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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00072147/00238
 Material Information
Title: Tapia
Physical Description: no. : illus. ; 43 cm.
Language: English
Publisher: Tapia House Pub. Co.
Place of Publication: Tunapuna
Creation Date: November 7, 1976
Frequency: completely irregular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Politics and government -- Periodicals -- Trinidad and Tobago   ( lcsh )
Genre: periodical   ( marcgt )
serial   ( sobekcm )
 Notes
Dates or Sequential Designation: no. 1- Sept. 28, 1969-
General Note: Includes supplements.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 000329131
oclc - 03123637
notis - ABV8695
System ID: UF00072147:00238

Full Text


Vol. 6 No. 45


SUNDAY NOVEMBER 7, 1976


LIBRARY
RESEARCH INSTITUTE
FOR TrHE STUDY OF MAN
"62 EAST 78 STREET
NCW YORK 21, N. Y.
RiIM )\ j -. -


PRINTED AND PIBI ISIIED BY THI: TAI'A IIOUSI PUBI FISHING CO. LTD.. 91 TUNAPUNA RD.. IUNAPUNA TI:L:662-5126.


CRACKDOWN


jiE .Lt.... I


HAS


BEGUN


THE GPO postmen may
yet be coming round with
envelopes this Christmas,
but this time it won't be
j for gifts to supplement
their earnings at the time
when they have most work
to do. I
*. The way things look,
the postmen may well be
out of work altogether -
their jobs having been
taken over by soldiers of
the Trinidad and Tobago
Regiment.
The clear intent of the
limited state of emergency
declared by the President
at the GPO is to punish
the postmen whose indus-
trial action over the last
two weeks caused there to
be huge amounts of un-
sorted mail.

SOLDIERS

Using the emergency
provisions of the new con-
stitution, the government
has created a new regime
at the post office. Throw-
ing up the usual smoke-
screen of legality, the
government' has placed
power in the hands of
the Postmaster General
and the Chief Personnel
Officer to apply the big
stick to the postmen.
Soldiers and armed
police now man the GPO
in a move that apparently
has the support of the
PSA whose members in
the\ Postal Service were
'.% reportedly offering volun-
; tary assistance late last
,| week.
-:'^ If the oil and sugar
.Ji strike of 1975 which
was also broken by getting
-. soldiers to deliver gas and
sugar is any guide to
what will happen, then
the soldiers will go on
loing the postmen s work
long after Mr. Gadraj Singh
S and his colleagues, conced-
ing defeat, will have been
prepared to return to
work.
By then, the population
will have been receiving its
mail, and the Postmen's
Union will have been


made an example of by
the government.
By then, too, the
country will have been
educated as to how this
PNM regime, newly re-
turned to office, is prepared
to deal with the accumul-
ated dissatisfactions that
are now causing ceaseless
protest and demonstration.
Intimidation is the name
of the game. The govern-
ment always has a terror
in reserve.
Days before Brig.
Serrette's men actually
moved in on wngnison
Road, the alarums were
about the ominous
meetings of the National
Security Council, the
huddles with the Prime
Minister, and finally, the
marching of the troops.
The GPO state of emer-
gency, following the oil
and sugar strike last year,
show an indisputable
trend: the government is
bringing the military into
the civil realm, and, eventu-
ally, with unforeseeable
consequences, into politics.

MUS!CE

In their roles of strike-
breakers, the soldiers of
the T&T Regiment are
now emerging with the
image of reserve muscle
for the use of the regime,
whenever it deems it
expedient.
Brigadier Serrette could
huffily declare last year
that his men are not
scavengers and therefore
should not be called upon
to clean the streets when
scavengers struck.
But, hankering for so
long after a useful role for
himself and his men, the
Brigadier can do little now
but persuade himself that
the Regiment is doing a
needed national service.
Even if that means
putting workers out of
their jobs indefinitely,
shunting aside any con-
sideration of legitimate
CONT'D OA ,CK PAGE


30 Cents









Tunapuna plans action


week


THE Tunapuna Constitu-
ency Party of Tapia will
celebrate a Tunapuna Week
from December 5 to 12.
The monthly meeting of
tLe party last week accept-.
ed that proposal put
forward by the Constitu-
ency Executive.
A release by Chairman
Alfrn Wafe states that the
week will begin with the
final Sitting of the Annual


General Assembly on
Sunday December 5.
SA programme of films
will run on evenings at
the Tapia House up to
Thursday December 9.
Films on- sport and on
Afro-Asian culture have
been commissioned.
On Friday' December
10, members will- spend
the afternoon selling '.the
Tapia newspaper all over


JUMBLE SALE

THE fund-raising campaign moves on in the various con-
stituencies.
-Last week Friday Tapia people in the Diego Martin
constituencies danced till the wee hours at the Borelys in
Diamond Vale. Junior Wiltshire, announcing plans for more
fund-raising occasions, admitted the Diamond Vale fete
made a tidy profit.
Fund-raising of a different sort is being planned by
the San Juan constituency. That constituency party will
be holding a jumble sale at the Greyfriars Church in Fred-
erick Street, the traditional site of such ventures.
Lloyd Taylor and San Juan organiser Valerie Harewood
are looking around for donations and contributions of
suitable goods. Check Taylor 638-4644.



PERSONAL ATTENTION

TO YOUR TRAVEL PLANS-

Consult

VENDRYES

TRAVEL

SERVICES
71 Frederick St, Port of Spain; Phone: 62-37272-3-4
137 Eastern Main Road STA: 662-49,7-4488



BOOKS
2HE REVOLUTIONS OF 1,41: POLITICAL WRITINGS
VOL. 1: BY KARL.MARX $4.50
Marx, then aged thirty, was mainly in Cologne at the time of
the revolution of 1843, when- he and Engels succeeded in
launching the Neue Eheinische Zeitung. The bulk of this
volume contains articles from that journal in which Marx
interpreted the risings in Vienna, Berlin and Prague and
accounted for their subsequent repression; in addition there
are reviews, addresses, speeches on Poland and the minutes
of the London meeting of 1850 when Schapper and others
finally left the Communist League. Many of these pieces
appear for the first time in English.
SURVEYS FROM EXILE: POLITICAL WRITINGS: VOL. 2:
BY KARL MARX $4.50
During the 1850s, after Marx had found asylum in England,
he was more completely isolated than at any other time. To
this period belong "The Class Struggles in France", in which
he brilliantly analyses the French political and social group-
ings after 1848, and The Eighteenth Brumaire of Louis
Napoleon, a similar study of the coup d'etal of 1S51. Both
are printed in this volume.
THE FIRST INTERNATIONAL AND AFTER: POLITICAL
WRITINGS VOL. 3: BY KARL MARX $4.50
In addition to documents connected with the firstt Interna-
tional this volume contains letters, addresses and essays in
which Marx used the principal European events and issues of
the period German unification, the Iranco-Prussian War,
the Paris Commune and Ireland as grindstones to sharpen
his theory of sceintific communism.


sStephens
PORT-OPFSPAIN SAN FERNANDO


the constituency and
mounting a subscription
.drive. A special Tunapuna
Supplement is being plan-
ned for publication in that
week's TAPIA.

CAKE SALE

Then on Saturday Dec-
ember 11, a cake sale will
take place at several shop-
ping centres during the
morning. That night, a
fund-raising fete will come
off at the home of Fitz
Baptiste on Cheeseman
Avenue, St. Augustine.
The following day the
week of action will end
with a grand. All-Fours
competition involving
visiting teams from the St.
Augustine, St. Joseph and
St. Anns Constituencies.


Our coverage of

THE REGION

is unsurpassed anywhere

tor focus and point.

Keep abreast of the

real currents in the

Caribbean Sea.
OWING to the recent increase in the postal
rates, the Tapia House Publishing Co., Ltd., has
found it necessary to increase the subscription
rates for TAPIA.

The new rates are as follows:


Trinidad & Tobago
Caricom countries
Other Caribbean
U.S./Canada
E.E.C. (incl. U.K.)


U.S.
U.S.
Stg.


$18.00 per year
30.00
$25.00
$30.00
L14.00


Surface rates and rates for other countries on
request The new rates are effective February 1, 1976.
Tapia, 82, St. Vincent St Tunapuna. Trinidad &
Tobago. W.I. Telenhone 662-5126 P, A2-75741


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For a lasting

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SUNDAY NOVEMBERI7, 1976


PAF2TAPIA





TAPIA PAGE 3


SUNDAY NOVEMBER 7, 1976


CHRISTMAS STOCKS


TIED UP ON
,.. .- .' .


IMPORTERS nave a ton
of Christmas goods down
on the orpI-of-Spain docks.
But a lot of the goodies
may never make it to the
stores in time for Christ-
mas.
The problem? A massive
pile-up o9t eargo on the
docks, with little hope that
the jam will be cleared in a
hurry.
"The country is not really

MASSA
DAY
START?
"MASSA DAY start?"
This is the provocative
theme that Denis Solomon,
Tapia Chairman, will
develop on November 11,
in another of the series of
newly revived Thursday
right sessions.
Solomon will review the
period since September 13
elections which the PNM
won, and will draw conclu-
sions from the develop-
ments since about the
emerging Williams philos-
ophy of government and
politics.
The Tapia Shadow Min-
ister for Administration
will also deal with the
implications for the gov-
ernment machinery of the
National Advisory Council
and the present situation
with regard to Tobago.
Solomon's talk begins"
at 7.30 p.m. Look out for
the text of his address in
next week's TAPIA.



UNIQUE

STORE
SERVING
SANGRE
GRANDE



UNCLE

SAM BAR
AN OASIS
IN
DOWNTOWN GRANDE


aware of the seriousness
of the situation", Chamber
of Commerce general
manager Carmipa Beard
said last week.
Some importers have


~l*pllrsLuUi( .C I rlI


DOCKS
whole country is losing."
The Chamber, which
lWepresents importers, has
been talking to the Gov-
ernment about the problem
for the past eight months.
"All we have had are
assurances and reassur-
toances", the Chamber GM
said.
Two reasons are given
for the great dock pile-up.
(1) Plans for expansion
of the port have -not
materialised; and (2) the
two-year oil "boom" has


been unable to clear goods
landed since March.
Beard, said: "You may
think it's just businesses
that are losing but we are
an importing country. The


fuelled a leap in imports.
Not geared to cope with
normal growth in trade,
the port is clogged by the
"boom" imports.
Containers are stacked


one on top the other. There
isn't equipment to unsta'ck
the goods. Nor enough
storage space.
And Port general manager
Pollard Moore has admit-
ted he is stumped on how
to cope.

JITTERY

The results? Shipping
lines are getting wary of
our port. Some ships wait
as many as 10 days out
in the stream because of
the jam.
Foreign insurers are
equally jittery about goods
consigned to Trinidad as
are local insurers who,
faced with the massive
pilferage on the docks, are
talking about increasing
their rates.
Businesses will pass on
those costs to the con-
sumer, who, as usual, will
end up paying for it all.


A certain smile that


Carenage might have seen


NOBODY might have paid much
attention, but the now famous
smile must have lit up a nightclub
or two in Carenage back in the
days of World War Two.
For US President elect Jimmy
Carter is no stranger to places like
Chaguaramas, Trinidad, and other
Caribbean ports of call.
As a. young US Navyman
Carter, records in his autobio-
graphy "Why Not The Best?", he
spent more than one summer in the
Caribbean doing duty on old
battleships, among them, the USS
New York.
Carter lists Trinidad Jamaica,


See


DHARRIES

COR.

INDEPENDENCE SQ.

&HENRY ST.POS

FOR:

POTS, PANS, GLASSWARE,

and other Household items.

ELECTRICAL FITTINGS

CHRISTMAS BULBS, PAINTS,

BRUSHES, NAILS.


Puerto Rico and the Virgin Islands
as points touched in the Caribbean.
Did he carry on like the
average American sailor ashore, or
did he stick strictly to official duty
in these ports?
Carter who reportedly told
Playboy magazine that he has
lusted after women only in his
heart, was not explicit about his
shore leave.
One sure thing, now, though:
if he does return to any of these
ports over the next four years of
his administration, everybody would
notice. And the smile might even
become a new local fashion. (R.A.P.)


2nd ANNIVERSARY SALE
NOW ON!


GENTS
CRIMPLENE &
GARBADINE
PANTS'
WAS $26.95
NOW $19.95


GOLD SEAL
S/SLEEVE
L/S JACKETS
WAS $29.95

NOW 2 for $39.95


I -


-~---I-----






SUNDAY N


PAGE 4 TAPIA


Raoul

Pan tin


THERE WAS enough
"wining" in it to satisfy
the lustiest Best Village
audience in Port-of-Spain.
But "REVIVAL", the
debut performance of the
Trinidad Theatre Work-
shop at Little Carib
Theatre last weekend,
was also a refreshing
reminder that not by
"wine" alone does the
art of dance live.
Not that this new
Company is the first and
only to stress this in
recent times.
In the cultural revival
that has been quietly
surging ahead in Trinidad
over the last five, six
years, Astor Johnson's
Repertory Dance Com-
pany has been a vanguard
movement.
Several of TTW's 14-
member Company have
done some of their best
work in appearances with
the RDT.

DISCIPLINE

But the grindstone
business of literally scrap-
ing together every pro-
duction has had an
unsettling effect on the
!DT (now promoting,
with the US Embassy,
performances here of the
Alvin Ailey Dance Work-
shop, opening-at Queen's
Hall on November 11).
Last weekend, "RE-
VIVAL" demonstrated
that the TTW Dance
Company has to be taken
seriously.


It wasn't only the
obvious discipline (at
times too rigid, as you
got the impression you
were interrupting a dance
class) and grasp of basic
technique that the Com-
pany exhibited.
The performance was
also the kind of produc-
tion that gripped the
attention at several levels
- costume, lighting, the
actual dancing and some
absorbing themes.

There were the usual
amateurish moments -
one night the show had
two false starts after
starting half an hour late;
in mid-poise one or two
dancers skipped cue.
_But if "REVIVAL" is
the standard that the
TTW Company is going
to work upwards from,
then there is a new and
potentially exciting move-
ment in dance in the
country.

More power to the
Trinidad Theatre Work-
shop. The new Company
is made up of Workshop
members, mostly women.
Carol La Chapelle is
the Company's Dance
Director, Noble Douglas
its Lead Dancer/Choreo-
grapher. Both are ardent
Theatre persons, special-
ising in dance but work-
ing in Workshop produc-
tions in acting roles and
as choreographers.
Well-known in dance
here, La Chapelle and
Douglas have distinctly


rC' '












If "Revival" is the
standard that the TTW
Dance Company is
going to work upwards
from, then there is a
new and potentially
exciting movement in
dance in th3
country. .


The combination of
Carol La Chapelle and
Noble Douglas is a
curious mixture of
near flagrant sensuality
and coldly precise
technique.-..

The theme was (not
surprisingly for a
Company of women)
the male/female
encounter...


Photos by Jerry Llewellvn.


different styles. Their
combination in "RE-
VIVAL" is a curious
mixture of near flagrant
sensuality and coldly
precise technique.


ft was also one of
those shows where the
choreography wasn't just
hands and legs waving
about in space. One saw
purpose and meaning, the


exploration a clear theme.
The theme chosen in
"REVIVAL" was (not
surprisingly for a Com-
pany of women) the
male/female encounter.
It was there in "In The
Beginning And The End",
in which the eternal
triangle is overseered by
a detached trio of women
who appear as spiritual
guides to their wronged.
sisters.
In "CAGES", the
theme sharpened: the
men who wrong one
women are puppets in


the hands ol another.
And dealt with accord-
ingly.
The triangle recurred
in "VARIATION ON A
THIIEMI., LOVE" in which
that complex human
sentiment is seen to scarl
at its highest peak and
then crumble as love
exacts its uncoimpromllis-
ing price.
Here, the rejected
lover comes to a stoic
acceptance.
In the best item on
the programme, "RhE-
VIVAL" whichc h included


a beautiful Shano seec-
tion) the women dance
to Nina Simone's "A New
World Comingi" as a
linked solidarity group.
The weakness in the
theme lay in its limited
conclusions, a la Women's
Lib. It will be interesting
to see where the TTW
Da,'ce Company points
next.

NOTE: Another per-
formance of "Revival" takes
place on Saturday, Nov-
ember 6 at the Little
Carib.


IEMBER 7, 1976


TAPIA PAGE 5






PAGE 6 TAPIA




And


SUNDAY NOVEMBER 7. 1976


after


- .4


The physical remains
of the crashed
Cubana DC-8 ...
the issues provoked
are very much alive.


THE CUBANA airliner
sabotage in which 73
-ersons died has continued
to provoke reaction in the
Caribbean and the rest of
the world.
In Guyana where Prime
Minister Forbes Burnham
on October 17 called the
crime part of "a conspiracy
against progressive Carib-
bean governments, part-
icularly Cuba and Guyana,"
there has been a notable
show of unanimity in the
condemnation of the USA
whose Central Intelligence
Agency has been suspected
of complicity in the
sabotage plot.
The Working People's
Alliance (WPA) in Guyana,
an anti-government coali-
tion of radical groups,
held an 8/2 hour picket
vigil at the US Embassy
on October 15.
The WPA picketers held
placards that read "The
USA Is Guilty"; "CIA El
Condor USA"; "Child
Killers", etc. and chanted
slogans, like "Yankee Go
Home" and "We Don't
Want No Yankee Aid".

CIA FRIEND

This demonstration was
followed by another the
day after held by mem-
bers of the "youth arm"
of the ruling PNC.
On the Cubana question;
the WPA announced its
"solidarity with the gov-
ernment as the official
representative of Guyanese
nationals".
But the Alliance has
hastened to point out, in
an issue of its paper
"Dayclean", that it is con-
tinuing the struggle "for
the working people and
the hungry, unemployed
masses" a struggle in
which it resolutely-holds
the Burnham government
as the enemy. (See TAPIA
last week.)
"Dayclean" claims that
"the mass movement in
Guyana is forcing the
PNC to make statements
which it never allowed
before."
The WPA organ, printed
and circulatLd underground
in-Guyana and elsewhere,
recalls that as recently as
March 1976 Burnham told-
a Venezuelan magazine that
he did not regard the


AIFLD to be an organisa-
tion used by the CIA.
(The AIFLD's connec-
tions with the CIA had
first been exposed by
TAPIA in 1971, and the
Trinidad and Tobago gov-
ernment closed its office
and expelled its representa-
tive from Port-of-Spain
thefollowing year.
The Guyana Prime
Minister reportedly also
admitted friendship with a
CIA operative who had
been so denounced by


author and former CIA
agent Philip Agee.
In a front-page article
of its November issue the
Trinidad-based, regional
monthly newspaper "Carib-
bean Contact"' called the
.Cubana sabotage "a crime
seen as a challenge to the
sovereignty of the Carib-
bean."
The "Contact" article,
written by editor Rickey
Singh, observes that until
the deportation to Vene-
zuela of the two suspects


Cubana?


on October 26, "the fact
that 73 people perished
somehow got lost in a
maze of legalistic argu-
ments that have left Carib-'
bean citizens witnessing
what is regarded as a
classic in political buck-
passing."
This reference to the
legal issues involved in the
Caribbean governments'
failure to decide which
had jurisdiction in the
Cubana crime, is taken up
elsewhere in the newspaper
by a writer on interna-
tional law who affirmed
the "legal correctness" of
the Trinidad and Tobago
government's position in
deciding to deport the
suspects to Venezuela.
Another "Contact"
writer, Faith Welcome of
Barbados, predicted that
"incidents like that of
October 6 will either forge
the Caribbean countries
together or blast their
regional ra o ve m e n t
asunder."
The implications of the


Ruin of US-Cuba detente
THE cancellation of the rapprochement have long shops in the last few years
hijacking agreement, an- since disappeared. But at has been much appreciated
nounced by Fidel Castro, another level the thought by the population.
on October 15, marks a must have crossed Castro's Their withdrawal could
significant break in the mind that Cuba itself may cause problems, and a
embryonic Havana-Wash- be a candidate for "destabil- return to the rhetoric of
ington thaw, even though isation" just as much as the the siege economy is an
the Cuban Prim6 Minister other weaker islands in the obvious fidelista response.
left open the possibility of Caribbean. Already there are signs


a change after the United
States, elections.
Of course, at one level
it merely formalises a
situation that has existed
at least since the Cuban
involvement in Angola a
year ago.
The high hopes that
existed in February 1973
of a Cuban-United States


Cuba is not going
through an easy period at
the moment. Although the
military involvement in
Angola was well-received
by public opinion the
economic outlook, after
the downturn in the sugar
price, is bleak.
The relative profusion
of consumer goods in the


that Cuba cannot pay
Argentina for the immense
orders that it made in
more optimistic days,
though the reason for the
dry-up of this particular
trade flow may be more
political than economic.
An Argentine official is
scheduled to arrive- in
Havana shortly to sort this
out. (Latin America)


I Cubana issue for Caribbean
unity had previously been
laken up by TAPIA (Oct-
ober 24) which had
contrasted the unanimity
shown by West Indian
governments in banning
regional militants with the
vulnerable position of an
otherwise divided region(
against externally origin-
ated terrorism.
Since then, Dominican
Rosie Douglas has been
banned from entering
Trinidad, Grenada and St.
Vincent.


TOURISTS

Meantime, potential
foreign terrorists and
agents of every hue, pre-
sumably in the guise of
tourists, find open doors
everywhere in these "wel-
coming societies".
The recent announce-
ment, too, of another
Trinidad and Tobago initi-
ative to join OPEC follow-
ing the failure of two
previous applications, has
directed attention again
to the foreign policies
being pursued by current
Caribbean regimes.
For the OPEC rejection
of Trinidad and Tobago
since 1971 is an indication
that this country is
regarded by OPEC coun-
tries as being insufficiently
independent of the United
States.
Barbados, Jamaica and
Guyana have given support
to the 1975 Cuban mili-
tary expedition in Angola.
Trinidad and Tobago, how-
ever, withheld such support
Which only underlines
the continuing disharmony
of the present crop of
regional regimes in every


I Co;t'd on Page 7


[KIRPALANI'Si


__ I


- -= := I-~----


..






SUNDAY NOVEMBER 7, 1976


DEAR FRIENDS, one
day some of you bright
and enterprising people
out there must write the
history of the people of
Trinidad and Tobago.
A history that is not
of dates and events but
of the human drama. The
comic, the tragic, the
hopeful and the absurd.
When you do, I hope
you find some little room
in your volumes for my
friend, the Commissioner
of Oaths and Affidavits.
He was old. I guess, in
his early seventies. Yet
he stood tall with only a
slight stop in the shoulders.
He wore a cream suit
which was shiny in places
telling a tale of years
of repeated laundering.
His pants were held up
by a pair of braces;, his
shirt white, stifflystarched
and ironed.

SELF-RESPECT

He wore a tie knotted
very tightly, in which the
original pattern-had faded
and -it was all a solid
dirty green.
The colors and cuffs
of his jacket and shirt
were frayed. His trousers
showed the scars of
repeated earnings.
His shoes were black,
polished and cracked all
over, with neat holes cut
to allow the little toes
some freedom and air.
He had been a civil
servant. One of those who
in all their years in the
Colonial Service had
never been responsible
for more than the inter-


In


his


standards


C


b ureau


departmental
of files and
folli i.


transport
folios and


Yet he had been too
old when Independence
came, to take part in the
scramble at the public
trough which has given
us our own "Black
Bourgeoisie".
Retired while still
strong in body and mind,
he had sought to fill his
hours, supplement his
pension and maintain his
self-respect by putting
up his shingle outside a
dark and musty little
office, and waiting for
the crumbs that came his
way after the aristocrats
of the legal profession
had had their lion's share
of the bread.
Now he peered at me
through the thick lens of
his wire-framed spectacles,
as with slow and precise
movements he tried to
light his foul-smelling
pipe.
He was talking about


standards, his words irrit-
atingly garbled by the
clicking of his ill-fitting
dentures.
"Standards," he said,
emphasising each word
by stabbing the musty
air with his pipe, "stand-
ards are what this
country lacks. You see,
we were so anxious to
rid ourselves of the tradi-
tions of colonialism that


WANTED: RELIABLE
HOMER PIGEONS


comment b

Fillip


we destroyed all the
old standards.
"Now look around
you and you will see
that there is no dignity,
no pride. We are breeding
a nation of ill-mannered
pigs."
He shook his head
slowly. "You see, young
man, it is only by the
rigid maintenance of
standards in the little


d 1100-


THE dock jam and pilferage are not the only horrors
businessmen are getting these days.
For the past six weeks, Independence Square -
centre of business activity in the city has been hit by
phone problems.
Numbers beginning with 5 either give trouble or
simply don't work.
"I've written ten letters to the Telephone Company
and even made several personal appeals to the general
manager," a businessman said last week. To no avail.
A flash flood on September 17 and a Richmond
Street repair trench are given as the cause of that problem.
Companies, meanwhile, have been taking out advert-
isements listing new phone numbers.
And then the mail strike. ..


AND AFTER CUBANA, WHAT?


From Page 6
sphere save that of kup-
ing regional militants under
heel.

So that the yearned-for
unity of the Caribbean
probably requires the
demise of the present
regimes, as a prelude to the
establishment of new
foreign policy concepts,
which emphasise the for-
mation of new kinds of
alignments on the world


stage.
It is the historical role
of these nation-states of
the Caribbean to lead in
the articulation and estab-
lishment of the new con-
cepts of international rela-
tions which begin by break-
ing clear of the division of'
the world into camps of
ideology into which so
many nations are ill-fittedly
corralled.
But this requires, in the
first instance, the unifica-
tion of this region.


(ANGOSTURA)


Angostura Old Oak Rum
A mellow blend of light
Trinidad rums. Snooth.
clean tasting


___I ___ ______ ~ _


1 I_ __ 11--1 11_1_1111_1


TP/ PAGE 7
.things, no matter how
funny or stupid they
may seem, that people
are tJuglht To maintain
standards ini the large and
important ones.
"I don't know what-
is going to happen, I just
don't know."

SARDINE

He looked at his watch,
then reached over and
covered the ancient type-
writer which stood on
the desk.
He got up and shut the
door of his little cubicle
which immediately be-
came darker than ever.
He went back to his
desk, opened a drawer
and took out a greasy
paperbag.
"Ah my favourite,"
he said, peering into the
paperbag," Would you
like one of my sardine
sandwiches."
I politely declined and,
making my excuses, left
him to his lunch, and
his standards.






SUNDAY NOVEMBER 7, 1976


Mlrs. Andrea Talbutt,
Research Institute for
Study of Man,
162, East 78th Street,
,,ew York, N,Y. 10021,
,. Lehigh 5 8448,
T" S _


POSTMEN were prepared
for the worst. The axe
finally fell last Thursday.
Shortly before me army
was put to civil work, the
postmen had told TAPIA:
"They could bring the
Regiment if they want."
They were prepared to
go "all the way", they
insisted.
The men they hold
immediately responsible
for the impasse are PSA
Boss, James Manswell and
money manipulator Mervyn
De Souza, Minister in the
Ministry of Finance.

CHRISTMAS

"Manswell playing he
using De Souza and De
Souza playing he using
Manswell," commented one
postman. "But I feel they
really playing both side."
Asked whether the post-
men did not think they
were holding the public
to ransom at Christmas
time, the reply was: "No,
we are in sympathy with


MNI



self. "Every time they What would they accept the end of delaying tactics
agree on something, in the for an early settlement? by the Post Office Pay-
end is a word of mouth Aparently, an immediate master.
agreement;., this is really a re-classification; the pay-
I "Rut. Y%. not i J tim-


the public and we ask
them to bear with us.
"Christmas is the only
time that we does get the
people to listen; all other
channels seem like they
block."

GRIEVANCE

The postmen reported
that they had written to
the Postmaster General.
No response. They had
written to the Minister
and had been blanked
once again.
As they spoke, an
animated group crowding
round, the Union Execu-
tive of 21 Members were
in anxious session upstairs
the General Post Office
on Wrightson Road.
The mail was piled up
in huge mountains all
around. Across the way,
the toilet door seemed a
dirty gaping hole, one of
the points of grievance.
"We have grievances like
bush", The man talking
could hardly contain him-


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promise land.
"We are not taking any
promises this time, said
another; not even a promise
in black and white."


ment of shift allowance
due since Dec. 1974; a
redress of anomalies going
back to 1966; the appoint-
ment of an Inspector to
supervise uniformed Staff;


IT IS not yet two months since the
September 13 elections. Bvt already
the State of Emergency has pressed
itself upon us.
Last time the elections were in
May of 1971 so that the Badger
Emergency of November took full
five months to mature. --
After 1966, the Emergency did
not arrive until four years of futility
had flowed under the bridge, albeit
into the roaring torrent of the Poui
Season 1970.
But even then, our first crisis
simulcast came as early as February
of 1967.
The cycle of crisis recurs over
and over, with a deepening intensity
each succeeding time. The bland re-
assertion of the two-party democracy;
the celebration of illusion in the
morning media and then, the return
to the real politik of guerrilla union-
ism, blind civic confrontation, futile
protest far and wide followed by
reaction, repression, the strengthening
of Executive power and the inexor-
able march of the military into the
province of the civil.
And yet the Scribes and the
pundits insist that there exists no
constitutional crisis; that there
existed none, that you simply cannot
eat any constitution reform.
But the postal workers are clear


iAut. we are no.L o m.LIl-
istic," concluded one very
realistic postman." This is
a cut-up game, yes."
Well, the axe fell on
Thursday morning. (L.B.)


on the issue.
By striking their blow at Christ-
mas every time, they recognize that
the normal process of representation
has irretrievably broken down.
The Ear of the Executive has
become so maddeningly hard that.the
only way to get a proper hearing is
to disrupt the life of the country and
to aim your biggest' blow at the
softest underbelly.
When else should they go slow
but at Xmas when it hurts?
The only solution is a reform to
give a tongue and a voice to popular
disadvantage. The only institution to
speak for the people is an assembly of
the valid leaders and the reputable
organizations, one designed to suit
the habits of the place.
All the reactionaries are content
with one Council or another troops
of advisers handpicked from on high.
The Prime Minister has his
National Advisory Council; the seces-
sionists from Tobago would counsel
two Senators chosen by democratic
action from above.
Until the matter of representa-
tion is resolved, the crisis will survive
even if those who labour are holding
the reins of Opposition.
I But how will we get effective
representation if we do not establish
a professional and permanent political
organisation?


The Crackdown


From Page One

grievances and, with the
added effect of intimidat-
ing other workers.

Observe how promptly
the firemen decided to
abandon their own plans
for industrial action.
The spate of industrial
uprisings and the incipient
move to crush such initi-
atives, as represented by
the GPO emergency, comes,
ironically, at a time when
workers have representa-
tion in Parliament in the


form of a "working class"
party.
But the ULF's own
assessment of its potential
for effective "working
class" representation in
Parliament is eloquently
reflected in its aim to
establish "People's Parlia-
ments" in the squares.
So we are right back
to a pre-1970 situation, it
seems. The elections have
resolved nothing. The
"due process" for the
resolution of conflicts and
the removal of grievances
is widely seen not to exist


or, if it does, not to work
to anybody's satisfaction.
Workers and others must
resort to flexing muscle -
hitting when and where it
hurts most to get what
they see as their just due.
The "public interest" is a
cynical abstraction to
justify the clench of the
iron fist.
And in such a situation
it is inevitably the
ones with the most force
who will triumph, at least
for now.
Look in at the GPO and
see.


_ _


___I_


IL ,:MERGE,", Y'' GAIN


I -