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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00072147/00225
 Material Information
Title: Tapia
Physical Description: no. : illus. ; 43 cm.
Language: English
Publisher: Tapia House Pub. Co.
Place of Publication: Tunapuna
Creation Date: August 8, 1976
Frequency: completely irregular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Politics and government -- Periodicals -- Trinidad and Tobago   ( lcsh )
Genre: periodical   ( marcgt )
serial   ( sobekcm )
 Notes
Dates or Sequential Designation: no. 1- Sept. 28, 1969-
General Note: Includes supplements.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 000329131
oclc - 03123637
notis - ABV8695
System ID: UF00072147:00225

Full Text


Vol. 6 No. 32


* 01


SUNDAY AUGUST 8, 1976


PRINTED AND PULSED BY THTAPIA USE PUBLISHING CO. LT., 91 TNAPUNA R., TUNAPUNA TL 2-5126.
PRINTED AN D PUBLIC IIED B TillI TAPIA IIHOUSE PUBLISHING CO. LTD-.,91 T1TNAPUN A RDI. ITUNAPUNAilL 662-5 126.


Production difficulties have forced us to reduce the size of this issue to eight pages.
*M'E..N.,-


INDEPENDENCE SQUARE

POS
WED. AUG. 11, 1976
7 P.M.
CHAIRMAN
SYL
LOWHAR


LAUGHLIN HARRIS


CROPPER


PRESENTATION OF NORTH CANDIDATES


THE WIDELY expres-
sed fears about "this re-
public business", though in
some measure deriving
from ignorance, are quite
justified.
And if they lead the
population to scrutinize
the constitution with which
we became a republic, "it
may well prove to be a
fatal political cost to the
regime."
In a timely and impor-
tant statement on the
changeover to a republican
constitution, Tapia Admin-
istrative Secretary (and
candidate for Port-of-Spain
Central) Allan Harris has
argued that the popular
instincts which lead people
to distrust the change may
be quite correct.
By itself, Harris said,
going republic represents
"no change at all to the
constitutional condition we
have enjoyed since 1962."
And there would have
been less misunderstanding
and apprehension about
the republican change if
the country had become a
republic at Independence
in 1962, "as properly we
should have done."
But as we didn't do it
then the result was that
the government got itself a
smokescreenn" in 1976
behind which to make
"fundamental changes" to
the Constitution, he con-
tinued.
Harris refer-ed in part-


icular to the provision in
the Republican constitu-
tion which allows the
Prime Minister to select an
unlimited number of min-
isters from the Senate.
In the old constitution,
the Prime Minister could
pick no more than four
ministers from the Senate.
Harris recalled "the
strong reservations of the
present Prime Minister
concerning the quality of
representatives thrown up
by the electoral process"
expressed since 1970.
Now what the 1976
constitution does is to
allow the Prime Minister to
choose from an "almost
limitless cadre of techno-
crats". Over these, Harris
argued, the Prime Minister
will have sole power.
Nor will these Prime
Minister's chosen techno-
crats "be answerable either
directly to the people or
to their representatives in
Parliament".
In such a scheme, Harris
pointed out, parties would
MEETINGS
MONDAY, AUGUST 9,
EASTERN MAIN ROAD,
SANGRE GRANDE
6.30 p.m.
TUESDAY, AUGUST 10
DEBE JUNCTION 5.30
THURSDAY -
EL SOCORRO ROAD


not matter so much, only
leaders.
"We would be electing a
President, American-style,
without acknowledging the
fact," Harris concluded.
In fact, it might be


worse: our Prime Minister
would have all the Presi-
dential power but none of
the limitations.
Citing the "widespread
opinion" that the Prime
Minister wanted to set


himself up as first President
of the Republic for life,
Harris said that view,
though naive, "contains
the hard kernel of truth".
Look out for the full
statement next week.


Out with the Queen.,,


and out go the lights


IMMEDIATELY after being
sworn in, Interim President
Ellis Clarke moved a toast
to the new Republic.
The 800 or so guests
lifted their champagne
gqasses.
"To the New Republic."
And that was it.
There was no stirring
speech, evoking the grand-
ness of a unique historical
moment. Interim President
Clarke said nothing.
Chief Justice Sir Isaac
HI-yatali simply read out
the oath of office.
Interim Prime Minister
Williams, historians extra-
ordinaire, uttered not a
word.
After the toast, the
.guests returned to doing
what they had been doing
since 10.30 p.m.' the
time specified on invita-
tions drinking Scbtch and
soda, gin and tonic, sherry
for the ladies and endless
champagne.
The guests were drawn


strictly from official posi-
tions in the society.
The heads of the
Churches. The heads of
the Legal profession. The
heads of the Business
Community.The Ambas-
sadors and diplomats of
deferent ranks. The Gov-
ernment men in the finance
and public utility Corpora-
tions; their wives and
children.

COCKTAILS

From 10.30 p.m. until
the appointed hour at mid-
night, the guests were
immersed in a giant cock-
tail party.
There was music, pro-
vided by the Regiment
Band.But the Band was
out on the lawn and the
music was inaudible inside
the Interim President's
Public Reception Room.
The actual ceremony -
Clarke, Hyatali, Williams,


as the main performers -
took place in that corner
of the room where the
portrait of the Queen
used to hang.
On Saturday night, July
31, the huge portrait
wasn't there. A new era.
Outside, in the country
at large, a joke quickly
made the rounds. A giant
blackout had hit the
country from evening. The
joke went: "Boy, you see
what happen as soon as we
sever ties with the British
Blackout."
At the Interim President's
House, the cocktail party
went on, under lights.
Interim Prime Minister
Williams seemed to enjoy
the occasion. He didn't
leave until 2.30 a.m.
And the New Republic
of Trinidad and Tobago
came into being, its most
significantly o f f i c i a l
moment, occurring at a
private cocktail party.
(Political Intelligence Bureau)


BEST


Pteopl


fear


republic


,_- --- ------------------


rlsht t





SUNDAY AUGUST 8, 19-/6


ONCE AGAIN, last week
end, the opening of the
Eddie Hart Football
League in Macoya was an
occasion of protest against
the conditions which
sportsmen and women in
this country have to
endure.
The annual opening of
the Eddie Hart League is
looked forward to as a
valid expression of grass-
root sentiment
It has been an outstand-
ing example of community
spirit, and a never-failing
reminder that the spirit of
self-help still prevails in
some communities across
the land.
And the spirit of inde-
pendence too. For the E.H.
Leaguers last Sunday were
not simply crying "Run
something", they're doing
something to help them-
selves, and are denouncing
the government for its
paltry efforts in the field
of sport.

FACILITIES

That this should take
place on the same week-
end that there was this
great official welcome
organised for Hasely Craw-
ford simply showed up the
regime's shameless oppor-
tunism.
Last Sunday was the
10th anniversary of the
Eddie Hart League and the
occasion was marked with
fitting ceremony.
The Trinidad and Tobago
Cadet Band played music
for the march past. It was
all dedicated to the honour
of Hasely Crawford.
Representatives of the
Youth Training Centre took
part, reflecting a recogni-
tion of the fact that the
opportunities provided for
underprivileged youth by
the Eddie Hart League


The Government's decision to set aside large sums of money for sport development came also in response to protests and demands
made over the years by sportsmen and women. The opening of the Eddie Hart League in Macoya last Sunday was another occasion of
protest, and some -of the footballers pose here for the TAPIA cameras with their telling placards "All work and no play make Jack a
dull boy ."





Sport $ millions





too little, too late


would be otherwise un-
available.
The thoughtless destruc-
tion of facilities that used
to exist and the heartless
refusal to develop new
facilities have been the
hallmarks of the govern-
ment's activities in sport
over the years.
The east Tunapuna,
Tacarigua, Arouca, etc -
abounding in talent, have
endured the situation in


Our coverage of

THE REGION

is unsurpassed anywhere

for focus and point.

Keep abreast of the

real currents in the

Caribbean Sea.
OWING to the recent increase in the postal
rates, the Tapia House Publishing Co., Ltd., has
found it necessary to increase the subscription
rates for TAPIA.
The new rates are as follows:


Trinidad & Tobago
Caricom countries
Other Caribbean
U.S./Canada
E.E.C. (incl. U.K.)


U.S.
U.S.
Stg.


$18.00 per year
30.00
$25.00
$30.00
L14.00


Surface rates and rates -for other countries on
request The new rates are effective February 1, 1976.
Tapia, 82, St Vincent St. Tunapuna, Trinidad &
Tobago, W.I. Telephone 662-5126 & 62-25241


which the Honeymoon
ground has been left to
go to ruin over years, in
fact depriving the residents
of a playing field that had
been used for years.
All of this has been
documented in TAPIA
before,' largely by Ruthven
Baptiste, and also by Earl
Best.
Now all the major issues
of sport are before the
country's eyes, brought
there by the dazzling
success of Hasely Craw-
ford.
The Eddie Hart opening
took place, of course,
some hours before the
Olympic gold medallist
was to be met at Piarco
-by the Prime Minister and
other dignitaries.
At that airport ceremony


the Prime Minister would
announce a $50 million
allocation for sport.
Without any visible plan
in accordance with which
to spend the money, the
$50 million allocation has
only announcement-value
at this election time.
Perhaps the truer picture
about sport in this country
lies in the fact that no
other member of the T&T
olympic contingent won
any kind of medal at all.
Blinded by the glory of
Hasely, there has been
little assessment of how
the rest of the team per-
formed.
But the mass of sports
men and women in this
country like the Eddie
Hart Leaguers in Macoya
- know fully well that


Eddie Hart, last Sunday.
50 million dollars do not
a new era in sport make.
Two billion-dollar bud-
gets have not altered the
quality of life in Trinidad
and Tobago in a way that
anyone can see, so the
$50m "gift" will not
redeem the givers.
It may yet be too little
anyway, and for sure it's
too late.


2* -.


...'~-. -~
-, ...
r--~ ..~.
~

4
~
.1.


.5 .
.f...,~


At I igilt isthe cadet hanid which piox Ided nI MUIC 0 1C Li iepidi.ll,-' i~iIi nllie IIC wu


Auti 2 fAPIA





TAPIA PAGE 3


SUNDAY AUGUST 8, 1976


thmT
-s -:ou.
Fro thehorse:,,: h




r.eal S., ot cono


I;


- 1- ---._.- -
-:_ _2 7 7:= --... ... -


So far from giving the proper emphasis to agriculture, the government has allowed destructive flooding to take place year after
year in the agricultural lands of central Trinidad.


LAST WEEK, Victor
Bruce, Governor of the
Central Bank, told mem-
bers of the Insurance
Institute that the Trinidad
and Tobago economy con-
tinues to show signs of
weakness, even with the
fall in the inflation rate.
About a month ago,
Frank Barsotti, Permanent
Secretary in the Ministry
of Finance, Planning and
Development, was imply-
ing that there was a
breakdown of planning
within the Public Sector.
Now these statements
have to considered care-
fully not only for their
content but for their tim-
ing.
As for the timing, is it
that these two high-level
technocrats are recognizing
that we are at the dawn
of a new era and want to
establish their indepen-
dence from the old order?

REGIME
Now both men are
hinting at. something
which we in Tapia have
long recognized.
But-hinting is as much
as men in their positions
can do.
In fact, they are both
talking about the econ-
omic mismanagement of
the PNM regime.
The Central Bank, cast
in the role of a neo-
colonial institution, has
been unable in its 11
years of operation to add
a development thrust to
the economic system of
Trinidad and -Tobago.
Thus when Bruce stated
that the economy was
weak and identified the
major areas of weakness as
agriculture and construc-
tion, he was in fact imply-


ing that the Government
had done little toetniulate
those two sectors which
are so vita! to the develop-
ment of a country like
ours.
The share of loanable
funds advanced by the
commercial banks to agri-
culture and to construc-
tion has remained consis-
tently at 2.5% and 3.5%
for the past seven to eight
years.
For 'the first quarter of
1976, agriculture received
only 2.0% of the loanable
funds, one year after the
famous Oil and Food Con-
ference of January 1975.
On the other hand,
almost,60% of the loan-
able funds have gone into
the distributive trades,
presumably to the import--
ers, and to individuals as
non-business loans, to pur-
chase imports.
It is in the finance of
consumer credit that the
banks have really been
raking it in, and there has
been no attempt by the
Government to reorient
the banking system towards
the development of the
sectors that hold the key
to the solution of the
problems of unemploy-
ment, inequality, under-
employment and poor
incomes in agriculture.
The Central Bank Act
leaves the Governor of the
Central Bank very weak in
this regard.
He is supposed to super-
vise the banking system
but cannot direct or even
influence the disposition
of the portfolios of the
commercial banks.
That would not have
been bad were the govern-
ment not lacking in fore-
sight and without the
moral authority to seize


initiatives apart from the
holding of seminars on the
Mobilisation of Financial
Resources.
Nothing that the techno-
crats did not know or say
before, emerged in the
deliberations of that
seminar.
When Barsotti, the Per-
manent Secretary in the
Ministry of Finance, Plan-
ning and Development,
mentioned to the QRC Old
Boys some of the problems
of planning, he was in fact
bemoaning the lack of
planning within the Public
Sector, and the replace-

PROPOSALS
ment of planning with a
hodge-podge of unrelated
proposals, which in the
final analysis would draw
upon the same resources.
Barsotti had also talked
-about National Income
Accounts. The government
has not published any such
data for over 10 years.
These are the data that
can tell us how well they
are performing the task of
economic management,
that is, how well the various
sectors of the economy
,are growing; how they
responded to the various
stimuli provided through
the annual budgets; and
how much the economic
pie has increased from



UNCLE


SAM BAR
AN OASIS
IN
DOWNTOWN GRANDE


one time period to another.
It is not surprising that
they have suppressed those"
dlata and have undermined
the whole exercise of
National Income Account-
ing.
TAPIA hasn't been so


easily fooled, of course.
We have revealed several
times before what has been
going on in relation to the
available indicators like
unemployment, food im-
ports, the number of
houses constructed etc.
Barsotti and Bruce have
merely given official con-
firmation of wh, we have
already said in TAPIA.
We have said that it is
agriculture and construc-
tion which in the short-
term will bring us the
elimination of unemploy-
ment.
With the building of
10,000 housing units each
year and the substantial
reduction in food imports,
(now it's about $300
million a year), we may
well have more than full
employment.
The entire banking sys-
tem will be reoriented so
as to ensure that it will
lubricate the wheels of
economic, transformation
of this country, not finance
the present scale of
imports and so create jobs
in other countries. (C.P.)


KIRPALANI'S


IS




















and BASIC

We've got what you
need at minimum oost.










KIHPALANI'S NATIONWIDE






PAGE 4 TAPIA
A VITAL PART of the building of the Tapia House Move'-
ment into a credible political Party, with roots in every
community, has been the "house" meeting a series of
organised sessions between Tapia leaders and the people in
their own living rooms.
It is at these sessions that the Movement has made
some of its most important breakthroughs, inspiring men
and women to look at the country, and its future, with a
new eye.
The "house" meetings have also been exercises in
basic democracy. After the Tapia cadres present their
views, the floor is opened to discussion.
The questions come slowly, haltingly, at-first.
Then, as the meeting goes on, confidence is acquired.
Some Tapiamen have been probed long and hard at
these meetings.
In a typical session held in Cascade, on the eve of the
new Republic, Tapiamen Lloyd Best and Ivan Laughlin
presented the Tapia vision of a New World.
Laughlin opened the
session, urging the two by TaviaReporter
dozen or so people present -
to come out and take part
in the politics. .
For hundreds of years -
now, Laughlin said, the .
people have been left out | J "
of politics. Suppressed by
a kind of Government that
had no real interest in -_ -
popular participation in -
anything. :


NEW MOMENT -

But a new moment
had arrived. And people
must seize it. "If you
opposing Tapia, oppose
it", Laughlin urged. "If
you backing us, back us.
But you have to get
involved in the politics."
He gave a brief his-
tory of the Movement,
going back to the New
World Movement, back to
that 'crucial point when
the West Indies Federation
broke up.
A whole new genera-
tion rose to defend the
region then, Laughlin said.
That was where Lloyd
Best had begun.
Through his own and
the endeavours of other
young West .Indians the
movement for a new Carib-
bean era was launched.
And the movement
had grown, embracing
more and. more people.

CONFIDENT

And now Tapia was
fully equipped to run
Trinidad and Tobago, to
begin opening up the'
politics to the country. And
the region.
Competent and self-
confident. That was the
movement today. "Because
in the process we have
urged people towards self-
knowledge, and away from
that inferior stance -
always looking up or out-
side for references.
"Men and women
are standing tall in our
Movement", Laughlin said.
He referred to the
TAPIA newspaper as evi-
dence of the Movement's
abilities and staying power.
"TAPIA is the only
political paper left in
Trinidad", Laughlin said.
"Not only Trinidad but
the whole of the Eastern
Caribbean. Don't you see


SUNDAY AUGUST 8. 1976


House meetings:


in


the process of


putting down




community roots


Commitment is
built up in
meetings of
small groups,
such as one
afforded by
house meetings.


where we are today?"
And finally, Laughlin
said, "the only promise
we make to people is that
we have an organisation
that is committed to a new
Trinidad and Tobago, come
hell or high water."
Lloyd Best opened
with Columbus' account
of how beautiful this
island was wooded hills
and streams and every
manner of fruit and how
beautiful it could still be.
And as far as Tapia
was concerned, Best said,
so will it be.
Because the Govern-
ment could not last. The
whole scheme of things
here was tottering.
Best quoted Yeats:
"Things fall apart; the
centre cannot hold."
The country was in


the midst of a "revolu-
tionary situation", he said.
"And it is either we make
a leap for glory or forever
stay in chains."
He pointed out that
Trinidad and Tobago lived
on the doorstep of Latin
America, with all that
familiar history of upheaval,
instability, the people held
down by oligarchies.
We had to' be careful
that we weren't heading
down the Main.
Urgently needed here
now was "a change for the
possibilities of the spirit",
Best said.
I l wasn't particularly
concerned about the
material. "The material

conditions of the place
have always promised
paradise."
But c o n c r e t e


measures had to be taken.
These had two dimen-
sions. One was the total
centralisation of power in
the country. "The answer
is to take that and break
it up and diffuse it."
Through the creation
of the Macco Senate "so
that the voices of the
little people can be heard;
giving people-Parliamentary
cover for the flowering of
opinion."
Everybody in Trinidad
had an opinion about
something, Best said.
People weren't stupid here.
They knew what was
going on.
But they couldn't
bring the collective weight
of public opinion on things
because they had no outlet
for their voices.
The second agency to
be created was the regional
Governments or Municipal
Councils so that right
through the country, com-
munities were in charge of
themselves.
On the economy,
Best said the people of
the country had to "get a
grip on the lifeline sectors."
Economic power, too,


had to be diffused. That
was how democracy was
protected.
All this talk of
socialism and capitalism is
just indulging the country
in mindlessness", Best said.
"We have to take people
out of all that orthodoxy."
Tapia was proposing
three sectors in the econ-
omy. One would be a high
technology sector, embrac-
ing all the country' s
resources in oil, petro-
chemicals, the possibilities
of -a Point Lisas and so on.
The other sector
would be low-technology
enterprise', providing mass
employment. And there
would also be a high
welfare sector, the country
taking care of its less-
fortunate citizens.
It had been said, Best
told the people of Cascade,
that "the founders of the
West Indies carried nogods
with them."
It was a straight case
of brutality and mayhem.
But the people living in
the West Indies today had
to findL ways to live and
love in peace in their own
place.


BOOKS
BUSINESS: ITS NATURE AND ENVIRONMENT: AN
INTRODUCTION (Sth Edition) BY R.E. GLOS: R.D.
STEADE & J.R. LOWRY $37.95
For the first time this text recognizes that business activities
in this country are carried by business persons rather than by
businessmen. The growing importance of women in the
business world, aided by their own efforts as well as legisla-
tion. is reflected in the text copy. The objectives of this book
are, (1) for both business and non-business majors, it provides
a knowledge what business is all about; (2) students acquire a
business vocabulary; (3) it explains capitalism ,and how it
functions, which apparently is not very well understood by a
large segment of our population; (4) it brings into focus the
conflicting demands made on business by such diverse groups
-as owners, employees, suppliers, customers, government, and
the general public; (5) students can gain an understanding of
the decision-making process in business.

BUSINESS CYCLES AND FORECASTING (4th edition):
BY C.A. DAUTlEN & L.M. VALENTINE $39.35
This book provides the background needed by individuals.
economists. and businessmen to understand the factors which
ontribute to economic growth and stability and to the levet
of national income. It also suriieys the techniques whichI mav
be used to analyse current economic conditions and to or'e-
cast future levels of activity. This book is intended for
senior or gradua/c courses in the field o. business cycles or
national income analysis and in forecasting.



Stephens






SUNDAY AUGUST 8, 1976 TAPIA PAGE 5



San Juan region




rally scores


despite rain and T&TEC


Barataria residents took advantage of the improved weather to enjoy an afternoon of sports, games
and music.


Africa Calling" Clive Zanda, displaying his
laying, gives the cue to drummer Benoit.


"percussive" style of piano-


Looking i, rilke .;ouvert morning characte- j, these six-a-side footballers play all the harder on the
soggy ground-.


S. "Shavers" Stanisclaus -'. wonL the men's
and 800 metres events h,s medal hung over
candidate for Barataria Ishi maoI Samad.


open 100,200,400
his neck by Tapia


THE WEEKEND of Hasely
Crawford's triumphant re-
turn would naturally be a
good time for sport.
rhis is what Tapia
cadres of the San Juan
region discovered when
their Rally came off at the
iarataria Savannah, Sixth
Avenue, on Sunday August
1
Early morning showers
threatened to wash out
what had been advertised
as a day of sporting musical
and political activity.
Undeterred, s e ve r a I
teams involving scores of'
young players sloshed about
the waterlogged turf as
they competed in six-a-side
football that went well
into the afternoon.

In the punishing one mile race
racc two competli tors picC e i lc
other.


By then, fortunately,
the sun had come out,
drying up t1 lot of the
ground and allowing a few
hundred \ ',:gers to stroll
over to the savannah.
And by mid-afternoon
it was possible for Michael
Billy-Montague, together
with the San Juan region
organizers to arrange for
the athletic events.
With a small fee asked'
of all competitors, the
participation was enthusi-
astic.

PIONEERING

In f ot. the organizers
were pressed to put on two
unscheduled events -- a
400 metre race for boys
under, 13 and a two-mile,
high-handle cycle race for
all comers.
At the end of all- the
events, prizes and medals
were distributed by Tapia
candidates, for the region;
by Cynthia, wife of M.
Billy-Montague; and by
other Tapia men and
wolmein.
And then it was time
for the music.
The San Juan region
cadres were determined


. that the mood of the
afternoon would not be
shaped by the funky-funk)
sounds of a popular DJ.
Music was chosen to
reflect the Tapia emphasis
on local resources.
It was into such a setting
that Clive Zanda, pianist-
composer, pioneer musician,
and husband of Kilibugile
Zanda fitted in comfort-
"ably.
Zanda's work had previ-
ously been highlighted by
TAPIA in late-1974, at the
time of the opening of the
Gayap Music Workshop in
Port-of-Spain.
Clive Zanda had been
one of the directors of the
Workshop which aimed
through co-operative work
to improve the professional
skills of affiliate musicians
and to direct research and
experimentation into tlhe
roots of indigenous music.
In 1971-72 ('Clive Zanda.
also an architect, had been
induced by thie charm of
thlie apia I use set tng to
move his piano there, and
the House became Cfor a
while lthe work-out centre
lom a numniher ol sinilarly
d is)posed musicians, not-
ably among them Andre


Tanker and Lancelot
Layne.
So last Sunday, as he
set up and tried out his
Fender Rhodes electric
piano on the small make-
shift pavilion in Barataria,
Zanda beamed and allowed
that the "vibes" were good
and flowing.

FINGERING

His group consisted of
Michael Benoit on Western
traps and Opio on African
drums. -
Introducing the group
Lennox Grant who acted
as announcer for most of
the day advised the audience
to watch the hands of the
pianist to observe how
inuitch more his technique
resembled that of a drum-
mer than i classically
trained pianist.
l)escribing it as a percus-
sive style of playing, Grant
pointed out that there was
no hass player, and that
the pianist was making do
\with his left hand lingering.
As hlie played three 1976
calypsocs and one of his


Cwt 'dol Pcat'






PAGE 6 TAPIA


VERNE G UER IN
REVIEWS "JOURNEY",
A NEW VOLUME
OF POETRY
BY RAOUL PANTIN.


These caves hollowed, burrowing
the rockface are broken mouths
silenced.
But silent their screams are dis-
figured stills of agony. (Blanchis-
seuse)

WHEN YOUNG POETS speak at
the top of their voices, one is apt
to wonder if the deep feelings
they -so gliblyexpress exist in their
beings at all.
What a hopeful change to
take a journey with a young poet
who values the Hemingwayan-
virtue of being most reticent when
speaking on matters about which
one feels very deeply.
Raoul Pantin is an angry poet
with the sensitivity of a very
private person, and the creation of
poetry, however much the poetry
may end up belonging to the tribe,
is finally a very singular response.
What these responses are and
how well they are expressed is
another matter. And whether or
not poetry is made out of them
still another.
But let us take our time and
discover, slowly, obliquely as it
were, while we, watch the brood-
ing poet trying to stride to the
rhythm of his black shadow cast
across the land.
The poet takes a journey
which begins with the vision of his
land, charred and scarred

where leaping yellow tongues
of flame are licking their way
through screaming tree crowns.

This aridity is death to him. But
bit by bit he discovers that even if
this is not a timeless furnace, the
same from July to July, where only
rain can bring .life, and that we
have our own seasons (our games,
our fruit, our fetes) and he is able
to look forward now to the end
of rain and the beginning of the
next dry season, it is nevertheless
a sort of hell. But at the end of
the journey he celebrates his
homecoming with a discovered
prayer which I find fake

we are found and lost
children we are lost and found

After that journey I won't
say I expected curses (far from it)
but certainly not prayer, not
acceptance. Some growth perhaps,
some new insights.

PERSONALITY

It is perhaps this negative
side, that passive side, this together
with the man's burning sensitivity
which creates his particular sensi-
bility and personality.
He knows where he is not at
but does he know where he is at.
After fourteen years (Your
Own) his vision should be truly
stiff.
Yet he is so often disgusted
by things about which he is more
vague than definite, too often
aware of things more inexpressible
than expressible and though so
happy with this reticence, one


finds oneself wondering sometimes
where reticence ends and silence
(or worse, inarticulation) begins.
But let us not rush things.
Let us observe his language -
it is simple, true, uncomplicated:
dropping auxiliary verbs "you
talking glibly" and so on to
create a persona both literate and
localised.
He is also good, Very. good,
very remarkably so in fact, when
observing nature.
Look at the hawk that comes
before the rain in journey. Look
at the rocks at Maracas

Rocks just jagged at this
end, there crabs scuttle
into holes drilled by the
sea exploding in
lash after lash, sea ric
cocheting on the
cracked open stone tumbling
stream in a broken heap. (Start
Out)
"cracked open stone tumbling
stream in a broken heap" is very
good: poetically imaginative. Look
at "Pilar

c ries,'cunning in her screams
one eye on your surrender to
her infant rebellion." (Pilar)

But one's final fascination is
with the poet's reticence-silence,
the poet's anger and passivity and
his time spent brooding by himself
(mostly by the sea).
What is the clarity that the
green depth suddenly startles him
into (good lines)'when the discord-
ant commercial interposes itself.
What is the identity of the monster
that

loomed
yawning treacherously
grining at us.

The poet tells us he takes off and


no longer asks why. Why? is what
we want expressed. Still he con-
tinues to watch the day very
carefully, and even though his

morning is strange indeed: "fragile
as molten silver'.' we must recognize
his

bamboo grove
through whose silvered
mesh
a flat dry river coursed
through an ocean of green
wet still
before that day
hardened.

But while listening to fraudulences
he breathes the balmed dawn air,
hums let it be and um-hums um-
humns um-hums the speaker to
death.
When he does speak out,
letting the spleen show as in a
1970 Letter, he offers little more
than a deep-sounding shallowness
and his language bogs down.
Was Davis a clumsy revolu-
tionary because he died at all or'
for the way he died? Of course we
know that Davis was not a revolu-
tionary at all (was not in life and
is not in the poem) and it is very
telling that when Pantin tries to go
public he goes false.
There are Public poets. Malik
(DeCoteau) speaking of hop-
skotch, rope-skipping girls becom-
ing gum-chewing, gun-toting whores
for instance.
"Where were you man/Now?
Then?" Where were yoI| now.
Ungrammatical if now means at
present. What he means, I believe,
Jis: Where were you, man? Then.
"Where now?"
But that is minor indeed andl
by the way. I used that to show
(however mucli he wants to feel
committed) his voice is for deli-
neating the very private. But is this
privacy involved or despairing? In
Saturday night


SUNDAY AUGUST 8, 1976.





Voice that





speaks for




a private t1'


One's final fascination is with the poet's reticence-silence and his time spent
brooding (mostly by the.sea) ...


"The poet returns to his green
cave buried deep in the giant
forest."
"Stunned into silence this exile
contains only one caution: sit
still." (Exile)
think only privately turn away
forever from dreams I cannot
reach." (Dreams)
"And the poets walk searching
landscapes for some old truths
to begin. "(Madmen)

In his "Yeah rap to me" there's the
same scorn that growls "Dont
brother me mister." In. Fragment
he merges into Roach the hawk

Eventually,
inevitably
the hawk is alone
soaring high
aloof in the sky.
And everything else
is -
what is the word?
Ah yes.
Divertissement!

In "Fragment 11" which also
contains a reference to Roach he
begs time to Lessen time must
lessen all this tragedy. Confronting
Chaguaramas he says it's occupied
by another army "but about things
that are yours you can wait be
easy take your own long cool
sweet time."

RETICENCE


He turns to America and is
neatly happy over the little
changes in Mississippi.
In "Exile" he sees all as- no
more than "frozen in that curse
that must have -first unleashed
that terrible passage."
"Burning Spear" shows how
poetry can reside in prose. I call it
prose because it reads like verse
only if you read it as it is punctu-
ated and not as it lies on the page.
It is better than all the other
politically oriented verses.
The reticence here is not
born of silence but of poetic con-
trol.
But this poem tells us what
warriors do. Not poets. Unknow-
ingly he has articulated this. That
shows his honesty. Next time
round he must articulate it know-
ingly.

GENUINE


Pantin's feelings, if not very
informed, are genuine and these
he expresses adequately, succinctly.
If he comes to terms with him-
self, his ideas, his beliefs, he would
be better able. to shape, under-
stand and express his feelings.
But at least even now he
refuses to scream the same shit.
The apprenticeship is over.
Let us look forward to the
mastership and listen for that
other voice which "booms within
this restless oceans incessant roar".
For a iran is most certainly a poet
f lie can write these lines

'For mile after mile of iinbroi ken
beach memory claws the ron
gti like corbeaux fieding off old
wounds bled deliberately to salt
their poison in this plunging
sea. (East Coast)

where there is such poetic control
of his imagery. Now he must write
poems worthy ot these lines.








SUNDAY~1 AUGUST~%FZC~ll~ 8, 1976 TAliA PAGE


* r -. -.n .


Cropper checks out Arouca land problem


A CASE of landslip caus-
ing damage to houses and
threatening the lives of the
occupants has been brought
to the notice of Tapia
Arouca candidate Angela
Cropper.
The. plight of Miss
Francois of Bertie Road,
Arouca, recalls the story
by Michael A. Harris in
last week's TAPIA--report-


ing on the hardship caused
to people in East Port-of-
'Spain by soil erosion.
Miss Francois' house,
too, is on private lands,
the ownership of which
changed hands some time
ago. Now nobody knows
who it belongs to.
And of course, the gov-
ernment pleads inability
to do anything on private


property. -
So the residents just
live through a daily horror
of seeing their houses
slowly crumbling the land
around, the foundations
unearthed. Nobody can do-
anything.
Some wouldn't even
try. Hector McLean, the
PNM Minister of Works
and representative for the


area where Miss Francois
lives, promised to go and
see what is happening on
Bertie Road.
The residents waited in
vain on July 20,, the
appointed day, for the
minister to come. They
then decided it was all a
waste of time and deter-
mined to look for an
altogether new dispensa-
tion.


MicJfael A. Harris, the candidate for
P.O.S. East. (Last Week's TAPIA
carried photo of wrong Harris.)


From Page 5)

SanJuanRally


own compositions, "Africa
Calling", Zanda made
several improvisational
essays, all the time urging
the accompanying drum-
mers to take off into solos
themselves.
The audience,- many of
whom had never heard of
Clive Zanda before, showed
warm appreciation and
interest.
It was announced that
Zanda's first LP "Zanda is
Here" would b.: asd
at th-e en y f _s *ron-h.
Th ",- --.c -


African and calypso
rhythms. %
Waiting to perform were
a keyed-up Bertie Marshall
with his Bertfone, the El
Socorro tassa drummers
and the Guarata Serena-
ders, when there was a
powers cut throughout the
area, plunging the savan-
nah into darkness and th.
San Jua:,-e. reio---
bitter i.T l :: .
T&TE C.
it was the secc-. -
in two weeks :hat -
h'd ffcU-


~1TAPI.AV TNTWS.F ONsh


TAPIA CADRES in the La
Brea constituency are
organising another political-
rally following their ven-
ture of July 25.
This one will is set
for Sunday, August,22, at
the Vessigny Community





1 "


Centre
details
later.


in La Brea. More
will be published


Rallies have so far been
heid in Tunapuna, Bara-
t ia M a r 'c a s -. "


the local areas in support
of the Tapia campaign,
hardly a weekend passes
that's not packed with
Movement activity poli-
tical, social and economic.
With all kinds-of "fun-
activities held in




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SUNDAY AUGUST 8. 1976


TAPIA






DENIS SOLOMON'S


111 Circular RoaDENCE
I7I Circular Road, St. Augustine


(Next


to Trinity Hall)


Saturday


r HAZEL RAMBERANSINGH
Featuring:ZHI-RA

GENE LAWRENCE

LANCE LAYNE

ashions by: BOUTIQUE

Adm: $3, Refreshments Served


ORDER EARLY and
avoid the rush.
A new shipment of
Tapia Jerseys has.just been
received.
According to Tapia
Treasurer Ivan Laughlin,
we could get only 500 of
the popular T-shirts this
time.
If previous demand is
any guide, they will be
sold out in days, Laughlin
thinks. Even at the new
price of $5.

LOOK FORWARD to "an
evening of rhythm and
soul"next Sunday.
That's what is promised
by the Oropouche Road
Boys who are associated
with the campaign of
Buntin Joseph.
They're having a session


with that title at Francis
Restaurant and Bar,
Eastern Main Road Sangre
Grande, on Sunday August
8.
The "evening" runs
from 6 p.m. to 2 a.m. and
among the attractions are
the "joyful sounds" of DJ
Cyril. Admission: "One
Red Bread."
Tapiaman
Arnold
Hood

PNM house-to-house cam-
paign in La Brea.
Resident: Hood (Tapia
candidate for La Brea)
with all yuh?
PNMites: Yes, sure. Vote
the Balisier!


Ann's

Dressmaking

Clothes made to order
or...
Original Designs

Ann's Dressmaking 27 Belle Smythe St. Curepe


-----------


PAGE 8TANAD


7th AU93


Jpm