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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00072147/00234
 Material Information
Title: Tapia
Physical Description: no. : illus. ; 43 cm.
Language: English
Publisher: Tapia House Pub. Co.
Place of Publication: Tunapuna
Creation Date: October 10, 1976
Frequency: completely irregular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Politics and government -- Periodicals -- Trinidad and Tobago   ( lcsh )
Genre: periodical   ( marcgt )
serial   ( sobekcm )
 Notes
Dates or Sequential Designation: no. 1- Sept. 28, 1969-
General Note: Includes supplements.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 000329131
oclc - 03123637
notis - ABV8695
System ID: UF00072147:00234

Full Text



VoL 6 No. 41


SUNDAY OCTOBERE10, 1976


COR? THE STUDy OF MlAi
162 EA(Mr 7. S~prFl-
A I cn 2, 7 il '4
w CTIif t


PRINII I \>1) X' M131 Sll 'I I P B 1111iiitAll iOUS I P t I l IISI IINt. O.((1,1 DU.,91 TI TN A IINA RIJ -I UNAJIUNA IlL:662-5126.


SUNDAY

COUNCIL
-THE Council of Repre-
sentatives will be holding
its regular monthly meel-
ing on Sunday 17, October
at the Tapia Centre DOS
at 10 am.
The Council will resume
discussion of the reform
of the Tapia constitution
which is to be decided at
the Annual General
Assembly on October 24,
1976.
Papers and positions on
Constitution reform will be
presented to the Council
for discussion.
Other items on the
agenda include the on-
going fund-raising drive
and the programme of
community work ahead.


TAPIA

FU ND-

RAISING
TAPIA is mounting a
national effort in fund-
raising 4to wipe out its
$30,000- debt and to con-
tinue to sustain the organ-
ization as a serious, perma-
nent, political -movema.-nt
with. a core staff of key
personnel.
All members, friends,
associates and sympathisers'
.are asked to become in-
volved in this effort, either
by making a donation
themselves or by helping
to raise funds.
If you need more infor-
mation or would like to
become actively involved
or would like to make a
contribution, Call 62-251241.


INTEGRITY is the biggest
thing these days, the biggest
thing since radiation hit
the town in 1959. In 20
years, we have not tracked
down one single racketeer
nor dismissed one single
senior official for reasons
cf integrity. All we have
done has been to shout
out woff. "
But 1now suddenly the
headlines are screaming
"Jail. -'"ine dor Asset
Trickery." (l evening News,
October, (6, 1'76) .

FOOLING

D. Does Ali Baba thin! he
is kooling- .ny y.' s"
there any interest whatso-
ever in the question? I
If we have been agitat-
ing-the matter ol integrity.,
is is not Ior oin' reason
alone? While every bodd.
gone off on the scene o01
morality, have \\,e not
been busily en dancing the
Prime Ministeri's powerr?
Have we not been surrepti-
tiously -establishing the
PresidentiallRepublic after
the Latili Aimerican
fashion'?
Have we not quietly
created a virtual nominated
element in the l x-co'? Have
we not created an Advis-
-ory Council enjoying; like
planters of old, influence
without any corresponding


TUNAPUNA


MR. Alfred Wafe has been
elected Chairman of the
Tapia Constituency Party
qf Tunapuna.
At-a meeting held on
Tuesday October 5, other
officials elected for the'
1976-77 term were is
follows:


Vice (hairmani
l3 harath.
Secretary I'itt
Assl. Sc. ('Ca
TIreasLrer


I-espo nsibhi i t
hodv"


to thle citizen


In other words, integrity
seems to have been lthe
screen behind which the
real constitution reform
has been slyly manipulated
We have turned the Cabi-
net into ,i Committee of
hired helpers, handpicked
at the level of the take-no-
crats and equally hand-.
picked at the level of the
teef--crats.
Meanwhile the Civil


Service languishes high and
dry. The House has he-
collime a Chamber of IHor-
rors. Party politic., has
become an empty slogan
of yester-year and tile-
Cabinet -is no longer a
Committee of the House
of Representatives.
Integrity was del.iber-
ately left over as thie most
juicy of the campaign
issues. If the Ombiudsman
was thought to be mere
milk anid water, what


PARTY
I)co Ale\is.


1 Buapti
rol Be:
Ba rba


Wale. ..
I.dl ucalion .Se
Iund RaisiiLe Soc.


ste On Tuelsd:y (Ocobr 1 2.
st. I meeting will bhe held at
'a The Tapia I. louse. InTutI-
lpina,,Clto. discuss plans Ior
!. lliunl-raising .and for lthe
Iorlhlcoiningi scss'iol of tlie
.1. Anllul l (ienerai Assemlll ly.


reason was there for not
including the current pro-
posals in the original
drafting?
The fact of the matter
is that officialdom cannot
dare to face the question
of integrity and morality

in public affairs. It is not
simply a question ol a lack
of will, or simply a ques-
tion of playing political
hoop;
Bribery and corruption
are not a matter of per-


so nal greed and individual
imminoralitv. It always
requires at least two to
tango so that bribery and
corruption can only pre-
vail on the current large
scale where thie public
accepts it as a part of the
cost of liivilg.

NEEDS

Immoralityv must there-
fore he seell as a collnse-
(lquence, a result of
crumbling institulti(ons.
When i tlie State can no
longer deliver the ordinary
needs of living, when the
:or1mi.al business (of thlie
people c'allot proceed with
dcespatch, there is no way
in which corruptionl could
be legislated aiw;Iay.

Whenl iiicoipelenice.
ineflicie' ncx and i cnsensilti\-


ity have become the habit,
not only must you grease
a hand here and grease a
hand ,there, you ,have in
fact to grease -a hand,
every where.
When the Government
cannot discipline the
work of the public service,
crookedness _becomes a
valuable and vital way of
life.
PHONE


Hoow
import
ties'?


else could vou
scarce commodi-


How else could you get
a telephone, or get your
limits connected, or get-
your goods through the
customs, or secure a birth
certificate or a passport-in:
time'?

LOYALTY


And thein the average
public--.;rrvant. seeing how
corrupt is the entire
scheme of things, is
forced to protect himself
by insisting 'that these
gangsters cannot get from
me any loyalty or com-
mitment."'
"If they want me to
work hard, then they will
have to pay me and give
me the chance for perks.
too besides."

POSTURE

The hallmark of a
twisted administration is
therefore the widening
spread of a cynical career-
ism and the 'rapid turnover
of the president's men,
each generation asking a
higher price.
Remember how in 1971,
xwe +were blessed with a
new generation of young
(Cabinet menl openly in
training at public expense.
In 1076. we have dis-
co\ ered a fresh Cnew set
again: we have conveniently
abandoned the posture of
\expensive trainillng.
This time tlie posture is
intecgrity not training.
Integrilt mne cce.


Tapia
f~Afmfv I* a


8th Anniversary


Sun


Nov


14th '76.


FOR ABADG GOVT,BRIBERY


IS A.NECESSARY AID

TO

A D MINISTRATION


-- I


- -I -- __


NEW-

Em L R
INI Gi


EYE


MY










OPPOSITION:


NOT


"MR. SPEAKER I have the
honour to lay on the table
the annual general report
of the Ministry of Health
for 1974. ."
Thus did Kamaluddin
Mohammed, Leader of
Government business in
the House, inaugurate the!
first debate sitting of the
Republic's first Parliament,
1976/77 session.
As scheduled, 20-year-
old Ian Anthony, PNM
Representative for La
Brea, rose to deliver a
formal motion of gratitude
to President Ellis Clarke
for the ceremonial speech
at Parliament's opening on
October 24.
Anthony's maiden speech
in the House took the
conventional form: thanks
to the President inters-
persed with references to
his constituency, his belief
that his own electoral
victory was a reflection of
the ruling Party's faith in
"youth". But his run up to
bowl caused eyebrows to
raise. "Mr. Leader of the
Opposition and Com-
rades. ." he began.

LAVENTILLE

No originator of phrases
or ideas, Anthony ended
with the affirmation: "Work
is worship. Duty is God."
PNM Port-of-Spain West
Representative Overand
Padmore led the applause
for the young Parliamen-
tarian's maiden address.
And then Joan Sealey,
PNM Laventille Represen-
tative, rose to deliver hers.
"A lot of people think
of Laventille as an under-
developed area", Sealey
said.
It wasn't?
Well there were some
nicely-built houses up
there, she said. What was
really needed,' she said in
the next breath, was water
'urgently", sporting facili-
ties for the youth of which
there was "a complete
lack" and better housing.
As Sealey resumed her
seat, a section of the
public gallery applauded.
House Speaker Arnold
Thomasos was moved to:
remind the gallery that
applause was not really
allowed during the House
'sitting. Then just in case
those Republicans in the
gallery hadn't understood,
Thomasos added: "Take it
easy ladies and gentlemen."
The Speaker turned to
recognize the next speaker.
He nodded to Opposition
Leader Basdeo Panday and .
said: "Mr. Basdeo Maraj."
.The entire House held its


ONLY


breath. Panday got to his
feet and said: "I forgive
you Mr. Speaker, I think
you meant BHADASE
Maraj. ."
Panday wasted no time
opening the debate. To
the motion of thanks, he
said, his side would like to
add a rider. The President's
speech was fine. "But we
regret certain matters left
out. .."
Then quoting from the
PNM's People's Charter of
1956, and an assortment
of other PNM documents,
Panday blasted the Gov-
ernment for saying one
thing and doing another
about morality in public
affairs.
"We want to give notice
he said "that we are not
going to be a party to any
wishy washy legislation
that will cover up rather
than deal seriously with
this question of public
integrity and account-
ability."
While the Government
was talking about the two,
"Ministers houses begin to
get bigger, Mohammedville
begins to take shape." The
proposed legislation on this
question was an attempt
"to close the stable door
after the horses or mill-
stones have-bolted."
Panday called for public
disclosures by all members
of the Houses of Parlia-
ment, the President, Judges
and Magistrates: And those
disclosures "should include
foreign bank accounts."
Assets "like those houses
we are hearing about in
Bermuda."
And "contributions to
the political parties."

TEETH

The legislation, he said,
should have "sharp, sharp
teeth." The proposed In-
tegrity Commission "should
not be a haven for Party
hacks. The Opposition
must be able to appoint at
least half of the members
of the Integrity Commis-
sion.
The public needed to
-know "how a certain PNM
person got 1 acre of land
from Caroni." Nor was
the Opposition supporting
the PNM's legislation on
MPs who cross the floor.
"We will not legislate
undated letters" he said.
"Undated letters create
millstones."
Government divestment
of shares was also a no, no.
Government should not be
allowed simply to mobilise
workers' money "without


OPPOSE


Members of the parliamentary Opposition U.I,F.


giving them anything sub-
stantial in return." Local
companies would remain
in the control of the multi-
national corporations "in
their ruthless pursuit of
profit and domination of
the economy."
The kind of divestment
the Government was talk-
ing about "appears to be
an attempt to direct the
population'away from the


more fundamental ques-
tions of the ownership of
the resources of the coun-
try."
In fact, there were
"moral and illegal" dangers
in the Government's divest-
ment plan.
At that point, Errol
Mahabir, PNM Represen-
tative for San Fernando
West, almost fell when-the
back of his chair broke.


"Millstones are
heavy" Panday
quickly.


indeed
shot in


Finally, Panday said he
wanted to give notice: "We
don't see our role in this
House as one where we are
here to oppose for opposi-
tion sake. We will support
those measures that improve
the quality of the lives of
the people." (RAP)


COUNCIL OF REPRESENTATIVES
MEETING
Sunday October 17th 10 A.M.
TAPIA POS CENTRE


PAE2TAPIAL


SUNDAY OCTOBER 10, 1976


WILL


WE










First


SUNDAY OCTOBER 10, 1976



'uss an


film.


disappointing


AFTER over a week of
build up in the daily press,
the firstfull length Russian
film to be shown in
Trinidad, Liberation
turned out to be a com-
plete disappointment. r
The Valpark cinema,
where the premiere was
held seats only about
three hundred; and though
the cinema was only about
half futi, those who were
there were half-asleep and
a good one half of the
audience completely asleep
during the showing of the
film. During intermission
some took the opport-
unity to go-home.
What was shown at the'
Valpark was the final two
episodes of a five part
film epic. The film itself
deals with the liberation
of Berlin from Hitler and


facism by the Russian
army in 1945, detailing
some of the events which
surrounded it.
The film is totally lack-
ing in dramatic credibility,
subtlety and suspense.
Characterization is non-
existent, human emotions
never show, human rela-
tionships never develop.

BORING
The events leading up
to the capture of Berlin
fail to convey any sense
of dramatic development
or tension and in this
context, the capture of
Berlin itself is hardly
climactic.
On the whole the film
is amateurish, boring, bad.
Still, there are elements
of uniqueness in Libera-


tion. The film places the
audience in a situation
where it is hard to dis-
tinguish fiction from fact;
where it becomes difficult
discern whether Liberation
is a "movie", in which
events are simulated in
order to tell a story from
a particular angle or point
of view or whether actual
historical events are being
documented from a
nationalistic (Russian)
perspective.
The confusion is created
first of all by a narrator's
voice which points out the
major historical figures in
relation to major historical
events.
. Secondly while the
film is in colour, a good
one quarter of the film is
in black and white -
mostly newsreels such as a


meeting between Stalin,
Churchill and Roosevelt
and military parades in
Germany in support of
Hitler.

HITLER
What is intriguing and
most confusing (perhaps
intentionally so) is that
all of the film which shows
Hitler and his advisors res-
ponding to the Russian
advance is in black and
white which in the context
of the film. seems to ,sug-
gest that these scenes are
not simulated but real.
Hitler is painted as an
ill-tempered, intolerant,
nervous authoritarian in
company with Boorman
and his other military
advisors. With Eva Braun


TAPIA PAGE 3
he is simply a doting fool.'
As his military elite
-" prattle on with advice or
remain silent in awe of
him, Hitler slouches in an
armchair now with the
look of a madman capable
of the most morbid vio-
lence, then with a kind of
sminile absent mindedness.
Suddenly ht would rush
wildly to his feet and rant
and rave giving orders in
desperation which his men
would immediately follow.
This is by no means a
historical distortion. In his
last days, it has been
generally agreed, that
Hitler was a senile but
raving despotic maniac.
The distortion lies in
the coupling of historically
accurate material with fic-
tional license in the same
context, as this film does
throughout, not for the
purpose of dramatic effect
but rather to present an
ideological position. And
at the same time, there
are the intrusions of the
narrator's voice suggesting
that one is viewing a docu-
mentary thus compounding
the distortion.
The film presents .an
ideological struggle be-
Cont'd on Back Page


Oct. llth-12th 1976




6.00%4


YEAR


BONDS
This is a $5 million issue. The 6.00 % Bonds 1978
can be purchased at T.T. $100.00 percent with a running
yield of 6.00 % per annum.




6.30%
7 YEAR BONDS
This is a $5 million issue. The 6.30% bonds 1981/
1983 can be purchased at T.T. $97.52 percent with a run-
ning yield of 6.46 % per annum, and a gross redemption
yield of 6.75 % per annum.




7.00%.
25 YEAR BONDS


This is a $10 million issue. The 7.00% bonds 1996/
2001 can be purchased at T.T. $92.28 percent with a run-
ning yield of 7.59 % per annum, and a gross redemption
yield of 7.70 % per annum. ,

GUARANTEED RETURN
The list of applications will be opened at 8.00 a.m.
on Monday, 11th October 1976 and closed at 12 noon on
Tuesday 12th October 1976. Bonds will be dated 1 2th
October 1976.
AGENT


The Central Bank of Trinidad and Tobago is the sole,and
exclusive agent for the raising and management of this
issue.
INTEREST
Interest will be payable half-yearly by the Central
Bank of Trinidad & Tobago on the 12th April and the
12th October. The first payment will be made on the
12th April 1977 at a rate of T.T. $6.00 per T.T. $100.
face value per annum for the 6.00 % bond and T.T. $6.30
per T.T. $100 face value per annum for the 6.30,% bond
and T.T. $7.00 per T.T. $100 face value per annum for th.
7.00 % bond.
PURPOSE OF ISSUE
The proceeds of this issue will be applied to financing
projects in the development programme for 1976 and to
providing long term securities for Insurance Companies,
Pension Funds and similar Investors.
WHERE TO OBTAIN APPLICATION FORMS
Prospectuses and application forms may be obtained at
the Investment Division of the Central Bank of Trinidad
and Tobago, Comptroller of Accounts, Central Bank
Building, any of the branches of the commercial banks
operating in Trinidad and Tobago, Trinidad Co-operative
Bank Limited, Caribbean Stock and Bond (Trinidad)
Limited, West Indies Stockbrokers Limited, Trinidad
and Tobago Stocks and Shares,Ltd, 'all Trust Companies
operating in Trinidad and Tobago and Barclays Finance
Corporation of Trinidad and Tobago Limited.
Applications will be received at the CENTRAL
BANK OF TRINIDAD AND TOBAGO, INVESTMENT
DIVISION, ST. VINCENT STREET, PORT OF SPAIN,
and must be accompanied by the full purchase price of the
bonds for which application is made.

APPLICATIONS CLOSE AT
12 noon, 12th October, 1976.


Cl NTRAL BANK OF TRINIDAD AND TOBAGO


0T


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SUNDAY OCTOBER 10, 1976


Research TIn~~~uet
Studl Of N
~ ast yBthl Stree
o'J 'L rX( b,Y. 100N
Leibh-L 5


C. W. UBOOT OUT T ULL


EX-PNM Senator Carl Tull
is now ex-Secretary General
- f the Communication
Workers' Union. After
holding on to the leader-
ship of the Union he
helped to establish for 14
years, Tull and all but one
member of the Union
Executive were sent pack-
ing by the rank and file
at the. biennial National
Convention that took
place two weekends ago.
Tull, it would be
remembered was the object
of attack., by his own union
over the strike he called


;and then .inexpicably
called ofT over the Ivain
Williams affair at TELCO.
On that occasion he- was
report." manhandled by
union cadres who had
become suspicious of him.
A letter to the Union
membership which was
circulated, by an anony-
mous group charged Tull
and his executive with
manipulation of the mem-
bership, with high living
off the Union's funds, with
high spending on overseas
trips and so on.
Tullhas,attempted to block


RUSSIAN FILM


From Page 3 move out into the realm
tween communism and of artistic freedom and
facism. imaginative possibility that
In fact, one soldier in would have allowed for
the film explains, "Corn- human interaction and
munism is anti-facism." therefore the potential for
So the focus- of the real drama.
film is not on the action There is little sense of
- the battle for Berlin proportion in the film.
and the-defeat of Hitler Even the Russian actresses
but the triumph of corn- who came here to promote
munism over fascism, and the film had roles of
for all intent and purposes milorsignificance.
the. triumph of good over A number of other
evil as far as the film is Russia'n films are to be
concerned. released soon in Trinidad.
The need to state an One hopes that Liberation
ideological position limits is the worst of the lot.
the capacity of the film to (B.T.)


his ousting from the
executive of the union by
tiling an injunction in the
Courts.
His injunction has since
been thrown out leaving
the young Lyle Townsend
as the new Secretary-
General of the Communi-
cation Workers' Union and
giving the newly elected
executive .the green light
to proceed with the Union's
business.

DOWNFALL

Tull's downfall points
to a growing trend on the
part of' workers to become
intolerant of union leaders
who seek their own interest
rather than that of the
workers they seek to
represent.
ti' il,.l ., too, full's down-
fall is merely a sign of
more shake-ups to come
in some of the other
unions in the Labour
Congress.
-In this. vein it should be
noted that in an. address
on Union Democracy the
day :before Tull himself lost
his office, .Il n-- I Ml .... 1i,
Secretary General of the
Public Service Association
and the Labour Congress
was -arguing against the
participation of, rank and


file members in elections.
The membership of the
W.U I. have stated in no
uncertain terms, however,


that they "want to move in
a new direction, and they
have used their vote to
say so.


I'y


ECONOMIC FACTORS IN POPULATION GROWTH: (Pro-
ceedings of a Conference held by the International Economic
Association at Valescure, France) $120.00

For its 1973 annual conference, the International Economic
Association decided to take advantage of the fact that many
of the world's demographers were gathered together in
Europe to consider some of the economic aspects of popula-
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change. In this field three important papers together with
the relevant discussions of one of them represent the-first
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the problems of fertility as an exercise of economic choice.
The conference next turned to the problems of employment
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TRADE EFFECTS OF PUBLIC SUBSIDIES TO PRIVATE
ENTERPRISE.; (Bv G. DENTON. S. O'CLEIREACAIN AND
SALLY ASH $90.00
(;'ove:rnhme1nt inri,',,ntim in the market nplce is becon, ry a
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issues thus exposed arc explored in this volume.

i St

^s- I 1 IS O s&__M
j ^e^e' ^^^'heBng a'


- .KIRPALA IS



Frederick St. POS1112 High St. San F'do, Arima,

and HARDWARE & ELECTRIC: Kirpalani's Roundabout


~-------------~-. ------------


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