saying the
Chilean military junta
which overthrew President
Salvador Allende have

('ontinue'd on Backpage


~s~lUIL-Al~l~ra~-e~131L.


- i ~ih~J~url~F ~s~p~s~eas~a~-~s~~sa~a~r;l~


-4 I -- I II


PAGE 2 TAPIA


SUNDAY NOVEMBER 14. 1976





SUNDAY NOVEMBER 14, 1976


tVERY NOW and then
local dignitaries are wel-
comed aboard a .visiting
British warship to cocktails
and chit chat sessions
hosted by sunburned naval
officers in spotless white
uniforms.
Thus do the imperial
powers convey a gentle
reminder that, though their
flags no longer fly atop
public buildings, their
presence is nonetheless as
real as ever-itn all parts of
the Caribbean,
And not oily is this an
economic presence repre-
sented by tlh.multi-national
corporations
From. tni Bahamas in
the north to Cayenne in
the south. :'be Caribbean
could be seen as a veritable
fortress garrisoned by
metropolitan military per-
sonnel.
The Cubana air disaster
the procedures of interna-
tional investigations which
followed focused atten-
tion on the -fact that the
Caribbean has remained a
staging ground for intrigue
and conflict deriving from
sources outside of the
region.
While various US media
spread unconfirmed reports


UNCLE

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UNIQUE

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SANGRE
GRANDE


about the presence of
Cuban forces in Guyana,
following Cuban involve-
ment in Angola, probably
few Americans remember
that the United States
maintains some 24 bases
and military installations
in the Caribbean.
The landing of US
Marines in Santo Domingo
in 1965; the inglorious


BAHAMAS Long range proving ground for US guided
missiles; underwater testing centre at Andros Island;
naval and coast guard installations.

CUBA Gyantanamo base with 20 nuclear submarines.
PUERTO FCO Ramie Air Force base; nuclear sub-
marines in San Juan.
BERMUDA'- US Army occupying 11% of Bermudan
territory.
TURKS AND CAICOS Various military installations.
ST. VINCENT AND GRENADINES Two frigates; a
battalion and a half of men.
ARUBA AND CURACAO Dutch military base two
escorts; one landing craft utility; one squad of anti-
submarine pWtrol aircraft; 10 companies of marines.
MARTINIQUE Headquarters of French Antilles of
Cayenne Defence Zone; one naval squadron; patrol
escort ship; two mine sweepers; submarines; detachment
of aircraft.
GUADELOUPE Marine batallion maintained.
FRENCH GUYANA Space research centre with
launching site for rockets and satellites.
\


invasion of Anguilla by
British "Red Devils" in
1969; a'd later reports of
French Legionnaires guard-
ing arrested nationalist
militants in Cayenne are
all instances of foreign
military involvement in
the region.
A detailed estimate of
foreign military might in
the Caribbean was recently
made in St. Vincent by a
Inmmber of the YOULOU
Liberation Movement
(YULIMO).
Dr. Ralph Gonsalves of
YULIMO, speaking at the
Second Annual Convention
of the Movement on Oct-
ober 22, gave a distribu-
tion of metropolitan


US WARSHIP


Caribbean. (See box),
YULIMO describes itself
as "an organisation based
on the ideology of Marxism/
Leninism". And the Octobei
22 convention also heard
C'de Mike Browne declare
that "in our lives socialism
and communism comes
before all else."
Dealing with the wide-
spread military presence of


military forces in the
non-Caribbean forces in
the region, Dr. Gonsalves
said: "The ball game is not
diplomats coming and
showing their teeth nor
tourists asking about your
culture.
"It is military might and
power backing economic
power."


LEFT: Ralph Gonzalves
of Yulimo


See


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TAPIA PAGE 3






SUNDAY


PAGE 4 TAPIA


TOBAGONIANS are very careful not to mention the word,
and when they do it is only to deny it. Yet in the 87
years which have elapsed since the islands of Trinidad and
Tobago were first united, never have the bonds of that
unity been so strained. Now the possibility of secession is
no longer only a flight of Dr. Norton's fancy.
That the word should have entered the political
consciousness of Trinidadians and Tobagonians is not
surprising. When, on the day after the General Elections, it
was found that Tobagonians had moved the PNM but
Trinidadians had not, the jokes and the rumours immedi-
ately began to fly.
Given this Government's reputation for vindictive-
ness, the cynics began to joke about the sudden break-
down of the Hasely Crawford Jet, which inexplicably
coincided with serious engine trouble on the inter-island
schooners and the drydocking of the newly-acauir-n .-"-
boat.


Tobagonians, the im-
plication was clear, were
going to be left high and
dry on their Robinson
Crusoe isle.
Then Williams, speak-
ing, as is his wont, both as
Prime Minister and Political
leader of the victorious
party, added fuel to the
flames of doubt when he
scornfully referred to the
,question of secession.
There was no real
problem, he told his
listeners, if Tobago wanted
to secede from Trinidad.
The problem would come
if Trinidad decided to
secede from Tobago.
And when, following
the Government's announce.


All the evils of mis-
management misgovern-
ment incompetence and
corruption which afflict
Trinidad are visited in
greater degree on Tobago.


ment of its new arrange-
ments, it was learnt that
Tobagonians had been left
with neither a Ministry for
Tobago Affairs nor even
with a senator specifically
charged with looking after
their island's affairs, the
apprehensions of Tobagon
ians seemed to be well-
in the latest episode
the DAC, the party which
took the two Tobago seats
from the PNM and so finds


itself in a somewhat
isolated state in Parlia-
ment, has issued a statement
on its own ideas of


Tobago's relationship with
Trinidad, which reads
almost like an ultimatum.
While nowhere in the
release is the word secession
specifically mentioned (the
DAC in fact being on
record as eschewing that
alternative) the language of
the release seems to
indicate that what is being
conducted, as far as the
DAC is concerned, are
negotiations between two
sovereign states.
It states the unequi-
vocal position that "any
future relationship between
Trinidad and Tobago must
be one of equality, as
among sovereign states."
It goes on to speak
of Tobago's "territorial
waters", of Tobago's "200-
mile economic zone", -
adding that "Tobago must
be treated with all respect
befitting a nation."
The release goes
further: "To say that
Tobago, .which produces
upwards of 250,000
oarrels of oil daily, is
deserving only of a county


council to run its affairs,
is nothing less than insult-
ing to a people who once
had their own Parliament
and a more fascinating
political culture than
Trinidad."
Whatever their motives,
the DAC are undoubtedly
right, and;just as undoubt-
edly, they voice the senti-
ments of many Tobagonians
when they point -to the
injustice and inequality
inherent in the present
relationship between Trini-
dad and Tobago.

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All the evils of mis-
management, misgovern-
ment, incompetence and
corruption which afflict
Trinidad are visited in
greater degree on Tobago.
Yet the channels of redress,
such as they are, have
always been even farther
away from Tobagonians.
Now they are more
so than ever. And the
DAC's problem should not
be underestimated. Theirs


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is the task of maintaining
their pohtical base in
Tobago, assuring their con-
stituents of proper repre-
sentation, without having
access to any of the sources
of patronage.
Certainly their first
step is to agitate for a
greater degree of autonomy
for Tobago. Any govern-
mental structure which
puts greater decision-
making powers in the
hands of Tobagonians will
not only aid Tobagonians
but, in all probability, if
they are organised to seize
it, give the DAC access to
some patronage and power.
If only for this very


reason it is certain that the
Covenmient is not about
to introduce any such
arrangement.
The alternatives for
the DAC are very few. The
first is to take the long,
hard approach to real
independence and auton-
omy, by seeking to
organise in the communi-
ties economic and social
enterprises constructed
and controlled by the
citizens.
The obstacles to such
a programme are, ot
course, formidable. Already
in Tobago the age old
traditions of self reliance
are being subverted and


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eroded by the debilitating
ease ot the Special Works
programme.
In addition, the last
decade has seen the flight
of some of the youngest
and brightest men and
women from Tobago, in
search of better opport-
unities elsewhere.
Yet such an approach
is still far more feasible
in Tobago than it could
ever be in Trinidad. The
homogeneous nature of
the society, the real and
deeply-rooted community
sentiment, and perhaps,


not least of all, the anger which the DAC has is


which most Tobagonians
feel over the shabby treat-
ment they have received
from this Government, are
all factors which can be
converted into assets in
any struggle for genuine
independence.
Perhaps the most
important feature of such
an approach is that to
whatever extent it suc-
ceeds, it will inevitably
provide invaluable lessons
in political education, anca
insights into political organ-
isation.
The last alternative


simply to do nothing but
parade. To sing loud and
long and capture the
headlines with their threats
and their bluffs, and to
hope that the vision of a
pie in the sky lasts foi five
more years.
It is perhaps too early
to say which road the
DAC is prepared to walk.
Yet it is not too early to
remind them, if in fact
they were looking that
way, that Devolution must
be composed of more than
South-Sea Oil.


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PAGE 5






SUNDAY NOVEMBER 14, 1976


Peace, Order, Stability


on Earth


Comment by

Fillip


DEAR FRIENDS, Mep-
histopheles came last
night to offer me the
usual package deal: fly
now pay later.
I must confess that I'
was quite prepared to
give him a chilly recep-
tion, pestered as I have
been lately by all types
of salesmen, all of whom
seem to think that it is
high time I, as they put
it, "seriously consider my
future".
But the poor old devil
looked so weary and
woebegone that I did not
have the heart to turn
away. So I invited him
in and offered him a
drink.

BLOODY MARY

Predictably enough, he
asked for a Bloody Mary.
I thought I had better
stick to orange juice.
"Well as you probably
already know, Sir," he
began, "I am authorised
to offer you all, that your
heart desires in return of
course for the pledge of
your soul to be delivered
to us at some future
date."
He went on, in a voice
which showed how tired
he was of making the
same sales pitch over and
over again for centuries,
to elaborate all the bene-
fits which would accrue
to me from what he
called "Our Young Exe-
cutive Policy."

RATING

It turned out that I
would not in fact get all
that my heart desired.
That was left only for
those whose souls were
absolutely pure.
But he had taken a
-look at my record of sin,
he said, and considering
my age, my .jaung was
surprisingly good.
Apparently the Young
Executive Policy was
designed to give the
clients everything they
wished but only in one
particular field.
So that if one wanted
to be a successful business-
man or a Nobel prize-
winning scientist, or a
world chamrpien--athlete,
this policy would gua-
rantee that, but only that.
1 indicated to the
Gentleman. (it was diffi-


cult for me to remember
that I was dealing with a
devil, so cultured was he)
that I had for some while
harboured some vague
political aspirations.
"Of course!" he ex-
claimed, "I really should
have known it. We have
several customers in that
field living in this
country."
Then he frowned and
shook his head. I inquired
if anything was wrong.
He explamed that he
would have, to' consult
with his Head Office


before he could make me
an offer in that particular
'field.
It seemed that the'
Board of Directors had
recently taken a'decision
to limit the intake *of
politicians.

TOLERANT

"Politicians," he said
angrily,"are never satisfied.
You give them everything
they want on earth and
yet when they come
across they want to
continue with their damn
nonsense."
I calmed him down
enough to find out that
recently all had not been
well over yonder.
Over the last hundred
years or so, certain
deceased politicians had
succeeded in forming


political parties of every
conceivable ideological
persuasion.
Since then not a day
has passed that there'has
not been a strike, or a
demonstration or some
petition.
"At first we had
regarded their antics with
some tolerant amuse-
ment," Mephistopheles -
continued, "but recently
they went too far."
It turned out that a
number of the left-wing
political parties had come
together and called a
massive strike, which
they nad threatened
would continue unless
there was introduced a
new democratic constitu-
tion, guaranteeing "free
and fair elections" and
an end to "one-man
rule."
"Imagine their gall!"


Mephistopheles thundered,'
his eyes ablaze. "They
want n democracy in
Hll."
I inquired, somewhat
timidly, as to the present
state - things.

DISHLY

The devil smiled fiend-
ishly and said, "Well, wc
dealt with their asses. We
declared a State of
Emergency and called out
the Praetorian Corpse."
He did not stay
much longer. He asked
whether I would be
interested in the deal if
he could arrange it.
I politely declined.
After all I saw no advant-
age.
It seemed to me that
we were doing as good a
job ensuring Stability and
- Order right here on Earth.







-"-.







/ '

?

'


PAGE 6 TA', A






SUNDAY NOVEMBER 14, 1976



Where the boys come out to


NAUGHTY PLAYBOY
magazine seldom makes it
into Trinidad these days
because ever-alert (and
equally naughty?) Cus-'
toms officers usually con-
fiscate it on sight.
That doesn't stop the
magazine's models from
frolicking on Caribbean
beaches in their birthday
suits though as evidenced
by the May 1976 issue.
Over a six-page coloui
picture spread, the nudies
are seen cavorting on
Caribbean beaches and
coves, making full use of
the tabled three Ss of the
region's tourist industry -
sea, sand and sex.

GESTAPO

At least two of the
photographs are designed
to stir our prim Customs
boys into action one,
in which a nude male
model is posed with two
females in the surf and
another in which the same
male is joined by three
nude females in what looks
like an orgy in the


DOWNTOWN
SCARBOROUGH
PLAYBOY
SEES
TOBACCO
AS
WILD
VIRGIN
COUNTRY


making.
The photos are one
thing, the six-page article
that, accompanies the
pictures something else.
Grenada is seen to have
"its own version of the
Third Reich, complete
with miniature Gestapo, as
Prime Minister Eric Gairy
continues to terrorise and
dispose of people he con-
siders politically undesir-
able."
The PLAYBOY sum up


on Grenada: "There's
nothing restful about a
police State in the sun."
Dominica, too, comes in
for its share. "A number
of tourists have been
robbed and a few have
been killed there these
past couple years, the
result of political agitation."
The Government of
Dominica, says PLAYBOY,
"has been rounding up the
dissidents and doing God
knows what with them."


Club Mediterranee
latest tourist-style
and package tour to
the region, is describe
"still the only game i
West Indies, with to
and nude beaches on
Guadeloupe and the
abundant."
The PLAYBOY
includes the Leeward
Windward islands -
Trinidad, which is so
ot Venezuela, acco
to PLAYBOY, "birds


TAPIA PAGE 7


play
Trinidad daily commute
there to feed."
Trinidad oil is said to
be in, abundance, "and it's
being .exploited like mad.
"Th&industrial age has
arrived on Trinidad with a
bullUozer and some tourists
simply don't think they
need to travel that far to
see an oil refinery. Even
worse, there isn't a beach
anywhere near Port-of-
Spain."
Never mind. PLAYBOY
"liked Trinidad a lot." The
Hilton was "probably the
Best place to stay." The
island is "teeming" with
life.
the Praising the three-hour
hotel drive over the North Coast
hit Road, PLAYBOY also
d notes "the shacks of
ed as
n the squatters" who "mostly
)pless stay alive by growing
both chives and selling them in
sex town. .."
What's the thing about
tour Trinidad PLAYBOY liked
and best?
and Tobago, with its "nearly
n untouched, wild virgin
close Defoe country."
irding
from (R.A.P.)


Can Carter push that


new br

"Georgia is at once the home
of the cotton-mill sweater and
of the most noisy and vapid
-sort of Chamber of Commerce,
of the Methodist parson turned.
Savonarola and of the lunching
bee."

NOW, almost half-a-century
since these lines were
penned by farmops Ameri-
can man of letters, H.L.
Mencken, comes Jimmy
Carter, the Iillionaire
peanut vendor.
And soon he will have
completed the process of
what Gerald F.rd. called
"waffling and wiggling"
his way into the White
House as the 39th Presi-
dent of the Unifed States.
Even after the? election,
and more than two years
of intensive and compre-
hensive exposure in the
American and international
media, Carter remains very
much the enigma that he'
started.

GEORGIA

As one cartoonist put it
when his campaign started
everyone asked "Jimmy
Who?" Now that it is over
people are asking "Who is
Jimmy?
Carter is a relative new-
comer to -the political
stage. His entry into politics
dates only from 1966
when he took part in the
Georgia gubernatorial race
and lost.
Not until he won the


oom

election to become Gover-
nor of Georgia in 1970
did real attention focus on
him. In addition, his,short
political career never took
him to Washington so th at,
to a large extent, he
escaped all the inevitable
wheeling and dealing in
which a congressman or
senator would have to
participate. And as he
wasn't in that, people
never learnt where he was
coming from.
From the start of his


campaign to the White
House almost two years
ago Carter has led a fervent
moral crusade in 'which he
emphasised a "new politics'
of trust, honesty and
openness.
But whatever the rea-
sons, the fact is that
Carter has won and won
not only as he boasts,
Without having written
any IOUs to the traditional
brokers and bossmen, but
without having pledged
himself to any specific
programme in any sphere
of Government.
Continued on Backpage


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COMPANY LIMITED.

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Phone: 62-37813








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Keel) a breast of the

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rates for TAPIA.
The new rates are as follows:


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Tapia, 82, St. Vincent St. Tunapuna. Trinidad &
Tobago, W.I. Telephone 662-5126. & 62-25241.


I ~ )- _-~BWP---r QIIP


RACE&

CLASS
Quarterly journal of the Institute of Race Relations and
the Transnational Institute

Volume XVIII < Autumn 1976 Number 2

Colin Prescod Guyana's Socialism: an interview with
Walter Rodney
Malcolm Caldwell Thailand: towards the revolution
Leslie Doyal & Imogen Pennell 'Pox Britannica': health,
medicine and underdevelopment
Fuad Faris The civil war in Lebanon
Also Notes on the Italian elections and German repression
- - - - -
I enclose $ 15/E5.50 or I year's subscription to oRace ( Clu(/ s,
starting with the current issue.
N am e . . . . . . . . . . . .
A d d ress . . . . . . . . .
............. ...... ...... . ip Lode ......... .
Send to the Institute of Race Relations, 247 Ientonville Road,
London N1 9NG, UK (Please send cash with orldel, Ichque% to be
made payable to the Institute of Race Relations).
7"- -_










Mrs. Andrea Talbutt, l '
Research Institute for

162, East 78th Street ,
New York, N,Y. 10021,
Ph. Lehigh 5 8448,
U.*S o. S '


From Page 7
Totally free, then, of all
the traditional constraints
that surround a candidate
by the time he reaches the
White House, is Carter in
any position to achieve the
type of Government which,
to be honest, one can
only vaguely discern from
his vision?

As has so otten been
said, whether he comes
originally from the right
or the left, an American
President always ends up
in the centre, a mere over-
seer of system so vast and
so complex and almost
self-regulating.

Yet over the last decade
or more the American
people have witnessed the
increasing domination of
the other branches of
Government by the Execu-
tive and the .pursuit by
successive Presidents of
policies frankly subversive
of both the -letter and the
spirit of the Constitution.


In throwing an incum-
bent President out of
office the American people
have merely continued
their strange revolt which
has seen one President
refuse to run for a second
term and another resign in
disgrace.

VICTORY

Carter, therefore. zomes
to the White House with
one more advantage in
that the American elector-
ate is apparently indeed
ready for a new broom.
The irony of it all is
that all of Mr. Carter's
advantages gives him, more
than any President in
history since Washington,
the opportunity truly to
become an "imperial Presi-
-dent".
In his first statement
after his victory, Carter
declared: "I think the sun
is rising on a beautiful
new day.for this country."
What that will mean in
actual terms, the American
electorate and the rest of
the world will just have to
wait on the peanut vendor
turned President to see.


Terrorist inT&T


From Page 2
helped to finance the anti-
Castro terrorist activity
The sources said: "We've
known it for years but
there's no way to do any-
thing about it."
Another key- figure
arrested -in' Caracas is Luis
Posada Carriles, a Cuban
exile who headed a<.private
detective agency and
formerly worked as Opera-
tions Chief of the Vene2
zuelan security police
agency, DSIP.
Posada and at least two
other exiled Cubans arrest-
ed by Venezuelan police
received training from the
CIA.
Freddy Lugo and


Hernan Losano, the two
Venezuelans held in Trini-
dad and then deported to
Venezuela in connection
with the Air Cubana crash,
were said to be employees
of Posada's detective
agency.
SPosada reportedly work-
ed with Cuban dictator
Fulgencio Batista's security
police and fled Cuba when
Castro took power in
1959.
Venez-uelan President
Carlos Andres Peres has
publicly promised to see
justice done in the Cubana
disaster. Lugo, Losano and
a number of other Cuban
exiles now in custody are
expected to face trial soon.


Anniversary y




ASSE MBLY


Sunday Nov14,1976


TAPIA HOUSE
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91, Tunapuna Road, Tunapuna (back)










Fernandes Vat 19 Rui-, .Friendlv& Exciting


THE GENTS' SHOP




OF CHARLOTTE ST.


rear